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III, I I I



SCANNED FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF



PFA Library and Film Study Center,

University of California, Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive

bampfa.berkeley.edu



Coordinated by the

Media History Digital
Library

www.mediahistoryproject.org



Funded by an anonymous donation
in memory of Carolyn Hauer



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. BERKELEY ART MUSEUV & PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE






Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2009 with funding from

Media History Digital Library



http://www.archive.org/details/photoplay3738movi



at ion a I Guide to Motion Pictures





JANUARY
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Photoplay Magazine for January, 1930

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Photoplay Magazine for January, 1930



The New Show World i



PARAMOUNT!



«>■





The Greatest Naine on the
Talking, Singing Screen!

TODAY, a new world of entertainment
is yours— better than Broadway,
greater than the screen was ever before —
THE NEW SHOW WORLD— with the best
of Stage, Screen, Music, and Radio com-
bined. And it's yours to see and hear and
enjoy right in your own neighborhood — but
at its best only when it's a Paramount
Picture! <J Because The New Show World
is Paramount! The greatest stars of stage
and screen are with Paramount! The fore-
most authors. The leading showmen and
directors. The greatest music composers,
song writers. And behind all is the greatest
name in entertainment— with the resources,
organization and man-power to produce
the world's greatest talking, singing pic-
tures. That's why the name Paramount is
your guarantee of the highest quality in
talking, singing entertainment, just as it
has been for 17 years, f In The New Show
World, as always before, "If it's a Para-
mount Picture, it's the best show in town!"




TUXE IX! Paramount-Publix Radio Hour, each Saturday Evening, 10-11 P. M. Eastern Time
over the nation-wide Columbia Broadcasting System. Hear your favorite stage and screen stars!

(paramount (pictures

PARAMOUNT FAMOUS LASKY CORP., ADOLPI1 Z11KOR, PRRS., PARAMOUNT BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY



Every advertisement in PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE is guaranteed.



The World's Leading Motion Picture Publication



LEONARD HALL

MANAGING EDITOR



Contents



Vol. XXXVII




For

January

1930



No. 2



<s»=



EDITOR -A:ND. PUBLISHER



=<<»



The High-Lights of This Issue



Cover Design

Billie Dove — Painted from Life



Earl Christy
6



Brief Reviews of Current Pictures

A Guide to Your Evening's Entertainment

Brickbats and Bouquets 8

The Voice of the Fan

As We Go to Press 10

Last Minute News from East and West

The Buffet Supper 15

Photoplay's Cook Book Will Help You Prepare It

Friendly Advice on Girls' Problems

Carolyn Van Wyck 18
Photoplay's Personal Service Department

Close-Ups and Long Shots James R. Quirk 29

The Editor Tells You What's What and Who With-
out Fear or Favor

Watch This Hombre! Katherine Albert 31

Is He the New Valentino?

Secrets of the Fitting Room Lois Shirley 32

Grand Stars Are Only Women to the Dressmaker

"Four Sons" Wins 34

Photoplay Gold Medal for Best Picture of 1928
Awarded

The Gimme Girl (Fiction Story)

Myrtle Gebhart 38

The Vain Love of Little Yellow Gim-Gam

Through the Studios with Pen and Camera

Cal York 42

Doings and Sayings of the Picture People

You Don't Have to Be Beautiful

Marquis Busby 47
Fazenda Is Ahead of a Lot of Pretty Babies

The Girl Who Just Missed Stardom

Katherine Albert 48
The Story of the Circus Girl of Lille



The Shadow Stage

Reviews of Latest Sound and Silent Pictures

50 Years of " IT " Cal York

Polly Moran Tells About Her Love-Life

Here Are Winners of $5,000 Cut Picture Puzzle
Contest

Fifty Film Fans Get Awards

Protecting Them from Fame Rosalind Shaffer

How Movie Parents Raise Their Children

Garbo-Maniacs Leonard Hall

To Criticize Her Brings Abuse to the Critic



50

54

56
58
60



Maxine Alton 65



Clara's First Train Ride

As Told by Her First Manager

How Studio Designers Use Lines to Remedy
Defects Lois Shirley 66

Ideas for Milady's Wardrobe

Doubling for Death (Fiction Story)

Roy Wilcox 68

A Seedy Double Outsmarts a Glamorous Star



Reeling Around



Leonard Hall 71



Tidbits Served with a Dash of Spice

Why Hollywood Scandal Fascinates Us

Louis E. Bisch, Ph. D.

