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Dorothy Gulliver
Otis Harlan



Raymond Keane
Merna Kennedy
Barbara Kent
Beth Laemmle
Arthur Lake
Laura La Plante
George Lewis
Fred Mackaye
Ken Maynard
Mary Nolan
Mary Philbin



Glenn Tryon
Barbara Worth



At Radio Pictures Studios, 780 Gower
Street, HoUywood, Calif.



Buzz Barton
Sally Blane
Olive Borden
Betty Compson



Bebe Daniels
Frankie Darro
Bob Steele
Tom Tyler



At Pathe Studios, Culver City, Calif.

Robert Armstrong Alan Hale



William Boyd
Junior Coghlan
Diane Ellis



Jeanette Loff
Carol Lombard
Eddie QuiUan



At First National Studios, Burbank.
Calif.



Richard Barthelmess
Doris Dawson
Billie Dove
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.
Corinne Griffith
Lloyd Hughes
Doris Kenyon
Dorothy Mackaill



Colleen Moore
Antonio Moreno
Jack MulhaU
Donald Reed
Milton Sills
Thelma Todd
Alice White
Loretta Young



At United Artists Studios, 1041 No.
Formosa Avenue, Hollywood, Calif.



Don Alvarado
Fannie Brice
Douglas Fairbanks
Mary Pickford



Gilbert Roland
Norma Talmadge
Constance Talmadge
Lupe Velez



At Columbia Studios, 1438 Gower Street.
Hollywood, Calif.



Olive Borden
WilUam Collier, Jr.
Ralph Graves
Jack Holt
Margaret Livingston



Jacqueline I^gan
Ben Lyon
Shirley Mason
Dorothy Revier



In care of Samuel Goldwyn, 7210 Santa
Monica Blvd., Hollywood, Calif.



Vilma Banky
Walter Byron



Ronald Colman
Lily Damita



In care of the Edwin Carewe Productions.
Tec-Art Studios, Hollywood, Calif.



Dolores Del Rio
Roland Drew



Rita Carewe
LeRoy Mason



Robert Agnew, 6357 La Mirada Avenue.
Hollywood, Calif.

Jackie Coogan, 673 South Oxford Avenue.
Los Angeles, Calif.

\'irginia Brown Faire, 1212 Gower Street.
Hollywood, Calif.

Gilda Gray, 22 East 60th Street, New York
City.

William S. Hart, 6404 Sunset Blvd., Holly-
wood, Calif.

Lloyd Hughes, 616 Taft Building, Holly-
wood, Calif.

Harold Lloyd, 6640 Santa Monica Blvd..
HoUyAvood, Cahf.

Bert Lytell, P. O. Box 235, Hollywood, Cahf.

Patsy Ruth Miller, 808 Crescent Drive,
Beveriy HiUs, Cahf.

Pat O'Malley, 1832 Taft Avenue, Los
Angeles CaUf.

Herbert Rawhnson, 1735 Highland Street.
Los Angeles, Cahf.

Ruth Roland, 3828 Wilshire Blvd., Los
Angeles, CaUf.

Estelle Taylor, 5254 Los Feliz Blvd., Los
Angeles, Calif.



Every advertisement in PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE Is guaranteed.



Photoplay Magazine for December, 1929



H7



The Disliked Girl



[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 51 ]



'em to say it right out, but every time I'd ask
'em about it they'd say, 'Just wait, Alice,
2verything will work out O. K.'

"Well, I waited and somebody else got the
Dart. But around the lot I was hard-boiled. I
acted as if I didn't care. I wouldn't let them
linow I cared. Not mucn.

"But all the stars complained about me.
Oh, they couldn't work mth White. Who did
I think I was — just a little script girl. Well,
ior that matter, who did they thihk they were?

"So, when nobody would have me in their
pictures there was nothing to do but to star me
or let me go. They told me I was a star. They
lold me that they'd give me four pictures and
if I didn't make good in those — out I went.

■'T BEGAN my first starring vehicle. I had to
-'■ fight for every scene. The director didn't
like me. He thought I was shallow and in-
sincere. I knew. I can tell when people don't
like me.

