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BAM/PFA-mrm^'




SCANNED FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF



PFA Library and Film Study Center,

University of California, Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive

bampfa.berkeley.edu



Coordinated by the

Media History Digital
Library

www.mediahistoryproject.org



Funded by an anonymous donation
in memory of Carolyn liauer



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. BERKELEY ART MUSEUM & PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2009 with funding from

IVIedia History Digital Library



http://www.archive.org/details/photoplay3637movi



^^TWe ISationaJ^Jjuiae to Motton ftctures




LKIES



E^ry thing You Want

\bout
\ SounH Pictures




Day-long protection for

fair hands



[



A BEAUTY SUGGESTION
FOR BUSY HOURS



]



When hands can look as smooth and cool as
flower-petals, doesn't it seem extravagant to
let their loveliness slip away — day by day —
in a round of soap-and-water tasks?

Many women have adopted_> very simple
plan to protect their hands V -y use Ivory to
wash gleaming china, lacquered furniture,
glossy woodwork, colored cottons and linens
— instead of harsh kitchen soaps which parch
and redden the skin.

These women have found that "Ivory for
everything" is a very practical and economical
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and white. Compared to other beauty aids in
their bathrooms and upon their dressing tables,
the little extra cost of Ivory is almost nothing!

Try Ivory for all your soap-and-water tasks
this week. Don't just tuck this suggestion
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If you begin tomorrow to use "Ivory for
everything" and see how much softer and
smoother your hands quickly become, we
believe you will never again let a harsh soap
rob them of their charm.



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KIND TO EVERYTHING IT TOUCHES

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©1929. P. & G. Co,



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section




uam your gums -protect your teeth
from tKe aamage done by your diet !



NEXT time you sit down to a meal,
take note of the dishes one by
one. See how many contain any rough-
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Very likely not a one! For the pres-
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soft and creamy foods, delicately
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Name .



Address ■



When you write to advertisers please mention niOTOPLAT MAGAZINE.



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section



These



Chaiigiiig Times

iu motion picture
entertainment find




PARAMOUNT
PICTURES

maintaining tlieir



LE ADERI^HIP



Paramount



♦iiit»r"~




irMOVING shadows on a screen
began to talk and sing and the mod-
ern miracle of entertainment — the
audible motion picture — was born.
Today, screen and stage technique
are wedded in a new art whose power
to thrill you and enchant you far
exceeds both, and whose possibilities
for development are only touched.
^ In this new medium. Paramount
has played the only part it knows^
that of delivering quality entertain-
ment — a good show every time — and
is today maintaining the leadership
it has held for 16 years. ^ And
Paramount has only started! New
productions in audible drama soon
to be announced will place Para-
mount farther in the lead than ever
and make the words "A Paramount
Picture" spell "stop, look and listen"
to every entertainment lover in the
land! In talking pictures, too, "If
it's a Paramount Picture it's the
best show in town!" .^ .a. .a.

PARAMOUNT FAMOUS LASKY CORPORATION
ADOLPH ZUKOR, PRES., PARAMOUNT BLOC, N. Y.



Every advertisement In PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE IB guaranteed.



The World's L e a d i n g^ M o 1 1 o ff Pi c t u r e Publication



FBEDERICE JAMES SMITH

MANAQlNa SSITOB



Contents



Vol. XXXVI




MARK LARKIN

WKSTBKM SDITOB



For

July

1929



James R. Quirk



No. 2



^b*^



E D 1 TOR - AN D. P L' B L I S H E R



=<^



TKe High-Lights of This Issue



Cover Design
Bessie Love



Earl Christy
-Painted from Life

As We Go to Press 6

Last Minute News from East and West

Brief Reviews of Current Pictures 8

A Guide to Your Evening's Entertainment

Brickbats and Bouquets 10

The Voice of the Fan

Friendly Advice on Girls' Problems

Carolyn Van Wyck 14
Photoplay's Personal Service Department

What Was the Best Picture of 1928? 16

Have You Cast Your Ballot for the Photoplay
Medal of Honor?



