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on the Lido and points East.

I never talk like that. Nor do any of my
friends and enemies. Whenever I do hear



anyone using that manner of speech, I find
that almost invariably it is an affectation, and
heartily despised.

Let's be natural. The talkies have a rosy
future, if they \vill only relax, take off their
shoes, park their feet on the table and make
themselves at home and homely!

B.vRBARA Berry.

Hear a Parent's Plea!

Philadelphia, Penna.

.'Vs the father of a five-year old son, I'd like
to remind motion picture producers that in
making talkies exclusively they ha\'e lost one
of their best markets.

Until a year ago, our son took us to most of
the shows we saw. As long as Noah Beery and
Baclanova expressed their venom in acrion, as
long as Richard Dix and Conrad Nagel de-
fended womanhood with their fists instead of
with epigrams, our offspring was delighted with
the movies and would sit through an entire
performance without fidgeting once.

When the talkies came along, he waited
patiently for somebody to break a chair over
somebody else's head. When they did nothing
but stand and speak, he asked for a drink of
water. He got foiu' drinks of water that eve-
ning.

A few more trips to the jabbering drama
and he was done forever.

MenUon movies to him now and a terrible
expression of mingled boredom and thirst comes
over his face.

There must be thousands of parents whose
patronage of pictures has been reduced for the
same reason. Sometliing must be done to
provide for the kids.

B. Storm.

Making Good Americans —

Bruno, Neb.

What are the movies doing to us back here
in Bruno? Why, they're making true-blue
Americans of us!

When a person can say that all his relatives
were born in the old country, naturalization
papers or no, he can't call himself aU-American.
What's more, if you settle in a foreign country
where everybody is no farther removed from
foreign influence than yourself, you don't
become an American very quickly. We're
nearly all Bohemians.

That's where the movies come in. Zehnej
Jim, Buh! (God bless them, in our Bohemian
language.)

Once a week an orgam'zarion shows a motion
picture before an average crowd. The music
is player-piano, and the selections aren't too
appropriate.

But as a result, we live differently, think
differently, dress differently, talk differently.
We are becoming Americans as fast as the
movies can teach us!

Grace Jelinek.
[ please torn to page 144 ]



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929




Fjvery Saturday ...in every stadium . . .

SORE THROAT!



Gargle with Listerine
when you get home . . .

HERE, as any doctor will tell you, is a bit
of sound wisdom for those who attend
late season football games.

Before going, and after returning from
them gargle with full strength Listerine.
This pleasant little precaution may spare
you a nasty siege with a cold or sore throat
or their more dangerous complications.

Medical records show that after football
games, there is marked increase in the
number of cases of colds . . . sore throat . . .
influenza and bronchitis.

They are caused by germs in the mouth
which get the upper hand when body resist-



ance is lowered by over exposure, change of
temperature, and emotional disturbances,
all of which are coincidental with seeing
a football game.

Listerine checks them effectively because,
used full strength, it is powerful against
germs— kills them by the million.

Even such stubborn organisms as the
Staphylococcus Aureus (pus) and Bacillus
Typhosus (typhoid) in counts ranging to
200,000,000 are killed by it in 15 seconds,
repeated laboratory tests show. Yet Listerine
is so safe that it may be used full strength
in any body cavity.

Use Listerine systematically during winter
weather. It is a pleasant habit, a cleanly
habit, and one that may lengthen your life.
Lambert Pharmacal Company, St. Louis,
Mo., U. S. A.




TO PREVENT
COLDS

Colds are often caused by
germs transferred from the
hands to food which then
enters the mouth. Rinsing
the hands with Listerine
before each meal kills
such germs. State Health
Boards recommend simi-
lar measures particularly
during epidemics of
influenza.



KILLS 200,000,000 GERMS



I N



1 5



SECONDS



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12



Photoplay Magazine for November^ 1929



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o u p , S a 1 a d and



They Make or
Mar the Meal



D



essert




With five children of his own dependent upon his

culinary skill, Eddie Cantor, famous stage and

screen comedian, finds his hands full in the

kitchen of his Beverly Hills home




Every once in a while Joan Crawford breaks train-
ing and creates her own individual dish — a salad
forbidden to devotees of svelte lines, but, never-
theless, most delicious



Matzos Kloese

ON the stage and screen Eddie Cantor is one of our most
rollicking comedians. But he is serious-minded about
food. He says he is a connoisseur of soups, and who are we
to doubt him? His favorite soup is made with Matzos Kloese
— dumplings of unleavened bread. Needless to say, this is a
Jewish dish.

