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Moving Picture Exhibitors' Association.

Photoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) online

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itself. wKtttK^mssi^?^^ ^

And remember, that these benefits ^

are costing you about half of what



LISTERINE TOOTH PASTE



When you write to advertisers please mention PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE.



88



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929



1 lie much photographed MllS. V ICHA€l7\
nas excruisitely tended hands



11L£\




W itu grave sweetness the lovely JVlrs.
Arleii explainea tlie exquisite simplicity
■with, which she cares lor her hands, so that
they have always an enchanting pertection.
£trst, X use the Liiticle Xvemover which
shapes and soltens the cuticle; second, the
i olish Jveniover to remove old polish, then
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sparkles lor days ; third, a tiny bit ol Cuti-
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A pjztleJa/ria- Aucucf/?tce lo 'Jti/i^ 'Tzoma^
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SHE has restored romance to ;i
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Young — tranquil — very beautiful
— the grave-eyed Countess Ata-
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Talented — sophisticated — a
writer of romance and intrigue —
the brilliant Michael Arlen!

The society of five continents
paid homage to her beauty and his
tame at theirimpressive marriage in
'he Greek Orthodox Church in
Cannes.

And Michael Arlen, renowned
both as a novelist and a lover of




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Where the brilliant pageantry of society
gathers Mrs. Michael Arlen lends the
exotic beauty of a tropic floiver, ^^Like
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itobility fostered through the dim cen-
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her uniquely exquisite personality grown.



beauty, wrote another story— a
fragrant romance bearing the deh-
cate imprint of his exquisite wife.

Skiing at St. Moritz, dancing and
tennis on the Riviera — at all the
blue and green and gold places
where the fashionable world plays
— Mrs. Arlen is conspicuous for her
exquisite grooming. Particularly
noticeable are her expressive ham'.s
— her slender tapering fingers and
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"To me," Mrs. Arlen said thought-
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Every advertisement In rilOTOPLAT JIAG.VZINE is guaranteed.



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929



Girls' Problems



[ CONTINUED FEOil PAGE 15 ]



And of course there are the attractively
shaped and decorated incense burners. Sandal-
wood is a fa\'orite choice, but there are many
other pleasinfi ones.

Here arc a few linal warnings about perfume
I would like to impress upon you:

Don't over-use it. A girl is known by the
subtlety and distinction of her perfume, its
quality and not its quantity.

If you are going to dance in a crowded, over-
heated room, be careful not to use an extremely
heavy scent. Or if you choose a rich, strong
odcur, use it sparingly.

Buy good perfume, in small quantities if
necessary. But never, under any circumstances,
buy cheap perfiune. Remember that you use
perfume for your own enjoyment as well as to
make you attractive to others, and if you don't
get pleasure from its fragrance it is unlikely
that it will be pleasing to them. So many of
the fine perfumes come in purse-size flacons,
which are inexpensively priced, that it is
hardly necessary for any girl to content herself
with inferior grades. And most salespeople
will let you try out perfume on the back of
your hand (which of course is the proper and
practi ;al way to test its fragrance), so you need
make no mistakes in choosing.

You don't need to use one perfume all the



time — you can change as frequently as you
desire. But try to clioose the scents that
"become" you.

Remember that you "wear" perfume, just
as you wear clothes and cosmetics. All these
externals are tlie outward signs of the inward
"you."

Joyce:

Max Ree, well known Hollywood designer,
ad^ses all girls to wear high heels, except for
sports. As long as you feel so mu, h more
comfortable and happy in them, I tliink you
may well take Mr. Ree's advice. No, you are
not a pound o\-erweight. A flesh or light
champagne powder, and a medium rouge
should be becoming to you.

Mary J.:

The use of a softening cuticle cream mil help
to prevent hangnails. For home manicuring
there are a number of excellent cuticle removers.

Faith:

Yes, brown would be an excellent color to
choose for the keynote of your winter ward-
robe. There are many shades that mil go well
with your auburn hair, brown eyes, and light
olive sldn. The warm golden browns will be




Just a little informal — but charming, none the less. Pretty lady

plus pretty teddy plus pretty flowers equals pretty picture. The

scantily clad damsel is Mona Rico, one of the supporting cast of

"Shanghai Lady," Unlversal's picture starring Mary Nolan




Adds Glossy Lustre^.

