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October 1959
Volume 5

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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE
MONTANA STATE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION



October 1959
Volume 5
^ No. 1




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE
MONTANA STATE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION



^^^^m^m^^^^^^m^^^^m



THb ^

/MONTANA LIBRARY QUARTERLY



Vol. 5, No. 1 October 19^9

President ' s Foreword Mrs . Alma Jacobs 2

Editorial 3

Books I've Enjoyed - Reading without a purpose Patricia Pay lore k

CHET HUNTLEY says Chet Huntley 7

Among Friends Mrs . Beverly Bends 7

MASL Notes : '::.•: . T,etitia Johnson 9

Our Advertisers : Gay lord Bros . , Inc 10

Report of PNLA Representative Alice M. Ridenour 12

1959 Trustee Institute Mrs . Hugh F . McNamer l4

Only a Library 17

MSLA Committees , 1959-60 l8

The Library Services Act in Montana Mrs . Ruth 0. Longworth 20

News and Notes 25

Directory of Advertisers

The Puget Sound News 5

V. J . Languille & Co 6

F . W. Faxon Co . , Inc 8

Gaylojrd Bros . , Inc 10

Gestetner • • 11

Hertzberg' s Washington Bindery • 12

The J. K. Gill Company. 13

Remington Rand 17

College Place Bindery. 19

Doubleday & Company 21

The Montana Library Quarterly is sent free to members of the Montana State Li-
braiy Association. To all others the annual subscription is $2.00. Please
enter subscriptions with the Editor, making checks payable to the Montana
State Library Association.

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE

Mrs. f'5aryHagerty,' 'Advertising Ruth Longworth, News

Public Librerys. . •. • State Library Extension Commission

Great Falls Missoula

Lesley M. Heathcote, Chairman and Editor
Montana State College Library, Bozeman

The Montana Library Quarterly is indexed in Library Literature and in Contents
in Advance.



ID



RESIDENT'S FOREWORD




I am pleased that the Editor of the
Quarterly gives the MSLA President
the space to greet you in each
issue . I want to feel that I have
some commiinication with the mem-
bers of the Association throughout
the year.

Elsewhere, you will find commit-
tees for the year listed. I hope
all chairmen will contact members
of their committees immediately and
that the work of the committee will
go forward.

While I'm on the subject of commu-
ication, I want to comment on the
answering of letters . From my ex-
perience in getting replies from
some committee members, I have a
feeling that we are all too guilty
of postponing correspondence . When
so much of the Association's busi-
ness is dependent on writing back
and forth, it is important for us
all to answer mail promptly. I
know how busy the day gets in every
library, and the temptation is to
procrastinate. If we could keep
handy a supply of post cards , we
can often scrawl an answer and post
it in the return mail. This will
expedite our business considerably.

I hope all of you are busy making
friends for libraries . The ground-
work for a successful legislative



program must begin much earlier
than the opening of the legislative
session.

Have you mentioned the May meeting
in Great Falls to your trustees and
friends? If you begin discussing
the meeting now, you will give them
ample opportunity to save the dates
and to be planning to attend.

I would especially appreciate
having program suggestions for the
May meeting. If you have an idea
for a meeting or subjects you'd
like discussed^ please write me a
note .

Alma Jacobs



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A FABLE FOR LIBRARIANS



With most humble apologies to James Thurber



Oec« upon a time there was a com-
munity of little white owls, all of
whom were excellent housekeepers.
They kept their houses clean Eind. al-
though most of the houses were old,
they were always neat. The children
were well cared for too, and there
was much visiting in the different
houses. The little white owls had
many ideas for improving their
homes , but there was never enough
money. One day, the great grey
owls who ran the community decided
that outsiders should be brought in
to tell the little white owls what
needed to be done to improve their
homes . The little white owls
thought this an unnecessary expend-
iture of money; after all, they
knew what to do if only someone
would provide the wherewithal. But
their opinion wasn't really asked.
So the great grey owls brought in a
pleasant and easy-going sort of
kiwi who knew all about kiwis'
houses, and talked about control
processes, and consistency scores
and normative content and whether
certain things would have a degree
of face validity. The kiwi called
in other helpers, some of the great
grey owls, a peacock who was so
hidden behind his tail that no one
ever did find out what he was
studying. There was even a penguin,
although he was kept pretty much in
the background. The study went on



