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Moving Picture Exhibitors' Association.

Photoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) online

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daughter, contribute a few plausible and
beautiful scenes. Grant Withers plays a
cocksure young sailor-bootlegger. Not for
children and too thin for grown-up minds.
Part Talkie.




International



When better prints are worn,
Mary Nolan will wear 'em! Mary
is shown here wearing one of the
very smartest models in printed
ensembles. The print is made
with a border which is used to
finish both the bottom of the
jacket and the bottom of the
charming^ wrap-around skirt.
Note the rakish velvet beret



THE BIG REVUE— All-star

/^NE wonders just where modernism is tak-
^-^ing us when ten-year-old kids sing "Moon-
hght Madness" and other such rot into the
microphone. But, at that, the youngsters are
good. It's straight revue (thank goodness they
didn't bring in Papa Boy) and gives the Ethel
Meglin Wonder aggregation a chance to see the
world u-ithout joining the navy. It's an all-
talking, singing, toddhng juvenile extrava-
ganza, and ought, somewhere, to please some-
one. All Talkie.

THE PRINCE AND THE DANCER—
World Wide

JUST another reason \\hy liuropean producers
should leave the subtle art of picture-making
to Long Island and Hollywood. The theme of
dissolute prince and lowly dancer, which is, in
itself, just a bit old school, is not noticeably
improved in this case by His Highness' flabbi-
ness and her dancership's clumsiness and
general inabihty to act. However, the titles
are diabolically sophisticated, and there are
some charming Viennese street scenes. Silent.

THE COLLEGE COQUETTE—

Columbia

' I 'HERE seems to be a conspiracy among the
•*■ producers of the nation to keep the Amer-
ican public from knowing what goes on in its
colleges. Not a textbook to be seen, and
chaise tongues in all the rooms instead of desks.
The odds are all against Jobyna Rowland,
John Holland and Buster Collier. Ruth
Taylor would be the same with or without
odds. All Talkie.



HUNGARIAN RHAPSODY—
UFA-Paramount

TLJERE is a real beauty — marvelously
-*• -*-directed, exquisitely produced and photo-
graphed, and has a simple country story beauti-
fully acted by a fine cast of German aces.
Lil Dagover, Dita Parlo and Willy Fritsch
play the leading roles, under the inspired baton
of Erich Pommer, and a synchronized score
plays the soul-compelling music of the famous
piece from which the film takes its name.
Restful and kindly, this little film, as a relief
from the current Hollywood hullabaloo! Sound.

RICHTHOFEN: THE RED KNIGHT
OF THE AIR—F. P. G. Production

•T^HE Germans have turned out a Teutonic
-*• "Wings" in this silent film record of the
war life, battles and death of Manfred Baron
von Richthofen, hero of eight)' air battles and
their red knight of the World War. Sadl)'
enough, they felt urged to insert a sticky
love stor)' to pad out the air stuff — which,
also sadly, isn't one, two, three with the great
Hollywood brand. Add to this, wretched act-
ing and worse photography and you'll see that
so far the California stunt flyers have all the
best of air battling. Silent.

THE SILVER KING— British

' I rilS is another British film of some interest
-'■ to American fans because it stars that
excellent actor and old friend, Percy Marmont
That, added to the fact that it is a pretty
thrilling mystery melodrama on the "Bulldog
Drummond" model, gives it some tone here.
Percy is suffering just as nobly as he has for
years, but a villain called "The Spider," and
not a heartless female, is responsible now. A

117



i8



Photoplay Magazine for NovembeEj 1929




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good silent thriller. Any sound efiFect will have
to be the hisses of the crowd, as "The Spider"
spides around. Silent.



IN OLD CALIFORNIA—

Audible Film Corp.

npHIS is about love and hate Under a Spanish
-'- Moon. The latter is the theme song and
no opportunity is lost in singing it. We
expected Henry B. Walthall to warble at any
moment. The setting is California during the

70's, a languidly romantic period. However, . /-^t>axtt> » ■» „• j

,u- I. J ■ lu c 1 L It t i\. A (j-KANU opportumty was missed some-
nothing happens durmg the first half of the /\ ^^^^^^ r^^r „,vi.f\,„. hp.n = „.„H
picture, and after that it doesn t matter any



tense, logical action, auQ oiltertaining dialogue.
A gang of international jewel thieves get a
yen for a particularly valuable collection of
diamonds owned by a humorous old gentleman •
on Long Island. Their leader takes one look
at his proposed victim's ward, and renounces
his Ufe of crime. Ian Keith's characteristic
nonchalance is impressive in the role of
"Light Fingers." All Talkie.



