Copyright
National Center for Research Resources (U.S.).

Annual report : National Center for Research Resources (Volume 1990) online

. (page 5 of 8)
Online LibraryNational Center for Research Resources (U.S.)Annual report : National Center for Research Resources (Volume 1990) → online text (page 5 of 8)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


80XXX family of processors, reliable peripherals, and a variety of powerful
compilers, it has become feasible to develop a relatively inexpensive
microcoir5>uter-based data collection and analysis system for flow cytometry
that performs as well as, or better than, minicomputer-based systems.

Earlier we developed an electronic interface system which linked the analog
signals from the four preamplifiers of the flow cytometer to the micro-
computer. This system collected, processed, and conditioned the analog
signals before acc[uisition by the micro-computer and effectively solved the
problem of interfacing asynchronous and synchronous data conversion,
acquisition and storage. We found that when analog signals occurred
simultaneously with the reset of the integrators only partial integrations
were obtained which skewed the cell histogram. A trigger hold-off circuit
in the analog detector section eliminated this problem. The complete
system, flow cytometer, interface, and micro-coirputer, has been in routine
laboratory use for almost two years.

During this period, we have studied in detail the timing of the various
interface and computer tasks to identify where improvements in data
throughput were possible.



MaSoMOTTwCr






93



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES • PUBUCllEALTH SERVICE
NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



PROJECT NUMBER

Z01 RR 10284-03 BEI



PERIOO COVERED



October 1, 1989 - S^tember 30, 1990



TITLE OF PROJECT (90 efifmemn or l—a. TUa must at on on* in* buwmtn Of boiOtn.)

Measurement of the Binding Heats of Oxygen to Hemoglobin



PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (Lbt effiw pralmaiontl ptnemttt Aatow crw Prindpol ImmtlaMor.t (Nvm, tM>. tafioralDry. and instAM* affiOiltan)



C.P. Mudd
R . L . Berger



Biomedical. Engineer
Chemist



ACES, BE IP, NCRR
LTD, NHLBI



COOPERATING UNITS (I any)

LTD, NHLBI



LAB^RANCH



Biomedical Engineering and Instriimentation Program



Applied Clinical Engineering



INSTITUTH AND LOCATION

NCRR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD



20892



TOTAL MAN-YEABS:



0.1



PROFESSIONAL:



0.1



0.0



CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX(ES)

D (a) Human subjects
D (a1) Minors
D (a2) Interviews



IS (b) Human tissues D (c) Neither



SUMMARY OP WORK (Use stmntHra vmOucad typa. Oo not mjcaod tt>» space providad.)

The binding of oxygen to hemoglobin is thought to be a
multistep process with different rate constants for each step.
With an all tantalum stopped-flow calorimeter developed
earlier, we can easily measure the heat of binding of oxygen to
hemoglobin. The all-tantalum system will prevent the diffusion
of oxygen into the system and will allow us to measure these
heats over the entire saturation range, 0-100%; preliminary
measurements of, the binding heat at 50% saturation are in good
agreement with published values .

An in-line spectroscopic flow cell is used to measure the
oxygen saturation of the mixed hemoglobin and oxygen to verify
the final saturation value. The measurements at lower'
saturation values, less than 35%, have been made. In order to
achieve high saturation values, we needed a solute which could
carry more oxygen than an aqueous based solution we used at the
lower saturation values. We found a fluorocarbon liquid which
can hold 25 times more oxygen than water. It will be used to
carry the oxygen for the measurement at higher saturation
values .



