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Annual report : National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (Volume 1986) online

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RSV and BRSV; however, RSV is an Important childhood disease. We plan studies
on target cell population, virus distribution in the host, patency periods, and'
the pathophysiology of the disease. Preliminary findings will be presented at
national meeting this fall. The PVM studies and MHV studies are both hampered
by lack of a clinical-experimental virologist within CMB.



170



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ■ PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT ! ZOl ES 22102-05 CMB



PERIOD COVERED

October 1, 1985 to September 30, 1986



TITLE OF PROJECT (80 c/i«ncMrs or /ass. Wt mutt tit on on* /in« 0«(w««n th9 Ixnitrs.)

Characterization of a Corona virus from Rabbits



PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (Uat othf pntuaaionU ptraonnal blow m* Pmapal invstigator ) (Nam*, ttth. laboratory, and inatrtuta attiliaoor)

P.I.: J. D. Small Head, Diagnostic Laboratory CMB, NIEHS
Others: M. E. Clements Biol. Lab. Tech. CMB, NIEHS



COOPERATING UNITS fit any) , .

Chemical Pathology Branch, TRTP, NIEHS, NIH (Dr. M. Thompson); Division of Compara-i

tive Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine (Drs. J. Strandberg and

L. Aurelian); National Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA, Ames, lA (Dr. R. D. Woods)



LAB/BRANCH

Comparative Medicine Branch



SECTION

Diagnostic Laboratory



INSTITUTE AND LOCATION

NIEHS, NIH, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709



TOTAL MAN-YEARS;
.3



PROFESSIONAL:

.2



OTHER:



CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX(ES)

G (a) Human subjects D (b) Human tissues S] (c) Neither
D (al) Minors
D (a2) Interviews



SUMMARY OF WORK {Usa sfnOua unr%<Sucaa typa. Oo not a*CM<3 tht jpac* orovtOad.)

The objective of this project is to study the pathogenesis of rabbit coronavirus
(RbCV), the rabbit's physiologic response to this virus, and the relatedness of
RbCV to other members of the Coronaviridae. Serum neutralization studies against
RbCV with antiserum to canine coronavirus (CCV), feline infectious peritonitis
(FIP), and transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) viruses in the intact rabbit were
completed. Results were: CCV 2/3, FIP 2/3, TGE 1/3, RbCV 3/3 survived. RbCV
alone was lethal. All rabbits receiving RbCV in combination with antiserum to
one of the coronaviruses, including RbCV showed clinical signs of disease. As
expected RbCV antiserum muted clinical signs the most. RbCV reacted with anti-
sera to CCV, FIP, or TGE produced a typical clinical picture of disease. In some
survivors the rectal temperature remaind above 40*C for 10-12 days and in others
the temperature pattern closely followed that of rabbits receiving RbCV + RbCV
antiserum. Gross lesions in those which died were similar to rabbits dying with
RbCV alone. Gross lesions were not observed in survivors killed following recov-
ery. Based on previous work showing a 2 way cross with coronavirus 229E (Human),
partial cross protection from vaccination with CCV and FIP, and this new data,
RbCV is most probably in Group II of the Coronaviridae. Nucleotide homology stu-
dies will be required to prove this supposition. Assessment of myocardial damage
measuring creatine kinase isozymes are in progress. Further attempts will be
made to adapt RbCV to tissue culture. The significance of this work lies in the
ability to study a viral disease with a cardiotropism in an animal of sufficient
but manageable size to allow sequential clinical and physiological observations.
The damage to the rabbit heart by RbCV has a corollary in the human heart with
the Coxsackie viruses. Mycoplasma pneumoniae, influenza virus. Herpes zoster , and
possibly other infectious agents.

171



PHS 6040 (R«v 1/84)



SPO 9' 4-9IS



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES • PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE



NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



ZOl ES 22103-03 CMB



PERIOD COVERED

October 1, 1985 to September 30, 1986



TITLE OF PROJECT (80 ctivcmn or vm. TiM must tit on ana lint CwnvMn m» oordun.)

Natural History of Mouse Hepatitis Virus



PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (Uat ottmr prof»asiona/ ptnonnul blow i/i* PnnapU invtaogator.) (Namt. «%, labontory, ana institute altilmtion)

P. I.: C. B. Richter Chief CMB, NIEHS

Others: J. E. Thigpen Head, Quality Assurance Lab CMB, NIEHS
E. H. Lebetkin Biol. Lab. Tech., QAL CMB, NIEHS

M. L. Dawes- Biol. Lab. Tech., QAL CMB, NIEHS



COOPERATING UNITS (It any)



LAB/BRANCH

Comparative Medicine Branch



SECTION

Office of Chief, Quality Assurance Laboratory



INSTULITE AND LOCATION

NIEHS, NIH, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709



TOTAL MAN-YEARS:

.5



PROFESSIONAL:
2



OTHER:



CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX(ES)

D (a) Hunftan subjects D (b) Human tissues IS (c) Neither
D (ai) Minors
n (a2) Interviews



SUMMARY OF WORK (Usa Standard unraducad typa. Oo not axcaad (ft* spaea provKtad.)

Transmission of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) was studied in a "natural" animal
room setting using euthymic and athymic mice; and in unnatural settings where
experimentally infected cage mates served as time-controlled donors.

We have demonstrated that euthymic senjtinel mice may not be as effective indi-
cators of MHV infection in mouse populations as generally accepted because of
slow, or low titre response under certain husbandry conditions. In a single
companion study, athymic sentinels gave histologically predictive indications
of incipient MHV at 7-11 weeks post placement, and fully developed MHV liver
lesions at 13-17 weeks post placement. The nude sentinel concept must be
approached cautiously because the long patent period of MHV infection in nude
mice identifies them as contributors to the persistence of the virus within
the colony. We have also shown that CD-I weanling mice experimentally
infected with a street strain of MHV shed virus between 12 and 18 days PI as
measured by cohabitant seroconversion. It must be emphasized that these
results are indicators for the CD-I mouse only, and must be confirmed.