A Noted Psycho-Analyst Lifts the Curtain

Just Try to Interview Ulric Mark Hellinger
This Boy Didn't Get to First Base

"Don't Call Me Lon Chaney" Stanley Burton
Paul Muni Makes the Request

Do- Re-Mi-Fa-Sol! Maurice Fenton

Photoplay's Theme Song Record Department

Questions and Answers The Answer Man

What You Want to Know About Films and Film Folk

Casts of Current Photoplays



73
76
78
82
92
125



(%>=



A complete list of all photoplays reviewed in the Shadow Stage this issue -will be found on page 12



<«?=



Published monthly by the Photoplay Publishing Co.

Editorial Offices, 221 W. 57th St., New York City Publishing Office, 750 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111.

The International News Company, Ltd., Distributing Agents, 5 Bream's Building, London, England

James R. Quirk, President Robert M. Eastman, Vice-President Kathryn Dougherty, Secretary and Treasurer

Yearly Subscription: S2.50 in the United States, its dependencies, Mexico and Cuba; S3. 00 Canada: S3. 50 for foreign countries. Remittances

should be made by check, or postal or express money order. Caution — Do not subscribe through persons unknown to you.

Entered as second-class matter April 24, 1912, at the Postoffice at Chicago. 111., under the Act of March 3. 1879.

Copyright, 1929, by the Photoplay Publishing Company, Chicago.




Brief Reviews of

Current Pictures



■^Indicates that photoplay was named as one
of the six best upon its month of review



ALOHA HAWAII— All Star.— Unusual produc-
tion based on Hawaiian legend. With native cast in
Hawaiian settings. Silent. (Aug,)

• ARGYLE CASE, THE— Warners.— Fascinat-
ing mvsterv story with a swell performance by
Thomas Meighan. All Talkie. (Aug.)

• AWFUL TRUTH, THE — Pathe. — Delight-
ful lna Claire in a sophisticated drama. Ex-
cellent support by Paul Harvey. All Talkie. (Oct.)

BACHELOR GIRL. THE— Columbia.— Dull love
triangle, but nicely acted by Jacqueline Logan and
William Collier, Jr. Part Talkie. (Sept.)

BEHIND THAT CURTAIN— Fox.— Well done
but rambling mystery melodrama well acted by War-
ner Baxter and Lois Moran. All Talkie. (Sept.)

BEHIND THE MAKE-UP— Paramount.— More
backstage melodrama, but different and real this time.
Hal Skelly is a restrained Pagliacci and Fay Wray and
Kay Francis are good. All Talkie. (Dec.)

BIG DIAMOND ROBBERY, THE— FBO.— Cow-
boy Mix in a fast and thrilling one. Silent. (July.)

BIG NEWS— Pathe.— Another, and obvious,
story of an unhappy young reporter, with pleasing
work by Bob Armstrong and Carol Lombard. All
Talkie. (Sept.)

BIG REVUE, THE— All-Star.— All-singing and
toddling juvenile extravaganza featuring the so-called
Ethel Meglin Wonder kids. If you like to hear
ten-year-olds singing about moonlight madness you'll
like this. All Talkie. (Nov.)

*' BIG TIME— Fox.— This is closer than a
brother to "Burlesque." but it's darned good.
Dialogue is bright and Lee Tracy and Mae Clarke
make the story convincing. All Talkie. (Nov.)

BLACK MAGIC— Fox.— Another priceless title
gone wrong. South Sea life — and very dull, too.
Sound. (Oct.)

• BLACKMAIL— Sono Art -World Wide.— A
few like this excellent phonoplay will put
British producers among the leaders in the talkie race.
All Talkie. (Dec.)

BLACK WATCH, THE — Fox. — Extravagant

melodrama of India, which just misses being one of
the best. All Talkie. (Aug.)

• BROADWAY— Universal.— The original and
best night club melodrama. In spite of its
grandiose settings, the story will get you. And some
good acting. All Talkie. (Aug.)

BROADWAY BABIES— First National.— Alice
White as a chorus cutie at her best to date. Fred
Kohler steals it as a big beer and booze man from
Detroit. All Talkie. (Sept.)

• BULLDOG DRUMMOND — Goldwyn-
United Artists. — Great melodrama, intelli-
gently produced and with a fine performance by
Ronald Colman. Don't miss it. All Talkie. (July.)

CALL OF THE CIRCUS, THE— Pickwick Prod.
— Worth seeing because it proves that Francis X.
Bushman and Ethel Clayton can still act. Otherwise
nil. All Talkie. (Dec.)