95



OCf»AIITMD«r or NIALTN MO NUMM tOIVICCS • MIKJC l«ALTM Mll^



'Wt^B^l, 1989 - September 30, 1990



TSSSSTNuSaS

Z01 RR 10285-03 BEI



Determination of Binding Enthalpiea of Anthracycline Drugs to DNA Host Cel ls



C.P. Mudd
D . P . Remeta
K.L. Breslauer



Biomedical, Engineer
Research Fellow
Chemist



ACES, BE IP, NCRR

FDA

Rutgers University



Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University



Biomedical Engineering and Instrumentation Program



SECTION

Applied Clinical Engineering



MSmun AND LOCATION

NCRR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892



TOTAL MAWVCAHt:



0.1



0.1



omeit



0.0



CHECK AfVnOmwrK KSGIES)

a M Human subjects
d (SI) Mkion
D («g Marvisws



a (b) Human tissues B (c) Neither



aUMMAKT OF WrOMC |l*» I



lmp».0»imtmmtwmip»c»mntMH



After performing the first direct measurements of the drug
binding enthalpies for daunomysin to DNA in the 10-20
micromolar range (where the . monomeric form predominates), we
extended the experiment to other anthracycline drugs . We have
now studied the salt and temperature dependence of the binding
enthalpies for this class of drug. With a tantalum stopped
flow microcalorimeter, we were able to measure 120 of these
runs per day with an uncertainty of only 3 microjoules.



il. A



-J



97



vtPltmxumit or msalth and numan scrvicc* • hmuc nialtm amvicc

Noncc Off iMTiiAHUfut iieteARCfrMiojecT



PMOJECT NUUMN



Z01 RR 10286-03 BEI



^tMOOCOVfMCO.

October 1, 1989 - September 30, 1990



High Speed Differential Stopped Flow Calorimeter



C.P. Mudd
R.L. Berger



Biomedical Engineer
Chemist



ACES, BE IP, NCRR
LTD, NHLBI



LTD, NHLBI



umm M HCH

Biomedical Engineering and Instrumentation



SECTION

implied Clinical Enqineering



MSmUIE AND L0CM10N

NCRR, National Institutes of Health. Bpthpsria^ md



?nRq?



TOTAL IMN-VEARS:



0.1



mOFESSlONAt:



SLl.



OTHER:



JUL



CHECK APntOPfMTE 8aX(ES)

Q (4 Human s ubjec t s
a (a1) Ifinors
O (a2) Interviews



a (b) Human tissues 8 (c) Neither



A preliminary single channel, high speed, stopped-flow
calorimeter has been constructed to evaluate mixing speeds,
flow velocities, pressure drops, and thermal detection
sensitivity. The system uses a variable speed flywheel and
electrically actuated clutch to transfer sufficient energy to
the two drive syringes to mix reagent volumes of 200
microliters in 5 milliseconds or less. The inlet tubes from
the drive syringes, as well as the mixer and the detection
chamber are kept at constant temperature between 25 and 50 deg
C. An ultra-fast thermistor (1 ms) is located in the detection
chamber to measure the temperature rise during the reaction.
A new drive cam is used which produces a constant acceleration
of the syringes. The mixing chamber contains a quartz
observation tube to allow optical measurement of the reaction.
The observation tube 'floats' in o-ring seals to reduce shock
loads during mixing.



Msrssicrissr



•#ie «i'44««'



99



DEPARTMENT Of HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES • PUBUC-HEALTH SERVICE
NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



PROJECT NUMBER

•Z01 RR 10289-03 BEI



ERIOO COVERED . ^ ^ ^

October 1, 1989 - S^tember 30, 1



990



TTOE Of PnOJB^ fW cAMCMrt ortau. TUu imat m on on» timbtloimnam boratt.1



[•antalvun Batch Calorimeter for In Vitro Cell Studies



ptnonnul btiow tfw Prindp^ lnxitftfiftM'.j ^Mwiw, tftfv, lifwupyy, Aotf 0wtM u l 9 iJMIffiiofl)



PRINOPAL INVESnSATOR (Utt oOmr

C.P. Mudd
R . L . Berger



Biomedicals Engineer
Chemist



ACES, BE IP, NCRR
LTD, NHLBI



COOPERATING UNITS <sr anjr;

