Moving Picture Exhibitors' Association.

Photoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) online

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Name. . .
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When you write to advertisers please mention PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE.



j^rickb



Three prizes

are given every month

for the best letters'^

$25, $10 and $5





Bouquets

The REAL CRITICS.

the FANS,
GIVE THEIR VIEWS



The Monthly Barometer

OUR mail has fairly exploded this month
ivith letters from excited fans. Some de-
mand that talkies be abolished; others say they
are through with silent pictures forever.

Jannings and Garbo are causing a great deal
of worry. Their loyal followers don't want to
lose them. No one seems to care whether
they talk or not — just as long as they continue
to act on the American screen.

The heated arguments about voice doubling
continue — both for speaking and singing. Some
of the disillusioned fans are wailing because
they can't be sure they are actually hearing
their favorites. Others argue that voice
doubling is no more to be frowned upon than
doubling for stunts, a scheme to which the fans
have long been accustomed.

From readers in foreign countries have come
many letters expressing great interest in the
talkies. Those who have not already heard
them are awaiting their advent xvith eagerness.

Protests against talking pictures have come
from the deaf — a situation that caUs for serious
thought.

Incidentally, Photoplay Magazine wants
to say thank you for the lovely bouquets it
has received in the past few months from
readers all over the world — words of praise we
are too modest to print, but which help by
their encouragement.

$25.00 Letter

Omaha, Nebraska.

No one who has never lived outside the
large cities can really appreciate what talking
pictures mean to the American public. If
the talkies brought only intelligent orchestral
accompaniment —

God bless 'em!

If there is anyone who can enter into the
forceful, moving spirit of "The King of Kings"
while a correspondence school pianist plays
"Why Should I Care?" in syncopated jazz
rhythm, on a piano that hasn't been tuned in
two years, during one of the most touching
moments of the film — •

There isn't!

Yet this not only actually happened but
occurs regularly in every town in the United
States, once you venture beyond cities large
enough to support theater orchestras. Con-
trast it mth the orchestral offerings in "The
Broadway Melody" and like pictures.

Motion pictures laid entertainment at the

10



The readers of Photoplay are in-
vited to write to this department — to
register complaints or compliments —
to tell just what they thinli of pictures
and players. We suggest that you
express your ideas as briefly as pos-
sible and refrain from severe per-
sonal criticism, remembering that the
object of these columns is to exchange
thoughts that may bring about better
pictures and better acting. Be con-
structive. We may not agree with the
sentiments expressed, but we'll pub-
lish them just the same ! Letters must
not exceed 200 words and should
bear the writer's full name and ad-
dress. Anonymous letters go to the
waste basket immediately.



feet of the world; talking pictures increase the
world's enjoyment a hundred-fold.

.\nd their present trend seems to insure us a
still greater boon: the doom of the mere
"pretty face" and weak plot and the advent
of the genuine actor who has something worth-
while to offer and demands a worthwhile play
in which to offer it.

E. C. WlIELAN.

$10.00 Letter

Toronto, Canada.

I am a clergyman's wife with one son ten
years old, whom everyone, including my
husband, says I spoil dreadfully. .-Vlthoiigh
well on in years I had never been in a moving
picture show, as I thought they were places
where nothing but vice was depicted, and
where no one could learn anything good.

A friend of mine (I know now she was a
real friend) induced me to go with her and
see "The Sins of the Fathers." No sermon
ever affected me as that picture did, and I
saw myself for the first time in my life, as I
was — a mother, who, for my own gratification,
was teaching my son to grow up in idleness;
neglecting his education, pampering his every
wish, and smoothing axwiy every obstacle in
his path instead of teaching him self-control,
and helping him to prepare for the battle
of life.

How thankful I am I was saved in time, by
that wonderful picture of the devoted father,
played by Emil Jannings, who showed how



easily a child may be misdirected in his youth
by parents' selfish love. Every mother should
see this picture. No better sermon was ever
preached.

L. Watkin.

$5.00 Letter

Santa Fe, N. M.

,'\bout the only thing I can find wrong with
the average movie producer is that he has the
modern boys and girls all wTong. We're not a
pack of drinking, smoking and petting-party
liounds that sneak home in the wee hours of
the morning after a night of whoopee. The
most of us are home, happily dreaming of
Greta and John in a love scene.

