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Moses Margoliouth.

Vestiges of the historic Anglo-Hebrews in East Anglia. With appendices and an apropos essay online

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romantic article, which appeared a couple of years ago
in the " Quarterly Review," under the title Talmud.
I dare say, I may be reminded of one of Seneca's old
" saws," "Gallus in suo sterquilinio plurimum potest."
But I venture to affirm that no bantam has ever had the
assurance to make such a jubilant noise, over so
unsavoury a heap notwithstanding the few-and-far-
between grains which may be scratched out of it as
some Jews have made over the Talmud since that
article was published. The marvel is, that many
sceptical Gentile "Christians" should take the writer's
ipse diosit for sober truth.

" Then where is the Niebuhr for an ANGLO-HEBREW
HISTORY to be found?" I answer, fearlessly, amongst
Anglo-Hebrew Christians. The majority of those
men have passed through a discipline which fits them



AN APROPOS ESSAY. 99

for the critical examination of the most complex
questions. They were bom and bred in a system which
they were led to hold as utterly incontrovertible ; by
a process of most scrutinising enquiry, and searching
examination of evidence pro and con, they have at last
arrived at the conviction that the Judaism which they
had hitherto professed, was not only defective, or
incomplete, but also fearfully corrupt. So strong
was their conviction, that they braved the greatest
losses that a Jew can possibly experience, even
the severance of the nearest and tenderest ties.
Nothing short of the most irrefragable and over-
whelming evidence could have induced them to
become obedient to THE FAITH in the covenant com-
pleted on Calvary. The structure of the Hebrew
Christian's mind is such as to refuse to take in any
theory, or statement, on trust ; it must weigh every-
thing in the justest balances; it must try every thought
in the most refining crucible. The Hebrew Christians
are, moreover, jealous of their nation's honour ; they
take every opportunity to point out that which is
great, good, and noble amongst the members of the
Jewish community. Though the latter revile, the
former bless ; the latter persecute, the former bear
patiently ; the latter defame, the former live down.

" But we are constantly assured, by the Jews them-
selves, that only the poorest and most ignorant of their
nation change their religion, and that from sordid
motives." There can be no doubt that there are some
poor and ignorant Jews in the Christian Church, as well
as in the Jewish synagogue, and possibly, now and



100 AN APROPOS ESSAY.

then, an unprincipled Jew, as well as an unprincipled
Gentile, trades upon religion ; but such are rare in-
stances indeed amongst Hebrew Christians. Though
Christianity does not profess to improve a poor man's
temporal prospects, it professes, and carries the pro-
fession into effect, to improve the ignorant and wicked
man's mental and moral character. The young
woman, Esther Lyons, whose case attracted lately so
much attention, is now a far better educated person
than she was whilst in her unhappy home, at Cardiff.
Such cases, however, as I have said, are but very
seldom to be met with amongst Hebrew Christians.
Their Jewish enemies try to persuade you, Gentile
Christians, that the rare exception is the rule. Be
on your guard ; take not the communications of your
informants, on that subject, as emanations from oracles
of truth. The enlightened, better educated, and
liberal-minded Jews do not treat those calumniators as
oracles of truth they feel an irresistible shrinking
from the touch of such bigots, though they, now and
then, hold out a reluctant hand to the slanderers. The
enlightened, well informed Jew is no bigot, no railer,
no false accuser. There are noble and impartial
spirits amongst the Jews everywhere, who, with
praiseworthy liberality, do justice to such of their
brethren as have seen reason to recognise the Divine
authority of the New Testament.

I will illustrate this, my statement, by a couple of
quotations from Jewish works of this present century.