" During the first week of work I bought a
chair for the set. I was tired standing up. I
had it put on the stage and when I got there it
was gone. I asked for it. They had taken it
and hung it up on a board 'way aboA-c the set.
Everybody laughed and when they did bring it
down, the director said, 'Make a platform for
the queen. Here you are, Miss White. Orches-
tra, some music'

" 'O. K.', I said, 'play "God Save the
Queen." ' I may be dumb but I didn't think
the joke was funny. Other stars have chairs on
the sets. They don't do it to be grand, but
iust to have somewhere to sit down.

" 'Show Girl' was my first starring vehicle
and I didn't have more than four or five close-
ups and I had to fight for every one of those.

"The other day in an interview the director
said he had to work Alice White inth a whip —
that's the only way he could get her to do any-
thing. That's nonsense. If he'd only known.
Why, I'm like a grateful little dog when some-
body pats me on the head and tells me I'm not
so bad.

"And then, of course, there's the talk. All
the women talk about me and you can't talk
back because they're e.xecutives' wives or
something. Why, people seem to resent any-
Dody who is young and has a good time.

"And I don't go out much. I never go out
when I'm working. Not because I'm so
goody-good, God knows, but because I'm so
tired. Too tired working — and battling.

"They give me the cheapest sets and rush
my pictures through as quickly as possible.
The minute I get a good cameraman, one of the
other stars takes him away from me.

"COUNDS like I'm crying, doesn't it?
'-'Sounds like I've got a chip on my shoulder.
Well, maybe I have. I've had to fight to get
anything. And I've cried plenty, too. At
home. Nights. Alone.

"But I've got this to be thankful for: If I
ever make a good picture, if I ever do any real
work, if I'm ever anything but just a crazy
little flapper in second rate stories, it will be all
my own doing — nobody will have helped mc.
I'll have done it all myself. I shall have fought
my way through."

Of course, she does take it too seriously. She
is too much on the defensive. But it's the only
way she knows to attack life. And it is an
attack. A one-man attack on life.

Her chin's out. Her fist is clenched. Her
mind is ready for every new onslaught. It's
the only way she knows.

She is, of course, only Alice White. She
wouldn't know a pose if she met one face to
face. Intense, vital, hard and bitter.

But Alice Wh'te is a good fighter. And, ac-
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When you write to advertisers please mention PIIOTOl'LAY MAGAZINE.



Brief Reviews of Current Pictures

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 ]



• MADAME X — M-G-M. — Fine performance
by Ruth Chatterton in this reliable old sob
producer. All Talkie. {July.)

MADONNA OF AVENUE A— Warners.— Too
grown-up for children and too childish for grown-ups.
A trite yarn. All Talkie. {Nov.)

MAN AND THE MOMENT, THE— First Na-
tional. — An old-fashioned ripsnorting movie, all love
and action. Billie Dove starred. Part Talkie. {Sept.)

MAN I LOVE, THE— Paramount.— A slight
storv, but you'll like Richard Arlen's work. AH
Talkie. {July.)

• MARIANNE- M-G-M. — Marion Davies
proves there is no limit to her versatility.
Delicious comedy and superb pathos. All Talkie.
{Nau.)

MASKED EMOTIONS— Fox.— Good melodrama
of adventure and brotherly love. Silent. {July.)

MASQUERADE — Fox. — Remade from silent ver-
sion of "The Brass Bowl." Old fashioned plot, but
Leila Hyams is nice. AH Talkie. (Sept.)

MELODY LANE— Universal.— The world seems
full of clowns with breaking hearts. Eddie Leonard
brings no vitality to a dead yarn. All Talkie. {Ocl.)

MORGANNE THE ENCHANTRESS— Franco-
Film. — One of the very worst from France. Awful
story, acting ham de luxe. Silent. {Sept.)

MOTHER*S BOY— Pathe.— Just another Jolson
plot, only this time the singer is an Irishman, Morton
Downey. All Talkie. {July.)

MYSTERIOUS DR. FU MANCHU, THE—

Paramount. — Fantastic mysterv varn, with Oriented
deviltry. All Talkie. {Aug.)

NEW BANKROLL, THE— Mack Sennett.— Andy
Clyde and Harry Gribbon and lots of very pretty
girls. Old time comedy. All Talkie. {Sepi.)

NEW YEAR'S EVE— Fox.— Dripping with senti-
mentality and sticky with melodrama. Sound.
{June.)

NEW YORK NIGHTS— United Artists.— A hoke
story, but Talmadge fans will be pleased with
Norma's voice. All Talkie. {Nov.)

