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visit, doctor. I'm anxious about them."

D.D.s. :"What's the matter?"

you: "Well, sometimes they're tender when
I brush my teeth. And once in a while they
bleed a little. But my teeth seem to be all
right. Just how serious is a thing like this?

D.D.s. :"ProbabIy nothing to bother
about, with a healthy mouth like
yours. But, just the same, I've seen
people with white and flawless teeth
get into serious trouble with their
gums."

you: "That's what worries me. pyorrhea
— gingivitis — trench mouth — all those hor-
rible-sounding things! Just a month ago a
jriend of mine had to have seven teeth
pulled out."

D.D.s.: "Yes, such things can happen.
Not long ago a patient came to me
with badly inflamed gums. I x-rayed
them and found the infection had spread
so far that eight teeth had to go. Some
of them were perfectly sound teeth,
too."

you: QAfter a pause') "I was reading a
dentifrice advertisement . . . about food."

D.D.s.: "Soft food? Yes, that's to blame
for most of the trouble. You see, our
gums get no exercise from the soft,
creamy foods we eat. Circulation lags
and weak spots develop on the gum
walls. That's how these troubles begin.
If you lived on rough, coarse fare your
gums would hardly need attention."




»»»».»»»>'».»»»-»^»>-»».S->-S.9-9-S-^S-»<





YOU : ' ' But, doctor, 1 can 't take up a diet of
raw roots and hardtack. People ivould
think I'd suddenly gone mad."

D.D.s.: "No need to change your diet.
But you can give your gums the stimu-
lation they need. Massage or brush
them twice a day when you brush
your teeth. And one other suggestion:
use Ipana Tooth Paste. It's a scientific,
modern dentifrice, and it contains
special ingredients that stimulate the
gums and help prevent infection."

* * *

/\n imaginary dialog? An imaginary
"you"? Admittedly, but the action is
real. It is drawn from life — from real
tragedies and near-tragedies enacted
every day in every city of the land!

And if dentists recommend Ipana, as
thousands of them do, it is because it is
good for the gums as well as for the
teeth. Under its continual use, the
teeth are gleaming white, the gums
firm and healthy. For Ipana contains
ziratol, a recognized hemostatic and
antiseptic well known to dentists for
its tonic effects upon gum tissue.

Don't wait for "pink tooth brush"
to appear before you start with Ipana.
The coupon brings you a sample which
will quickly prove Ipana's pleasant
taste and cleaning power.

But, to know all of Ipana's good ef-
fects, it is far better to go to your near-
est druggist and get a large tube. After
you have used its hundred brushings
you will know its benefits to the health
of your gums as well as your teeth.



BRISTOL-MYERS CO.. Dept. 1-89
73 West Street, New York, N. Y.

Kindly send me a trial tube of IPANA TOOTH
PASTE. Enclosed is a two-cent stamp to cover
partly the cost of packing and mailing.

Name

Addreis

Ciiy Stale



V\'hen you write to advertisers please mention PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE.



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section



. . . THE NEW
SHOW WORLD




B



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The World's Leading Motion Picture Publication



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MANAOUtO KsnoB




Contents




For

August

1929



Vol. XXXVI




. Quirk



No. 3



<^=



L D I T O R -A!N BiiP U B L 1 S H E R



Cover Design
Greta Garbo-



-Painted from Life



The High-Lights of This Issue

Earl Christy



As We Go to Press

Last Minute News from East and West

Brief Reviews of Current Pictures

A Guide to Your Evening's Entertainment

Brickbats and Bouquets
The Voice of the Fan

Friendly Advice on Girls' Problems

Carolyn Van Wyck
Photoplay's Personal Service Department

Close-Ups and Long Shots James R. Quirk

The Editor Tells You What's What and Who
Without Fear or Favor

The Girl Who Played Greta Garbo

Lois Shirley
Hired to Double She Literally Became the Swedish
Star

The Passing of the Extra Girl

Katherine Albert
The 1929 One Must Have More Than Beauty

Should Old Acquaintance Be Forgot?

What Yesterday's Favorites Are Doing Today

Why Jack Gilbert Married

Adela Rogers St. Johns
"I Simply Met the Nicest Person I'd Ever Known,"
He Says

Excess Baggage Katherine Albert

Being Husbands and Wives of Film Favorites

Hollywood's New Slayer Herbert Howe

None Other Than Mary Duncan

An Old Fashioned Girl Steps Out

(Fiction Story) Grace Mack

Something Happened When the Film Style in
Heroines Changed



6

8

10

16

27

29

30
34

36

40
43

46



Gossip of All the Studios Cal York

What the Film Folk Are Doing and Saying

How to Make a Talking Picture

Leonard Hall
You Need Ten Dirty Gentlemen to say "Shhhhhh!"