Leaves Your Hair

Easy to Manage

IFyou want to make )our hair . . . easy
to manage , , . and add to its natural
gloss and lustre — this is very EASY to do.
Just put a few drops of Glostora on the
bristles of your hair brush, and . . .
brush it through yottr hair . . . when
you dress it.

You will be surprised at the result. It
will give your hair an unusually rich,
silky gloss and lustre — instantly.

Glostora simply makes your hair more
beautiful by enhancing its natural wa\ e
and color. It keeps the wave and curl in,
and leaves your hair so soft and pliable,
and so easy to manage, that it will ...stay
any style you arrange it . . . even after
shampooing — whether long or bobbed.

A few drops of Glostora impart that
bright, brilliant, silky sheen, so much
admired, and >our hair v ill fairh' sparkle
and glow with natural gloss and lustre.
A large bottle of
Glostora costs but a
trifle at any drug store
or toilet goods coim-
ter.

Try it! — You will
bedelighted tosee how
much more beautiful
your hair will look,
and how easy it will
be to manage.

Try It FREE

THE K. L. WATKINS CO. 29-G-20

1276 West 3rd Street, Cleveland, Oliiu
Ple.ise send me FREE a sample of GLOSTOK.i,
all charges paid.




Name.



Address.



In CaiiaHn ail<lt t-ss 462 Wellinirton ."Jt. . W.'st, Toronto'. 2-()th.



W*hen jou write to advertisers plea!,e menUon PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE.




Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929
especially flattering. All shades of brown are lines.



*'^v:




LOVELY HAIR

always more lovely
by combing



For combing cnliances its smooth silk) te\-
ture by stimulating the flow of natural oil
and gently exercising the delicate scalp
muscles. It has the added feature of soften-
ing the lines of the waves.

Aee Combs have certain very definite ad-
vantages. Made of pure grade hard rubber,
they are impervious to tonics, oils and soap,
or any preparations used for cleaning or
dressing the hair. All surfaces, even those
between the teeth, are smoothly finished.

Ace Combs are made in a wide range of
sizes and patterns — large 8 or 9 inch dress-
ing combs to use at home, small pocket or
purse combs to take along with you, and the
fine-tooth or "dry shampoo" combs. These
are sold by drug stores and department
stores everywhere.

From this Cabinet, as illustrated, on dis-
play in leading stores everjTvhere, you may
select those styles of Ace Combs most suit-
able to your personal needs.




ACE
COMBS

American Hard Rubber Co.



11 Mercer Street



New York



Enclosed find 25c (stamps preferred) for booklet

and sample comb. I have written my name and

address plainly in margin.



extremely fashionable this season.

Harriet:

Try using a castile shampoo for a while. It
will not darken the hair nor make it dry.
Different types of hair require different treat-
ment, but I think this will bring you good re-
sults.

Sue C:

You sound like a very attractive person and
I don't think you need worry about being pop-
ular. Nor do I think you need fret about giving
the impression of being reserved. That's a
happy combination — to look up-to-date and
yet retain the appearance of a girl who has kept
her self-respect and the respect of others. And
I can think of a much worse fate than to be
called a "nice" girl. Even in this upsetting
age that's a desirable adjective for any girl
to merit. The use of correct grammar and the
cultivation of a low tone of voice is surely
praiseworthy, as long as you are careful not to
seem affected. Don't let yourself get "stagey."
Study the best voices in the talkies and be
uided by them.

Angela:

There isn't any way of making coarse hair
finer. You can't change its texture, but you
can keep it soft and glossy by proper sham-
pooing and daily brushing. The use of a hair
lotion or brilliantine will help you to train
your hair in the way it should go.

Helen G. W.:

Cold water, dashed on the face for several
minutes, is an excellent, mild skin tonic. For
those enlarged pores I suggest the use of an
astringent. There are several good ones, pre-
pared by reliable beauty specialists.

Troubled:

The e\er-useful squatting exercise will help
to make your knees symmetrical.

.\fler your muscles have gradually become
accustomed to it, you may practice this
exercise five minutes, night and morning.
Stand erect with feet close together in parallel



Rest your hands lightly on your hips.
Rise to tiptoe. Then sit in squatring position,
bending knees sharply outward until the
thighs and legs are doubled upon each other
and the weight of the entire body is supported
by the toes. Be sure to keep your body erect.
Return to standing position.