The late Rabbi Isaac Beer Levinsohn, of Krem-
nitz, in Russia, in his well-written Hebrew work



AN APROPOS ESSAY. 101

DDtf, Ephes Damim, purporting to be a series
of conversations, at Jerusalem, between a patri-
arch of the Greek Church, Simmias by name, and a
chief rabbi of the Jews, Abraham Maimonides by
name, concerning the foul charge against the Jews, of
using Christian blood, which was then revived.
.Rabbi I. B. Levin sohn puts the following candid
confession into the mouth of Maimonides :



DVH D^DIDH
IK marmi rrw nint^o DHD^D :m

DVH XVD' 1 ^Ipm ......

:pm mi t^K nvro

" The majority of converts now-a-day are from the
nobles of the children of Israel; and are generally
learned in various languages and sciences, or wonder-
fully wealthy ...... And with difficulty can now-

a-day a convert be found, who is either unlearned,
or uninformed."

That northern rabbi's sentiment found an echo in
the mind of a rabbi in the east, in the very place
where anti-christian Jews were so fearfully branded,
at Smyrna. (Rev. ii. 8 10.) I happened to be, in
1848, in " the queen of the cities of Anatolia" known
in the days of yore as " the crown of Ionia," " the
ornament of Asia." I found the Jews numerous there,
learned, and generally well-to-do. I paid a visit to
their chief, and really great, Rabbi Chayim Palagi.
That master in Israel received me cordially. In the
course of a long interview, we conversed on various
subjects touching the state of parties, and their



102 AN APROPOS ESSAY.

respective conditions, amongst the Jews in Europe.
I particularly dwelt on the three classes into which the
Anglo-Hebrews are ranged, Talmudical, " Reformed,"
and Christian. I asked the venerable man whether
he had heard of the interest which the Anglo-
Hebrew Christians took in the sufferings of their
anti-christian brethren at Damascus, when the latter
were accused, a few years ago, of murdering a Roman
Catholic priest, in order to secure his blood for the
Passover festival 1 The question put the rabbi in the
very best of humours, for he had an opportunity of
referring to a work of his, which he had published on
the subject, in the shape of a sermon. He spoke in
the same breath of Sir Moses Montefiore, and of Mr.
Pieritz now Rector of Hardwicke, diocese of Ely
the Anglo-Hebrew Christian who personally pleaded
the cause of the persecuted Jews before the pacha.
The rabbi owned that the latter did more than the
former for the exculpation of the Hebrews from
the foul calumny. He went up to one of his book-
shelves, and took down a volume it was his pub-
lished sermon, which he dedicated to Sir Moses
Montefiore and read out the following passage :



DKPJ om Tronic lw D^nnD HDD
:"oi mn



" And even the many of our wise men who have
changed their religion, does any one of them believe
in this thing]" &c., &c.

" This will convince you," said R. Chayim Palagi
to me, " that I have great respect for Jewish Christians.



ATS T APROPOS ESSAY.

I do not deny that many wise and many learned are
to be found amongst them. May I ask you to accept
this volume, as a memento of sincere friendship on
my part 1" Of course I accepted the book.*

The late Sir J. L. Goldsmid, a Jewish baronet,
when addressing a meeting, on the 28th of May,
1844, respecting the Jewish Literary and Scientific
Institution, said, " I will just mention a fact which has
just come to my knowledge, that out of the one hun-
dred and forty-two professors in the Berlin University,
fourteen of them are Jews, certainly converted ones,
but still Jews." The candid Jew everywhere ac-
knowledges that the change of sentiment, for the
better, amongst Gentile Christians, towards the
Jewish community, is owing, in a great measure, to
the pleadings of Hebrew Christians in its behalf.

Such exceptional Israelites as the three examples
which I have just adduced, are neither scarce nor un-
common. Unfortunately, however, those enlightened
and liberal-minded Jews do not care to become his-
torians of their nation. There are many things in the
annals of the people of which free thinking Jews I
use the term not in an opprobrious sense have reason
to be ashamed. They know, moreover, the enormous
capacity for abuse which bigotry possesses and
employs. Not having gone through the school and
discipline of most Hebrew Christians, they have not
the courage of the latter. They feel somewhat like the
late Duke of Wellington, when he said to Rogers, " I

* " A Pilgrimage to the Land of my Fathers." Vol. II.,
pp. 159, 160.