LUCKY IN LOVE—Pathe



how. Helen Ferguson and George Duryea are
among those present. All Talkie.

OH. YEAH'.—Pathe

A SATISFYING saga of fistic and romantic
•'»• encounters of two itinerant railroad bums
— as told by two consummate artists in dis-
creetly ribald dialogue. This is the first time
James Gleason and Robert Armstrong have
played together since "Is Zat So," the weU-
remembered comedy hit of the legitimate
stage. Gleason wTote the dialogue udth Tay A RACY story of shady gentlemen with
Garnett, the director — a devastatingly humor- ■*»■ taking ways, who care in a big way for
ZaSu Pitts put more than diamonds which do not belong to them. A



where. This might have been a good
picture, hokiun and all As it is, you'll laugh
at it, not with it. Morton Downey is the
buxom lad who gets back to Ireland in time
to pay off the mortgage on a castle which
looks like the Parliament Building. Most of it
is siUy, and badly directed. The Downey
hush-a-by tenor helps considerably, and there's
a "foine" performance by J. M. Kerrigan.
All Talkie.

THE GIRL FROM HAVANA— Fox



ous combination.

unusual subtlety into a monologue which will

panic the house. All Talkie.

LIGHT FINGERS— Columbia

npHIS is an all-talking crook melodrama of
■^ the better sort, in which scenarist and
director have effected a fine balance between



clever cast, headed by Lola Lane, Paul Page,
Kenneth Thompson and Natalie Moorehead,
was assembled, and they spent several weeks
in Cuba. Lola Lane, as the beautiful girl
detective, plays one of her most convincing
roles. Above-average entertainment. All
Talkie.




These are Alan Dwan's Four Esquimaux — no relation to Joe Cook's
Four Hawaiians. They appear in Lenore Ulric's first talking
picture, "Frozen Justice." Reading from right to left — Ulgid
Abced, Mary Abced and Joe Abced. And the other one? Oh, that's
only Lenore Ulric

Every advertisement in PHOTOPLAT MAGAZINE is guaranteed.



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929



119



Another Hollywood
Racket

[ CONTINUED TROU PAGE 45 ]



Mrs. West must have secretly gloated.

"^\libi" was completed. It was a success,
one of the most talked about pictures made in
the new medium. And everybody in the cast
was a success — particularly Chester Morris and
Toomey.

npHE production was previewed one sunny
-•■ morning at Grauman's Chinese Theater.
Paramount officials were there. Regis Toomej-
was there.

A few days later Regis Toomey was at
Paramount signing a long term contract. He's
made two pictures since then, "The Wheel of
Life." with Richard Dix, and "Illusion," with
Buddy Rogers.

These are the bare facts of his success. He
has a nice smile and an intelligent young face
and, above all, ideals.

He's simply not going to let Hollywood
''get" him.



Hollywood High
Hat

I CONTINUED TROM P.\GE 65 J



loftily, "it's the old story of the hare and the
tortoise. I'm developing too fast for her and
she'll never get the higher viewpoint. It
serves me right, at that, for marrying a San
Francisco salesgirl with nothing but a perfect
three-quarter right profile."

"If you think I'll register rage, you're out of
Juck," throbbed Joyce, stealing a look at a
mirror. "I was the best change maker the
Five-and-Ten ever had, and I'm not ashamed
to go back. Voii — the man of a million
sweethearts — -I'll raffle you off to any of 'em
for a thousand weekly alimony. Honest, Abie,
Vhen we were married he was almost real once
you got him away where no one was looking.
But now he's fallen for the society racket I
expect he'll start sporting a monocle!"

The bewildered president stumbled to his
feet and reeled to his official throne. "Do I
look like a night club hostess or somethink,"
he moaned, "that you got to bawl on my
lapels? A pfiii on j'ou for a couple false pre-
tencers! ."^in't it only four months since I
slipped you that Persian rug along with my
blessink while I was pretty near chokink in
my new Prince Isaac? It's better you should
be soft and slushy like your pictures and
maybe you can run in harness. But anyway, "
said Mr. Zoop, "dish me the details and I'll
see can I do any solutionink. "

TTHE Mountstephens bared their souls with
-*■ acrid eagerness, untU Mr. Zoop waved them
to unwilling silence.

"Listen," he said shortly. "A divorce is
out, y'understand? It's bad publicity, and
besides, all them boulevard beetles who lo\-e
scandal will be laughink at you, let alone me,
after the way we ballyhooed the ideal love
match."