CAMPUS KNIGHTS— Chesterfield.— Life in a

fashionable boarding-school — as it isn't. Don't waste
your money. Silent. (Aug.)

CAREERS — First National. — More intrigue and
scandal in a white colony in Asia. Pretty good. All
Talkie. (Aug.)

CHARMING SINNERS — Paramount.— Well
acted and intelligent drama. All Talkie. (Aug.)

CHASING THROUGH EUROPE— Fox.— Sue

Stuart and Nick Carol (our error!) seeing Europe witli
lipstick and camera. Sound. (Oct.)



CLEAN-UP, THE— Excellent.— A noble news-
paper fellow cleans up the bootleggers. Not bad.
Silent. (Aug.)

CLIMAX, THE— Universal.— Jean Hersholt good
as an old maestro in a picture of music, love and music
lovers. All Talkie. (Sept.)

• COCK EYED WORLD, THE— Fox.— Fur-
ther disagreements of Sergeants Eddie Lowe
Quirt and Vic McLaglen Flagg, with Lily Damita the
chief trouble-maker. Highly seasoned. All Talkie.
(Oct.)

COCOANUTS, THE— Paramount.— Filmed ver-
sion of the Marx Brothers' musical show. Some
hilarious moments. All Talkie. (Aug.)

COLLEGE COQUETTE, THE— Columbia.—
Another picture of college life as it ain't. There
ought to be a law. AH Talkie. (Nov.)

COLLEGE LOVE— Universal.— "The Collegians"
elaborated and improved. Lots of fun. All Talkie.
(Aug.)

COME ACROSS— Universal.— Just a round-up of
discarded movie plots. Part Talkie. (July.)



Pictures You
Should Not Miss

"The Cock Eyed World"

"Hallelujah"

"Hollywood Revue of 1929"

"The Dance of Life"

"Bulldog Drummond"

"The Broadway Melody"

"Alibi"

As a service to its readers, Photo-
play Magazine presents brief critical
comments on all photoplays of the
preceding six months. By consulting
this valuable guide, you can deter-
mine at a glance whether or not your
promised evening's entertainment is
worth while. Photoplay's reviews
have always been the most author-
itative published. And its tabloid
reviews show you accurately and con-
cisely how to save your motion picture
time and money. The month at the
end of each review indicates the issue
of Photoplay in which the original
review appeared.



CONSTANT NYMPH, THE— Gainsborough.—
Englisti production of a fine novel, told with taste and
intelligence but badly photographed. Silent. (Aug.)

• DANCE OF LIFE, THE— Paramount.— Hal
Skelly and Nancy Carroll in an all-talkie made
from the famous backstage play, "Burlesque."
Grand. (Sept.)

• DANGEROUS CURVES— Paramount— Clara
Bow in tights in a love storv of a small circus.
Richard Arlen does well. All Talkie. (Sept.)

DARK SKIES— Biltmore.— Old time yarn of
"East Lynne" vintage. Terrible. All Talkie, (Nov.)



DARK STREETS— First National.— One of the
first dual roles in the talkies. Jack Mulhall plays an
honest cop and his gangster twin and Lila Lee is his
(their?) gal. All Talkie. (Dec.)

DARKENED ROOMS — Paramount. — Unim-
portant little comedy-drama with an O. Henry twist.
Neil Hamilton scores but Evelyn Brent is again sacri-
ficed to an unworthy vehicle. All Talkie. (Dec.)

DAUGHTER OF HEAVEN— All Star.— Nicely
done Chinese picture, with Lady Tsen Mai, promi-
nent in "The Letter," in lead. Silent. (Sept.)

DELIGHTFUL ROGUE, THE— Radio Pictures.
—Rod LaRocque gives such a superb performance as a
villainous pirate that the heroine marries him instead
of the hero I All Talkie. (Dec.)

DEVIL'S CHAPLAIN, THE— Rayart.— Adven-
tures of royalty in America. Fairly entertaining.
Silent. (July.)

• DISRAELI — Warners. — Introducing George
Arliss to the audible screen in one of his most
brilliant characterizations. He's grand. All Talkie.
(Dec.)

DOCTOR'S WOMEN, THE— World Wide-
Just forget this was ever made. That's what its pro-
ducers would probably like to do. Silent. (Dec.)

• DRAG — First National. — Dick Barthelmess
shines in a quiet domestic story, with Lila Lee
a sensation in the film. All Talkie. (Sept.)