In "Our Dancing Daughters" Joan Crawford
got a big laugh from some of the younger
generation I know. She was a hot toddy,
I'll agree, but she weisn't carrying our banner.
"The Godless Girl" wasn't a good likeness of
us either. I take it that high school was
supposed to be a repUca of any school in the
United States. Well, all I've got to say is
that DeMille fell down on that picture.

Clara Bow is supposed to be the symbol of us.
She is certainly a good actress, but she can't
represent the modern girl. Of course, there
are different types, but even at oiu- wildest
we don't resemble that red-headed child.

We're more on the Bronson-Moran type —
chic, sophisticated, but with enough sense to
come home while it's still dark and a few stars
are left.

Mary Walsh.

It Does Sound Logical

Aldcn, Pa.

I personally most emphatically prefer talkies
because I find them more entertaining.

The comments of some of the objectors are
quite amusing. One of your readers fears that
the advent of talkies will prevent him from
exercising his imagination! .'\nother is quite
wrought up over the introduction of dialogue
and sound in movies because it will disturb
his repose!

To the first objector I might advise cutting
out movies entirely and confining himself to
reading good books, where his imagination can
have full scope. To the second objector I
would suggest that if he wishes repose, why
in the name of common sense does he not go
to bed?

[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 111 ]



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section



1 1




one true



You probably can't imagine yourself in
this woman's predicament — yet the pos-
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Yet today she is rather a pathetic figure
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How unfortunate that a minor defect
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12



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section



It is not too late to enter the

Photoplay $5000

Cut Picture
Puzzle Contest



For full particulars regarding con-
test see page 58. If your dealer can-
not supply you with the June Photo-
play just send coupon below to Pho-
toplay Magazine, 750 N. Michigan
Avenue, Chicago. A reprint of the
set of cut pictures which appeared
in June issue, together with complete
rules, will be sent you free by return
mail. Or, if you prefer to take ad-
vantage of our Special Six Months'
Contest rate, send $1.25 and we will
mail you the reprint from June Pho-
toplay and enter your subscription
for 6 months, starting with the
August issue.

What a Subscription
to PHOTOPLAY

Will Bring You

More than a thousand pictures of
photoplayers and illustrations of their
work and pastime.

Scores of interesting articles about the
people you see on the screen.

Splendidly written short stories, some
of which you will see acted at your
moving picture theater.

The trul/i, and nothing but the truth, about
motion pictures, the stars, and the industry.

You have read this issue of Photoplay so
there is no necessity for telling you that
it is one of the most superbly illustrated,
the best written and the most attracli^■ely
printed magazines published today — and
alone in its field of motion pictures.

Send money order or check to

PHOTOPLAY
MAGAZINE

Dept. 14-G, 750 N. Michigan Ave.
CHICAGO

The coupon beloiv is for your convenience



PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE

Dept. 14-G, 750 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago

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I I Send me the reprint of the set of cut pic-
' — ' tures which appeared in June PHOTO-
PLAY.




Brief Reviews of Current Pictures

[ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 ]



ELIGIBLE MR. BANGS, THE— Coronet-Educa-
tional. — A clever little dress-suit comedy in one reel,
with Edward Everett Horton fine. (April,)

ETERNAL LOVE— United Artists.— John Profile
Barrymore and Camilla Horn get romantic in the
Swiss Alps. (April.)

ETERNAL WOMAN, THE — Columbia.—
Frenzied society melodrama with a rubber plot that
bounces all over the map. (June.)

EVA AND THE GRASSHOPPER— UFA.— Some

remarkable insect photography and a not-so-good
modern story. Anyway, a novelty. (Fe6.)

FAKER, THE— Columbia.— Well done expose of
spiritualistic charlatans, with Warner Oland fine as
the phoney spook-chaser, (April.)

FLOATING COLLEGE, THE— Tiffany-Stah!.—
Based on one of those university cruises, this picture
had possibilities that aren't realized. (March.)

FLYIN' BUCKAROO, THE— Pathe.— How to
capture bandits. (Feb.)

• FLYING FLEET, THE— Metro-Goldwyn-
Mayer. — The training of a flyer, told with
thrills, accuracy and an absence of bunk. It's a real
picture: you'll like it. (Feb.)

FUGITIVES— Fox. — Conventional story of a
wronged girl and a Horatio Alger district attorney.

