Moving Picture Exhibitors' Association.

Photoplay (Volume 35 – 36 (Jan. - Jun. 1929)) online

. (page 94 of 138)
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flakes. Look for the red-and-green pack-
age. Made by Kellogg in Battle Creek.

Important— Kellogg's Pep Bran Flakes are mildly

laxative, all-bran — another Kellogg product — is 100%

bran and guaranteed to relieve constipation.




PEP BRAN FLAKES

WITH OTHER PARTS OF WHEAT



PEP

BRAN FLAKES



^-^^; .



WITH OTHER PARTS
OF WHEAT




Hollywood Puddings!




Jobyna stirs one — and that's
Dick's weakness now



Now that winter is just a memory and we are tired of the
heavier, heat-producing foods, let's make a pudding. A
light, frothy pudding, in keeping with springtime moods
and tastes.

Jobyna Ralston has contributed one of those easy-to-make

and delightful-to-eat brown tapioca puddings for Photoplay's

Cook Book. The children will adore it — it's the kind of dessert

that's both good, and good for them.

First you add two-thirds cup of ordinar>' tapioca to one quart



.a^



Photoplay Magazine
750 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111.

Please send me a copy of Photoplay's Cook
Book, containing 150 favorite recipes of the stars.
I am enclosing twenty-five cents.



Be sure to write name and addresa plainly.
You may send either stamps or coin.



of water, letting it soak for an hour. Then add two and two-
thirds cups of brown sugar, one cup of finely chopped nuts, and
just a pinch of salt. Mix thoroughly and cook in a slow oven
until thick, being careful to stir it often. Cool in icebox and
serve with whipped cream.

The busy housewife will appreciate the fact that this dessert
can be made early in the day and left in the icebox until needed.

Richard Arlen's favorite is Peach Cabinet Pudding, so it is
safe to assume this is the one served oftenest at the Arlen table.
This is a much fancier recipe than Jobyna's and is suitable
for quite a formal dinner. You will need the following in-
gredients:



/ cat! peaches

J 3 cup powdered sugar

2 tablespoons sherry flavoring

1 tablespoon brandy flavoring

Z cups milk



Yolks 3 eggs

Whiles 3 eggs

34 cup sugar

J^ teaspoon salt

l]/2 tablespoons granulated gelatine



2 tablespoons cold water

Drain the peaches and cut in quarters. Sprinkle with
powdered sugar and pour the flavoring over them.

Then make a custard of the milk, egg yolks, sugar and salt,
and just before removing from fire add gelatine, which has
been soaked in cold water. Strain this, and when slightly
cooled, add the liquor drained from the peaches. Stir until
the mixture begins to thicken. Then add whites of eggs beaten
stifT.

Line a mould with the peaches, pour in the custard, and chill.

Carolyn Van Wyck.

13



14



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section



So



UND




i- -f- ^ ^ ^ ¥-



CTURES

a pro dad ofi/ie




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These producers, on their part, have had to create




The monitor, operating delicate apparatus, controls the volume
of sound from actors or orchestra and sound machines.



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Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section



Telep/i



to/ie^



\ Yesterday's
dream is
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MOVING pictures with sound are here! This new, popular
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i6



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section




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Brief Reviews of Current Pictures

[ CONnNUED FROM PAGE 6 1



• DUMMY, THE — Paramount. — In this excel-
lent all-talking crook melodrama, two Holly-
wooders — ZaSu Pitts and Mickey Bennett — steal
honors from a lot of stage stars. {A pril.)

DUTY'S REWARD— Elbee.— More cops, crooked

politics, etc. i^Dec)

ELIGIBLE MR. BANGS, THE— Coronet-Educa-
tional. — A clever little dress-suit comedy in one reel,
with Edward Everett Horton fane. {April.)

ETERNAL LOVE— United Artists.— John Profile
Barrymore and Camilla Horn get romantic in the
Swiss Alps. {April.)

EVA AND THE GRASSHOPPER— UFA— Some

remarkable insect photography and a not-so-good
modern story. Anyway, a novelty. iFeb.)

FAKER, THE— Columbia.— Well done expose of
spiritualistic charlatans, with Warner Oland fine as
the phoney spook-chaser, (April.)

FIRST KISS, THE— Paramount.— Young love,
played by Fay Wray and Gary Cooper and set in a
deep sea background. (November.)

FLEET'S IN, THE— Paramount.- Clara Bow
among tlie sailors. Of course, you won't miss it.
(November.)

FLOATING COLLEGE, THE— Tiffany-Stahl.—
Eased on one of those university cruises, lliis picture
had possibilities that aren't realized. (March.)