Elena M.:

Yes, if you are overweight, and are starting
a reduction regime, your face will get thinner
gradually. You won't want to lose weight too
quickly, as that brings about a loosened skin
and resulting wrinkles. You can make your
face appear more slender by wearing your hair
very simply about your face, not too far for-
ward on the cheeks. If your lips are colorless
I suggest you use a lipstick, choosing a shade
that is not too bright.

Betty S.:

Yes, most young boys pass through that
"smart aleck" stage before they approach the
more dignified years. Some of them never do
outgrow that annoying phase! And most girls
rather resent their antics. But if she is wise,
the girl will be a little tolerant in her attitude,
laugh indulgently at the boy's foolishness,
unless it is too marked, and set him a better
example of dignity and maturity. Boys don't
grow up mentally as quickly as girls, in most
cases, and it takes them a few years to catch
up. .'Vfter all, it's probably good that they
keep us girls from taking life too seriously
before we need to !

KayM.:

I think you are a little proud of being
notional and changeable in your attitude to-
ward others. Perhaps it is that touch of bore-
dom in your manner that makes you popular
TOth boys. Indifference may pique a man's
interest.. But when you meet a man for whom
you can really care deeply, you may find that
after the novelty of your attitude has worn off,
your indifference will bring out indifference
from him. I don't believe, Kay, that you can
afford to indulge a quality which can pro\'e
to be such a boomerang against your future
happiness.





When Jeanette MacDonald appears in "The Love Parade" in a
gorgeous court gown with a sweeping train of white satin, audiences
will gasp at the effectiveness of the costume as a whole, but they
will not notice the detail. Yet ten bead workers labored with in-
finite patience for two weeks, taking the millions of tiny stitches
necessary to snare the sequins, rhinestone brilliants and pearls to
this costly fabric. The workers here are shown at their frame in
the wardrobe department of the Paramount studios in Hollywood

Every advertisement in PHOTOPLAY MAGAZIXE is Buaranteed.



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929



91



Colgate's Cleans Teeth Best



because actual scientific tests

prove that it has highest

penetrating* power



Its active, penetrating foam re-
moves decaying impurities from
those hard-to-reach places
where the ordinary toothpaste
cannot go.

Your dentist will tell
you that decay doesn't
start on the smooth outer sur-
faces of the teeth; but in the
tiny crevices where food par-
ticles and mucin collect. These
must be kept clean.

Therefore, the sluggish tooth-
paste which merely scrubs
the outer surfaces fails utterly
to give your teeth that thor-
ough, scientific cleansing
which really protects. Your
toothpaste should be able to
go down into the crevices and
clean them.

A recent test . . . made by a
well-known, impartial labora-
tory . . . proved that Colgate's
active foam possesses a greater
penetrating power than any of
the leading dentifrices on the
market today.

The reason for this lies in a
truly remarkable property
(called low "surface tension")
which this foam has. This
property enables it to sweep
down to the very bottom of
the tiniest pits and fissures,
washing away impurities in a
bubbling, detergent wave . . .
purifying and cleansing every
part of every tooth as no other
toothpaste can.




In this foam, of course, is a
safe, effective polishing agent
which makes teeth sparkle and
gleam. Thus Colgate's cleanses
with a double effectiveness.

Millions of people get this
extra protection . . . why not
you? When you use Colgate's
you have the comfort of know-
ing that the home-care of your
teeth is approved by the vast
majority of dentists.

Remember, too, that Colgate's
is most economical — a 25c tube
of Colgate's contains more
toothpaste than any other lead-
ing brand selling at 25c.

This low price is due to vol-
ume production — Colgate's is
the largest-selling dentifrice in
the world.

If you have not yet become
acquainted with Colgate's, may
we send you a generous trial
tube and an interesting booklet
on the care of the teeth and
mouth."" Just mail the coupon.

*HowColgate's Cleans Crevices
WhereTooth Decay May Start




Greatly magnified
picture of tiny tooth
crevice. Note how
ordinary, sluggish
toothpaste (having
high "surface-ten-
sion") fails to pene-
trate deep down
where the causes of
decay lurlc



This diagram shows
how Colgate's active
foam{having low
"surface-tension")
penetratesdeepdown
into every tiny crev-
ice, cleansing it com-
pletely where the
toothbrush cannot
reach.