Close-Ups and Long Shots James R. Quirk

The Editor Tells You What's What and Who With-
out Fear or Favor



Little Alabam

A Picture of the "Other Side



27



29



Cut Picture Puzzle



30



Katherine Albert

of Dorothy Sebastian

The Girl Jack Gilbert Married

Ruth Waterbury
You'll Love Ina Claire Just as You Love Jack

The Truth About Voice Doubling

Mark Larkin 32
The Why and How of It

My Boy Buddy

Father Rogers Tells His Story

A Jungle Lorelei Herbert Howe

Nina May, the New Colored Wonder

The Butterfly Man and the Little Clown

Adela Rogers St. Johns
The Sad Love Story of Lew Cody and Mabel
Normand



B. H. Rogers 34



36



38



She Prayed for the Part Frank Pope 40

And Winifred Westover Won the Title Role in
"Lummox"



Lucky Amateur Detectives

Here Are the Winners in The Studio Murder Mys-
tery Contest

That Awkward Length

This Will Help You Solve the Problem of Growing
Out Gracefully

Rosie Rolls Her Eyes (Fiction Story)

Stewart Robertson
Here's the First Story of the New Talkie Studios

Gossip of All the Studios Cal York

What the Film Folk Are Doing and Saying

Trials of the Talkies Albert Boswell

The "Mikes" Even Hear a Pin Drop

The Shadow Stage

Reviews of the Latest Silent and Sound Pictures

$5,000 in Fifty Cash Prizes
Rules in Photoplay's New
Contest

What Next for Gloria? Katherine Albert

Swanson's Future Is in the Fans' Hands

The Golden Fleecer (Fiction Story)

Grace Mack
A Modern Jason Does His Stuff

Reeling Around Leonard Hall

Do You Drink Enough Water?

Dr. H. B. K. Willis
Photoplay's Diet Expert Gives the Proper Propor-
tions

How They Manage Their Homes

Alma Whitaker

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Morosco Show You Their New
Domicile

Amateur Movies Frederick James Smith

Film Elimination's Progress in Photoplay's Contest

A Simimer Tonic for the Complexion

Questions and Answers The Answer Man

Casts of Current Photoplays



41

42

44
48
52
54
58

64

66
68
69

70

72

81

90

141



<^=



A complete list of all photoplays reviewed in the



Shadow Staoje this issue w^ill be found on



pag,



;e la



^v?=



-.<i?



Published monthly by the Photoplay Publishing Co.
Editorial Offices, 221 W. 57th St., New York City Publishing Office, 750 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111.

The International News Company, Ltd.. Distributing Agents, 5 Bream's Building, London, England

James R. Quirk, President Robert M. Eastman, Vice-President Kathryn Dougherty, Secretary and Treasurer

Yearly StmscRIPTlON: $2.50 in the United States, its dependencies, Mexico and Cuba: $3.00 Canada: $3.50 for foreign countries. Remittances

should be made by check, or postal or express money order. Caution — Do not subscribe through persons unknown to you.

Entered as second-class matter April 24, 1912, at the Postoffice at Chicago, 111., under the Act of March 3, 1879.

Copyright, 1929, by the Photoplay Publishing Company, Chicago.



As We Go to Press



THE White House in Washington has
been wired for the showing of sound
pictures. President Hoover saw and
heard his first talkies recently.

BERT LYTELL, who has had a successful
season on the New York speaking stage
in "Brothers," is gomg to marry his leading
woman, Grace Menken, sister of Helen
Menken, according to rumors.

PATSY RUTH MH-LER annoxmces that
she is going to wed Tay Gamett, film
director, in September.

THE indictment of Tom Mix, on charges
of falsifying income tax returns, has
startled Hollywood. The indictments
charge that Tom conspired to withhold
$112,114.11, due as income tax during 1925,
1926 and 1927. Mix answers that the whole
thing was unintentional, since he had left
his income tax afifairs in the hands of an
expert.



Last Minute

NEWS

from

East ^;?^West



ARTHXJR LAKE finishes his five-year
contract with Universal in July. Several
producers are after his services.

FOR the first time since she has been in
America, Greta Garbo is living in a
house. She has made her home in a hotel
up to now. Her residence, in Beverly Hills,
is a ten-room house.



RONALD COLMAN'S next will be "Con-
demned," a story which up to now had
been sidetracked by Sam Goldwyn because
of its morbidity.

AFTER two more starring pictures for
M.-G.-M., Marion Davies goes to
Europe for a vacation.

AFTER working for several years on
"Hell's Angels," Ben Lyon is returning
to pictures. He has the male lead in
"Lummox."

TALKING pictures have ended the fol-
lowing players' film careers at Fox:
Maria Alba and Antonio Cumellas, of
Spain; and Lola Salvu and Gino Conti, of
Italy.



w



ILLIAM FOX did not renew Mary
Astor's contract.



WELCOME
been decided



DANGER" has
upon as the
final title of Harold Lloyd's new
comedy, in which you will hear his
voice for the first time.