"But, Abie," quavered the former Miss
Cleary, "I — "

"Don't pull no tears on me," advised the
president. "If you leave your twin bed and
Hubert's board I'll let your contract lapse
without castink you in another picture."

!Mr. Mountstephen chuckled nastily.

"And as for you," yelled Mr. Zoop.enjojing
his authority, "you're the kind of a guy who'd
say, 'Guess w^ho this is' on a telephone call
to London. You got no judgment, Hubert,



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Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929

when you try to ditch a swell girl like Joyce.
Look at Momma and me — for twenty-five
years we've been disagreeink, and stiQ she
never locks her door. "

"Well, something's got to be done," pouted
Hubert, "or I can't do creative work."

" Save that guff for the interviews, " croaked
Abie. "I know all that line about 'men who
do things.' You ain't in that class, Hubert;
you're a good, commercial heart render, and
that's why I pay you big wages. Now, the
idea is that you want to get in the social whirl,
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"THEN go ahead. You can say that your

•'• wife is shrinkink, and likes a good book of
poems, so she's devotink her life tryink to
find one. What is it you want, anyhow,
Cleary?"

"1 really don't know," said Joyce, "but
perhaps it's to get away from these lily-handed
actors. I used to go with a hard-boiled chap
when I worked in San Francisco — Spike
Rafferty — and I believe I'll look him up
again."

"That's right," said Mr. Zoop dreamily,
estunating the bulge of Napoleon's forehead.
"Your company is goink up there to make
Chinatown e.xteriors, and it'll take a week.
Rafferty, hey? Don't tell me a guy \vith a
name like that works in the Five-and-Ten. "

"Not much he doesn't. He runs a gym
somewhere down on Mission Street, or he used
lo, and—"

"I ain't interested in your love life," an-
nounced the president. " Now listen: live your
own existences, but don't forget that your
marriage license holds good outside the city
hmits. If you want a divorce after a year
we'll talk it over. Just now you can't feed no
juicy headhnes to the tabloids. "

"Friendly enemies," remarked Mr. Mount-
Stephen. "Well, I guess I can stand it, but
jemember, sweetheart, when I flatter you in
public it won't mean anything. "

Abie watched the couple exit haughtily, and
then winked cagily at a bust of the Little
Corporal. "Us geniuses," he confided, "we
know how to handle these temperamental
birds, am I a liar? Independent, Uiat's me,



TUTR. MOUNTSTEPHEN disentangled him-
■l*-'-self from the fragile Brenda Berkeley at
the end of an ardent love scene and cast an
inquiring eye at the director.

"Never better," said that weary gentleman.
"Just about all the heat the celluloid will
stand, Hubert. What's pepped you up? "

"An artist can't stand still," repUed the
star airily, "and I'm trying to ready myself
for man-about-town roles. "

"You're not the type. Too kind looking,
old sock. You have to resemble either a
foundered sport or a healthy moron, so that's
scratched. "

"He's right," fluted Miss Berkeley. "The
idle rich are a washout, Hubert. There's one
of them who drops in on me every winter and
I think she's coming out today. A terrible
bore — Glossop's her name. "

" Glossop, " said Hubert reverently. " Not — ,
surely not the Long Island Glossops? "

"Nobody else. The same crew that enter-
tained the Prince of Wales. Every once in a
while the old lady goes slumming around the
studios, and I'm her favorite at Stupefaction
because I give her hints on how to dress."

" Rubbish, " pronounced Mr. Mountstephen.
"More likely the other way."

Brenda started to reply, then switched her
attention to a commotion at the door. A large,
horsy looking woman, dressed in a badly cut
tweed taUormade, lurched across the stage,
waving a hand that would have made a
middleweight jealous.

"Cheerio, old bun duster," she called.
"How's the little orchid these balmy adver-
tised awfternoons, and all that sort of rot?"



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Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929



121



"Oh,"" murmured Hubert, "so she's Eng-
Ush."

"English your eye, "said the director. "Say,
I used to be an inquiring reporter and I found
out that after you reach the inner circle you
narrow your hips and broaden your A's. Why,
that dame's grandfather got his start selling
German silver watches to the Pennsylvania
Dutch.

"Come on, it's time for lunch."

BY this time Brenda and the new arrival were
engaged in an animated conversation, but
as Mr. Mountstephen strolled past, Mrs.
Glossop inquired in a voice that would ha\e
carried across Grand Central Station, "What
might be the name of that intriguing devil?
Rather gentlemanly for an actor, what?"

Miss Berkeley told her and the lady con-
tinued:




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Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929



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Online LibraryMoving Picture Exhibitors' AssociationPhotoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) → online text (page 113 of 145)