(March.)

• GENTLEMEN OF THE PRESS— Paramount.
— A newspaper story that is a knockout. Fine
performances by an all-stage cast. Check up this one
as one of the hits of the talkies. (June.)

GERALDINE — Pathe. — Light and amusing com-
edy with Marion Nixon and Eddie Quillan. (Jan.)

GHOST TALKS, THE— Fox.— A talkie farce.
Plenty of laughs. (Feb.)

GIRL WHOWOULDN'T'WAIT, THE— Liberty.
— In spite of its title this is one of the best pictures
turned out by an independent producer. You'll
like it. (June,)

GIRLS WHO DARE— Trinity. — Sleuths fail to
find a reason for this picture. Who cares if girls do,
after this one? (April.)

GLORIOUS TRAIL, THE— First National.—
Ken Maynard and Tarzan work on that first overland
telegraph line. You know the rest. (March.)



GREYHOUND LIMITED, THE— Warners.—
Not a dog story, but a railroad melodrama. It's
speedy, exciting and good fun. (June.)

GUN RUNNER, THE— Tiffany-Stahl.— Bullets
and romance in a South American republic. Frothy
entertainment. (Feb,)

HARDBOILED—FBO.— Hackneyed story about
a gold-digging show girl, but well played by Saliy
O'Neill and Donald Reed. (April.)

HARVEST OF HATE, THE— Universal.— In
which the great talents of Rex, the wild horse, are
ignored to make footage for a trite romance. (Jan.)

HAUNTED LADY, THE— Universal.— Laura
LaPlante knows who did the murder, but is afraid to
tell. She and the story are good. (.April.)

HEAD OF THE FAMILY, THE— Gotham.—
Rather cuckoo farce. (Jan.)

• HEARTS IN DIXIE— Fox.— Plantation life
according to a Fox talkie, with the stupendous
debut of Stepin Fetchit, colored comic. (May.)

• HIS CAPTIVE WOMAN— First National-
Getting away with murder in the South Seas.
However, good performances by Milton Sills and
Dorothy Mackaill make this melodrama worth your
attention. With sound and talk. (March.)

HIS LUCKY DAY— Universal.— Another flimsy
story for Rcggy Denny, with the star a dizzy realtor,
(April.)

HONEYMOON ABROAD — World Wide.—
Monty Banks in a spotty comedy made in London
and Paris. (.April.)

HOT STUFF— First National.— Collegiate stuff in
musical comedy style. Alice White disrobes, smokes
and tipples, as usual. (May.)

HOUSE OF HORROR, THE— First National.—
Cheap claptrap mystery movie wliich is saved by the
comedy of Chester Conklin and Louise Fazenda.
(May.)

HOUSE OF SHAME, THE— Chesterfield.— Do-
mestic drama — if that's what you want. (Feb.)

HUNTINGTOWER — Paramount. — Imported
Scotch — celluloid. With Sir Harry Lauder and a lot
of atmosphere. (Feb.)

IN HOLLAND— Fox Movietone — Another by
those fine stage comedians, Clark and McCullough.
(April.)



Photoplays Reviewed in the Shadow Stage This Issue

Save this magazine — Refer to the criticisms before you pic\ out
your evenings entertainment. Ma\e this your reference list.