104 AN APROPOS ESSAY.

should like to tell the truth, but if I did, I should be
torn to pieces, here or abroad." Indeed there are
many highly respectable Jewish families, in this
country, who have joined the Church, and keep the
fact an inviolable secret. The Nicodemus type of
Hebrew Christians was at all times to be found
amongst the Jewish people.

At the close of the year 1862, when I resided in
Huntingdon, I was invited to London to baptize
privately a whole Sephardim family, consisting of
twenty-two members aged father and mother, six
sons, three daughters, four daughters-in-law, and
seven grandchildren. The interesting catechumens
particularly stipulated that the sacrament should be
administered to them under the seal of secrecy, as
they had an irresistible antipathy to publicity.
As a clergyman of the Church of England, I
could not minister in another man's parish with-
out the permission of " the powers that be." I was
obliged, therefore, to put myself into communica-
tion, on the subject, with the then Bishop of London
the present Archbishop of Canterbury and the Rev.
H. Howarth, Rector of St. George's, Hanover Square.
To both those authorities I have made known all the
particulars of that most interesting case. My com-
munications to them were, respectively, dated Novem-
ber 24th, 27th, and December 1st, 1862.

There are certain impertinent persons amongst the
anti-christian Jews, who have the assurance to ask for
the publication of the names of the Hebrew Christians
in England ! What for ? That they might indulge in



AN APROPOS ESSAY. 105

coarse abuse against some of the best men, and most
consistent Christians, when a parliamentary election
shall again take place. To vilify other Hebrew
Christian candidates as they have maligned Mr.
Samtida ! ! !

There are, however, many eminent Hebrew
Christians, whose moral prowess is invincible. "Truth
against the world," though only recently adopted by
the Laureate, has been their motto for upwards of
eighteen hundred years. A reliable, sound, critical,
and unbiassed history of the Jews, either in this land
or in other lands, can only be got from the pens
of the learned amongst the " Israelites indeed." A
college for such men not the bantling of a society
a chartered college, under the government and chan-
cellorship of distinguished Anglo-Hebrew Christians,
might prove the nursery of the purest literature
and soundest science.

-' How do I propose to raise the money for the
required fabric and endowment \ " By Act of Parlia-
ment ! Repeal the Spoliation Act of Anno Primo
Victoria? Reginse, cap. XLVI. Let the vast accumu-
lated property of the " Domus Conversorum," in
Chancery Lane, and Fetter Lane, be restored to its
proper object ; and a well-endowed college with its
chapel, and residences for professors, students,
porters is ready to hand. The new Public Record
Office would not be a bad college to begin with.
\Vhy not add " Sion College " to it \

"When the Hebrew Christian, Sir Francis Palgrave,
was appointed Master of the Rolls, some facetious



106 AN APROPOS ESSAY.

humourist, at the time, put a question in the " Notes
and Queries," to the effect, " How long since was it
that the property of the ' Domus Conversorum ' had
been restored to its original purpose "? " When I read
it, I could not help observing, " Many a true word
spoken in jest." Some may probably be disposed to
treat this, my proposition, as a jest. Let me assure
my readers that I am thoroughly and soberly in
earnest.

Is there no cause for courageous earnestness in the
matter! Nay, has not the time arrived for Anglo-
Hebrew Christians to be the most outspoken, of
all her Majesty's subjects, in this land ! There is no
department in the realm whether it be political,
ecclesiastical, civil, literary, or commercial which
some Hebrew Christians do not adorn. The " Israel-
ites indeed " have their representatives in the Senate,
at the Bar, in the Church, on the Exchange, and in
the Mart. The arts and the sciences count the children
of " the remnant" amongst their most genuine sup-
porters. Thank God, the Anglo-Hebrew Christians
are ornaments to every profession, quality, or trade
with which their names happen to be associated.