FLYIN' BUCKAROO, THE— Pathe.— How to
capture bandits. (Feb.)

• FLYING FLEET, THE— Metro-Goldwyn-
Mayer. — The training of a flyer, told with
thrills, accuracy and an absence of bunk. It's a real
picture; you 'II like it. (Feb.)

FORBIDDEN LOVE— Pathe —English film
brought to this country merely because it stars Lily
Damita. (Dec.)

• FOUR DEVILS— Fox.— Dramatic and beauti-
fully presented story of Continental Circus
life, with great performances by Janet Gaynor.
Charles Morton and Barry Norton. You'll want to
see it. (Dec.)

FUGITIVES — Fox. — Conventional story of a
wronged girl and a Horatio Alger district attorney.
(.March.)

FURY OF THE WILD— FBC— More real meat
for Ranger. (November.)

GERALDINE — Pathe. — Light and amusing com-
edy with Marion Nixon and Eddie Quillan. (Jan.)

GHOST TALKS, THE— Fox.— A talkie farce.
Plenty of laughs. (Feb.)

GIRL ON THE BARGE, THE— Universal.— A
little slow but pleasant enough. Sally O'Neil wears
her one expression. (Dec.)

GIRLS WHO DARE— Trinity. — Sleuths fail to
find a reason for this picture. Who cares if girls do,
after this one? (April.)

GLORIOUS TRAIL, THE— First National.—
Ken Maynard and Tarzan work on that first overland
telegraph line. You know the rest. (March.)

GRAIN OF DUST, THE— Tiffany-Stahl.— Inter-
esting drama based on the David Graham Phillips
novel, with the grief rather heavily stressed. (Nov.)



GUARDIANS OF THE WILD— Universal.—
Too bad that Rex. the wonder horse, can't write his
own stories and put some horse-sense into them.
(November.)

GUN RUNNER, THE— Tiffany-Stahl.— Bullets
and romance in a South American republic. Frothy
entertainment. (Feb.)

HARDBOILED— FBC— Hackneyed story about
a gold-digging show girl, but well played by Sally
O'Neil and Donald Reed. (April.)

HARVEST OF HATE, THE— Universal.— In

which the great talents of Rex. the wild horse, are
ignored to make footage for a trite romance. (Jan.)

HAUNTED HOUSE, THE— First National.—
Too much Chester Conklin and not enough mystery.
(November.)

HAUNTED LADY, THE— Universal.— Laura
LaPlante knows who did the murder, but is afraid to
tell. She and the story are good. (April.)

HEAD OF THE FAMILY, THE— Gotham.—
Rather cuckoo farce. (Jan.)

HEY, RUBE— FBC— Carnival life film that has
the real stuff. ( Dec.)

• HIS CAPTIVE WOMAN— First National-
Getting away witli murder in the South Seas.
However, good performances by Milton Sills and
Dorothy Mackaill make this melodrama worth your
attention. With sound and talk. (March.)

HIS LAST HAUL— FBC— Just a tear jerker.

(Dec.)

HIS LUCKY DAY— Universal.— Another flimsy
story for Rpggy Dennv. with the star a dizzy realtor.
(April.)

HIS PRIVATE LIFE— Paramount.— One of
those French farces that is full of doors and bores.
However, it has Adolphe Menjou. (Dec.)

HOLLYWOOD BOUND — Warners. — Talkie
farce that sounds as though it had been written by
someone who never had been nearer Hollywood than
Parsons, Kans. (November.)

HOMESICK — Fox. — Sammy Cohen as a New
York tourist in California. Fairly funny. (Dec.)

• HOME TOWNERS, THE — Warners.—
Smoothest talkie so far. Good lines, by George
M. Cohan, and a fine performance by Doris Kenyon.
(Dec.)

HONEYMOON ABROAD— World Wide Pictures.
— Monty Banks in a spotty comedy made in London
and Paris. (April.)

HOUSE OF SHAME, THE— Chesterfield.— Do-
mestic drama — if that's what you want. (Feb.)

HUNTINGTOWER — Paramount. — Imported
Scotch — celluloid. With Sir Harry Lauder and a lot
of atmosphere. (Feb.)

I FORBID — Fan-Maid Pictures. — An over-ripe
Kosher film of breaking hearts. (November.)

IN HOLLAND — Fox Movietone — Another by
those fine stage comedians. Clark and McCullough.
(April.)

• IN OLD ARIZONA— Fox.— Pointing the way
to bigger and better talkies. A fine Western
that pleases the eye. the ear and the dramatic
instinct. (.Feb.)

