Moving Picture Exhibitors' Association.

Photoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) online

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Quarter atmosphere mingled with religious hysteria.
The story is improbable, but the picture has a certain
pull. (March.)

RED MARK. THE— Pathe.— Depressing business
in a tropical penal institution. Some people have an
odd idea of fun. (Jan.)

REDSKIN — Paramount. — Richard Dix scores
again in a magnificent color picture of an Indian love
story that will delight your eye. (Feb.)

RED SWORD, THE— FBO.— Rough old Russia
before the Revolution, with a big chance for our old
pal. Carmel Myers. (April.)

• RED WINE— Fox.— Delightful and subtle
comedy of a Perfect Husband on the loose. A
treat. (Jan.)

• RESCUE. THE — Goldwyn-United Artists.—
Ronald Colman at his best. But an unsatisfac-
tory debut for the charming Lily Damita. Too much
Conrad plot, but good atmosphere and detail. (March.)

RESTLESS YOUTH—Columbia. — Just a very
old — and very cheap — story. (Feb.)



RILEYTHECOP— Fox.— J. Farrcll MacDonald's
work is the best thing in a not too interesting picture.
(Jan.)

• RIVER, THE — Fox. — An unusual and daring
story, well played by Charles Farrell and Mary
Duncan. A drama that is not for the children.
(March.)

• ROMANCE OF THE UNDERWORLD—
Fox. — Thanks to a sure-fire story, neat di-
rection and good acting, this film is one of the best of
its kind. (Jan.)

ROYAL RIDER, THE— First National— Ken
Maynard in still another mythical kingdom. Cant
keep cowboys on the range. Oh, dear! (May.)

SALVAGE — Supreme. — All a picture should not
be. (June.)

SATANESQUE—Sparta.- An American film, but
European in treatment, with its story of class con
flict in romance. (March.)

• SCARLET SEAS— First National.— Hard-
boiled stor\' of a tough skipper and his gal, who
manage to get religion without spoiling the picture
Good work by Richard Barthelmcss and Betty Comp-
son. (Jan.)

SEVEN FOOTPRINTS TO SATAN — First
National. — I love the title, don't you? But un-
fortunately it's just a hodgepodge mystery story.
(Feb.)

SHADY LADY, THE— Pathe.— Good acting,
some mystery and sharp comedy. (Feb.)

SHAKEDOWN, THE— Universal.— Another yarn
about a good bad-man. Fair enough. (Jan.)

SHANGHAI ROSE— Rayart.— A rewriting of the
old Madame X angle, with Irene Rich, as the mothah,
fighting vainly to save it all from the bow-wows of
boredom. (May.)

SHEGOESTO WAR— United Artists.— Eleanor
Boardman gives a superb performance of a sociel\-
girl who turns fighter. And the battle scenes are
wonderful. An excellent, but not great, picture
(June.)

SHIPS OF THE NIGHT— Rayart —South Sea
life seen by someone never off Main Street. Just too
kiddish for anything. (April.)

SHOPWORN ANGEL, THE— Paramount.- War-
time love story of a naughty chorus girl and an inno-
cent boy. With real drama and heart interest. (Feb.)

• SHOW BOAT— Universal.— Lavish produc-
tion of a colorful novel that deserved le?s
obvious direction. (June.)




The trained animal business in Hollywood is going to the dogs.
And all on account of the talkies. Directions cannot be shouted
from behind the camera lines, as in the silent movies, and it's a
clever animal trainer who can teach a dog to perform by motioned
signals. This is a picture of King, the white collie used in *'Dr. Fu
Manchu." King has been taught to bark when his trainer raises
his hand, to stop when the hand is brought down and to run off
stage when the trainer swings his arm. Neil Hamilton is the actor
in this picture who is giving King some lessons in make-up




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Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section




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SIDESHOW, THE— Columbia.— Hold on to
something! An original circus yarn! Little Billie
plays the lead in this story of a midget's battle for
success. (May.)

SILENT SENTINEL. THE— Chesterfield. — A
crook drama, of all oddities! (Feb.)

SILENT SHELDON— Rayart.— Pleasant sort of
Western. (Jan,)

SINNERS' PARADE— Columbia.— The ritzy side
of the underworld with a snappy plot. (Jan.'t

SIN SISTER. THE— Fox.— An Alaskan melo-
drama that has good suspense and excellent acting.
(June.)

• SINS OF THE FATHERS — Paramount—
Emil Jannings in a tragedy of Prohibition, Not
one of his great pictures — but, nevertheless, eminently
worth your while. (Jan.)