LTD, NHLBI



LAaORANCH

Biomedical Engineering and Instrumentation Program



SECTION

Applied Clinical Engineering



INSTTOfTE AND LOCATION

NCRR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892



TOTAL MAN-YEARS:



0.1



PROFESSIONAL:



0.1



0.0



CHECK APPROPRUTE BOX(ES)

D (a) Human subjects
D (a1) Minors
D (a2) Interviews



D (b) Human tissues SI (c) Neither



SUMMARY OP VNK3RK (Ute itwxMrd wirMkx»tf (yp*. Oo nor aaCMd ffw spM* pronOM^;

In biological experiments, it is often desirable to monit6r the
heat output of In vitro cell preparations as nutrients, drugs,
etc., are added to the preparation. In addition, the
measurement of temperature, p02, pC02, and pH is very useful.
To meet these needs, we have designed a new type of heat
conduction batch calorimeter. The instrument has two, large
(5 ml) tantalum cells arranged in a differential configuration.
Each cell has, provision to accommodate 6, 1 mm O.D, fluid
delivery lin'^s or fiber optic sensor lines. The heat
production of the cell preparation is detected using a scheme
similar to that used in our earlier batch calorimeters. The
cell temperature can be set between 4 deg C and 50 deg C.



101



oePARTMorr or health and human senvices - pubuc hsalth senvice
NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



PnOIECT NUMBER



Z01 RR 10296-03 BEI



pemoocovEMO

October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1990



TITLE Of PROJECT (90 o mwemn or MM 7M» imttl monomUnt Olttmn «• boiaan.1

Experiments with a High Resolution Field-Emission STEM



PfMNOPAL MVESnOATOR AM I

R . D . Leapman
S . B . Andrews
J. Hunt



C.R. Swyt



Physical Scientist

Chemist

Electronics Engineer



Physical Scientist



BEIP, NCRR
LN, NINCDS
Dept . Material

Science, Lehigh
University
BEIP, NCRR



COOPERATMG UMTS (» «M

LN, NINCDS; Lehigh University



LAOenANCH

Biomedical Engineering and Instrumentation Prnyram



sanxM



Electron Beam Imaging and Microspectroscopy p;rrinp



INSTITUTE ANO LOCATION

NCRR. National Institutes of Hf>a1l-h. RPl-h.:^.c,Ha , Mn ?naQ9



TOTAL MAN-YEARS:



PnOFESSIONAl^



0.8



n-8



OTHSt:



CHECK APPROPniATE 80XIES)

D (a) Human subjects
D (al) Minors
D (a2) Interviews



D (b) Human tissues Sf (c) Neither



SUMMARY OF WORK ruw jCBMtotf iinnMUsad lyp*. Oo not aoeMtf 0w 4paM prondMli

A VG Microscopes field-emission scanning transmission
electron microscope (STEM) has been used to image and analyze
rapidly frozen isolated macromolecules . Despite structural
degradation due to radiation damage, elemental analysis of
metal atoms bound to proteins was achievable at a resolution
of ~100A using parallel-detection electron energy loss
spectroscopy (PEELS) . Copper was measured in hemocyanin
molecules 4Jid the four iron atoms in hemoglobin were
detectable if very high electron doses were used
(~5xl0^e/k^) . Phosphorus was detectable in the tobacco mosaic
virus containing a single strand of RNA, suggesting that
PEELS could be used to measure the degree of phosphorylation
of proteins such as neurofilaments . Elemental mapping was
achieved using a digital accpaisition system interfaced to the
parallel EELS and it was demonstrated that images could be
obtained from ferritin molecules giving the iron distribution
in these molecules.



pHsao4a)R«» 1/841



O^O >«4««>«



10^






'■8?l?BI?°l, 1989 to September 30, 1990



Z01 RR 10300-02 BEI



^Tj^jg^g^rg gf eghftggWfCTrgggay



T. Talbot
C-P. Mudd
Joseph Schmitt
G. Krishna



Mechanical Engineer
Biomedical Engineer
Staff Fellow
Sr. Investigator



BE IP, NCRR
BE IP, NCRR
BE IP, NCRR
CP, NHLBI



OOCyCRAHNO UMTS »•«»