The Shadow Stage

Reviews of the Latest Silent and Sound Pictures

$5,000 in Fifty Cash Prizes

Rules in Photoplay's Cut Picture Puzzle Contest

It's All Over Now Marquis Busby

Joan Bennett Has No Further Use for This Thing
Called Love

How They Manage Their Homes

Alma Whitaker

Joan Crawford Planned Her House as the Setting for
a Perpetual Honeymoon

Monahan the Menace (Fiction Story)

Stewart Robertson
"Tug" Learns Not Always to Judge a Star by His
Looks



Reeling Around



Leonard Hall



<%>-



Tidbits Served with a Dash of Spice

Amateur Movies Frederick James Smith

News About Photoplay's Contest

Eat and Be Merry Dr. H. B. K. Willis

Photoplay's Diet Expert Tells You the Way to Do It

What Was the Best Picture of 1928?

Cast Your Ballot for Photoplay's Gold Medal

Cook with Bran

Photoplay's Cook Book Contains These Recipes

Questions and Answers The Answer Man

What You Want to Know About Films and Film Folk

Casts of Current Photoplays

Complete for Every Picture Reviewed in This Issue



48

52

54
58
63

64

66

69
70
72
78
81
86
141



A complete list of all photoplays reviewed in the Shadow Stage this issue will be found on page 14



<<iP=



i-a?



Published monthly by the Photoplay Publishing Co.

Editorial Offices, 221 W. 57th St., New York City Publishing Office, 750 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111.

The International News Company. Ltd.. Distributing Agents, 5 Bream's Building, London, England

James R. Quirk, President Robert M. Eastman, Vice-President Kathryn Dougherty, Secretary and Treasurer

Yearly Subscription: $2.50 in the United States, its dependencies. Mexico and Cuba; $3.00 Canada; $3.50 for foreign countries. Remittances

should be made by check, or postal or express money order. Caution — Do not subscribe through persons unknown to you.

Entered as second-class matter April 24. 1912. at the Postoffice at Chicago, 111., under the Act of March 3, 1879.

Copyright, 1929, by the Photoplay Publishing Company, Chicago.



As We Go to Press

Last Minute NEWS from East ^;/^West



ONE more silent picture before you
hear Greta Garbo talk in "Anna
Christie." She is making a story by
Jacques Feyder without sound. Garbo is
anxious to face the "mike."

IN Bill Hart's first comeback picture,
Thelma Todd will be leading lady.

LON CHANEY will talk on the screen-
as soon as the mechanics are perfected.
He also demands a successful dialogue
director. Will he become the Man of a
Thousand Voices?

MIDSUMMER romancing — Edward
Everett Horton and Lois Moran are
going places. Buddy Rogers is courting
June CoUyer. Arthur Lake and Mary Brian
seem to care, and Marian Nixon is listening
to the honeyed words of Eddie Hillman, a
Chicago polo shark. The David Rollins-
Dixie Lee romance began during the mak-
ing of the "Fox Movietone Follies." No
date has been set for the Bebe Daniels-Ben
Lyon wedding, with both principals saying
it is four or five months off.



THREE new young
stars at Paramount —
Dick Arlen, Gary Cooper
and Nancy Carroll. Gary's
first solo picture is
"Medals."

WILL ROGERS is aU
set to begin his pic-
ture work at Fox. A $7,000
bungalow is being built for
him. John McCormack
will have one too, and
possibly Janet Gaynor.

WITH her marriage
to Jack Gilbert, Ina
Claire's fan mail has
leaped to 20,000 letters a
week. Her former fiance,
Gene Markey, high priced
writer, is now one of the
leading bachelors of Holly-
wood. He has been lunch-
ing, dining and dancing
with Ruth Taylor and
other filmland girls.

RUTH TAYLOR will
play the lead in "Col-
lege Coquette" for Co-
lumbia. Others are Jobyna
Ralston, William Collier,
Jr., and John Holland.

THE cast of the all-
color Pickford-Fair-
banks, "Taming of the
Shrew," will include Jef-
fery Wardwell, Edwin
Maxwell, Dorothy Jordan,
Joseph Cawthorne and
Clyde Cook.