SIOUX BLOOD— Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. — In-
dian whoopee that might have been filmed in 1910.
(Jan.)

SKY SKIDDER, THE— Universal.— They are
aviators now. instead of cowboys. And the thrills are
new. {March.)

SMALL TOWN SINNERS— Hugo Brahn. —
German fillum. with most of the action in a barroom.
{Feb.)

SOME MOTHER*S BOY— Rayart.— Quickie
hokum. {June.)

SOMEONE TO LOVE— Paramount.— ** Buddy "
Rogers and Mary Brian in a thoroughly agreeable
picture. (Jan.)

SOMME. THE— New Era.— Made in Britain. A
grim presentation of the Sorarae campaign of 1916.
(Feb.)

SONNY BOY— Warners.— They've put poor
little Davey Lee in a bedroom farce! The kid is
swell, the film a disappointment. (May.)

SOUTH OF PANAMA— Chesterfield.— You've
guessed it. It's all about love and revolution in a
Latin republic. (Jan.)

• SPEAKEASY— Fox.— The talkies" first melo-
drama of the prize ring and the under-cover
barrooms. Fast entertainment. (May.)

SPEED CLASSIC. THE— Excellent.— An auto-
mobile racing picture — and just Hke all the others.
(Feb.)

SPITE MARRIAGE— Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. —
One of the best that Buster Keaton has made,
with Dorothy Sebastian excellent. Don't miss.
(April.)

SQUARE SHOULDERS— Pathe— A story of
father love, with Louis Wolheim as the hard-boiled
dad. (March.)

STOOL PIGEON— Columbia.— Gang melodrama.
(Feb.)

STRANGE CARGO— Pathe.— Another all-talking
m>stery, this time on board a yacht, with an all-stage
cast. (April.)

W STRONG BOY— Fox.— Victor McLaglen in a
"^n rattling good comedy drama, with the star as
head man of the baggage smashers. (April.)

SUNSET PASS— Paramount.— Jack Holt in one
of the best Westerns in months. And Jack's a sheriff.
Dearie me I (A pril.)

SYNCOPATION— RKC— Gay and jazzy night
club entertainment that will enliven your evening.
(June.)

SYNTHETIC SIN — First NaUonaL — Colleen
Moore goes through her usual antics — but the story is
missing. (Feb.)

THAT PARTY IN PERSON— Paramount.— A
talkie with Eddie Cantor, the only logical contender
for Al Jolson's crown. Come again. Eddie. (Feb.)

THIS IS HEAVEN— Goldwyn-United Artists.—
Vilma Bankv talks and it is charming! But the
story— Cinderella. No. 123456789. (May.)

THREE PASSIONS, THE— United Artists.—
Rex Ingram produces an old-fashioned story of
English high life, with AUce Terry still an ice cake.
(April.)

THREE WEEK-ENDS— Paramount.— It has
Clara Bow. but that's about all you can say for it.
(Feb.)

TRACKED— FBC— Ranger, the dog. in a picture
that is better than most human efforts. (Feb.)

TRAIL OFTHE HORSE THIEVES.THE— FBO.

— Easy-going Western, with Tom Tyler just lopin'
along. Tom and Frankie Darro together. (May.)

TRENT'S LAST CASE— Fox.— A mystery story,
treated like a farce. And very good, too. (June.)



• TRIAL OF MARY DUGAN— M -G -M.— A
distinct achievement, in that it is a hteral
translation of one of the best recent plays. And a
triumphant talkie debut for Norma Shearer. (June.)

TROPICAL NIGHTS — Tiffany-Stahl. — South
Sea Island story with an original twist to the plot.
(March.)

TROPIC MADNESS— FBC— Turbulent melo-
drama of England and the South Seas. (March.)

TRUE HEAVEN— Fox.— A poky story of love in
the secret service, with Lois Moran and big George
O'Brien. (April.)

TYRANT OF RED GULCH— FBO— Not a
Western, in spite of the title. Just a badly bent story.
(Feb.)

UNDER THE SOUTHERN CROSS— Universal.
-^The natives of New Zealand are the actors in this
picture. It's different and it has primitive charm.
(March.)

UNEASY MONEY— Fox-Europa.— German pic-
ture, well directed, well acted and original in theme.
(Feb.)

VEILED WOMAN, THE— Fox.— Hollywood's
foreign legion in a not bad. not good, story. (Feb.)

VIKING, THE — Technicolor-M.-G.-M. — How
Lief the Lucky discovered America, told in color and
with plenti' of wliiskcrs. (Jan.)