for years and years and strange
birds were always turning up in the
homes of the little white owls when
least expected. It was most dis-
concerting, for being short of
funds, the little white owls could
not always invite them to dinner.
And the questions they asked!
Finally, the study was declared to
be complete and all the kiwis and
peacocks and even the penguin were
seen no more . Then the great grey
owls called the little white owls
together and said, "See what we
have done for youl Here is the
study all finished and all you have
to do is to get the money so that
you can implement the recommen-
dations these wonderful creatures
have given you'."

But the little white owls went
sadly back to their homes and picked
up the work they'd been doing when
they were interrupted. You see, no
one had thought to get them any
fimds to get the help to carry out
these wonderful ideas that they'd
long ago thought up for themselves.



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"Reading Without a Purpose"

Patricia Paylore*



My housemate calls me a retarded
reader. She bases this on the
fact that I was going on fifty be-
fore I ever read The VJind in the
Willows . I read it then as a part
of what might be called a program
of planned purposelessness. I'm
glad I finally got around to it,
for I was forgetting;, during the
quarter of a century that I have
been concentrating on the south-
western Americana -iiiat is my trade-
mark, so to speak, that it was
possible to laugh with a book.
(l don't know whether to be glad
or sorry that Peter Green in his
new biography of Kenneth GraJiame
insists that the reader of The
Wind in the Willows acknowledge
the londerlying politick, and social
meaning for which Grahame created
the book as a vehicle.) Anyhow,
now through the desert winter
nights I lay abed reading it
simply and pleasurably, often
laughing aloud \antil Phyllis would
come to stand in my bedroom door
to ask, "Wbere are you now? Now
what are they doing? Have you met
Badger yet? Don't you simply love
Rat?" I truly believe there was
never devised a more ecstatic ex-
pression than Mr. Toad's "Poop-
poop" , nor would it be easy to find
another passage in literature quite
*Miss Paylore is Assistant Li-
brarian, University of Arizona.
She has written forvarious national
library periodicals and we are
proud that she has written this for
us.



as moving as the almost mystical
search for the lost baby otter.

I was firm about the year I had
allowed myself to read without a
purpose, intent on my aimlessness,
bragging a little about it, feeling
a little virtuous about my apos-
tasy. I read at random, an
assorted hodgepodge of old and new,
re-reading almost forgotten things
like The Sun Also Rises as I tried
to recapture whatever it was about
it that had made me so sad thirty
years before; or following a chance
encounter with Henry Adams back
into the time cf Eleanor of Aquitaine
and the Four Kings ; then forward,
without reason, to The Turn of The
Screw , quarrelling amiably with
Phyllis because she was as stubborn
in her refusal to read James as I
was to read her precious Walden .

Summer came. At the beach in a
wonderfiil supermarket which I
haunted daily in a futile attempt
to assuage our prodigious sea-air-
induced appetites, I searched the
paperback rack, dra^^^l inevitably by
the smoking guns and the riders
silhouetted against the setting
suns. No, I thought bo myself, and
resolutely looked on with what I
now believe was a kind of curious
fatality. Discouraged, I was about
to turn away when I glanced behind
a what I call bosom book, and there,
looking at me as much as to say,
"I thought you'd never find me'."
was Ray Bradbury ' s Dandelion VJine .

Autobiographical, I suppose.
Dandelion V/ine is an account of the
twelfth summer of a boy as re-
markable as any boy in literature I
know, and as ordinary. This boy
doesn't yet know the Fahrenheit
temperature at which books burn,
nor has he yet experienced in his
imagination the lonely independence
of the astral pilot, restlessly
earthbound as he awaits his next
journey through the black silence
of space - knowledge which charac-



terizes his literary father's best-
laiown novels - but he does know
other things, more important things,
more earth-shaking, simpler. He
knows the winged feet of new
tennis shoes and the unbearable
sorrow of a companion's leaving and
the suspense cf time and the anguish
of no more trolleys and the burden
of knowing and above all the sense
of Schweitzer's "wonder before
life" . Sometimes known to adults
as a legacy of childhood, seldom
are iiiese things remembered withthei>
tensity and meaning that they have
for this boy. To me this was truly
emotion recollected in Bradbury's
tranquillity, resulting in a prose
poetry as ^/arming as the dandelion
wine whose concoction symbolizes
this unforgettable summer.