NIGHT CLUB— Paramount. — Made some time
ago, this film is little but a series of face and voice
tests for many Broadway celebrities. All Talkie.
{Nov.)

NO MORE CHILDREN— Broughton.— Tasteless
and worthless birth control propaganda. Don't be
fooled, it's just stupid. Silent. {June.)

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH— Paramount.—
Richard Dix in an old. but good, stage farce. A
pleasant evening's entertainment. All Talkie. {July.)

NOT QUITE DECENT— Fox.— Louise Dresser
also does an Al Jolson. Can you bear it? Part
Talkie. {July.)

OH, YEAH!— Pathe.— James Gleason and Robert
Armstrong of "Is Zat So" fame team up again —
and howl Hilarious dialogue which pla>'s tag with
the censors. ZaSu Pitts does one of her riotous
monologues. All Talkie. {Nm.)

ONE WOMAN IDEA, THE— Fox— Rod La-
Rocque is a Persian diplomat who falls in love, and
that's about all. Sound. {Sept.)

• ON WITH THE SHOW— Warners.— Singing,
dancing, talking and Technicolor. Good on
spectacle but weak on comedy. All Talkie. {Aug.)

OPPRESSED, THE— William Elliott Production.
— Tills ought to be renamed The Depressed — mean-
ing the audience. Raquel Meller disappoints. Silent.
{Ocl.)

^ OUR MODERN MAIDENS — M-G-M.—

?\. Joan Crawford and Doug Fairbanks, Jr., in a
sequel to "Our Dancing Daughters." Must you be
told that it's a sure-fire hit? Sound. {July.)

• PARIS BOUND— Pathe.— A smooth drama of
domestic woes that introduces to the screen
Ann Harding, stage beaut\- and good actress. All
Talkie. {Sept.)

PAWNS OF PASSION— World Wide.— Rather
better than its title and also better than most foreign
productions. Silent. {July.)

PHANTOMS OF THE NORTH— All Star.— One
of the old time Northwest epics, with nothing to dis-
tinguish it. Silent. {Sept.)

PHYSICIAN, THE — Tiffany-Stahl. — Terrible
story of the narcotic evil well acted b\' Miles Mander
and Elsa Brink, Silent. {Sept.)



PICCADILLY— World Wide.—Wonder of won-
ders — a truly fine British picture I Gilda Gray is
starred but Anna May Wong brings home the bacon.
Silent. {Oct.)

PLEASURE CRAZED— Fox.— A good story,
smothered in English accents, and played entirely
by stage actors. All Talkie. {Oct.)

PLUNGING HOOFS— Universal.— For those who
are crazy over horses, horses, horses. Silent. {June.)

POINTS WEST— Universal.— Good old-fashioned

Western melodrama. Silent. {June.)

PRINCE AND THE DANCER. THE— World-
Wide. — This European film is sure to inspire
patriotism in the bosoms of American movie-goers.
It's awful. Silent. {Nov.)




Gene Gauntier, the female Huck
Finn shown above, used to make
two-reelers in the old nickelodeon
days. Now she has gone lit*r*y
and written a novel on the stage,
which Coward-McCann is pub-
lishing



PRINCE OF HEARTS. THE—I mperial.— Weak
carbon copy of "The Merr^- Widow." Silent. {July.)

• PRISONERS- First National.— Effective en-
tertainment. Just to be different, the locale in
this one is a Hungarian night club. Part Talkie.
{Aug.)

PROTECTION— Fox.— More bootlegging drama.
With some exciting moments. Sound. (.41*^.)

OUEEN OF THE NIGHT CLUBS— Warners.—

Texas Guinan in a phoney story of silly revels. Of
course, if you want to get a look at Tex, here she is.
Part Talkie. {June.)

QUITTER, THE— Columbia.— Rather trite story
redeemed by an effective climax. Silent. {July.)

RAINBOW MAN, THE— Sono A rt- Par amount. —
In which Eddie Dowling does his version of the Jolson
story. But he has an attractive personality. All
Talkie. {July.)

RICHTHOFEN: THE RED KNIGHT OF THE

AIR — F.P.G. Production. — A Teutonic version of
"Wings" lacking all the virtues of the American
epic of the air. Silent. {Nov.)



*RIO RITA— Radio Pictures.— The finest of
screen musicals to date. Comedy, singing,
dancing and romance de luxe. Bebe Daniels wows
*em and John Boles sets hearts to fluttering anew.
All Talkie. {Nov.)