I CONTINUED ON PAGE 143 ]



Photoplays Revie-wed in the Shadow Stage This Issue

Save this magazine — Refer to the criticisms before you pic\ out
your evenings entertainment. 'bAa\e this your reference list.



Page

Alibi — United Artists 56

Behind Closed Doors — Columbia 57

Betrayal — Paramount 55

Born to the Saddle — Universal 108

Bridge of San Luis Rey, The— M.-G.-M. 56

Brothers— Rayart 108

Chinatown Nights — Paramount 56

Close Harmony — Paramount 54

Hearts in Di.xie — Fox 55

Hot Stuff— First National 56

House of Horror, The — First National. 57

Letter, The — Paramount 54

Lone Wolf's Daughter, The — Columbia. 57
Lure of the South Seas, The — Co-
operative 108



Page

Mysterious Island, The— M.-G.-M .54

Navajo — Goodwill 108

Peacock Fan, The— Chesterfield 108

Royal Rider, The— First National 108

Shanghai Rose — Rayart 57

Sideshow, The — Columbia 57

Sonny Boy — Warners 56

Speakeasy — Fox 55

This Is Heaven — Goldwyn-United Ar-
tists 56

Trail of the Horse Thieves, The— FBO. . 108

Voice of the Storm, The— FBO 108

When Dreams Come True — Rayart . . . 108
Winged Horseman, The — Universal.. . . 57
Woman I Love, The— FBO 108



Brery advertisement In PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE Is guaranteed.



FPe toM you
to pt*^patre
for thie best

»ud



Photoplay Magazine— Ai)vi;iiri.siNG Section

''A



17



H

it



ere
IN I



A film M'hosc ''^
g:reatne§s jj

lias taken ||)
Los Ang^eles I ■
by storm at
its brilliant
World
Premiere.

It will come
to j'onr city
SOOIV!








Read!

Read!

"All Los Angeles
flanked the scene with
popping eyes. The
most ambitious effort
of Frank Lloyd since
his memorable "The
Sea Hawk." Excels
that picture in spec-
tacular elements. One
of the best examples
of the new art of
synchronization."—
Los Angeles Evening
Press.

"One of the most
picturesque films of
the year. No set has
been more artistically
•Jesigned or photo-
graphed. Miss Griffith
sings several songs
and very prettily." —
I.MS Angeles Eveninz
Herald.

"If Lady Hamilton
were half as lovely as
Corinne Griffith you
couldn't blame Lord
Nelson for being will-
ing to sacrifice fame,
wife and all else for
ber." — Los Angeles
Examiner.

" Lovely l>eyond
comparison in its
embellishments of
setting and costume."
— Los Angeles Times.



Every picture a
"Double Feature



When you write to advertisers please mention PHOTOrLAY !inr. \ztvt-




Teacher, housewife, office worker, beauty specialist, nurse, actress, journalist, saleswoman — these are
just a few of the careers which women follow so successfully. How shall a girl choose wisely from such a

tempting and varied list?

Friendly Advice from Carolyn Van Wyck on

Girls' Problems



DEAR CAROLYN VAN WYCK:
More than anything else in the world
I want to be a movie actress. I feel sure
I would be successful because I have always
done well in amateur theatricals. I am attrac-
tive looking and my features photograph well. .
My health is good, and I have a small nest-egg
to tide me over until I begin to earn.

My parents think I should enter a business
office and be a secretary. I took a stenographic
course at high school and could easily brush up
on my speed. But how can I become inter-
ested in business when in my heart there is just
one career I long for? I know it isn't all
glamour and that acting isn't easy, but I would
be satisfied with even a small success.

My folks think that if I fail I will come home
discontented, with warped views about life.
I'm old enough to take care of myself and I
wouldn't be afraid of hard work and loneUness,
and even deprivation. Don't you think I
should have my chance?

hortense m.

T~\ear Carolyn Van 'Wyck:
-*-' My father is a physician on the staff of a
city hospital. He never had a son to follow in his
footsteps, but all his life he has hoped I would
take up nursing when I was old enough to
choose a profession. And I know I am disap-
pointing him cruelly by planning to enter a
normal school to begin my training as a teacher.

But, Mrs. Van Wyck, proud as I am of my
father's fine work, I don't feel I am suited to
the e.xacting demands of a nurse's life. I have
been brought up in the atmosphere of hospitals
and doctors and I want to get away from it
now. I would like to get into a small town
school and settle down and become part of the
community hfe.

I have the patience which is essential to both
professions, but I know I would be happier
teaching. And yet, I hate to make this im-
portant decision alone. My mother will not
advise me. She would like me to make my
father happy, but she doesn't feel it's right to
influence me one way or the other. She says
I'm old enough to choose for myself. What do
you think?