DRAKE CASE, THE— Universal.— Tense murder
melodrama. Noteworthy chiefly for the late Gladys
Brockwell's fine performance in the leading role.
All Talkie. (Nov.)

DUKE STEPS OUT, THE— M-G-M. — Light-
weight but amusing story of the romance of a cul-
tured prize-fighter. Part Talkie. (July.)

• DYNAMITE— M-G-M.— Stark drama, full of
suspense, bringing to the screen two splendid
players, Charles Bickford and Kay Johnson. All
Talkie. (Oct.)

EMBARRASSING MOMENTS — Universal. —
Reginald Denny in a farce that manages to amuse in
spite of its hoary plot. All Talkie. (Sept.)

• EVANGELINE— United Artists.— Beautiful
and touching film version of one of America's
best-loved poems. Worth your while. Sound. (Aug.)

EVIDENCE— Warners. — Bewhiskered drammer
of circumstantial evidence in the divorce courts. But
Pauline Frederick is swell and so is the rest of the
cast. All Talkie. (Dec.)

EXALTED FLAPPER, THE— Fox.— A princess
turns flapper and upsets royal traditions. Frothy but
funny. Sound. (July.)

EYES OF THE UNDERWORLD— Universal.—

Old-fashioned movie thriller. Silent. (July.)

FALL OF EVE, THE— Columbia.— Rowdy farce
of the buyer who comes to the big town to make
whoopee. Ford Sterling, Patsy Rutli Miller. All
Talkie. (Sept.)

FAR CALL, THE— Fox. — Piracy in the Bering
Sea. Plenty of action for your money. Sound. (Aug.)

m

• FARO NELL— Paramount-Christie.— A re-
viewer's dream of what a two-reel talking com-
edy should be and usually isn't. Gorgeously acted
burlesque of the old-time Western thriller with Louise
Fazenda in long yellow curls. All Talkie. (Dec.)

• FASHIONS IN LOVE— Paramount.— Adolphe
Menjou with a French accent. Amorous and
amusing farce. All Talkie. (Aug.)

I PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 13 ]



Photoplay Magazine for January, 1930



They tried to be modern
— but they couldn't escape



//



THIS thing:



CALLED LOVE



JJ



Watch for these other Pathe hits!




LNA CLAIRE in
THE AWFUL TRUTH

The talking picture debut of Broadway's
favorite 6tar in her greatest stage success.
Directed by MARSHALL NEILAN
Supervised by MAURICE REVNES




ANN HARDING in
HER PRIVATE AFFAIR

A picture of marital complications that both

starts and ends with a reunion.

Directed by PAUL STEIN




ROBERT ARMSTRONG in

THE RACKETEER

with CAROL LOMBARD

The downfall of a gangster who loved out-
eide hieclass. Adramatic tale, grippingly told.

Directed by HOWARD HIGGIN
Associate Producer RALPH BLOCK




WILLIAM BOYD in

HIS FIRST COMMAND

with DOROTHY SEBASTIAN

Action, thrills, laughs and romance against

an authentic militarv background.

Directed and Adapted by

GREGORY LA CAVA

Associate Producer RALPH BLOCK



with EDMUND LOWE
and CONSTANCE BENNETT




Ann and Robert weren't going to have the usual kind of
marriage with its petty quarrels and hampering jealousies.
So they tried a new plan — Ann drew a salary for her services
as a homemaker — Bob could have all the girl friends he
desired, she all the male admirers she wished. It worked
fine until the green-eyed god elbowed his way in in spite of
them ! Rich in humor, full of clever dialog, penetrating in
its satire on "modern marriage." THIS THING CALLED LOVE
is grown-up entertainment, with a brilliant cast including
Zasu Pitts, Carmelita Geraghty and Stuart Erwin.

ALL MUSIC-ALL SOU ND-A LL DIALOGUE

Pathe f> Picture



DIRECTED BY PAUL STEIN



RALPH BLOCK PRODUCTION



TVlif>n ^ou write to advertisers please mention PHOTOPLAY MAGAZINE.




Brickbats & Bouquets



YOU FANS
ARE THE

REAL
CRITICS



Give Us Your Views



$25, $10 and $5
Monthly for the Best Letters



Sez You !

TO make this department a true expression
of the fan viewpoint we would have to
devote at least half of it to Garbo. 'What
a woman! We have read so many raves about
the Glorious One in the past month that we arc
getting a kind of Garbo fixation. Scratch a
movie goer and you find a Garbo fan.