DICK BARTHELMESS has been
spending a vacation in New
York with his wife. When he re-
turns to Hollywood he will do Rex
Beach's "Son of the Gods," a story
of the 'Frisco Chinese quarter.
Another "Broken Blossoms," may-
be.

AT last RKO has decided defi-
nitely upon the star of "Rio
Rita." The star will be Bebe
Daniels.

REGINALD DENNY, leaving
Universal, may go to RKO. He
has been gettmg $3,500 a week
from U.

UNIVERSAL is trying to buy up
Mary Philbin's contract, which
expires in November. Universal
does not plan to make any more
Philbin pictures between now and
then.

AFTER United Artists had re-
leased her, Camilla Horn came
to New York and signed with War-
ner Brothers. She is making a
German film.

THEY say that Bill Hart is com-
ing back to the screen. Negotia-
tions are now imder way with Hal
Roach for his appearance in talking
Westerns.

DOLORES DEL RIO is going to
New Orleans to attend the
world premiere of her "Evangeline,"
in which she sings but does not talk.

ALICE WHITE is scheduled to
start an all-color talkie version
of "No, No, Nannette," on June 15th.

YOU are going to hear Erich Von
Stroheim on the screen. He
will appear in James Cruze's "The
Great Gabbo," written by Ben
Hecht. His will be the first ventril-
oquist characterization in the gab-
bies.




HE old iron mask is gone. In other

words. Buster Keaton is going to drop

his dead pan face with his next

comedy. You'U see him smile

when he dances and sings.

GARY COOPER is to spend part
of June and July on his dude
ranch in Montana.



p. and A. Photos



Here comes the bride! The wedding of
Constance Talmadge and Townsend
Netcher, sent by telephoto from Los
Angeles to Photoplay. "The other two
didn't count," said Connie. "This is the
real thing"



w



ARNER BROTHERS will
star Grant Withers.



M.-G.-M. is sending Tod Brown-
ing to the West Indies to make-
"The Sea Bat." Wally Beery will
have the lead.

KATHRYN McGUIRE broke her
ankle playing tennis at Colleen
Moore's new house. No more film
work until late July. Eve Southern
is recovering from an automobile
accident. She has been in a plaster
cast for many weeks.

EVER since Rod La Rocque an-
nounced his retirement from the
screen, he has been working in
films steadily. Now he has signed
with RKO for two productions.

VILMA BANKY has received her
papers as a citizen of the U. S. A.

IF you liked Dorothy Sebastian
opposite Buster Keaton in "Spite
Marriage," watch for her opposite
Bill Haines in "Speedway."

ADAMAE VAUGHN, Wampas
baby star and sister of Alberta
Vaughn, announces her engagement
to Joseph Valentine Raoul Fleur
Viscount D'Anvray of Anvray,
France.

JANET GAYNOR refuses to be
cordial to Lydell Peck, San Fran-
cisco attorney, any more. It is re-
ported he tried to crash through
their quasi engagement to a mar-
riage and that Janet balked.

RICHARD DDC entered a Balti-
more hospital under the name
of "Brimmer" for a minor opera-
tion.

CONSTANCE BENNETT is to
return to the screen in "This
Thing Called Love," a talkie.



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section




L

It is only natural that Dorothy Mackailt,
of First National Pictures, and one of
the most lustrous stars in the firmament
of the film-future should select a Bradley
of futuristic pattern.



In the circle, you see Dorothy Mackaitl

trying to talk Jack Mulhall {also First

National) i)ito a bathing suit.



Andhere at the right areDorothy Gulliver
and George Lewis (both of Universal
Pictures) enjoying themselves on the
beach. And who ivouldn't — in such good
company — and in such fine bathingsuits?



HOLLYWOOD may not take its
swimming seriously — but it
takes it smartly, and comfortably — in
Bradley Bathing Suits. For you can't
fool a film star when it comes to
what's what in what to wear — ■
whether it be on the "lot" or on
the beach . . . Your favorite store
has Bradleys in all the gay models
and colors so favored by moviedom.
And you may have a free copy of
the Bradley Style Book by writing
Bradley Knitting Co., Delavan, Wis.



into a




and out-of-doors




When you write to advertisers please mention PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE.