Cecile G.

IS



Hundreds of letters like these from Hortense
and Cecile come to me every month. A girl
has reached an important turning-point in her
life when she faces the problem of choosing her
career, and while older and wiser persons may
guide her, the real decision must be hers. She
alone knows what things she can give to her
work and what things she must get from it.
She must analyze her abilities and her limita-
tions. She must try to gauge her capacity for
plodding along under dull routine without be-
coming drab and stale herself. It is for her to
decide whether she is equal to the brilliant
performances required by certain professions,
such as acting and writing. Can she let her



What Career Shall
I Ckoose?

Is This Month's Discussion

SO many fascinating vocations from
which to make a choice. So many
roads beckoning to the girl who is
ready to shoulder her share of the
world's work. No wonder she is a
little bewildered.

Perhaps I can help you solve this
difficult problem. Write me some-
thing about yourself, your abilities and
talents, your opportunities and aims.

You may have other questions to ask
—what clothes and colors are suited to
you, what to do to make hair and com-
plexion more attractive.

For a personal reply, or for my skin
pamphlet, be sure to enclose a stamped,
self-addressed envelope. Other letters
will be answered as quickly as possible
in the magazine. Ten cents will bring
you my booklet on sane reducing.

Write me in care of PHOTOPLAY
Magazine, 221 West 57th Street,
New York.

Carolyn Van Wyck



imagination — all the brilliancy of mind and
spirit — flare up in her work, and remain poised
and normal in her private hfe?

TvJO matter what work she chooses, she mil
■'■ ^ have to make some compromises. The girl
who follows a profession may have to renounce
some of the joys of a quiet home hfe. The girl
to whom home-making most appeals may
dream a little wistfuUy of the glamour and
glory of public hfe. Each has to weigh the
sacrifices of her chosen career against the re-
wards. Great love for her work, and the con-
sequent joy in the doing of it, will compensate
her for many seeming sacrifices.

So much has been said and written on the
subject of the amateur who tries to break into
the movies that it seems hardly necessary to
repeat it here. Out of every thousand girls who
are swept off their feet by the urge to see them-
selves among the romantic shadows of the sil-
ver screen, I suppose there is one who has that
rare thing which we duUy call "dramatic
ability," and the requisite physical quahdes
to make her a successful actress.

And before that one girl has the chance to
prove her power, there are a hundred hurdles
to be jumped, a hundred disappointments to be
faced. There are so many lesser talents trying
to make a place for themselves, and there is
room for so few, that she is lost in the crowd.
Only by great good luck, transcendent beauty
or abihty, or after long and gruelling days,
weeks, months, and sometimes years of striv-
ing is she able to make a definite place for her-
self. In no other profession that I know of are
the odds so against one.

My advice to Hortense is this:

Unless you have studied the special require-
ments of this profession and feel sure you are
peculiarly fitted for it — •

Unless you have money enough to hve
modestly, but in proper surroundings, for at
least a year — a year in which you may earn
nothing, or only a few dollars here and there —

Unless you have the stamina and moral fibre
to meet disappointment after disappointment
without losing courage, to meet temptation
with firmness —

I CONTINLTED ON PAGE 98 ]



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section




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20



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section



VoteJ.

tne i^oveliest

of



t



'7



F. SCOTT riTZGERAXD

COR1\£I.Ii;S VA]VDERBILr,jR.

JOHN BAJRKYMORE





Mrs. Hester, snapped beside the Plaza
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Mrs. George Franklin Hester of Richmond, Virginia . . chosen
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SHE is tall, slim as a wand, with beautiful
bright brown eyes, full of golden lights,
and a skin like a Marechal Niel rose.

Her face, seen in repose, is grave and rather
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She was born in Richmond, Virginia, and
comes of a long line of Southern beauties.
She made her debut at eighteen, and four
years later she married — a young Southerner
like herself. She is still in her early twenties.

The things that interest her are music and
books, beautiful color, texture, line. She is a
musician, and has studied the violin since she
was five. She plays golf to please her husband
and the piano to please herself. "Butterfly"
is her favorite among modern operas; " The
Bridge of San Luis Rey" among recent books.

She opens her eyes in wonder at Northern



women — their energy, dash, ambition. "They
all do things— in the South we just live."



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three distinguished judges are choosing the
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Every adverllscment in PHOTOPLAY M.\G.*ZINE la guaranteed.



Online LibraryMoving Picture Exhibitors' AssociationPhotoplay (Volume 35 – 36 (Jan. - Jun. 1929)) → online text (page 94 of 138)