VOICE IN THE STORM, THE— FBO.— Just be-
fore the hanging, mother. The old one about the
innocent boy, the noose, the reprieve! (May.)

VOICE OF THE CITY, THE— M.-G.-M.— Old

stuff, written and directed by Willard Mack and
acted by Mr. and Mrs. Willard Mack. It's a speakie.
(Jutie.)

WAGES OF CONSCIENCE— Superlative.— But
where was the conscience of the producer of such a
picture? (Feb.)

• WEARY RIVER— First National.— Barlhel-
mess' first talkie, with the star as a reformed
convict. A popular sensation. (April.)

WHAT A NIGHT!— Paramount.— Bebe Daniels
in a gaggy — and gaga — newspaper story. (Feb.)

WHEN DREAMS COME TRUE— Rayart.— This
has been going on for years. Blue-grass racing
story, with Helene Costello and Rex Lease. (May.)

WHERE EAST IS EAST~M.-G.-M.— Another
Clianey bed-time story, with a touch of Kipling and
Poe. (June.)



WHY BE GOOD?— First National.— Colleen
Moore at her naughtiest and nicest. Peppy and



entertaining. {April.)



WILD BLOOD — Universal. — Rex. the wonder
horse, sets a rough deal in a particularly childish
Western. {April.)

• WILD ORCHIDS— Metro-GoIdwyn-Ma\er.
— Greta Garbo and Nils Asther in a stor>' that
7jroves that tropical heat melts all conventions. Tlie
scene is Java — the details are superb — and the picture
is a riot for audiences. {March.)

• WILD PARTY, THE— Paramount.— Clara
Bow's first talkie. Clara is a smooth contralto.
It's a collegiate story — and that's what they want.
(June.)

WINGEDHORSEMAN.THE— Universal.— Hoot

Gibson gives up his pony and takes the air, with Ruth
Elder his flying partner. Vague plot. {May.)

WOLF OF WALL STREET. THE— Paramount.
— Whether j'ou have won or lost money in Wall Street,
or haven't played the stock market at all. George
Bancroft and Baclanova will give you one of the most
entertaining talkies so far made. A deliglitful eve-
ning. (Feb.)

WOLF SONG — Paramount. — Mountains, trees
and some good singing by Lupe Velez. But not such
a good break for Gary Cooper. {March.)

WOLVES OF THE CITY— Universal. — Action
thriller, with Bill Cody saving Sally Blane from the
rascally ransom-crooks, {.[pril.)

WOMAN I LOVE, THE— FBC— Mad husband
sets out to murder man for making love to wife.
Excited? Neither are we. {May.)

WOMAN IN THE NIGHT, A— World Wide.—
English production with a slow and sentimental
story. {June.)

• WOMAN OF AFFAIRS, A— Metro-Goldwyn-
Mayer. — Greta Garbo and Jolin Gilbert in
what is none other than Michael Arlen's "The Green
Hat." Why wa.ste space urging you to drop everj'tliing
and see this one? {Jan.)

YELLOWBACK, THE — FBO. — More Royal
Mounted Police, with the usual help from the scenery.
{March.)



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Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section



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Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section



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Address

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J



Addresses of the Stars



At P a r a m o u n t - Famous-Lasky
Studios, Hollywood, Calif.



Richard Arleti
Jean Arthur
William Austin
Olga Baclanova
George Bancroft
Wallace Beery
Clara Bow
Evelyn Brent
Mary Brian
Clive Brook
Nancy Carroll
Kathryn Carver
Robert Castle
Lane Chandler
Ruth Chatterton
Maurice Chevalier
Chester Conklin
Gary Cooper
Richard Di.x
Paul Guertzman

At Metro-Goldwyn-
ver City, Calif.
Renee Adoree
George K. Arthur
Nils Asthcr
Lionel Barrymore
John Mack Brown
Lon Chaney
Joan Crawford
Karl Dane
Marion Davies
Josephine Dunn
Cireta Garbo
John Gilbert
Raymond Hackett
William Haines
Phyllis Haver
Leila Hyams



James Hall
Neil Hamilton
O. P. Heggie
Doris Hill
Phillips Holmes
Emil Jannings
Jack Luden
Frederic March
Adolphe Menjou
David Newell
Jack Oakie
Warner Gland
Guy OUver
William Powell
Esther Ralston
Charles Rogers
Ruth Taylor
Florence Vidor
Fay Wray