Brief Reviews of

Current Pictures



■4rlndicates that photoplay was named as one
of the six best upon its month of review



ADORATION— First National.— Concerning the BRIDGE OF SAN LUIS REY, THE— M.-G.-M— CHARLATAN. THE— Universal.— Murder mys-

post-revolution romance of a Romanoff prince and To the astonishment of all, a good picture from the tery done with nice, light touch, especially by Holmes
princess. Ornamented by Billie Dove. (.Jan.) Wilder novel. And, oh, zat Lily Damital (Moy.) Herbert. (April.)



princess. Ornamented by ]

ALIBI — United Artists. — An almost flawless
talkie about a young gunman who marries a cop s
daughter. Elegant melodrama. (May.)

ALL-AMERICAN, THE— Supreme.— How a col-
legiate sprinter mops up the Olympic Games, demon-
strated by Charlie Paddock. (March.)

ALL AT SEA — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. — A Dane-
Arthur comedy. The title explains it. (March.)

ALL FACES WEST — Pioneer. — Western thriller
filmed with Mormon money. Marie Prevost and Ben
Lyon are in it. (April.)

AMAZING VAGABOND, THE— FBO.— Not so

amazing. Just the usual stunts, on land and in tlic
air. (Jan.)

ANNE AGAINST THE WORLD— Rayart —

Story of the terrible life of a misunderstood musical
comedy queen. Terrible is right. (June.)

APACHE, THE — Columbia. — Just the romance of
two sweet kids in the Latin Quarter — if you believe in
such things. (Feb.)

AVALANCHE — Paramount. — High-class Western
with Jack Holt and Baclanova — the picture thief 1
yon.)

AVENGING RIDER, THE— FBO. — Simple-
minded Western mystery story. (Jan.)

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS— Columbia.— PsstI

Secret service stuff in another mythical country.
Virginia Valli. (May.)

BEHIND THE GERMAN LINES— UFA-Para-
mount. — The German side of the war. with excellent
and authentic battle scenes spoiled by some obviously
studio shots. (Feb.)

BELOW THE DEADLINE — Chesterfield.—
Quickie crook stuff — and something awful. (June.)

• BETRAYAL — Paramount. — Not a pretty
tale, but fine dramatic fare, with Emil Jannings,
Esther Ralston, Gary Cooper. (May.)

BLACK ACE, THE — Pathe.— So-so Western that
will fill in a blank evening. (Jan.)

BLACK BIRDS OF FIJI — Australasian. —
Another South Sea Island picture — only so-so. (Feb.)

BLACK HILLS, THE— Dakota.— In which the

dam bursts again. (March.)

BLACK PEARL, THE — Rayart. — Loose-limbed
mystery that rambles aimlessly through the Orient.
(April.)

BLACK WATERS — World Wide.— Thrilling,
chilling melodrama with mediocre dialogue. (June.)

BLOCKADE — FBO. — Bootlegging made attrac-
tive by Anna Q. Nilsson. A good melodrama.
(March.)

BLOW FOR BLOW — Universal. — More adven-
tures of Hoot Gibson, if you're interested in Westerns.
(Feb.)

BLUE SKIES — Fox. — .\n orphanage romance,
beautifully acted and charmingly directed. (June.)

BONDMAN, THE — World Wide.— Foreign ver-
sion of Hall Caine's novel, messed up by poor
photography. (June.)

BORN TO THE SADDLE — Universal. — Three
rousing cheers! A real good Western, with action
and humor. Ted Wells is head man. (May.)

BRIDE'S RELATIONS, THE— Bennett-Educa-
tional. — One-reel talking comedy sad and funny by
turns. Eddie Gribbon is best. (April.)



BROADWAY FEVER — Tiffany-Stahl. — Sally
O'Neill being literally too cute for words in a trivial
story. (March.)

• BROADWAY MELODY, THE— Metro-Gold-
wyn-Mayer. — Brilliant all-talkie of backstage
life, with Bessie Love astonishing. (April.)

BROTHERS— Rayart. — A good brotherly love
yarn, one a crook and one a nice boy. Barbara
Bedford dares do a heavy. (May.)

BYE-BYE BUDDY— Supreme.— Did you know
that night club hostesses have hearts of gold? This
one is an unintentionally funny sob story. (June.)

• CANARY MURDER CASE, THE— Para-
mount. — Logical and well constructed mystery
story. William Powell is perfectly swell as the de-
tective. (Feb.)

CAPTAIN LASH — Fox. — A coal stoker's romance
or love on the waterfront. Rather strong stuff. (Feb.)