Well, I almost made it. But a
month before the end of my foolish
schedule, I defected. Stranded in



the St. Paul -Minneapolis airport,
homesick in that rainy green land
where the spring burgeoning cf plant
life overwhelmed and oppressed me,
I bought a copy of Oakley Hall's
Warlock. The book was in my lap as
I flew westward into the darkening
day and I found it strangely hard
to read. The style was awkward,
confused, deliberately so, I
thought crossly. But the landscape
was reall IJarlock of course is
Tombstone, and the cast and the
scenery were as familiar to me as
the University of Arizona campus.
Plodding doggedly on, chapter after
chapter, I began gradually to see
that this western was a strange
amalgam of every western ever
written, with something else throvm
in. I had realized vaguely that
the "psychological" western was a
new trend, as apparent on television
as on the newsstand, but this was
my first experience with it.



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.6-



I can't say I recommend Warlock ex-
actly. I find it a caricature in
many ways: the over-peopled gaudy
canvas without a character missing
- the good prostitute ; the drunken
judge, Apaches, rustlers ^ the "ban-
ished medic, and the U. S. Army —
and the repit?.tious el<- lents of vi-
olence, liludc^oned tirelessly but
tiringly into the reader's brain,
not once as in the classic simpli-
city of The Vir<^inlan or High Noon
but ag-iir. and again - outlaw
against citizen, deputy against
outlaw, £,E.rfiblcr against friend,
and finally na,ri;hal against deputy,
until the scene is burned into the
mind li2:e the bullet that endlessly
finds its proper mark.

But for all these faults, in Warlock
for the first time in my experience
there is exposed -iie painful probing
to fill in the shades between the
old-fashioned black and white . We
see it in the journals of Good-
pasture, the citizen, as he sits at
his desk by laznplight each night,
trying to bring to bear his unusual
intellectual background on the
troubled violence taat is Warlock's.
We see it in the tortured searching
of Deputy Gannon into his own mo-
tivation as he tries to walk the
knife-edge of truth. We see it
most painfully, perhaps, in the
Marshal, torn -.:ith a pain that is
beyor.l bearing as he recognizes
bitterly the role he is doomed to
fill: the eri.pty street, the un-
seen audience, the lean and tor-
tured hero -^7ith his dark shadow
cast lono; befor-^ him, the villain
face to f r^.ce , the moment of
appraisal that lasts forever in a
second of riecsured time, the re-
luctant lightning draw and the ob-
scuring gunsmoke . It clears away
finally and ^re look upon the ground
to see i;ho has fallen.

Why do we ever doubt? And yet —
and yet - .

To recognize the hold that these



primitive protagonists have on our
hearts and imagination is to con-
cede that we, too, long on various
levels of our subconscious to be
cast in a role where we can act ,
not be paralyzed by the civilized
behavior that modem society has
imposed upon us.

What am I reading now? I'Jhy, all
that southwestern Americana I
missed during that wonderful year
of purposelessnessl





REMEMBER

1


MONTANA


DAY


NOVEMBER


8



VJ. LflflCUILII ECO.

Library Bindings
"Bound to Last"

Over kO years of dependable and
satisfactory service



Picture Covers, Lettered
Covers and Decorated Covers



All work in accordance to
"Class-A: specifications



V. J. LANGUILLE & CO.

6l2 West 3^<3. Avenue

Spokane k^ Washington



-7-



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.'^"^



SAYS:



(Editor's Note: In a radio broad-
cast from Missoula we heard Mr.
Hiintley admonish people to read,
read, read. So we asked him if he
wo\ild write a couple of brief para-
graphs, expanding his idea a little.
Here then is a message from a
Montanan to his f ellow-Montanans )

The "reading habit" is essential to
responsible citizenship in any
modern, enlightened nation. To be
sure, the great ideas of the
twentieth centuiy vie with each
other in all the media of commun-
ication; but it is in print where
those ideas clash in awesome ccm-

bat where the contest goes far

beyond skirmishing.