Printed at the Operative Jewish Converts' Institution, Palestine Place, Bethnal Green, E.



Jurtjror.



i.

ABYSSINIA: ITS PAST, PRESENT, AND PROB-
ABLE FUTURE. A Lecture, with Notes and Appendices.
Published by Request. Price 3s.

"We felt whilst reading it that it is the production of a man thoroughly
acquainted with the subject : of one who enters into it fully equipped with
all that is required to do it justice, for he possesses Biblical, geographical,
and historical knowledge. The book reads like a romance, and has all the
charms which a loving heart alone can impart even to the writing of
truth." The Scattered Nation.

" Besides the direct object of the lecture, the writer has treated on several
important Biblical matters, in the preface, notes, &c." The ClericalJournal.

" Dr. Margoliouth has stated the case against the Foreign Office very
clearly, and it is impossible not to admit the force of his reasoning." The
A then<Bum.

" To those who desire to read for themselves an authentic account of the
Abyssinian martyrdoms, we cordially recommend the perusal of a brilliant
little brochure, entitled 'Abyssinia : its Past, Present, and Probable Future,'
from the facile pen of the Rev. Dr. Margoliouth. It is a book that will
repay an attentive consideration." Bell's Weekly Messenger.

II.

THE HAIDAD; A HARVEST THANKSGIVING

SERMON. With Preface and Appendices intended for careful perusal.
Price Is.

" I beg to thank you for your learned sermon, entitled ' Haidad.' Your
exposition of that word is a very interesting one, and it seems to have the
marks of probability, and to open out a view of joyful religious associations,
especially in connection with Harvest Thanksgiving." Extract from a Letter
of the Venerable Archdeacon Wordsworth.

" A learned Harvest Sermon." The Guardian.

" In the discourse will be found much matter of interest to those who
wish to gain an insight into that abstruse subject, the metrical, or poetical
anatomy of the Psalms in the original Hebrew." The Musical Standard.

III.

THE SPIRIT OF PROPHECY: being an Exposition,

in Four Sermons, on Revelation i. 7, xxii. 20. Preached on the Morn-
ings of the Sundays in Advent, 1863, with Appendices. Price 2s. 6d.

"The author displays, with some power, the sublime incidents of the
second coming of our Lord." Church Review.

" We shall always be glad to receive from his pen Expositions of Holy
Writ, at once so full of learning, and so free from extravagances as those
contained in the work before us." Clerical Journal.



WORKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR.
IV.

ENGLAND'S CROWN OF REJOICING: a Sermon

preached on the Sunday before the Marriage of the Prince of Wales.
With an Appendix : being a Translation of the Hebrew Poem presented
to the late Prince Consort, at the Baptism of H.R.H. the Prince of
Wales. Price Is.

" This is a sermon extremely appropriate to the occasion on which it was
preached, from a text of singular beauty and significance." Literary
Churchman.

V.

THE TRUE LIGHT: a Farewell Sermon preached on

the evening of St. Bartholomew's Day, in the Parish Church of Wyton,
Hunts, on retiring from the spiritual charge of the Parish. Price 6d.

" We do not know when we have heard any one speak out more plainly
on the sin and danger of schism than does Dr. Margoliouth. * * *
We thank him for giving the weight of his name to the present protest
against schism on the part of the Clergy." The Clerical Journal.



VI.

THE END OF THE LAW: Two Sermons preached

at the Church of St. Edmund-the-King, Lombard Street. To which is
added A LETTER, with numerous Notes, to the Rev. William J. C.
Lindsay, B.A., Rector of Llanvaches, Monmouthshire ; being a Pre-
liminary Examination of the "Essays and Reviews." Rivingtons.

" A valuable work." Bishop of Rochester.

"A learned and useful work profitable to the Church at the present
time." Rev. Dr. M'Caul.

"A most well-timed and important work, calculated to do immediate good.
Interesting and zweckmassig ." Rev. Dr. Jelf.