Pictures You
Should Not Miss

"In Old Arizona"

"The River"

"The Canary Murder Case"

"Wild Orchids"

"7th Heaven"

"The Singing Fool"

"Interference"

"Mother Knows Best"

"Street Angel"

"The Patriot"

"Four Devils"

"Wings"

As a service to its readers, Photo-
play Magazine presents brief critical
comments on all photoplays of the
preceding six months. By consulting
this valuable guide, you can deter-
mine at a glance whether or not your
promised evening's entertainment is
worth while. Photoplay's reviews
have always been the most author-
itative published. And its tabloid
reviews show you accurately and con-
cisely how to save your motion picture
time and money. The month at the
end of each review indicates the issue
of Photoplay in which the original
review appeared.



• CASE OF LENA SMITH, THE— Paramount.
— Sincere drama of the love affair of a servant
girl, her hardships and her martyrdom. A real
picture for intelligent adult audiences. (Feb.)

CAVALIER, THE— Tiffany-Stahl.— Richard Tal-
madge in some imitations of Douglas Fairbanks.
(Jan.)



CHINA BOUND— M.-G.-M.— Messieurs Dane
and Arthur in a Chinese revolution. Fairly funny.
(June.)

CHINA SLAVERS, THE— Trinity.— Ragged
story of the Oriental slave trade, but smartly acted by
Sojin. (April.)

CHINATOWN NIGHTS— Paramount.— Piping
hot melodrama of tong wars and such, with Wallace
Beery and Florence Vidor good. (May.)

• CHRISTINA — Fox. — Slender and improbable
story made beautiful and worth seeing by the
inspired acting of Janet Gaynor. (June.)

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE— Chesterfield.
— Nothing that you could care about in a big way.
(March.)

CITY OF PURPLE DREAMS, THE — Rayart.—
Story of wheat pits of Chicago. Top heavy with
drama. (Jan.)

CLEAR THE DECKS — Universal. — Reginald

Denny in one of the oldest farce plots in the world.
(.March.)

• CLOSE HARMONY— Paramount.— Brilliant
talkie of backstage vaudeville life. Fine fun,
with Buddy Rogers and Nancy Carroll aces. (May.)

COHENS AND KELLYS IN ATLANTIC CITY.

THE — Universal. — For those who hke this sort of
thing. (March.)

• COQUETTE — United Artists. — Denatured
version of the stage play with a fine perform-
ance by Mary Pickford. And Mary's voice is one of
the best in the talkies. Of course you'll want to see —
and hear — her. (June.)

DANGEROUS WOMAN, THE— Paramount.—
Reviewed under title of "The Woman Who Needed
Killing." "Tropical and torrid drama of the South
Seas. Not for children. (June.)

DESERT NIGHTS — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. —
One of Jack Gilbert's less fortunate vehicles. (March.)

DESERT SONG, THE — Warners. — All-singing
and talking operetta that is a bit old-fashioned and
stagy. Some good singing by John Boles. (June.)

DIPLOMATS, THE — Fox-Movietone. — Clark
and McCullough in a two-reel talkie that will give you
some laughs. (March.)

• DOCTOR'S SECRET. THE— Paramount.—
Barrie's playlet. "Half an Hour," emerges as a
superior and well-constructed talkie. It is brilliantly
acted and well worth your time and money. (March.)

DOMESTIC MEDDLERS— Tiffany-SUhl.-The

eternal and well-worn triangle. (Feb.)

DONOVAN AFFAIR. THE— Columbia.— Mys-
tery play with too little suspense and too much
forced comedy. Nevertheless, it has a good cast.
It's a talkie. (June.)

DREAM OF LOVE — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. —
The prince and the pretty peasant — again. Phoney
stuff in spite of Joan Crawford and Nils Asther.
(Feb.)

DRIFTER, THE — FBO. — Just another Western.
But send the kids, anyway, because Tom Mix is in it.
(March.)

DRIFTWOOD — Columbia. — Looks like a tenth
carbon copy of " Sadie Thompson." (Jan.)

• DUMMY, THE — Paramount. — In this excel-
lent all-talking crook melodrama, two Holly-
wooders — ZaSu Pitts and Mickey Bennett — steal
honors from a lot of stage stars. (April.)

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 12 ]



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section

oociety simply wont
stand for Indelicate W)men








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This Personal Deodorant

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There are many uses of this wonderful,
scientific powder! Use it after your bath,
sprinkle it, if you wish, into your lingerie
as you dress, put it in your slippers — you
can be free with its use for it is harmless
and not at all costly! It is pleasant to



Online LibraryMoving Picture Exhibitors' AssociationPhotoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) → online text (page 1 of 145)