Mayer Studios, Cul-

Dorothy Janis
Buster Kcaton
Charles King
Gwen Lee
Bessie Love
Tim McCoy
Conrad Nagel
Ramon No\'arro
Edward Nugent
Anita Page
Aileen Pringle
Dorothy Sebastian
Norma Shearer
Lewis Stone
Ernest Torrence
Raquel Torres

1401 No. Western
Calif.
Janet Gaynor
George Jessel
Ivan Linow
Edmund Lowe
Sharon Lynn
Farrell MacDonald
Victor McLaglen
Lois Moran
Charles ISIorton
Barry Norton
George O'Brien
Sally Phipps
David Rollins
Arthur Stone
Nick Stuart
Don Terry
Helen Twelvetrees



At Fox Studios,
Avenue, Hollywood,

Frank Albertson
Mary Astor
Ben Bard
Warner Baxter
Marjorie Beebe
Rex Bell
Dorothy Burgess
Warren Burke
Sue Carol
Sammy Cohen
June CoUyer
Louise Dresser
Nancy Drexel
Mary Duncan
Charles Eaton
Charles Farrell
Earle Foxe

At Warner Brothers Studios, 5842 Sunset
Blvd., Hollywood, Calif.



John Barrymore
Monte Blue
Betty Bronson
William Collier, Jr.
Dolores Costello
Louise Fazenda



Audrey Ferris
Al Jolson
Davey Lee
May McAvoy
Grant Withers



At Universal Studios, Universal City,
Calif.



Lina Basquette
John Boles
Ethlyn Claire
Kathryn Crawford
Reginald Denny
Jack Dougherty
Lorayne DuVal
Ruth Elder
Hoot Gibson
Dorothy Gulliver
Otis Harlan
Raymond Keane
Merna Kennedy



Barbara Kent
Beth Laemmle
Arthur Lake
Laura La Plante
George Lewis
Fred Mackaye
Ken Maynard
Mary Nolan
Mary Philbin
Eddie Phillips
Joseph Schildkraut
Glenn Tryon
Barbara Worth



At RKO Studios, 780 Gower Street,
Hollywood, Calif.



Buzz Barton
Sally Blane
Olive Borden
Betty Compson



Bebe Daniels
Frankie Darro
Bob Steele
Tom Tyler



At Pathe Studios, Culver City, Calif.

Robert Armstrong Alan Hale

William Boyd Jeanette Lo£f

Junior Coghlan Carol Lombard

At First National Studios, Burbank,
CaUf.



Richard Barthekness
BiUie Dove
Corinne Griffith
Doris Kenyon
Dorothy MackalU



Colleen Moore
Jack Mulhall
Donald Reed
Milton Sills
Alice White



At United Artists Studios, 1041 No.
Formosa Avenue, Hollywood, Calif.



Don Alvarado
Fannie Brice
Douglas Fairbanks
Mary Pickford



Gilbert Roland
Norma Talmadge
Constance Talmadge
Lupe Velez



At Columbia Studios, 1438 Gower Street,
Hollywood, Calif.



Olive Borden
William Collier, Jr.
Ralph Graves
Jack Holt
Margaret Livingston



Jacqueline Logan
Ben Lyon
Shirley Mason
Dorothy Revier
Lois Wilson



In care of Samuel Goldwyn, 7210 Santa
Monica Blvd., Hollywood, Calif.



Vilma Banky
Walter Byron



Ronald Colman
Lily Damita



In care of the Edwin Carewe Productions,
Tec-Art Studios, Holl}fwood, Calif.



Dolores Del Rio
Roland Drew



Rita Carewe
LeRoy Mason



Robert Agnew, 6357 La Mirada Avenue,
Hollywood, Calif.

Jackie Coogan, 673 South Oxford Avenue,
Los Angeles, CaUf .

Virginia Brown Faire, 1212 Gower Street,
Hollywood, Calif.

Gilda Gray, 22 East 60th Street, New York
City.

WiUiam S. Hart, 6404 Sunset Blvd., Holly-
wood, Calif.

Lloyd Hughes, 616 Taft Building, HoUy-
wood, Calif.

Harold Lloyd, 6640 Santa Monica Blvd.,
Hollywood, Calif.

Bert Lytell, P. O. Box 235, HoUy^vood, CaUf.

Patsy Ruth Miller, 808 Crescent Drive,
Beveriy HUls, Calif.

Pat O'Malley, 1832 Taft Avenue, Los
Angeles, Cahf.

Herbert Rawhnson, 1735 Highland Street,
Los Angeles, Calif.