RIVER OF ROMANCE— Paramount.— Humor-
ous romance of crinoline days in the South, with ex-
cellent work by Buddy Rogers, Mary Brian and
Wallace Bee^^■, All Talkie. {Oct.)

ROARING FIRES— Ellbee.— Not only silent but
positively dumb. {July.)

SAILOR'S HOLIDAY— Pathe.— Riotously funny
account of a sailor on shore leave. All Talkie. {Oct.)

SALUTE — Fox. — A glorified newsreel about a
West Point cadet with a kid brother at Annapolis.
All Talkie. {Oct.)

SALVAGE — Supreme. — All a picture should not
be. Silent. {June.)

SAP, THE— Warners.— Good comedy with lots of
laughs. All Talkie. {A7tg.)

SATURDAY'S CHILDREN— First National.—
It was a Pulitzer prize stage play, but the movie ver-
sion is slow. And Corinne Griffith is miscast. Part
Talkie. {July.)

SCARLET DAREDEVIL, THE— World Wide.—
A melodrama of the French Revolution from
England, unusually well acted. Silent. {Sept.)

SHE GOES TO WAR— United Artists.— Eleanor
Boardman gives a superb performance of a society
girl who turns fighter. And the battle scenes are
wonderful. An excellent, but not great, picture.
Sound. {June.)

SHIP MATES— Educational.— In the Na\T with

Lupino Lane. Plenty of laughs as the pies anddishes
go whizzing by. All Talkie. {July.)

• SHOW BOAT— Universal.— Lavish produc-
tion of a colorful novel that deserved less
obvious direction. Part Talkie. {June.)

SILVER KING. THE— British.— A good silent
thriller starring our old friend Percy Marmont.
Pcrc^■ still suffers superbly. Silent. {Noi'.)

• SINGLE STANDARD, THE — M-G-M —
Garbo was never finer than in this story of a
ver>' modern woman. Nils Astlier and Johnny Mack
Brown, too. Silent. (-SV;>/.)

SIN SISTER. THE— Fox.— An Alaskan melo-
drama that has good suspense and excellent acting.
Sound. {June.)

SKIN DEEP— Warners.— Pretty good crook yarn.
AU Tidkie. {Aug.)

SMILING IRISH EVES— First National. -
Brogues, brawls and bunkum, but >ou"ll like Colleen
Moore's talkie personality. All Talkie. {Oct.)

SOME MOTHER'S BOY— Rayart.— Quickie

hokum. Silent. {Ju7ie.)

SOPHOMORE, THE— Pathe.— Proving that it is
possible to make an entertaining college picture with-
out necking or drinking. All Talkie. {Aug.)

SO THIS IS COLLEGE— M-G-M —Reviewed

under title "Happy Davs." The U. S. C. -Stanford
football game in sound is one of life's big moments.
Otherwise just another farce that will make real
collegians commit hara-kiri. All Talkie. {Nov.)

SPEEDWAY- M-G-M.— Bill Haines disappoint-
ing in an unoriginal racetrack yarn. Part Talkie.

{Ocl.)

SQUALL, THE— First National.— All about a bad,
bad baby vamp. The film doesn't click. All Talkie.
{July.)

STREET GIRL— Radio Pictures.— Betty Comr>-
son. Jack Oakie and John Harron in a tale about a girl
violinist and a group of musicians. Good entertain-
ment. All Talkie. {Oct.)

• STUDIO MURDER MYSTERY, THE —
Paramount. — Photoplay's thrilling serial
comes to the screen and makes a corking melodrama.
All Talkie. {July.)

SYNCOPATION — Radio Pictures. — Gay and
jazzy night club entertainment that will enliven your
evening All Talkie. {June.)

• TAMING OF THE SHREW, THE— United
Artists. — Here's that long-awaited co-starrin«
appearance of Mar>' and Doug. It isn't Shakespeare,
but it's swell entertainment. All Talkie. {Noi'.)
[ PLEASE TURN TO PACE 150 1



148



Photoplay Magazine for December, 1929



149




GOLDWYN-MAYER

PRODUCES THE

SENSATIONAL

SMASH HITS

OF THE SEASON



CECIL B. DeMlLLE, director of a hundred hits, has
made in Dynamite what will be considered his
greatest screen achievement. A thrilling drama which
explodes the hypocrisy of the modern Babel called
Society. Dynamite digs through the outer veneer of
sham, pretense and glitter— and gets down to the
bed-rock of human emotions. Charles Bickford, Con>
rad Nagel and Kay Johnson give the best performance
of their careers. AU-talking. Also silent version.