The library is a veritable truth
factory. There on the shelves the
great debate goes on. Dan/in and
H\ixley carry oniiieir conversations.
Copernicus argues with Newton.
Einstein and Fenni interject.
Imagine the argument; the laughter,

the shouts the incomparable

discourse which goes on in a

library at night, when the lights
go out and the immortals of all the
civilizations begin testing their
convictions one against the other.



NATIONAL
LIBRARY WEEK



APRIL 3-9 1960



■r^'



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Ffiifl




Beverly Bemis

H^lp. ■■
Encourage
LfLbrary
rogress

Since our last visit together in
Livingston at Montana State Library
Association, I have had the pleasant
opportunityto meet a great many new
Friends at the Home Demonstration
Council. Bess McClelland invited
me to attend and to take part in the
program at their meeting in June.
Many cf the Home Demonstration clubs
are enrolled with us as official
Friends of the Library and are
doing a fine job of encouraging the
use of libraries in their commu-
nities. The results of Amy Wold's
"Reading Poll" are certainly note-
worthy and I was delighted to see
that so many of the members are
spending so much of their time
reading .

I had a preview of Montana's Pro-
gress Report for 1959 > prepared for
the Library Services Branch in
Washington, D.C. by Ruth Longworth.
She tells me you will all soon re-
ceive a copy and I know that you,
too, will be impressed. The news
of two new federations - making a
total of four in the state - is
very good indeed. I am so pleased
to have had a share in one of the
first. We had a meeting of the
Five Valleys Federation just last
week and what a pleasure it was to
see the interest and enthusiasm of
all of the fine people who are
working together in such friendly
accord'. When I look back upon our
past two years and see how far we



-8-



have come, I am very proud to have
had a part in this program.

All good Friends who are in the
areas that are now starting a demon-
stration, truly have an opportunity
for service. I know from our ex-
perience how much we need the help
of the Friends - to publicize the
program and to stimiilate interest
in the use of all of the exciting
new books that will soon be avail-
able. In the areas where there are
plans for future federations, our
work is cut out for us, too. Better
library service through cooperation
can surely come about through our
efforts .

Ruth brought home a quote from the
trustee ' s meeting that preceded the
American Library Association Con-
ference in Washington. One of the
trustees said "1-Jhat we need is a
militant cohesive force of people



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who are pro'." I believe this is
exactly what we need and I know
that everyone of you. Friends of
Libraries and librarians, who are
dedicated to the concept that books
and reading are a vital necessity
of life, will agree with me.

The pleasantest part of my job is
reporting activities of the Friends
in the state. The B.P.V/. in Butte
provided a scholarship for a
summer quarter in Library Seirvice
for one of their members. Friends
in many places coiild follow this
example with profit. The shortage
of trained librarians is acute, but
we do have two undergraduate pro-
grams in both the Montana State
University and Montana State
College in the state and graduate
programs in both the University of
Denver and the University of Wash-
inton .

Soon I will be sending letters out,
inviting individuals to join and
asking clubs to have representation
in the Montana State Library Assoc-
iation. We have had surprisingly
good results fromtiaese invitations.
Where we have the best response is
where a Friend invites a friend.
We can be that large cohesive group
that is "pro" if you will help'.




l^dC^



1^



fifl



Ctii

Letitia Johnson



Greetings to you'.

Let's get acquainted.

Your officers are Frances Wells,
Vice-chairman and Chairman-elect;
Sylvia Lillehaugen, Secretary; Jane
Carey, Treasurer. Past chairman
Bill Pate and MSLA representative
Inez Herrig are on the Executive
Board of our Division.

Acquaint yourself ^■n.th the recently
published Northwest Accrediting
Standards . Your administrator has
a copy; you can read the library
section in two minutes . Elementary
school standards are available from
our State Department of Public In-
struction now and the high school
standards are expected soon.



gram to the school board, the Rotary
(e.g.), or the P.T.A. Each report
can also point out some area of
possibility for improvement.