The matzos may be purchased at almost any delicatessen
store.

These are the ingredients:

4 matzos Chopped parsley

1 onion Matzos meal

3 eggs Chicken fat
Salt, pepper, ginger

First soak the matzos. Place the chicken fat in a frying pan
and add onion which has been cut fine. Drain the matzos,
put in pan, and fry. Let cool and add well beaten eggs. Then
add a small quantity of the matzos meal, the chopped parsle}'.



Photopl.vy M.\g.\zi.\b
750 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III.
Please send me a copy of Photopl.w's Cook Book,
containing 150 favorite recipes of the stars. I am
enclosing twenty-five cents.



Be sure to write name and address plainly.
You may send either stamps or coin.



salt, ginger and pepper to taste. Roll into balls and drop in
any kind of clear soup. Cook ten minutes in a covered kettle.

French Banana Salad

THE salad which has been christened with Joan Crawford's
name is made of chicken and lettuce — a non-fattening com-
bination. But once in a while, being only human, Joan forgets
all about her careful diet, as witness her recipe for French
Banana Salad:



6 bananas

1 cup chopped peanuts



Yi cup mayonnaise
1 head lettuce



Arrange lettuce on plates, using only the tender, crisp leaves.
Cut bananas in half, lengthwise. Loosen the peeling, but do
not remove. Place bananas on plates and cover with mayon-
naise. Sprinkle generously with chopped nuts (Joan prefers
peanuts). This is a nourishing winter salad which should be
prepared at the last minute, so the bananas will not become
discolored. Decidedly not for those who are watching their
weight.

Lemon Pie

AND here's the happy ending — for dessert. Lemon Pie
a la Douglas Fairbanks, Sr.

1 cup sugar Grated rind of one lemon

3 level teaspoons cornstarch Juice of XYi lemons
Yi teaspoon salt 3 egg yolks

\Y^ cups boiling water Y2 level tablespoon butter

Pastry crust

Mix sugar, cornstarch and salt in top of double boiler. Add
boiling water slowly and stir. Cook over the fire until boiling
point is reached. Place over hot water and cook 20 minutes,
stirring occasionally.

Mix grated rind, juice of lemon, and egg yolks slightly beaten.
Add butter and stir. Cook two minutes.

Cool and turn into a cooked pastry crust. Spread meringue
and bake eight minutes in moderate oven.

C.\ROLYN Van Wyck.

13



14



Photoplay Magazine for November, 1929





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Brief Reviews of Current Pictures

I CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 )



FOUR DEVILS— Fox.— Talk has been added to
lusL part of F. W. Murnau's good circus film. You'll
hear Janet Gaynor. Part Talkie. (Sept.)

• FOUR FEATHERS, THE— Paramount. —
Tile story of a coward's regeneration grafted on
a nature film shot in the Soudan. Excellent film, with
Richard Aden fine. Sound. (Sept.)

*FOX MOVIETONE FOLLIES— Fox.— Lots
of good tunes, swell comedy by Stepin Fetcliit
and the good-looking girls that go with any revue.
All Talkie. (July.)

GAIVIBLERS, THE— ■Warners.— Well acted story
of high finance with a pretty theme song. All Talkie.
Uuly.)

• GENTLEMEN OF THE PRESS— Paramount.
— A newspaper story that is a knockout. Fine
performances by an all-stage cast. Check up tliis
as one of the hits of the talkies. All Tali;ic. (June.)

GENTLEMAN PREFERRED. A— Supreme.—
From cowboy to earl in one badiy-aimed picture.
Silent. (SepI )

GIRL IN THE GLASS CAGE, THE— First Na-
tional. — The glassed-in gal. in case you wondered, is a
theater ticket seller, played by Loretta Voun;.'.
Pretty bad. Part Talkie. (Oct.)

GIRLS GONE WILD— Fox.— Plenty hot and

plentj' fast. Sound, (July.)

GIRL WHO WOULDN'T WAIT. THE— Liberty.
— In spite of its title this is one of the best pictures
turned out by an independent producer. "You'll
like it. Silent. (June.)

GLAD RAG DOLL, THE— Warners.— Mostly
hokum. All Talkie. (.4ks-)

• GREENE MURDER CASE, THE— Para-
mount. — .Anotlier fine Van Dine murder mys-
ter>- film, with Bill Powell an elegant Philo Vance.
All Talkie. {SepI.)