" Your strictures on the ' Essays and Reviews ' are appropriate and well-
timed." Rev. Thomas Hartwell Home.

" No one can peruse a single page of this admirable work without being

struck at once by its profundity as well as its clearness The style

is easy, lucid, and pleasant to read, even when expounding matters which
are usually served up as pieces de resistance for the delectation of savans
alone." Weekly Messenger.

VII.

THE GOSPEL AND ITS MISSION. Second Edition.

"It is an admirable Sermon." Rev. Dr. Marsh.



WORKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR.
VIII.

SACRED MINSTRELSY. A Lecture on Biblical and

Post-Biblical Hebrew Music.

" A great deal of interesting matter is given in these pages. The Jewish
airs will please the lovers of ruusic." Clerical Journal.

IX.

THE QUARREL OF GOD'S COVENANT. A Fast-

Day Sermon. Wertheim, Macintosh, and Hunt.

X.

THE LORD'S ANOINTED. A Coronation Sermon,

preached in the British Chapel at Moscow, on the Sunday before the
enthronement of Alexander II. Booth.

"May claim attention as a historical document, as well as a pulpit
discourse." Literary Gazette.

XI.

THE PENITENTIAL HYMN of JUDAH and ISRAEL

after the SPIRIT: an Exposition of Isaiah liii. Second Edition.
Longman and Co.

Extract from a letter to the Author, by the late Bishop of Kildare :
"My dear Margoliouth, I return the two last of a series of Sermons
which it would be unjust to withhold from the public at large," &c.

" Able, learned, and most profitable throughout ; to the scholar it will be
most interesting." Presbyterian Review.

" The author's whole aim is to demonstrate its vital importance, for
which purpose he takes it verse by verse, and comments upon each ex-
pression critically, historically, polemically, and practically "We feel

that we are quite safe in commending these Lectures to the attentive perusal
of all who are interested in this most wonderful prophecy." English Review.

XII.

GENUINE REPENTANCE, and its EFFECTS. An

Exposition of the Fourteenth Chapter of Hosea. Longman and Co.

" You have selected a very interesting portion of Scripture, and one
peculiarly suited to our moral and political state ; and I cannot doubt of the
effect that address will have upon your hearers." One of the Last Letter*
of the late Chancellor Raikes, of Chester, to the Author.

"The discourses are earnest and practical." The Literary Gazette.



WORKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR.



XIII.

THE APOSTOLIC TRIPLE BENEDICTION. A

Farewell Sermon, preached at St. Bartholomew's Church, Salford.
XIV.

HOLMFIRTH'S SOLEMN VOICE. A Sermon preached

in St. Bartholomew's Church, Salford, in behalf of the Sufferers from
the calamitous visitation of Holmfirth. Wertheim and Macintosh.



XV.

THE HISTORY of the JEWS in GREAT BRITAIN.

In Three Vols. Post 8vo. Richard Bentley.

" The minute and patient research here bestowed on the History of the
Jews in England has brought to light a mass of curious information, of
which few have any idea. The "work is one of real value, in more ways
than one ; especially as containing fragments of history almost inaccessible."
Presbyterian Review.

" These volumes are invested with great historical value and importance."
Caledonian Mercury.

" A. very complete and interesting History of the Jews in England. The
Author writes with candour and impartiality." Weekly Chronicle.



XVI.

A PILGRIMAGE TO THE LAND OF MY FATHERS.

Two Vols. 8vo. With numerous Illustrations. Richard Bentley.

" The Letters which he (Mr. M. M.) addressed to me were replete with
interesting information. The friends to whom I communicated them, read
them with as much pleasure as I had done ; and I believe him not only to
be singularly qualified to draw out and discover what is curious in the
countries that he visited, but likewise very happy in his manner of de-
scribing them." The Worshipful and Rev. Chancellor Raikes.