Altogether it's the old favorites who are top-
ping the list — with the exception of Ruth
Chatterton, who continues to build up a strong
following. Bow, Shearer, Crawford, Gaynor,
Asther, Column and Gilbert still rate top of the
heap, with Boles and Powell following close.

Stage stars who are going over big with the
fans are Chevalier, Jolson, and the late Jeanne
Eagels, who, judging from the bouquets re-
ceived, was bidding fair to become as big a
name in pictures as on the stage.

There was a deluge of "what-has-become-
of's" this month. Fans would like to see some
of the silent favorites — both stars and pictures
— brought back.

The phonoplay continues to increase in pop-
ularity, although many bewail the fact that
movies no longer move and would like to see
less dialogue and more action.

An astounding number of letters telling of
improvement through films has been received
this month. Fans say that the phonoplay is
teaching them how to talk, walk, dress, think
and act.

That hardy perennial "The Desert Song"
continues to flourish, and the more recent
"Bulldog Drummond" is skyrocketing this
month.

The Church Speaks

The $25.00 Letter

St. Petersburg, Fla.

I am an ordained minister of the Gospel,
educated in the old school of religion that
teaches any diversion outside of church-going
is sinful and destructive to the soul. But I
have found that my education was narrow-
minded and bigoted.

I am a patron of the movies because I believe

8



This is your department. Come right in, hang up
your hat and pat or spat the players. Just plain
spiteful letters won't be printed, and don't spank too
hard, because we want to be helpful when we can.
Limit your letters to 200 words, and if you are not
willing to have your name and address attached,
don't write. All anonymous letters go straight into
the wicker. We reserve the right to cut letters to
suit our space limitations. Come in — you're always
welcome !



them to be a power for good and a stabilizer of
the moral code of Christianity. Who could
witness "Ben-Hur" without a true sense of the
living Christ, or the "King of Kings" without a
deeper feeling of obligation to Him, or who
could fail to see the folly of sin after seeing
Emil Jannings in the "Street of Sin"?

The usual flaming youth picture is designed
to show the modern youth the folly of such
living, and is not intended to be prediction or
picture of our youth as it is.

I have attended many a movie performance
and gone back to my study and built a sermon
about the theme of the picture. Usually, my
congregation are free with their praise of these
sermons.

I not only believe in and attend the movies
but I urge my congregation to do so.

C. Leslie Conrad.

Let 'Em Marry



The



.00 Letter



Portsmouth, Va.

The reason that nas inspired me to write this
is that I couldn't let this question, "Why do
motion picture actors get married?" asked by
Violet Hopwood go unanswered.

Why shouldn't they marry? There is no law
against it, I hope. Haven't they the right to
pursue love and happiness without the permis-
sion of this narrow-minded, jealous and fickle
public?

Why shouldn't John Gilbert marry Ina
Claire? I can't see where it spoils his popu-
larity. Hasn't he the right to choose his own
private life without your interference?

The actors give the best hours of the day
working hard to give you just two hours of en-
tertainment, yet you are so selfish as to de-
mand their private hours. When are you pub-
lic going to realize that the private lives of the
actors are their own and not yours?

Rosalie Tedesco.

Hands Across the Sea

The $5.00 Letter

Devonshire, England.
Now that the talkies have come, all our
English schoolmasters and parsons have got up
on their hind legs, and in loud voices are telling
the world that all our poor little kids are going
to learn the horrible American twang. If the



talkies teach our people to speak American in
preference to some of our own horrible dialects
they will have done a very good thing.

Another thing your films have done is to
teach the girls on this side how to dress and
groom themselves. Whereas only a few years
ago clothes slung on anyhow, untidy heads and
wrinkled silk stockings were as common as the
roses in June, all that is altered now, and why?
The movies, of course.

"A Devonshire Voice."

Canned Culture

Greensboro, N. C.

Count Keyserling has made the remark that
Virginia holds the only semblance of culture to
be found in our United States today. Virginia
culture has long been associated with the broad
"a" and the broad "a" in turn is now associated
with the talkies.

The broad "a," as interpreted by Mrs.
Chcyncy and Bulldog Drummond, is doing new
things to us. Time will tell, and Count
Keyserling will swallow his words. The
movies have long since dictated to Dame
Fashion, but just watch Dame Culture bowl
over.

Walter B. Smali.ey.

Some Like 'Em Silent

Santa Cruz, Calif.

The present talking pictures will never outdo
the old silent pictures. Granted that tbose



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