GREYHOUND LIMITED, THE— Warners —

Not a dog story, but a railroad melodrama. It's
speedy, exciting and good fun. Sound. {June.)

GUN LAW— FBO.— A lot of shooting, all in fun.
Silent. (July.)

HALF MARRIAGE— RKO.— Another and duller
one about companionate marriage, occasionallj' re-
deemed by Olive Borden. Sound. (Oct.)

• HALLELUJAH- M-G-M.— Striking epic of
the negro, sensitivelj- directed and spontane-
ously acted. All Talkie. (Ocl.)

• HEARTS IN DIXIE— Fox.— Plantation life
according to a Fox talkie, with the stupendous
debut of Stepin Fetcliit, colored comic. All Talkie.
(May.)

HIGH VOLTAGE— Pjithe.-Stupid and morbid.
All Talkie. (.Iks.)

HOLE IN THE WALL, THE— Paramount.— Con-
fusing crook stor\', acted by a good cast. \\\ Talkie.
Uuly.\



• HOLLYWOOD REVUE OF 1929— M-G-W
— .A great big merry girl and music show, willl
all the Metro people from Gilbert and Shearer on
down. All Talkie. (SepI.)

HONKY TONK— Warners.— Story of a night
club mamma with a heart of gold. With Sophie
Tucker and her songs. All Talkie. (July.)

HOOFBEATS OF VENGEANCE — Universal. —
Even worse than it sounds. Rex. the marvelous
horse star, has a ramshackle vehicle to pull. Silent.
(Ocl.)

HOT STUFF— First National.— Collegiate stuff in
musical comedy style. Alice White disrobes, smokes
and tipples, as usual. Part Talkie. (.May.)

HOTTENTOT, THE— Warners.— Hilarious farce
comedy. You'll like it. All Talkie. (July.)

HOUSE OF HORROR, THE— First National.—
Cheap claptrap mystery movie which is saved by the
comedy of Chester Conklin and Louise Fazenda.
Sound. (May.)

IDLE RICH, THE— M-G-M.— Literal transla-
tion of the stage play. "White Collars," with good
acting. All Talkie. (Aug.)

• INNOCENTS OF PARIS — Paramount. —
Inconsequential plot made delightful by the
charming personality of Maurice Chevalier. All
Talkie. (July.)

IT'S EASY TO BECOME A FATHER— UFA.—

The German idea of a funny farce about an American
gal running wild abroad. Silent. (Sept.) •

JOY STREET— Fox.— Oh, how the kids carry onl
Younger generation stuff and possibly you'll like it.
Lois Moran, Nick Stuart. Sound. (SepI.)

KEMPY— M-G-M.— High water mark in talking
comedies. Unpretentious stor>' of the love life of a
youthful plumber. All Talkie. (Ocl.)

KITTY — Worldwide. — First foreign-made picture
to be synchronized with talking sequences and music.
Good entertainment against a beautiful English
background. Part Talkie. (Ocl.)

• LAST OF MRS. CHEYNEY, THE— M-G-M.
— Norma Shearer as a charming and wily lady
crook who plies her trade amongst Britain's blue-
bloods. ."MI Talkie. (Oct.)

LAST PERFORMANCE, THE — Universal. —
Conrad Veidt as a magician in a much over-acted and
over-directed film. Part Talkie. (Sept.)

LAUGHING AT DEATH— FBO.— Bob Steele,
the Western actor, in curls and ribbons as one of tliese
mj'thical princes. Whoops I Silent. (Sept.)

LAWLESS LEGION, THE— First National.— A
cowboy story, with Ken Maynard. that is good
enough entertainment for anybody. Silent. (June.)

• LETTER, THE— Paramount.— The talkies'
first big emotional performance, by Jeanne
H:igrN. Good strong drama. Not for kids. All
T.dkie. {May.)



Photoplays Reviewed in the Shadow Stage This Issue

Save this magazine — Refer to the criticisms before you pic\ out
your evenings entertainment. Ma\e this your reference list.