" So ends our review of a work which has entertained us with a variety of
topics, treated in an original way." Literary Gazette.

" The work abounds with curious details concerning the condition and
opinions of the Jewish populations of the various countries in Europe, Asia,
and Africa, which the Author visited. Some of the disclosures, too, are
as astounding and romantic as anything in Mr. Disraeli's fictions, and with
the additional advantage of being not inventions but truths Of the



WORKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR.

more learned portions of the work, its critical and antiquarian discussions,
we despair of giving an adequate account. They embrace a great variety
of subjects, and are highly creditable to the Author's learning and ability."
Daily News.

" It is replete with information as varied as it is valuable, as curious as it
is attractive." Britannia.

" He appears to be thoroughly conversant with Hebrew literature, and
his notices of Hebrew poetry, and occasional specimens of Hebrew music,
are curious." Examiner.



XVII.

THE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF MODERN

JUDAISM INVESTIGATED. One Vol. 8vo. Wertheimand

Macintosh.

" Your luminous book, which suggests a most valuable alteration in the
course hitherto pursued by students of Theology, has not yet been a suf-
ficient time before the public to excite attention Your

investigation of Modern Judaism I have read several times throughout with
great attention. That work, with Mr. Chancellor Raikes' Preface, and your
short Memoir, form a compendium of much value to Theological Students,
because it brings together one whole subject of Talmudical learning, which
they have had to collect from different authors." Extract from a Letter of
the late Bishop of Kildare to the Author.



XVIII.

ISRAEL'S ORDINANCES EXAMINED. 8vo. Wert-

heim and Macintosh.

"We do not know any one whose reply we should look for with more
interest than Mr. Margoliouth's ; and on the perusal of his little pamphlet,
we found it just as happy in its spirit as it is conclusive in its arguments."
Christian Examiner.



&c., &c., &c., &c.



WORKS READY FOR PRESS THESE MANY YEARS, BY
THE SAME AUTHOR.



to fefameiti



WITH

CRITICAL, PHILOLOGICAL, HISTORICAL, POLEMICAL, AND
EXPOSITORY ENGLISH COMMENTS;

THE PRINCIPAL PORTIONS OF WHICH AUE ORIGINAL.

In Five Quarto Volumes.



The Author humbly trusts that, with the blessing of God, the
work which he has been permitted to finish will not only prove
useful to the advanced Theological Student, but also prove an im-
portant auxiliary to the ordinary Bible reader, who may be altogether
unacquainted with the Sacred tongue.

The production of this work has been one of the principal objects
of the Author's life ; he has diligently studied the writings of
Moses and the prophets in their original tongue, with a view to
their elucidation. During his various travels in the East, the West,
and the North, he has ever borne in mind his great enterprise, viz.,
the illustration of the " Scriptures of Truth."

A great number of new references have been added in the
margin of this work, and the inapplicable ones discarded. A con-
siderable number of new readings have been discovered, which
make many passages, hitherto obscure, clear and intelligible.

The Author has already spent upwards of Six Thousand Pounds
sterling on the preparation of this work. The enterprise proved
the cause of protracted illness, misfortunes, and disappointments to
him, all of which conspired in putting the publication of it, for a
time at least, in abeyance.



THE HISTORY OF THE JEWS FROM THE GREAT

DISPERSION to A.D. 1860. Twelve Vols. 8vo.

THE WHOLE PLAN OF POST-BIBLICAL JUDAISM.
ESSAYS ON THE POETRY AND MUSIC OF THE

HEBREWS, BIBLICAL AND POST-BIBLICAL. Two Vols.

MISCELLANEOUS LECTURES. Two Vols. 8vo.

&c., &c., &c.



39 PATERNOSTER Ro-w, E.G.
LONDON: April 1869.



GENERAL LIST OF WORKS



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Online LibraryMoses MargoliouthVestiges of the historic Anglo-Hebrews in East Anglia. With appendices and an apropos essay → online text (page 7 of 11)