WHAT a cast! More stars than there are. in heaven!
A glittering, gorgeous, spectacular revue — the
kind you would pay $6.60 for on Broadway. Marion
Davies, John Gilbert, Norma Shearer, William Haines,
Joan Crawford, Buster Keaton, Bessie Love, Charles
King, Conrad Nagel, Marie Dressier, Jack Benny, Gus
Edwards, Karl Dane, George K. Arthur, Stan Laurel,
Oliver Hardy, Cliff Edwards (Ukulele Ike,) Anita Page,
Polly Moran, Gwen Lee, Brox Sisters, Albertina Rasch
Ballad, Natacha Nattova & Co., The Rounders, and a
chorus of 200. A remarkable all-singing, all-talking,
all-dancing picture. The hit picture ivith the song hits'.



HERE is the picture that Broadway went wild about
— Hallelujah, the greatest drama of its kind ever
produced. Directed by KING VIDOR, who made
The Big Parade — this stirring drama of the Southland
immortalizes the soul of the colored race. Daniel
Haynes, noted Negro singer, and Nina Mae McKinney,
a beauty discovered in the night clubs of Harlem, lead
an all-Negro cast in this remarkable production. One of
the classics of the screen that will never die. Don't miss it!
Hear Irving Berlin's "Waiting at the End of the Road."



•MORE STARS THAN THERE ARE IN HEAVEN" i J^



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Photoplay Magazine for December, 1929




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Brief Reviews of Current Pictures

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 148 ]



THIRTEENTH CHAIR, THE— M-G-M.— If
you don't thrill over this, lie down. You're dead.
Margaret Wychcrly scores in the r31e she created
on the stage. All Talkie. {Nov.)

THIS MAD WORLD— M-G-M.— A tender yet
glamorous filmization of one of the most beautiful of
war stories, with glorious work by Kay "Dynamite"
Johnson and Basil Rathbone. All Talkie. {Nov.)

THREE LIVE GHOSTS— United Artists— An
unimportant tale of three war buddies who return
to life after being reported killed. The cast is from
the stage. All Talkie. {Nov.)

THRU DIFFERENT EYES— Fox.— More mur-
ders and more courtrooms. The old story is cleverly
told. AU Talkie. (Jw/y.)

THUNDER — M-G-M. — Snow storms, train
wTecks and floods, with Lon Cheney at the throttle of
the locomotive. Sound. {Aug.)

• THUNDERBOLT- Paramount.— An engross-
ing and well acted story. One of the best of
the gangster operas. All Talkie. {Aug.)

TIME, THE PLACE AND THE GIRL, THE—

Warners. — Lively comedy of what happens to a foot-
ball hero after graduation. AU Talkie. {July.)

TIP-OFF. THE — Universal. — Crooks again!
Silent. {Aug.)

TOMMY ATKINS— World Wide.— English made
production that has the "Beau Geste" atmosphere.
Silent. {July.)

TONIGHT AT TWELVE— Universal.— Can it be
possible? — a mystery play witliout a murder or a
Hindu servant! Good situations. .\11 Talkie. {Nov.)

TRAIL OFTHE HORSE THIEVES,THE— FBO.

— Easy-going Western, with Tom Tyler just lopln'
along. Tom and Frankie Darro together. Silent.
{May.)

TRENT'S LAST CASE— Fox.— A mystery story.
treated like a farce. .And ver>' good. too. Sound.
{June.)

TRIAL MARRIAGE— Colurabia.—How to hold
a wife overnight in seven reels. Racy and sophis-
ticated. Sound. {Oct.)

• TRIAL OF MARY DUGAN — M-G-M. — A
distinct achievement, in that it is a literal
translation of one of the best recent plays. And a
triumphant talkie debut for Norma Shearer. All
Talkie. {June.)

TWIN BEDS— First National.- Frothy bedroom
farce with onl>' a mild kick. Jack Mulhall and Patsy
Ruth Miller help. All Talkie. {Oct.)

TWO MEN AND A MAID— Tif!any-Stahl.— Back



Online LibraryMoving Picture Exhibitors' AssociationPhotoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) → online text (page 143 of 145)