Moving Picture Exhibitors' Association.

Photoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) online

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white frame house on Franklin Avenue one
morning, I knew by its very look that it be-
longed to Gary Cooper.

Inside the rooms are spacious and informal.
It looks like a very comfortable, modern ranch
house should look (and probably doesn't).

Gary's mother, Mrs. Charles Cooper, lives
with him.

His father, the Judge, was, at the moment,
in Montana converting their property into a
dude ranch.

pVERYTHING in the place breathes com-
-'— 'fort. The pillows are not the kind you look
at and murmur "how pretty" from a respectful
distance.

They're to put your head on and even to
throw.

The big chairs show that they've been sat in
on long pleasant evenings before the fire.

The living room boasts a large fire place,
numbers of books on either side, in old fash-
ioned book cases, and an upright piano strewn
with music.

The table was cluttered mth newspapers,
magazines and a loom where Mrs. Cooper
was weaving a rug for Gary's bedroom.

Upstairs there is a sitting room which opens
into the four bedrooms. Gary's room has an
old-fashioned four poster and a large marble
topped dresser.

There are in evidence, everywhere, old
Indian relics — the beaded belt Gary wore
when he was in school, the Indian suit he
made himself, several love tokens from Indian
friends, and a war bonnet.

By his bed is a httle rag rug sent to him by a
fan in Kentucky.

The Southern belle was not so bold as to
mail the gift direct to Gary.

She dispatched it, with a note, to his mother,
and, since then, has carried on a correspondence
with her.

There are old pewter mugs (brought by
his father from England) and a very fine old
drinking horn.

Downstairs, the big kitchen smelt of baking
ham, a gift from Andy Lawlor's mother who
had it shipped from Virginia.

A^RS. COOPER has entire charge of the
■^ ''■'■bouse, with a cleaning woman to help and
two women in when there is entertaining to be
done.

The parties, however, are always informal.
Old friends from Montana drop in — boys and
girls they used to know.

I kept wondering how Lupe Velez fits into
this scheme of things.

When the Judge comes out he and Mrs.
Cooper will take a home or an apartment to
themselves.

I wonder if Gary will build another place
for Lupe.

Jimmy Hall used to be one of the prize
bachelors, with a charming place in Holly-
wood, but the house was made ready for
Merna Kennedy, not long ago, who will be
answering to Mrs. Hall by the time you read
this.

Grant Withers has just bought a new house,
which is managed by his mother. The place,
in Brentwood, is large and Spanish and costly
and Grant had to go to Jack Warner to get
the money to buy it.

Hugh Trevor owns a mansion and entertains
la'vishly.

So you see that the bachelor apartment is as
extinct as last year's ingenue. HoUyTiV^ood,
according to Will Hays and the latest vital
statistics, is a city of homes.



Every advertisement in PHOTOPLAT MAGAZINE is guaranteed.



Soon these
other outstanding Pothe
hits will be shown at your
favorite theatre — watch
for them !




INA CLAIRE

in
THE AWFUL TRUTH

Broadway's favorite stage star
makes tier talking picture debut in
her own greatest stage successi

Directed by MARSHALL NEILAN
MAURICE REVNES PRODUaiON




BIG NEWS

with

ROBERT ARMSTRONG and

CAROL LOMBARD

The most gripping murder story
ever told in talking pictures! See
from ttie Inside how the case is
handled by the newspapers and
the policel

Directed by GREGORY LaCAVA
RALPH BLOCK PRODUCTION




THE SOPHOMORE

with

EDDIE QUILLAN

SALLY ONEIL — JEANEnE LOFF

A comedy of college youth which
is breaking all records for sus-
tained laughterl Guaranteed to
drive away the blackest gloomsl

Directed by LEO McCAREY

WILLIAM COUNSELMAN

PRODUCTION




LUCKY IN LOVE

with

MORTON DOWNEY and

BETTY LAWFORD

A love tale of the Emerald Isle
that just keeps you laughing
through your tears from start to
finishi

Directed by KENNCTH WEBB
ROBERT T. KANE PRODUaiON



Ik



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929

PAT H E' ^^

presents is^^.



c/^



nn





Swarding



IN



PARIS BOUND

From the Stage Play by Philip Barry



jj&.lEISll'lIMl» is the
story of an idyllic marriage, threatened by ugly suspicion, saved
by the sensible realization that the sure road to happiness seldom
leads through the divorce courts.