Get acquainted with other teacher-
librarians by attending your sec-
tional meeting and the library
breakfast or luncheon at MEA con-
ventions . You don't have to have
an organization (or pay any dues)
to get together with other school
librarians in your area for a
luncheon - or a supper - after a Sat-
urday at some shopping center. If
you haven't heard from Jane Carey,
Glendive Senior High School,
Frances Wells, Helena Senior High
School, or Sylvia Lillehaugen,
Missoula County High School, Higgins
Ave. Bldg.; write the one closest
to you for suggestions on school-
librarian morale boosters ,

Go with some of your library
assistants or library club members
to regional or state meetings of
the Montana Student Librarians - it
sparks interest and builds loy-
alties .



The American Library Association

Standards for School Libraries will
be published early in I96O. They
will serve as worthy goals in this
state that has such a potential for
development .

Your Division of MSLA has applied
to ALA to become one of the six
"pilot" states for the implemen-
tation of the new standards . The
aims of the pilot program are to
acquaint school personnel, espe-
cially librarians and adminis-
trators, with the standards and to
promote an improved library program
and services for the school chil-
dren in the state .

Acquaint your administrators with
your work by making periodical re-
ports; phrase your report to be an
effective tod in a busy man's hands
when he is interpreting your pro-



Make this the year you join other
school librarians in their Division
at the annual meeting of the
Montana State Library Association
in centrally located Great Falls
the first week-end in May.

It's going to be fun; you come tool



NATIONAL
LIBRARY WEEK



APRIL 3-9 196C



-10-



^^



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f ^ r" r) f-"^






(Editor's Note: This continues
our series of articles about our
who advertise in the
The Editor is indebted
F. Hogan, Advertising
Gaylord Bros . Inc . for
the material from which this was



friends ;,
Quarterly ,
to Mr. W
Manager of



written)



II. Gaylord Bros. Inc.



To all librarians the name "Gaylord
Bros." is a synonym for dependable
service and quality in library
supplies and equipment. Here in
Montana we think of their estab-
lishment in Stockton^ California^
since that is the distribution
point for us . Actually the Company
was foimded in Syracuse, N.Y. and
there the main office still is .

In 1896 Willis E. and Henry Jay
Gaylord set up the Company to sell
their oi<m product "Transparent Ad-
hesive Parchment Paper" for mending
torn pages . They also sold gummed
cloth for book repair. From the
beginning their interest was in
serving librarians and their pro-
ducts have been evolved from library
needs .

In 1906 Gaylord Bros . introduced
the first patented pamphlet binder^
and an early picture in the Gaylord
archives shows the father of the
two founders cutting binder board
in the Syracuse workroom. In I909
they introduced the double stitched



binder and in 1912 the "folded and
sealed" book pocket as we know it.
Before that time book pockets came
flat and the librarians had to fold
them and seal them with paste or
mucilage. This one product has
saved millions of hours of library
staff time.

In 1926 the western branch at
Stockton was opened to serve the
growing libraries on the west
coast and in the Rocky Mountains,
and it has expanded steadily. In
line with the Company's slogan of
"Service, Quality, New Ideas" there
has been steady growth and ex-
pansion in both the Syracuse and
Stockton plants , with new products
being added constantly. In both
places building additions became
necessary and were erected in 1956.
Pictures reproduced in Gaylords '
Triangle for September 195o show
the contrast between the old roll-




SINCE 1896



Library Supplies
Library Furniture

Bookmen DING
Materials



SEE OUR CATALOG

Quylord Gros. 9nc.
Stoctcn, QalifGrnici



-11-



top desks ^ high ceilings and dim

light of the 1911 era and the

modem office of today, light, airy
and uncluttered.

In 1930 Gaylord Bros . introduced
the Electric Book Charging Machine,
which is now in use in so many li-
braries . It too has been a notable
time saver for busy librarians ^ be-
sides introducing a mechanical
accuracy impossible of attainment
hy Puxely human means .

The Company has representatives who
keep in touch with libraries in 39
states . Their employes number in
the hundreds, and many of them have


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