Page
Nothing but the Truth — Paramount.. . 56

Not Quite Decent — Fo.x 57

Our Modern Maidens— M.-G.-M 54

Pa^vns of Passion — World Wide 133

Prince of Hearts, The-^Imperial 133

Quitter, Tlie — Columbia 133

Rainbow Man, The — Sono-Art-Para-

mount 56

Roaring Fires — Ellbee 134

Saturday's Children — First National.. . 57

Ship Mates — Educational 134

Squall, The — First National 56

Studio Murder Mystery, The — Para-
mount 55

Thru Different Eyes— Fo.x 57

Time, the Place and the Girl, The —

Warners 57

Tommy Atkins— World Wide 133

Vagabond Cub, Tht^FBO 134

You Can't Buy Love — Universal 134



Page
Big Diamond Robbery, The— FBO. ... 134
Bulldog Drummond — Goldwyn-United

Artists 54

Come Across — Universal 134

Devil's Chaplain, The— Rayart 134

Duke Steps Out, Thf^M.-G.-M 56

Exalted Flapper, The— Fox 134

Eyes of the Underworld — Universal . . . 133

Fox Movietone FoUies — Fox 55

Gamblers, The — Warners 133

Girls Gone WUd— Fox 134

Gun Law— FBO 133

Hole in the Wall, The — Paramount.. . . 57

Honky-Tonk — Warners 56

Hottentot, The — Warners 134

Innocents of Paris — Paramount 54

Madame X— M.-G.-M 55

Man I Love, The — Paramount 56

Masked Emotions — Fox 134

Mother's Boy — Pathe 57



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section



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PHOTOS
ENLARGED



m




• IN OLD ARIZONA— Fox.— Pointing the way
to bigger and better talkies. A fine Western
that pleases the eye, the ear and the dramatic
instinct. {Feb.)

• IRON MASK, THE— United Artists.— Doug
Fairbanks goes back to D'Arlagnan — liurray!
Action and more action. A good evening. (.Feb.)

JAZZ AGE, THE— FBO.— Flaming youth and
mostly a bad imitation of "Our Dancitig Daughters."
{Feb.)

JAZZLAND — Quality. — If you can guess what this
is all about, you ought to get a prize. (March.)

• JEANNE D'ARC— Societe Generale de Films.
— A rarely fine artistic achievement and a
significant picture. You ma>- not see it at your local
theater but jou will feel its influence in future films.
(Feb.)

JUST OFF BROADWAY— Chesterfield.— Boot-
legging, serious drinking, gunfire and pure night-cluli
girls in an impossible hodge-podge. (A Pril.)

KING COWBOY— FBO.— Please. Mr. Mix. don't
do anything like this again! (Jan.)

KING OF THE RODEO— Universal.— Hoot Gib-
son's best contribution to Art in a long time. (Jan.)

LADY OF CHANCE, A— Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.
— Norma Shearer in a drama of a gold-digger who
reforms. If they only would in real lifel (Feb.)

LADY OF THE PAVEMENTS — United Artists.
— In which the vivid Lupe Velez runs away with a
Griffith picture. (Feb.)

LAST WARNING, THE— Universal.— Muddled
mystery with no plot but a lot of fancy sets and
fancier photography. (Feb.)

LAWLESS LEGION, THE— First National.— A

cowboy story, with Ken Maynard, that is good
enough entertainment for anybody. (June.)

LEATHERNECK, THE— Pathe.— Good, silent
film crippled with some talk. Bill Boyd, Alan Hale
and Co. fine in Marine yarn. (April.)



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Producer Announcements

ofT^ew Pictures

and Stars

While all good advertising is news,
we consider producer advertising
of particular interest to our read'
ers. With this directory you easily
can locate each announcement:

Fox Film Corp Pag^ 1^9

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer . . Page 135

Paramount Page 4

Warner Bros Page 143




Girls

lest^ucAif Abiliff

REI



LEGEND OF GOSTA BERLING, THE—

Swedish Biograpli. — European film with Greta
Garbo. proving that Hollywood changed an ugly
duckling into a swan. {Jan.)

• LETTER, THE— Paramount.— The talkies'
first big emotional performance, by Jeanne
Eagels. Good strong drama. Not for kids. (May.)

LINDA — Mrs. Wallace Reid Production. — Maud-
lin sentimentality. {Feb.)

LION'S ROAR, THE— Educational.— A Sennett
comedy with all the incidental noises. (.Feb.)

LITTLE SAVAGE, THE— FBO.— A Western that
is saved by some good human interest touches.
(March.)

LONE WOLF'S DAUGHTER, THE— Columbia.
— Bert Lytell's perennial crook, the Lone Wolf, in a
good melodramatic comedy. (May.)

LOOKOUT GIRL, THE— Quality.— Not worth
your valuable time. (Feb.)

LOOPING THE LOOP— UFA-Paramount.— For-
eign drama of circus life, with an old theme, but with
some good Continental atmosphere — if that's what
you're looking for. (.March.)

LOVE IN THE DESERT— FED —Smart and
funny version of the good old hot-sand stutT, with
Olive Borden. Hugh Trevor, Noah Beery, (April.)
[ PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 136 ]



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Online LibraryMoving Picture Exhibitors' AssociationPhotoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) → online text (page 2 of 145)