It is sophisticated, grown-up drama,- original in its viewpoint on
an age-old problem; penetrating, sympathetic, human.

Add to its unusual plot and skillful development of an absorb-
ing theme the fact that PARIS BOUND brings to the screen for the
first time the glorious voice and brilliant stage presence of Ann
Harding — and you have one picture that you simply wouldn't
want to miss.

PARIS BOUND will be shown at your favorite local theatre
soon. Watch for the announcement, then make your plans to see it!

Directed by EDWARD H. GRIFFITH A MAURICE REVNES PRODUCTION

AN ALL TALKING

Pathe ® Picture



When rou write to advertisers please mention PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE.



36



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929




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The first jar proves its magic worth.
At alt druggists.



Stillman*s




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Removes T Whitens
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4



STILLMAN CO.
32 Rosemary Lane
Aurora, Illinois
Please send me Free book-
let "Beauty" for Everyone.



I
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;ilv State . ■



$1900 CASH PRIZES

AWARDED PAE31ER

STUDEXTS

In the recent "Photoplay Magazine "Lucky Amateur
Detective" contest, Mrs. M. M, H. of Barre, Vt., a
Palmer trained student, won first prize of $1000.
In tlie same contest three other Palmer students won
prizes of $150,00, $100.00 and $50.00, respectively.
Thus 4. out of 1 9 possible prize winners had received
their training through the Palmer Institute of Author-
ship — a showing that speaks for itself.
In the Cecil DeMllle'Ttj/^t/V" contest, Palmer students
won both 2nd and 3rd prizes, amounting to $600.00
in cash.

These are but a few of the many testimonials which
we receive constantly from successful students. Under
Palmer Training you can learn the professional touch
in writing — either photoplays or short stories. Why
not make that talent of yours pay you di\idends as it
has countless others !



PALMER INSTITUTE OF AUTHORSHIP
Dept. 12-Y,Palmer Building, Hollywood. Calif.

I am interested in: D Photoplay Writing D Short Story

Writing O English and Self-Expression

□ Writers' Criticism Service

Name



Address

-■/ / correspcndence strictly



nfi<l,-r,ti.,l. No u^hsm.in xvill call.



The Birth of the Theme Song

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 66 ]



With the selling of composers down the
river other questions came up. It is all very
well to have a song, but what to do with it once
it is being sung. What about the fans who
would want to try it over on their pianos?

R.VDIO! If pohticians and toothpaste
mixers found it worth while broadcasting
their stuff, why not have the made-to-order
songs flung far and wide — by getting into the
broadcasting business?

So, among others, Warners acquire Wit-
mark's and Paramount get half of the Colum-
bia Broadcasting System— and the movement
is only beginning.

Naturally, coiilrdcmps arises. Music pub-
lishers have quaint attachments to bearded
old ditties. "My Rosary." "Silver Threads
Among the Gold." "When You Come to the
End of a Perfect Day." . . . They love
these veterans because they are the backbone
of their business. But the new masters have



new notions. "Scrap everything composed
before last Wednesday!"

Which seems to have brought us to tlie
point we have been trying to reach. The
fatherly interest which is growing in the breasts
of the gentlemen in charge of the canned music
factories.

"If these are go-getter songs, we'll get them."

And they have.

NOW no talking machine company dreams
of issuing a monthly list without its section
devoted to the songs made by and for the
jMovies. Coming eastward, after finishing a
picture, actors take time to visit the laborato-
ries. There experts run them up against a
familiar looking mike and bid them yodel. The
stars are beginning to twinkle orthophonically.
What next?

So far as we are concerned, just this: With-
out malice aforethought, we propose to sur-
vey this output.



Here Are a Few of the Records Available
from Recent and Current Hits



THE BROADWAY MELODY


EVANGELINE




The Ben Selvin and


Columbia


Evangeline Andy Senella


Columbia


Broadway Orchestra


1738-D




1846-D


Melody Charles King


Victor
21964


Paul Oliver


Victor
22011






Harold Lambert


Brunswick


The Wedding Harold Lambert


Brunswick




4369


of the


4380


From this we will pass on, w


thout further


Painted DoU ^^^ Reisman


Columbia
1780-D


ado, to:




Charles King


Victor


INNOCENTS OF PARIS




21964


Louise Dick Robertson


Brunswick


Should be familiar bv this time. The ad-




4387


vantage here is that you get both for the price


Maurice


Victor


of one from Victor.