Page

Big Revue, The— .\11-Star 117

Big Time — Fo.x 53

CoUege Coquette, The — Columbia. . . .117

Dark .Skies — Biltmore 117

Drake Case, The — Universal 117

Fast Company — Paramount 55

Fast Life— First National 117

Frozen Justice — Fo.x 55

Girl from Havana, The — Fo.x 118

Gold Diggers of Broadway — Warners . . 54

Happy Days — M-G-M 55

Hard to Get— First National 54

Her Private Affair— Pathe 53

Hungarian Rhapsody — UFA-Paramountl 17

Illusion — Paramount 54

In Old California — .\udible Film Corp .118

Kibitzer — Paramount 52

Light Fingers — Columbia 118

Love Doctor, The — Paramount 55

Lucky in Love — Pathe 118



Page

Madonna of Avenue A — Warners 117

Marianne— M-G-M 52

New York Nights — United Artists. ... 54

Night Club — Paramount 117

Oh, Yeah!— Pathe 118

Prince and the Dancer, The — World

Wide 117

Pusher-In-The-Face — Paramount 117

Richthofen: The Red Knight of the Air

— F. P. G. Production 117

Rio Rita— RKO 52

Silver King, The — British 117

Taming of the Shrew — United .Artists.. 53

They Had to See Paris — Fox 6

Thirteenth Chair, The— M-G-M 54

This Mad Worid— M-G-M 55

Three Live Ghosts — United Artists. ... 55

Tonight at Twelve — Universal 54

Wrecker, The— Tiffany-Stahl 117

Why Leave Home? — Fo.x. 117



Every advertisement in PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE is guaranteed.



Photoplay Magazine fur November, 1929



15



LONE WOLF'S DAUGHTER, THE— Columbia.
^Bert Lytell's perennial crogk, the Lone Wolf, in a
good melodramatic comedy. Part Talkie. (May.)

LOVE TRAP. THE— Universal.— Laura LaPlante.
with little hilp from Neil Hamilton, proves that
chorus girls arc good girls. Part Talkie. (Sept.)

LUCKY LARKIN— Universal.— A typical West-
ern and a movie that actually moves in the good old
style. Ken Maynard and a trick horse. Silent. {Oct.)

• LUCKY STAR— Fox. —That immortal duo.
Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrcll, in a gentle
and charming story. Part Talkie. iOcl.)

LURE OF THE SOUTH SEAS, THE— Coopera-
tive. — Picturesque, authentic South Sea story, lilraed
among those dream isles. Silent. (May.)



MADAME X-



-M-G-M.
?rton in
(Jtdy.)



• Fine performance



'^RT by Ruth Chattcrton in this reliable old sob
producer. All Talkie.



MAN AND THE MOMENT, THE— First Na-
tional — An old-fashioned ripsnorting movie, all love
and action. Billic Dove starred. Part Talkie. (Sepi.)

MAN I LOVE. THE— Paramount.— A slight
story, but you'll like Richard Arlen's work. All
Talkie. Uidy.)

MASKED EMOTIONS— Fox.— Good melodrama
of adventure and brotherly love. Silent. (July.)

MASQUERADE — Fox.— Remade from silent ver-
sion of "The Brass Bowl." Old fashioned plot, but
Leila Hyams is nice. All Talkie. (Sept.)



OPPRESSED, THE— William Elliott Production.
— This ought to be renamed The Depressed — mean-
ing the audience. Raquel Mclkr disappoints. Silent.
(Oct.)

• OUR MODERN MAIDENS — M-G-M. —
Joan Crawford and Doug Fairbanks, Jr., in a
sequel to "Our Dancing Daughters." Must you be
told tliat it's a sure-fire hit? Sound. (July.)

• PARIS BOUND — Pathe. — A smooth drama of
domestic woes that introduces to the screen
Ann Harding, stage beauty and good actress. AH
talkie. (.Sept.)

PAWNS OF PASSION— World Wide.— Rather
better than its title and also better than most foreign
productions. Silent. (July.)

PEACOCK FAN, THE— Chesterfield.- A quickie
mystery melodrama that could only happen in the
films. Tom ("Big Parade") O'Brien in it. Silent.
(May.) .

PHANTOMS OF THE NORTH— All Star.— One
of the old time Northwest epics, witli nothing to dis-
tinguish it. Silent. (Sept.)

PHYSICIAN, THE — Tififany-Stahl. — Terrible
storv of the narcotic evil well acted by Mil^s Mander
and Elsa Brink. Silent. (Sepl.)

PICCADILLY— World W^ide.— Wonder of won-
ders — a truly fine British picture! Gilda Gray ife
starred but Anna May Wong brings home the bacon.
Silent. (Oct.)

PLEASURE CRAZED— Fox.— A good story,
smothered in English accents, and played entire^'
by stage actors. All Talkie. (Oct.)