NHLBI, Clinical Pharmacology



Biomedical Engineering and Instrumentation Program



sccnoN

Applied Clinical Engineering Section



MSniUIC AND tflCAHON

NCRR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892



TOTAL ftUM-VCAlia:



0.2



0.2



omsi:



a (al Human «ubi6Cts
D (a2)



a (b) Human tissues (c) Naittier



r «IML As Mr MBM« ai* 4P«« pntioMi



Myocardial cells grown in culture exhibit dramatic visible changes in

beating characteristics when they are presented with various types of

chemo therapeutic agents. A technique for quantifying these changes is of

paramount importance. Because of the fragile nature of these cells in
culture the measurement modality must be totally non-invasive.

A video tracking system currently used to cjuantify the myocardial
depressant effects of septic serum on rat neonate myocardial cell
cultures will be adapted to this experimental setup. This system can
measure the displacement of an individual cell as it beats. We intend to
enhance this system by measuring the first and second derivatives, which
will yield the velocity and acceleration of the beating cell. It is
hoped that the acceleration can be incorporated into an estimate of the
force of contraction.

This project is complete. The device as described above was modified and
delivered to the senior investigator. The device is functioning well and
experiments are underway that we anticipate will provide further
understanding of myocardial contractility.



10!



OEPARTMENT Of HCALTH ANO HUMAN SOIVICeS • PUWJC MIALTN SCRVICe
NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



pnojecT NUMSCR

201 RR 10301-02 BEI



PEmoocoveiEo

October 1, 1989 to September 30. 1990



TTRE Oe PROjeCT m olmmemn or Mo. TMi mutt Itl on on* *)• fti wui Vw tai^tn.t

Particle Size Distributions of Nebulized Drugs



PMNCIPAL MVesnOATOn AM <

E.G. Walker

A. Rich

R.C. Hubbard, MD



Chief, ACES
Mechanical Engineer
Senior Investigator



BE IP, NCRR
BE IP, NCRR
PB, NHLBI



COOPSUTmC UNTTS (7 Mif



PB, NHLBI



LABORANCH

Biomedical Engineering and Instrumentation Program



Applied Clinical Engineering Section



BSTnUTH ANO LOCATION

NCRR, National Institutes >of Health. Bethesda. MD 20892



TOTAL MAN-YEARS:



,10



PROFESSIONAL:



J^



OTHSt



CHeCK APPROPRMTE aOXIES)

(a) Human subjects
a (al) Minors
D (a2) Interviews



D (b) Human tissues D (c) Neither



SUM M A R Y OF WORK (Um tlanama umduoad iyp». Do not mxeuud ttm «p«o» prowaWLJ

Recombinant alpha 1-antitrypsin is currently administered
intravenously in the treatment of cystic fibrosis. A new
protocol has been designed to treat patients with this
condition via aerosol so as to deliver large doses of alpha-1
antitrypsin directly to the respiratory tract.

We will study the particle size distributions of several
nebulizers ,to ensure that the proper particle size (1-3
microns) is being delivered to the patient.

The Malvern particle sizer (Model 2600C, Malvern Inc., South
Borough, MA) was purchased and used to perform several
preliminary studies. The Misty, Retec,_ Vortran, Ultravant and
Pari-Boy nebulizers were evaluated. Further studies will
involve a more in-depth analysis of the drugs and nebulizers.
Some of the nebulizers were found to consistently produce
particles in the range for aerosol administration.



PHSflO«)(Rw 1/S4I



OPO ■I4^«*



106



ocPAnTMorr of health and human scRvices • puauc health SERVicfi
NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



PROJCCT NUMBCR



Z01 RR1 0302-02 BEI



PEMOOCOVCRCO

October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1990



TITLE Of PAOJECT (tO cKmm a m or lm». nw itrntt • on on* tnt fli ftui tm beiam.)