"TT'OOTLIGHTS AND
-T" FOOLS" will be Col-
leen Moore's last picture
under her old First Na-
tional contract. Another
company may grab the
Irish lass, as Warners are
said to be averse to sign-
ing her even at the former



figure — $12,000 a week. She remains a
great draw. When Colleen finishes the
film she will charter a yacht and sail Alaskan
waters.



WARNER BROTHERS
start production of



are about to
a daring stage
play, "Outward Bound." The action takes
place on a ship at sea, and all the characters
are supposedly dead. Two suicides escape
the ship and return to life.



EVELYN BRENT is at last to be starred
by Paramount. She has fought off
stardom, feeling that a star's life is short,
while featured players go on forever.



HIS Paramount contract over,



Adolphe
■Menjou has sailed for Europe. He will
probably live at Cannes, on the Riviera, for
a while. He did not re-sign.



HAL SKELLY'S second picture for Para-
mount will be "Behind the Makeup."
Another back stage story, with Esther Ral-
ston as leading woman and William Powell
in a feature role.




PARAMOUNT may waive its rights to a
last Richard Dix picture under his old
contract. He will then be free to go right
to work for RKO under his new starring
contract.

DENNIS KING arrives in Hollywood to
play his famous role in the Paramount
filming of "The Vagabond King." King
starred in it for two years on the stage.
Jeannette MacDonald, famous stage blonde,
will be opposite.

DOROTHY MACKAILL has been given
a month's vacation, and will holiday in
Honolulu.

WARNERS are also to make a Vita-
phone of "Golden Dawn," Hammer-
stein operetta. All color, with Larry Ceballos
staging the ensembles and Ray Enright
directing.

"TV/TAGNOLIA," made several years ago

■'■''-•■as a silent film starring CuUen Landis,

makes its bow as a talkie for Paramount,

with Charlie Rogers, Mary Brian and June

Collyer. The new title is

"River of Romance."



THERE is a rumor that
Paramount may yet
produce "An American
Tragedy," if censors can
be placated. Charles
Rogers is a surprise choice
for the lead. It is an emo-
tional role in a rather
sordid and very tragic
story, and such a part will
be a severe test of Rogers'
nice-boy following.

FOX is advertising
Mary Duncan for one
more picture only. Con-
tract not renewed?



R.



& A. Photo



This contraption is the long-awaited camera equipment
for taking three dimension, or stereoscopic, movies. With
it are the inventors, John Berggren and George K. Spoor.
The machine represents ten years of labor and the expend-
iture of over three million dollars. A screen fifty feet wide
and thirty feet high is used in the projection.



AOUL WALSH'S
•next picture will be
"The Cisco Kid," with
Edmund Lowe and
Warner Baxter, famous
team of "In Old Arizona."

CLIVE BROOK is home
from an English vaca-
tion to start work on a
Sherlock Holmes story for
Paramount.

CORINNE GRIFFITH
liked life abroad so
well on her recent junket
in Europe that she will
buy a small chateau near
Paris and spend three
months a year there.

NELL HAMILTON has
joined the film yachts-
men by buying a thirty-
four foot yawl named ' 'The
Venus." He will sail her
himself.

BILLIE DOVE'S next
for First National will
be "Give the Girl a
Hand." Alexander Korda
will direct.



Photoplay Magazine — Advertising Section




1 iJLM covers teeth

— it dulls them — it destroys them

Yet gleaming whiteness will return if you remove it



SCIENCE discovered the way to
keep teeth white and brilliant while
seeking a way to combat the start of
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Today, the approved method of pro-
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The special way to remove it

Ordinary brushing ways are not suc-
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You must employ the scientific method
that first curdles film so that brushing

Pepsodent



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You marvel at the natural white-
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When you write to advertisers please mention PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE.




Brief Reviews of

Current Pictures



-^Indicates that photoplay was named as one
of the six best upon its month of review



ALIBI — United Artists. — An almost flawless
talkie about a young gunman who marries a cop's
daughter. Elegant melodrama. All Talkie. (May.)

ALL-AMERICAN. THE— Supreme.— How a col-
legiate sprinter mops up the Olympic Games, demon-
strated by Charhe Paddock. Silent. {March.)

ALL AT SEA — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. — A Dane-
Arthur comedy. The title explains it. Silent.
{March.)

ALL FACES WEST— Pioneer.— Western thriller
filmed with Mormon money. Marie Prevost and Ben
Lyon are in it. Silent. {April.)