Ruth Roland, 3828 Wilshire Blvd., Los
Angeles, Calif.

EsteUe Taylor, 5254 Los Feliz Blvd., Los
Angeles, Cahf.



Every adTertisement in PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE is guaranteed.



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section



Casts of Current Photoplays

Complete for every picture reviewed in this issue



"BIG DIAMOND ROBBERY. THE"— FBO.—
From the story by Frank Howard Clarke. Adapted
by John Stuart Twist. Directed by Eugene Ford.
The cast: Tom Markham, Tom Mix; Ellen Brooks.
Kathryn McGuire; George Brooks. Frank Bcal;
A untie Brooks, Martha Mattox; Stevens, Ernest
Hiltiard; Barney, Barney Furey; Chick, Ethan Laid-
law.

"BULLDOG DRUMMOND"—Goldwyn-United
Artists. — -From the stage play by Sapper. Scenario
by Wallace Smith. Directed by F. Richard Jones.
The cast: Bulldog Drummond, Ronald Colman;
Phyllis, Joan Bennett; Erma. Lilyan Tashman;
Peterson, MontaRU Love; Lakington. Lawrence Grant;
Danny, Wilson Benge; Algy. Claude Allister; Marco-
vitch, Adolph Milar; Travers, Charles Scllon; Chong^
Tetsu Komai.

"COME ACROSS"— Universal.— From the
story, "The Stolen Lady," by Wm. Dudley Pelley.
Adapted by Peter Milne. Directed by Ray Taylor.
Photography by R. Redman. The cast: Mary
Houston, Lina Basquette; Harry Eraser, Reed Howes;
Pop Hanson, Gustav Von Seyffertitz; "Caster Oil"
Cassie, Flora Finch; George Harcourt, Crauford Kent;
Harriet Houston, Clarissa Selwynne.

"DEVIL'S CHAPLAIN, THE"— Rayart.—
From the story by George Bronson Howard.
Adapted by Arthur Hoerl. Directed by Duke
Worne. Photography by Hap Depew. The cast:
The King, Josef Swickard; Princess Therese, Virginia
Brown Faire; Yorke Norroy, Cornelius Keefe;
Nicholay, Wheeler Oakman; The Prince, George
Macintosh; Boris, Boris Karloff; Ivan, Leland Carr.

"DUKE STEPS OUT, THE "- M.-G.-M.— From
the story by Lucian Car>'. Adapted by Raymond
Schrock and Dale Van Every. Directed by James
Cruze. Photography by Ira Morgan. The cast:
Duke, William Haines; Susie, Joan Crawford; Barney,
Karl Dane; Jake, Tenen Holtz; Tommy Wells, Eddie
Nugent; Poison Kerrigan, Jack Roper; Bossy
Edwards, Delmer Daves; Professor Widdicomb, Luke
Cosgrave; Mr, Corbin, Herbert Prior.

"EXALTED FLAPPER. THE"— Fox.— From the
story by Will Irwin. Adapted by Ray Harris.
Directed by James Tinling. The cast: Princess Izola,
Sue Carol; Prince Boris, Barry Norton; Queen
Charlotte, Irene Rich; King Alexander, Albert Conti;
Marjorie, Sylvia Field; Bimbo Mehaffey. Stuart
Erwin; Premier Vadisco, Lawrence Grant; Dr.
Nicholas, Charles Clary; Old Fritz, Michael Visaroff;
Reporter, Don Fullen; Banker, Landers Stevens.

"EYES OF THE UNDERWORLD "—Univer-
sal. — From the story by Leigh Jason. Directed by
Leigh Jason and Ray Taylor. Photography by AI
G. Jones. The cast: Pat Doran, VVilliam Cody;
Florence Huesfon, Sally Blane; Gang Leader, Arthur
Lubin; Gimpy Johnson, Harry Tenbrook; John
Hueslon, Charles Clary; Gardener, Monte Montague.

"FOX MOVIETONE FOLLIES"— Fox.— From
the story by David Butler. Dialogue by William
K. Wells. Directed by David Butler. The cast:
George Shelby, John Breeden; Lila Beaumont, Lola
Lane; Jay Darrell, DeWitt Jennings; Ann Foster,
Sharon Lynn; Al Leaton, Arthur Stone; Swifiy,
Stepin Fetchit; Martin, Warren Hymer; Stage
Manager, Archie Gottler; Orchestra Leader, Arthur
Kay; Le Maire, Mario Dominici. Principals



Online LibraryMoving Picture Exhibitors' AssociationPhotoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) → online text (page 24 of 145)