Calibration System for Electronic or Automated Sphygmomanometers



PRMCTAL INVESTKMTOR OM oviv 0(a*MMM( pMMnn^ Mbw «• A*ie»tf <mwai9MK> (N«^



E.G. Walker
T . Carson
R- Corsey



Chief, ACES
Technician
Electronic Engineer



BE IP, NCRR
BE IP, NCRR
BE IP, NCRR



CCXyeUTMQ UMTS (V any)



Clinical Center



LAaflRANCH

Biomedical Engineering and Instrtunentation Program



Applied Clinical Engineering Section



mSrnVTE AND LOCATION

NCRR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MP 20892



TOTAL MAN-YEARS:



PROFESSIONAL:



.1



CHECK APPROPRUTE 80X(ES)

D (sO Human subjects
D (al) Minors
D (a2) Interviews



D (b) Human tissues IS- (c) Neither



SUMMARY OF WORK O/M sttrMkrtf unrwkieatf lypiL Oo nor aasMtf «M 4Pac« PTOMdid;

Current hospital accreditation standards require performance
evaluation of hospital equipment. Although certain performance
aspects of electronic sphygmomanometers can be evaluated, a
standardized complete evaluation is not commercially available.

We are currently developing a system to simulate a subject
during the blood pressure measurement cycle. This system will
serve as a st^andard "patient" for the evaluation of electronic
sphygmomanometers. In practice, a user will be able to
interface an electronic sphygmomanometer to the calibrator and
select the values, such as blood pressure and heart rate, at
which the sphygmomanometer is to be tested. At the conclusion
of the test a summary report will be provided.

A prototype system has been fabricated and evaluated. Results
show that the system is effective, but some modifications
should be incorporated in a second prototype .



ousjotojam-iaAL.



idUMbA&iAiaiiSE



107



OEPARTMENT Of HEAtTH AND HUMAN SERVICES • MMUC HEALTH SERVICfi
NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



PnOlECT NUMSCR

Z01 RR 10303-02 BEI



pcmoocovEnEO

October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1990



rm£ oe PtVXXCT (to elmmemn or It— . im mut m on ant imn



Assessment of Scratching in Biliary Cirrhosis Patients



PWNOPAt IWV6STIQAT0R flJB otm i MUl m ikM im ftmonntt ttitom »» Pitneytt Intutao u or.i (Ww. mit. MeMory. and *MIMi aflUMan;



T, Talbot

J. Schmitt

E. Walker

N. Bergasa

E . Jones



Mechanical^ Engineer
Staff Fellow
Section Chief
Medical Staff Fellow
Senior Investigator



BE IP, NCRR
BE IP, NCRR
BE IP, NCRR
LDS, NIDDK
LDS, NIDDK



COOPERATING UNtTSOtmir)



NIDDK, Liver Unit



LAOBRANCH

Biomedical Enqineerincr and Instrumentation Program



SECTION

Applied Clinical Engineering Section



INSTITUTE ANO U3CATK3N

NCRR, National Institutes of Heal'th. Bethesda. MP 20892



TOTAL MAN-YEARS:



1.0



PROFESSIONAL:



IJL



CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX(ES)

S (a) Human subjects
D (a1) Minors
D (a2) Interviews



D (b) Human tissues D (c) Neither



SUMMARY OF WORK (Uf ttanOanl unmluont lypai Do not ocMtf tfw 4pae* pnmdta.)

Patients with the disease primary biliary cirrhosis suf:^er from
severe bouts of itching, manifested clinically by chronic
scratching. In order to evaluate the efficacy of experdmental
drugs that may relieve the itching, -it- is necessary to
quantify the scratching. A piezoelectric foil cemented to the
patient's primary scratching fingernail will transduce
mechanical vibrations generated by the scratching to a
miniature FM, transmitter . After the signal is obtained with a
FM receiver,, it will be processed by a custom-designed
frequency counter, which in turn is interrogated and reset
periodically by a personal computer. The study will consist of
measurement periods of six to eight hours both before treatment
and after treatment with specific drugs. Each patient will
serve as his or her own control.