Chevalier


21918


mniTDTTV




Paul Whiteman


Columbia



Coquette Paul Oliver



Victor
21898



Pete Woolery Columbia

1805-D

Could never make out exactly what this
had to do with the show but it goes over well
and the records are about equal.



CHRISTINA
The Columbians



Christina The Columbians Columbia

1817-D

Lewis James Victor

21962

"Make my dreams come true, Darling I love
you" type of innocuous waltz, ^\"hen waltzes
are used for this purpose they must be pretty
good ones. Christina has a long way to go,
poor girl.



1819-D
Felt as if we were handling stolen goods
when we played with these, \\here have we
heard something like it before?

IS EVERYBODY HAPPY?

I'm the

Medicine Man

for the Blues Ted Lewis and Columbia

Wouldn't It His Band 1882-D

Be Wonderful

Typical Ted Lewis moaning and well re-
corded.

ON WITH THE SHOW



Am I Blue? Ethel Waters



My Song of
the Nile



DRAG

Melody Three



A waltz again.
Both well played.



Victor
22028

Columbia
1817-D

One up on the last, however.



The Columbians



Columbia
1837-D

Sbilkret and Victor

Orchestra 22004

Birmingham Waters Columbia

Bertha 1837-D

Blues stuff. The Ethel Waters, original
screen artist, one are the best if only for that
reason — and you get them both on one
Coliunbia.



THE DESERT SONG

One Alone Richard Crooks Victor

1370

Don Voorhees Columbia

1824-D

Lasted almost a lifetime on Broadway and
probably deserved it. Crooks does it to per-
fection.
cry adveitisement in PHOTOPL.\Y MAGAZINE is guaranteed.



Pagan Love
Song



THE PAGAN

James Melton



Columbia
1853-D

Harold Lambert Brunswick
4369

Franklyn Baur Victor
21992

Nothing very pagan about this boy. The
usual waltz with the usual limitations. Plenty
of sentiment but nothing like a cave-man here.



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929



^37




Billy Haines continues to be one

of Hollywood's most persistent

young bachelors



Slipping the Mar-
riage Noose



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3t ]

Barbara La Marr; then Gloria Swanson, Pola
Nesri, Marilyn Miller, Ruth Elder. Important
girls, those.

Right now Ben is engaged to Bebe Daniels.
But is Ben married to anyone? No, children,
Ben is not married.

Not that you can blame all this anti-
matrimony on the men.

Take Bessie Love, whose name says more
than she does. Bessie's always the life of the
party, the best sport in the crowd, the cutest
thing ever.

But Bessie a bride?

Net yet.

THEN Clara Bow and Alice White. How
those girls will love me for putting their
names together!

But they are alike in more ways than one.

Both jazzy.

Both ambitious.

Both full of S. A. and What It Takes.

Clara certainly acts, off screen, as though she
wants to get married. I honestly believe she
does, for she's been a lonely little kid most of
her life.

But despite her engagements to Gilbert
Roland, Bob Savage, Victor Fleming, Gary
Cooper and now Harry Richman, she is still
Miss Bow.

The White infant with the red hair loves
'em and leaves 'em. She's been right next to
the altar with several lads — Dick Grace, the
aviator, Donald Keith and more — but she
ne\'er lets herself get quite inside the marriage
circle.

Anita Page plays safe by going everywhere
with her Papa. A boy just can't make any
headway with a girl who goes everywhere with
her Papa.

AS for Garbo, it is now appaient to everyone
that she loved Mauritz Stiller, the director
who first discovered her and who recently died
in Sweden.

She seems to have had a sort of amused
affection for Jack Gilbert.

But for myself I expect Garbo to marry
about the time rose bushes start blooming
around the North Pole.

The real low-dowm on all this seems to be
that these famous folks just don't care to get
married.

And when you stop to consider it coldly
you can't blame them.




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When you write to advertisers please mention PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE.



138



Photoplay Magazine for November



1929




[asij ard

practical

to Drij
Clear
at home



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In the case of the girls, it is hard for them
to find men who meet their standards. When
a girl has youth, beauty, fame, fortune and
gratified ambition, what can the average man
offer her that would make her throw it all
aside for life in a cottage?



So they search on.

Love?

Ah, love. Love is something else again.
Love is something you make scenes of in front
of a camera.

Love is called "being that way." Love is
something to laugh over or brag about — in



TN the case of the men, handsome, debonaire, Hollywood.