ANNE AGAINST THE WORLD— Ray art-
Story of the terrible life of a misunderstood musical
comedy queen. Terrible is right. Silent. {June.)

APACHE, THE— Columbia.— Just the romance of
two sweet kids in the Latin Quarter — if you believe in

such things. Silent. {Feb.)

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS— Columbia.— PsstI
Secret service stuff in another mythical country.
Virginia VaUi. Silent, {May.)

BEHIND THE GERMAN LINES— UFA-Para-
mount. — The German side of the war, with excellent
and authentic battle scenes spoiled by some obviously
studio shots. Sound. {Feb.)

BELOW THE DEADLINE — Chesterfield.—
Quickie crook stuff — and something awful. Silent.
{June.)

• BETRAYAL- Paramount.— Not a pretty
tale, but fine dramatic fare, with Emil Jannings,
Esther Ralston, Gary Cooper. Sound. {May.)

BIG DIAMOND ROBBERY, THE— FBO— Cow-
boy Mix in a fast and thrilling one. Silent. {July.)

BLACK BIRDS OF FIJI — Australasian. —
Another South Sea Island picture — only so-so.
Silent. {Feb.)

BLACK HILLS, THE— Dakota.— In which the
dam bursts again. Silent. {March.)

BLACK PEARL, THE— Rayart.— Loose-limbed
mystery that rambles aimlessly through the Orient.
Silent. {April.)

BLACK WATERS — World Wide.— Thrilling,
chilling melodrama with mediocre dialogue. Silent.
{June.)

BLOCKADE— FED. — Bootlegging made attrac-
tive by Anna Q. Nilsson. A good melodrama.
Part Talkie. {March.)

BLOW FOR BLOW— Universal.— More adven-
tures of Hoot Gibson, if you're interested in Westerns.
Silent. {Feb.)

BLUE SKIES — Fox. — An orphanage romance,
beautifully acted and charmingly directed. Sound.
{June).

BONDMAN, THE— World Wide,— Foreign ver-
sion of Hall Caine's novel, messed up by poor
photography. Silent. {June.)

BORN TO THE SADDLE— Universal —Three
rousing cheers! A real good Western, with action
and humor. Ted Wclli is head man. Silent. {May.)

BRIDE'S RELATIONS. THE— Sennett-Educa-
tional. — One-reel talking comedy sad and funny by
turns. Eddie Gribbon is best. All Talkie. {April.)

BRIDGE OF SAN LUIS REY, THE— M.-G.-M.—

To the astonishment of all, a good picture from the
Wilder novel. And, oh, zat Lily Damital Part
talkie. {May.)

BROADWAY FEVER — Tiffany-Stahl. — Sally
O'Neill being literally too cute for words in a trivial
story. Silent. {March.)

• BROADWAY MELODY, THE— Metro-Gold-
wyn-Mayer. — Brilliant all-talkie of backstage
life, with Bessie Love astonishing. Ail Talkie.
{April.)

BROTHERS — Rayart. — A good brotherly love
yarn, one a crook and one a nice boy. Barbara
Bedford dares do a heavy. Silent. {May.)

8



• BULLDOG DRUMMOND — Goldwyn-
United Artists. — Great melodrama, intelli-
ge ntly produced a nd with a fine performance by
Ronald Colman. Don't miss it. All Talkie. {July.)

BYE-BYE BUDDY— Supreme.— Did you know
that night club hostesses have hearts of gold? This
one is an unintentionally funny sob story. Silent.
{June.)

• CANARY MURDER CASE, THE— Para-
mount.— Logical and well constructed mystery
story. William Powell is perfectly swell as the de-
tective. All Talkie. {Feb.)

CAPTAIN LASH — Fox. — A coal stoker's romance
or love on the waterfront. Rather strong stuff.
Sound. {Feb.)

• CASE OF LENA SMITH, THE— Paramount.
— Sincere drama of the love affair of a servant
girl, her hardships and her martyrdom. A real
picture for intelligent adult audiences. Silent. {Feb.)



Pictu res You
Should Not Miss

"In Old Arizona"

"Alibi"

"Bulldog Drummond"

"The Broadway Melody"

"jth Heaven"

"The Singing Fool"

"Interference"



As a service to its readers, Photo-
play Magazine presents brief critical
comments on all photoplays of the
preceding six months. By consulting
this valuable guide, you can deter-
mine at a glance whether or not your
promised evening's entertainment is
worth while. Photoplay's reviews
have always been the most author-
itative published. And its tabloid
reviews show you accurately and con-
cisely how to save your motion picture
time and money. The month at the
end of each review indicates the issue
of Photoplay in which the original
review appeared.