PM^»40(Rj^»4l



109



Od^ANTMnff or NIAtTN AND HUMAN tOIViea • nNUCNIALTN MHVICS

rnnCM 0K4NTl|AMUMt llitlAIICfrf>nOMECT



jsgutgrssssBi

Z01 RR 10305-02 BEI



•^Sc^oBer^l, 1989 to September 30, 1990



CC/ Image Taanagement s ySt ein **



ftimKlH»L9*ttMttaAnMtUmmmrm9tmitmm0mmmmtmmtmmmam^mmmtt



R,L. Levin
E . Lamoreaux
J, Foy
T . Lewis



Biomedical ^ Engineer
Computer Scientist
Asst. Chief
Chief



BE IP, NCRR
ROB, NCI
MIS, CC
MIS, CC



COOrCRATMO UMTS «r •«)

Radiation Oncology Branch/NCI; Medical Infor. System Dept./CC



Biomedical Engineering and Instrumentation Program



Mechanical Engineering Section



NCRR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892



TOTAL MAMVCARft



0.2



0.2



omst



CHECK AmunVATC BOMlEa)

a M Human subjects
d (al) Minors
O (a2) Intsrviewrs



a (b) Human tissues D (c) Neither



SUUMART OP WOMK 4UW 4



t»pfcflBiwt— — <ii<p«e*»iiim<J



In order to facilitate the viewing and analysis of biomedical
images, the Clinical Center is in the process of designing and
developing an Image Management System (IMS) to complement the
current text -based Medical Information System (MIS) . This new
system- will consist of the following four key components: (1)
several different types of medical image gateways (MIG) , (2) an
image archival and retrieval system (lARS) that has a MIS
interface, (3) several different types of workstations (WS)
possessing a common biomedical shell, and (4) an interconnecting
communications network. The MIGs will permit digital
radiological images (i.e. MR, CT, PET, etc.), non-digital
radiological images (i.e. plane-film X-ray), and non-radiological
images (i.e. video-microscopic images, EKG tracings, patient
monitor information etc.) to be converted to a common format,
compressed in a loss-less manner, and automatically sent to the
lARS. The lARS will permit not only the long term archiving on
optical media of the images coming from the MIGs but also the
retrieval of multiple modality images to local workstations in
response to queries via the existing MIS data-base, the new IMS
data-base, or individual departme;ital data-bases'. In the
workstation area, we will be developing two or three different
types of biomedical workstations. The key to this series of
workstations is that they would utilize the same biomedical shell
(i.e. user interface). Application programs for diagnostic
imaging, stereotaxic surgical planning, radiation therapy
planning, tumor staging, etc, will also be developed.



Ill



OEPARTMEMT Of HEALTH ANO HUMAN SOIVICeS • PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE
NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



PROJECT NUMMH

Z01 RR 10306-02 BEI



pcwoo covcnco

October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1990



TITIM Of PnOJECT (K c M nomn or iMa. no* tmmt Mr an on* an* fl«i> n « n *m fiorOkr*.;

Liposome Photolysis and Antibody Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery
PfMNOPAL MVESnOATOn ftJB otm u i v lm mm \tt pmwennal bttom «M MnetoK mvmagmer.t (Mama. tfHi. iaftom n ry. and mtmum amWwi)



P.D. Smith
C. Black
H. Pass



Physicist

Biochemist

Surgeon



BE IP, NCRR
ROB, NCI
SB, NCI



COOPSUTMG UMTS (T anif

ROB, NCI; SB, NCI



lABIBHAMCH

Biomedical En'gineering and Instrtimentation Program



SKTION



Electronic and Electrical Engineering Section



■NSTITUTE ANO LOCATION

NCRR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MP 20892



TOTAL MAN-YEARS:



0.5



PROFESStONAl;



0.4



OTHER:



0.1



CI«CK APPnOPRUTE 8QXS9

D (a) Human subjects
a (a1) MinofS
O (a2) Interviews



Q (b) Human tissues IS (c) Neither



SUMMARY OF WORK (Ua* nvaflknf iinrMUMtf lypa. Do fW caeMd tfw «•» pronOML;

The ability to selectively deliver a drug to a specific' site is
a requirement in many clinical situations. One potential
vehicle for this are liposomes which can be made to incorporate
the drug. This study examines the prospects of being able to
release the drug by lysis following photo-excitation of a dye
incorporated into the liposome wall. Several compositions of
the liposome preparation have been evaluated each including
phthalocyanir^e which is excited at 670nm.

A second approach is to use an antibody, targeted for a
specific site or tissue mass, with a desired drug attached.
The potential, with anti-tumor antibodies, is to improve the
selectivity of photodynamic cancer therapy, and secondarily, ' to
increase tissue penetrance both of which reduce the clinical
effectiveness of this therapeutic modality.



''""^"•°- •""



,.aMa.AU AK»A»^



114



OCf ANTMfNT Of MCALTM »M0 NUMAN MH VIO tt • fMUC MtALTM MflVICB

NQTIGC OF iNTRAMUfUM. HeSCARCft PROMECT



PMOJCCTMUMMH



Z01 RR 10307-02 BEI



fCMOOCOVCIIEO.

October 1, ^P9? tg gfiPtenOi^ftr m, 199n



' tg g.eptenmftr



TmMCfpmojterm*

Pulse Oximeter Calibrator



J.M. Schmitt
G.X. Zhou
E.G. Walker



Staff Fellpw
Visiting Scientist
Section Chief, ACES



BE IP, NCRR
BEIP, NCRR
BE IP, NCRR



COOfCRATMO UMTS # «9|



lAttBRANCH

Biomedical Engineering and Instrninf>ntai-ir>n PTog,-;.m



SECTION

Applied Clinical Engineering Section



MSTTTUTE And LOCATION

NCRR, National Institutes of Health,



R«:.1-h^.c,rta^ Mn 9nRQ?



TOTAL MAN-YEARS:



0.2



PROFESSKMAU



JL-L



n 1



CHECK AmorauTE 8aX(ES)

D (a) Human subjects
a (al) Minors
D (a2) Intsrviaws



D (b) Human tissues S (c) Neither



SUUMMtY OF WORK (Um 4



f QipSL 00 Mf ffflDMtf Mv 4PW pWidMlJ



Although the clinical application of pulse oximetry has become
widespread since the early 1980 's, a convenient method for
testing the operation and accuracy of commercial pulse
oximeters does not yet exist. Our work has been directed
toward the development of a calibrator that employs a liquid-
crystal light valve to simulate the optical signals measured by
pulse oximeters. The feasibility of our calibration method has
been demonstrated using a prototype device constructed in our
laboratory.



lib



OCf AMTMtNT Of NSALTN AND HUMAN SCRVICeS • MMUC NCALTN SIHVICC

NOTKi Of iMmAMURM MieARat^llOJeCT



pwojccr NUMtcn

Z01 RR 10308-02 BEI .



^CMOOCOVfMCO-

October 1, 1989 to September 30^ 1990



inil(yM0JtCT4W«M>MIM«rlHi. nMMMr««iam*i>l

Reflectance-Mode Pulse Oximetry



J.M. Schmitt
G.X. Zhou
E.C. Walker
R.T. Wall



Staff Fellow
Visiting Scientist
Section Chief, ACES
Chief, Anesthesia Dept



BE IP, NCRR
BE IP, NCRR
BEIP, NCRR


1 2 3 5 7 8

Online LibraryNational Center for Research Resources (U.S.)Annual report : National Center for Research Resources (Volume 1990) → online text (page 5 of 8)