Try Colgate's one week FREE

COLGATE. Dept. H-254fl.

P. O. Bo\ 37.5. Grand Centr,il Post Offlcc.

New York, N. Y.

Please send a free trial tube of Colpate's
Ribbon Dental Cream, with booklet "How
to Keep Teeth and Mouth Healthy."

Name

Address



When you write to advertisers please mention PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE.




Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929



YOU'D see your face light up
with pleasure — you'd hear your
voice exclaim in delighted surprise, if ue
could make a movietone of YOU the first
time you try Tastveast. For it certainly
is amazing to reahze that anything so
good to eat can be so good for you.

Cifind Health and r*leasure
in this JZKscious (Judge ^ar

Tastveast is a wonderful new choc-
olate fudge confection, in which we have
concealed the equivalent of more than
an ordinary yeast cake. Eaten regularly
three times a day, it gives you all the
benefits of finest yeast : banishes skin
blemishes, overcomes constipation, re-
places that dragged out feeling with
youthful 'pep'

Tea St This M'^ay is 'De/icious
Say Thousands of Users

Enthusiasm typical of Tastveast-
eaters is reflected in this voluntary testi-
monial : "Have eaten Tastyeast for 6
liseeksy and have gained almost 10 pounds
•which I need as I u-as 30 pounds under-
weight. It's wonderful the 'new life'
Tastyeast has given me"

— H. A.f'iamt on rfgrift }
Denver, Colorado




Questions and Answers



Made by the makers of''''BIG BANKER'''
GREEN BROS. CANDY CO. Springf=ield, Mass.

m



I CONTINTTED FROM PAGE 82 ]



M. R. D., ALBUQTJEEQtTE, NeW MEXICO.—
Joe Cobb is very much alive. He has reached
the ripe old age of fourteen years and is leaving
Our Gang to free-lance. Norman (Chubby)
Chaney, who replaces him, is still in the prime
of life, being nine years old and weighing 160
pounds. Norman is not related to Lon and
hasn't a single face in common with him.

O. P. Hewitt, Jr., Jasper, Fla. — Olive
Borden is twenty-two years old and her latest
picture is "Half Marriage." That still leaves
Olive's many male admirers half a chance!
JIary Nolan will be twent} - four in December,
and her latest is "The Shanghai Lady."

Elizabeth Crowe, Chattanooga, Tenn. —
Here I am, just chuck-full of answers. Clara
Bow has finished work on "The Saturday
Xight Kid" and is off for Europe for a rest.
Imagine Clara resting! May McAvoy was
born in New York City about twenty-eight
years ago. Richard Arlen's latest picture is
"The Virginian."

Lyndell, MotTND City. III. — James Hall
had the lead opposite Clara Bow in "The
Fleet's In." Charles Ray appeared with May
Mc.Avoy in "The Fire Brigade." Don
.-Mvarado heroed in "The .Apache."

Pat, Greenfield, Ohio. — Try a sound-
proof stage when you want to rave about
Lupe! In the "\Volf Song" she sang "Yo-Te-
.\mo." It is in sheet music form and can be
purchased any^vhere. Lupe hails from Mex-
ico. Y'es — Bebe Daniels is Bebe's own name —
until she changes it to Mrs. Ben Lyon.

Robert Russell, B.^side, L. I. — No
bother at all — but Irene Rich would probably
resent that crack about "old timers"! Irene
was born in Buffalo, N. Y., Oct. 13, 1894. She
is five feet, six inches tall and weighs 138
pounds. June Collyer sistered Mary Brian in
the "River of Romance."

Reds, Pitman, N. J. — Maurice Chevalier
was born in Menilmontant, near Paris, France,
about thirty-seven years ago. He is five feet,
eleven inches tall, weighs 165 pounds and has
brown hair and blue e3'es. His next picture
will be "The Love Parade." Now, Reds —



how can any mere mortal be expected to
know what Clara Bow will do after she gets
married — if she gets married?

V. S., Lebanon, Penna. — Ben Lyon and
Claudette Colbert played the leads in "For
the Love of Mike." Nils Asther is twenty-
seven years old and divorced. The pride and
joy of the Y'oung family — Loretta — is only
nineteen years young. The other Y'oungsters,
also in pictures, are Sally Blane and Polly Ann
Y'oung.