Producer Announcements of J^ew Pictures
and Stars

While all good advertising is news, we consider producer advertising

of particular interest to our readers. With this directory you easily

can locate each announcement:

First National Page 143 Paramount Page 4

Fox Film Corp Page 131 Pathe Film Page 135

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer . . Page 139 Warner Bros Page 147



MELODY LANE— Universal.— The world seems
full of clowns with breaking hearts. Eddie Leonard
brings no vitality to a dead yarn. All Talkie. (Oct.)

MORGANNE THE ENCHANTRESS- Franco-
Film. — One of the very worst from France. A\\'ful
story, acting ham (it- /uxf. Silent. (Sept.)

MOTHER'S BOY— Pathe.— Just another Jolson
plot, only this time the singer is an Irisliman, Morton
Downey. All Talkie. (July.)

MYSTERIOUS DR. FU MANCHU. THE—

Paramount. — Fantastic mystery yarn, with Oriental
deviltry. All Talkie. (Aug.)

• MYSTERIOUS ISLAND. THE— M-G-M.—
Beautiful and thrilling all-color production
based on Jules Verne's story. Entertaining fantasy.
Sound. (May.)

NAVAJO — Goodwill. — Lives and habits of the
Navajo Indians, shot among them. Very educational.
Just a little longer news reel. Silent. (May.)

NEW BANKROLL, THE— Mack Sennett.— Andy
Clyde and Harry Gribbon and lots cf very pretty
girls. Old time comedy. All Talkie. (Sept.)

NEW YEAR'S EVE— Fox.— Dripping with senti-
mentality and sticky with melodrama. Sound.
(June.)

NO MORE CHILDREN— Broughton.-Tasteless
and worthless birth control propaganda. Don't be
fooled, it's just stupid. Silent. (June.)

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH— Paramount.—
Richard Dix in an old, but good, stage farce. A
pleasant evening's entertainment. All Talkie. (July.)

NOT QUITE DECENT— Fox— Louise Dresser
also does an AI Jolson. Can you bear it? Part
Talkie. (July.)

ONE WOMAN IDEA, THE— Fox.— Rod La-
Rocque is a Persian diplomat who falls in love, and
that's about all. Sound. (Sepl.)

• ON WITH THE SHOW— Warners.— Singing,
dancing, talking and Technicolor. Good on
spectacle but weak on comedy. All Talkie. (Aug.)



PLUNGING HOOFS— Universal.— For those who

arc crazy over horses, horses, horses. Silent. (June.)

POINTS WEST— Universal.— Good old-fashioned

Western melodrama. Silent. (June.)

PRINCE OF HEARTS, THE— Imperial.— Weak
carboncopy of "Tlie Merry Widow." Silent. (July.)

• PRISONERS- First National.— Effective en-
tertainment. Just to be different, tlie locale i



this one
(Aug.)



is a Hungarian night club. Part Talkie.



PROTECTION— Fox.— More bootlegging drama
With some exciting moments. Sound. (Aug.)

QUEEN OF THE NIGHT CLUBS— Warners-
Texas Guinan in a phoney story of silly revels. Of
course, if you want to get a look at Tex, here she is.
Part Talkie. (June.)



QUITTER, THE— Columbia.-
redeemed by an effective climax.



-Rather trite storv
Silent. (July.)



RAINBOW MAN, THE— So no- Art-Paramo unt.—
In which Eddie Dowling does his version of the Jolson
story. But he has an attractive personality. All
Talkie. (July.)

RIVER OF ROMANCE— Paramount.— Humor-
ous romance of crinoline days in the South, with ex-
cellent work by Buddv Rogers, Mary Brian and
Wallace Beery. All Talkie. (Oct.)

ROARING FIRES— Ellbee.— Not only silent but
positively dumb. (July.)

ROYAL RIDER, THE— First National.— Ken
Maynard in still another mythical kingdom. Can't
keep cowboys on the range. Oh. dear. Silent. (May.)



SAILOR'S HOLIDAY— Pathe.-

account of a sailor on shore leave.



-Riotously funny
All Talkie. (Oct.)



SALUTE — Fox. — A glorified newsreel about a
West Point cadet with a kid brother at Annapolis.
AH Talkie. (Oct.)



SALVAGE— Supreme.-
be. Silent. (June.)



-All a picture should not




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Online LibraryMoving Picture Exhibitors' AssociationPhotoplay (Volume 36 – 37 (Jul. - Dec. 1929)) → online text (page 99 of 145)