CHARLATAN, THE — Universal. — Murder mys-
tery done with nice, light touch, especially by Holmes
Herbert. Part Talkie. (April.)

CHINA BOUND — M.-G.-M. — Messieurs Dane
and Arthur in a Chinese.revolution. Fairly funny.
Sound. (June.)

CHINA SLAVERS, THE— Trinity.— Ragged
story of the Oriental slave trade, but smartly acted by
Sojin. Silent. (April,)

CHINATOWN NIGHTS— Paramount.— Piping
hot melodrama of tong wars and such, with Wallace
Beery and Florence Vidor good. All Talkie. {May.)

• CHRISTINA — Fox. — Slender and improbable
story made beautiful and worth seeing by the
inspired acting of Janet Gaynor. Part Talkie. {June.)

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE— Chesterfield.
— Nothing that you could care about in a big way.
Silent. {March.)



CLEAR THE DECKS — Universal. — Reginald

Denny in one of the oldest farce plots in the world.
Part Talkie. {March.)

• CLOSE HARMONY— Paramount.— Brilliant
talkie of backstage vaudeville life. Fine fun,
with Buddi' Rogers and Nancy Carroll aces. All
Talkie. {May.)

COHENS AND KELLYS IN ATLANTIC CITY,

THE — Universal. — For those who like this sort of
thing. Part Talkie. {March.)

COME ACROSS— Universal.— Just a round-up of
discarded movie plots. Part Talkie. {July.)

• COQUETTE — United Artists. — Denatured
version of the stage play with a fine perform-
ance by Mary Pickford. And Mary's voice is one of
the best in the talkies. Of course you'll want to see —
and hear — her. .\11 Talkie. {June.)

DANGEROUS WOMAN, THE— Paramount.—
Reviewed under title of "The Woman Who Needed
Killing." Tropical and torrid drama of the South
Seas. Not for children. All Talkie. {June.)

DESERT NIGHTS — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. —
One of Jack Gilbert's less fortunate vehicles. Sound.
{March.)

DESERT SONG, THE— Warners.— All-singing
and talking operetta that is a bit old-fashioned and
stagj'. Some good singing by Jolin Boles. Part
Talkie. {June).

DEVIL'S CHAPLAIN, THE— Rayarl.— Adven-
tures of royalty in America. Fairly entertaining.
Silent. {July.)

DIPLOMATS, THE — Fox-Movietone. — Clark
and McCullough in a two-reel talkie that will give you
some laughs. .Ml Talkie. {March.)

• DOCTOR'S SECRET, THE— Paramount.—
Barrie's playlet. "Half an Hour," emerges as a
superior and well-constructed talkie. It is brilliantly
acted and well worth your time and money. All
Talkie. {March.)

DOMESTIC MEDDLERS— Tiffany-Stahl.— The

eternal and well-worn triangle. Silent. {Feb.)

DONOVAN AFFAIR, THE— Columbia.— Mys-
tery play with too little suspense and too much
forced comedy. Nevertheless, it has a good cast.
All Talkie. {June.)

DREAM OF LOVE — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. —
The prince and the pretty peasant — again. Phoney
stuff in spite of Joan Crawford and Nils Asther.
Sound. (Feb.)

DRIFTER, THE— FBO.— Just another Western.
But send the kids, anyway, because Tom Mix is in it.
Silent. {March.)

DUKE STEPS OUT, THE— M.-G.-M. — Light-
weight but amusing stor\- of the romance of a cul-
tured prize-fighter. Part Talkie. {July.)

• DUMMY, THE — Paramount. — In this excel-
lent all-talking crook melodrama, two HoUy-
wooders — ZaSu Pitts and Mickey Bennett — steal
honors from a lot of stage stars. .AH Talkie. (,-l;>ri;.)

ELIGIBLE MR. BANGS, THE— Coronet-Educa-
tional. — A clever little dress-suit comedy in one reel,
with Edward Everett Horton fine. All Talkie.
{AprU).

ETERNAL LOVE— United Artists.— John Profile
Barrymore and Camilla Horn get romantic in the
Swiss Alps. Sound. {April.)

ETERNAL WOMAN, THE — Columbia.—
Frenzied society melodrama with a rubber plot that
bounces all over the map. Silent. {June.)



Online LibraryMoving Picture Exhibitors' AssociationPhotoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) → online text (page 26 of 145)