M. P., Derby, Conn. — Y'our friend was
wrong about Clara. Warner Baxter was
born in Columbus, Ohio, thirty-eight years
ago. He has dark-brown hair and eyes and is
married. Carlotta King played Margot in
"The Desert Song."

Helen Jeppesen, Houston, Texas —
Pleased to meet you. Helen. Com.e and see us
again some time. H. B. Warner could sign
checks Henry Byron Warner if he wanted to.
Sue Carol and Nancy Carroll don't even com.e
within an ell of being related. Nancy's real
moniker is Lahiff and Sue's is Evelyn Lederer.
James Hall is divorced from his wife, but will
probably try again with Merna Kennedy.
George Barraud was the crook partner in
"The Last of Mrs. Cheyney."

Philip McGee, Univ. of Kentucky. — I
have Ken Maynard's own word for it that he
was born in Mission, Texas — and I think if
Ken wanted to invent a birthplace he could
think up a better one than that! Adolphe
Menjou is making pictures in Europe. In
"The Son of the Sheik" Rudolph Valentino
played the dual role of father and son. You
will hear both John Boles and Bebe Daniels
singing in "Rio Rita" — and reports have it
that Bebe is a sensation.

D. D., Amsterdam, New York. — "Wild
Orchids" was an original story written for the
screen by John "Shanghai Gesture" Colton.

M. E. B., Toronto, Canada. — Mary
Pickford is thirty-sLx years old. She divorced
Owen Moore in 1920 and is now married to
Douglas Fairbanks.

[ please titrn to page 94 ]




Montgomery, Ala.

Several years ago I suffered from
the most cruel punishment that one
human being can inflict on another —
unjust accusation. A murder mys-
tery occurred on an adjoining farm,
and though no warrants were ever
issued, everything was done to make
me unhappy. Most of my friends fell
away, I was dropped from clubs, and
practically ostracised. How well 1
remember the cold, hard stares of
former associates as I passed along
the streets of my native town.

In my bitterness of spirit I turned
to one staid friend for solace and com-



fort — the moving pictures. There, in
sheltered seclusion, I could watch
the scenes of happiness and innocent
gaiety which were denied me in real
life. I spent endless hours in picture
houses and there eased my mind of
its burden and refreshed my spirit
in the comforting atmosphere.

That was seven years ago, and now
the cloud has passed and many people
realize the great injustice done to me.
But I shall never forget the experi-
ence, nor who my real friend was in
time of trouble. And — you have
guessed it — I am an incurable movie
fan. M. B. R.



Every advertisement in PHOTOPLAY MAG.^ZINE is guaranteed.



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929



93




)iUie Dove

in ^''Qareers"

First National Production
Make-Up by Max Factor

Billie Dove, resplendent in her resell beauty,
•will again tl:rill you in "Careers", her first
all-talking Vitaphone Prodticlion.

"Max Factor s Make-Up, in my opinion,
renders a distinct and valuable service to the
motion picture profession.



Sj^J



W/ie/i B////e Dove

Faces the Camera

Heriyjake-Up

/< 4r M AX FACTOR

Faultless Beauty that Thrills!... ^;/i
now you may know the make-up secret
of the screen stars. Max Factor, Film-
land's Make- Up Genius, offers you
this Priceless Beauty Gift. See Coupon.




UNSEEN ... yet back of the flashing beauty of the
screen stars is the deft touch of art in make-up.
Make-up so perfect, so natural, so hfclike that you
are never aware of it. The personality of the star dominates
. . . you are enthralled with her rare beauty, her charm.

So it should be with you, too, and with every woman.
Make-Up to really enhance your beauty must become a
natural part of you. Powder, rouge, lipstick and other
make-up essentials must blend in color harmony with your
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ing youi' own personality . . . thus creating that vision of
beauty you have always dreamed of.

This amazing new kind of make-up, created by Ma.x
Factor for the stars of the screen, is based on cosmetic color
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hundreds of feature pictures like "Careers'" and "Adoration",
starring Billie Dove, have seen the perfection of make-up
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Upon this new principle of cosmetic color harmony. Max Factor created a
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Whether you are blonde, brunette or redhead, whatever your type... there
is a correct color harmony in make-up for you. Discover it, learn the correct
individual method of make-up, and you've at last found the way to actually



Online LibraryMoving Picture Exhibitors' AssociationPhotoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) → online text (page 108 of 145)