-^wealthy, there are so many girls all over the But that isn't real love, you murmur.

world. All right.

After all, doesn't it look as though they Let's consider real love,
could get any girl they wanted?

And how can they be sure any one girl is TF you are really and truly in love in Holly-

the perfect girl? J-wood what do you do?

Maybe the next, or the next, or the one after Well, you get engaged,
that, will be The Only One. , But you don't get married.



Hollywood Leads Paris in Fashions

I CONTINUED FROM PAGE 57 1



smarter than IIolly\vood women as a whole
because they know how to wear their gowns
better, but — and this is the important thing — ■
Ihc lines oj Hollywood have become the lines of
Paris.

"T'VE looked over a lot of dresses that I
-••created for the screen several years ago.
They are in good style now. Only minor
changes have been made. These changes in-
clude the feminine trend. Bows, jabots and
friUs are smart.

"For instance, one smart new coat of mine
introduces a large cuff that is attached to
the glove.

"When you peel off the gloves, you peel off
the cuffs with them and there is a fitted coat
sleeve underneath.

"Hollywood is either seven j'cars ahead of
the times or else it has stood still for seven
years and allowed the styles to catch up with
it.



"I believe, however, that, ver>' subtly, Paris,
like the rest of the world, has been affected
by the movie mode," he added in concluding
his thoughts.

Greer has often refused to dress many of the
picture girls because they would not be a credit
to him, yet he finds that they are now in
fashion.

And thus is the old guard routed. "It is
appalling," he mumbles, "that some of the
atrocities worn on the screen ^vill be copied by
millions of women, when they should not be
taken too literally. The gowns the camera
photographs are simply inspiration to be taken
as Paris took them, a mad outgrowth of mad
minds now interpreted in terms of rhythm and
beauty."

AND the mannequins in the exotic Maison
Greer, Hollywood's most exclusive gown
shop, -are showing the fitted frocks so scorned
by the master a year ago !




25 West 45th Street



New York



"See?" says Ramon Novarro to Dorothy Jordan. "High C," comes
back Miss Jordan snappily. Ramon is illustrating to Miss Jordan
a high note of one of the several songs they will sing in "The Battle
of the Ladies," the star's newest M-G-M picture. Miss Jordan,
dainty musical comedy star, plays opposite Novarro in the pro-
duction

Evoxy advertisement in PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE is euaranteed.



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929



139




A Metro - Goldwyn - Mayer

ALL-TALKING
ALL-SINGING
PRODUCTION

DIRECTED by KING VIDOR
Who Made "The BIG PARADE"



"Like little children that ain't growed up"



CLAP yo' hands! Slap yo'
thigh! "Hallelujah" is here!
"Hallelujah" the great! "Halle-
lujah" the first truly epic picture
portraying the soul of the col-
ored race. Destined to take its
place in filmdom's Hall of Fame
along with "The Big Parade,"
"The Broadway Melody" and
"The Hollywood Revue." 5 King
Vidor wrote and directed this
stirring all- negro drama, this
absorbing story of the colored
boy, indirectly responsible for
his young brother's death in a
gaming house brawl, who be-
comes a negro revivalist; of his
devotion to his ideals; and of his
craving for a seductive "yaller
girl." 5 The soul of the colored
race is immortalized in " Hal-
lelujah." Every phase
of their picturesque



lives — their fierce loves, their
joyous, carefree pursuit of happi-
ness, their hates and passions —
finds dramatic expression against
vivid backgrounds of cabarets,
cotton fields, gaming houses, and
humble shacks called home.
5 Daniel Haynes, noted Negro
singer, plays the central char-
acter. Nina Mae McKinney, a
beauty discovered in the night
clubs of Harlem, has the leading
feminine role. In addition, the
celebrated Dixie Jubilee Singers
and other noted performers sing
the songs of the negro as they
have never been sung before.
Don't miss this tremendous
event in the history of
the screen!

Now playing simultaneously
at the Embassy and the
lyette Theatre, N. Y.
Twice Daily




"Soon forgotten were the fields of cotton"

$





f-^^fSTSTAROSji;



METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER



"More Stars Than There Are in Heaven"



Wlien you write to advertisers please mention PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE,



140



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929




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•'I had pimples and blackheads so badly, and
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Online LibraryMoving Picture Exhibitors' AssociationPhotoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) → online text (page 117 of 145)