We are presently repeating the euthymic sentinel study in a carefully con-
trolled circumstance where sentinels are examined biweekly and/or monthly in
known infected and non infected rooms.



172



phS fifun iB«u i/fu> sPO»i*-»n



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES • PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE ,



NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



ZOl ES 22104-03 CMB



PERIOD COVERED

October 1, 1985 to September 30, 1986



TITLE OF PROJECT (30 cfaracmn or less. Title must fit on one line Oetween ttia txyrOers.)

Assessment of the Mouse Bioassay Test for Detecting Estrogenic Activity in Feed

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (Ust other professionaJ personnel below the Pnnapal Investigator ) (Name, title, laboratory, and institute attiliation)

P.I.: J. E. Thigpen Microbiologist CMB, NIEHS

Others: C. B. Richter Chief CMB, NIEHS

E. H. Lebetkin Biol. Lab. Tech. CMB, NIEHS

M. L. Dawes- Biol. Lab. Tech. CMB, NIEHS



COOPERATING UNITS (H any)



LAB/BRANCH

Comparative Medicine Branch



SECTION

Quality Assurance Laboratory



INSTITUTE AND LOCATION , ^ . ,. , ^ , . /^->-t/^n

NIEHS, NIH, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709



TOTAL MAN- YEARS:

.5



PROFESSIONAL;



OTHER:



CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX(ES)

n (a) Human subjects D (b) Human tissues B (c) Neither
n (a1) Minors
n (a2) Interviews



SUMMARY OF WORK (Use standard unreduced type. Do not exceed the space provided.)

We have previously shown that mice fed the American Institute of Nutrition
(AIN-76A) purified diet experience a significant increase in uterine-body weight
(U:BW) ratios when compared to the U:BW ratios of mice fed Purina #5002, a
closed formula natural ingredient diet. The AIN-76A diet contains 65X car-
bohydrate with 50* coming from sucrose or dextrose and 15X from corn starch.
The objective of this study was to determine whether fat and carbohydrate con-
tent contribute to unexpected uterine growth promoting activity observed in mice
fed the AIN-76A diet. Bioassays were performed using CO-1 mice weaned at 15
days of age and randomly assigned to #5002 diet fortified with corn starch,
sucrose, dextrose, corn oil, or soybean oil at the lOX and/or 25X level and to
#5002 diet containing 0, 4, or 6 ppb diethylstilbestrol (OES). Uterine: BW
ratios were determined on 15 mice/diet at 5 and 7 days post feeding. The U:BW
ratios of mice fed #5002 diet fortified with corn oil, soybean oil, sucrose,
dextrose or cornstarch were similar to each other, and were higher than the U:BW
ratios of mice fed the standard #5002 diet without added DES. This increase in
U:BW ratios is similar to the U:BW ratios of mice fed the #5002 diet containing
4 ppb DES. It was concluded that both the fat and the carbohydrate content of
the AIN-76A diet contributed to its uterine growth promoting activity.



17:



PHS 6040 (Rev 1/84)



SPO SI 4-S1S



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES • PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT ZOl ES 22106-02 CMB



PEWOO COVERED

i October 1, 1985 to September 30. 1986



TITLE OF PROJECT (SO chtncmrs or lusi Tim must M on one line between me borOers)

Characterization of an Acid Fast Bacterium Isolated from Animal Drinking Water



PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (Ust other professional personnel below me Pnncipal Investigator ) (Name, titte. laOormtory. ana institute atliliatKyi)

P.I. : J. D. Small Head, Diagnostic Laboratory CMB, NIEHS

Others: M. E. Clements Biol. Lab. Tech. CMB, NIEHS



COOPERATING UNITS (It any)

Chemical Pathology Branch, TRTP, NIEHS, NIH (Dr. C. A. Montgomery, Jr.)



LAB/BRANCH

Comparative Medicine Branch



SECTION

Diagnostic Laboratory



INSTITUTE AND LOCATION ^ ^ _ _ . « , . ' „„««

NIEHS, NIH, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709



TOTAL MAN-YEARS;
.5



PROFESSIONAL:

.3



OTHER



CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX<ES)

C (a) Human subjects D (b) Human tissues Q (c) Neither
G (al) Minors
n (a2) Interviews



SUMMARY OF WORK (Use startaard unre<3uced type Do not exceed ttie space provided)

The objective of this project is to characterize and study the pathogenic potential
of an acid fast (AF) bacterium repeatedly isolated from an ultrapure water source
furnishing drinking water to some of the Institute's animals. The organism has
been identified as Mycobacterium chelonae . Growth characteristics were compared in
broth media and on solid phase media. STddlebrook 7H9 broth + albumin fraction V
and dextrose gave no advantage over BHI or TSB which gave similar results. Nu-
trient broth was inferior. TSE agar was as effective or more so than TSA,
Mueller-Hinton, and Middlebrook 7H9 broth as above -•■ agar and is our standard agar.
Sensitivity to several antimicrobials was determined. From these results the
growth of M. chelonae on T6E agar containing vancomycin (3 pg/ml) + polymyxin
(10 pg/ml) was examined. Preliminary results indicate that M. chelonae is not
affected by these concentrations. The media (T6E+VP) should prove useful in
examining water samples and animal specimens for the presence of M. chelonae .
Athymic mice inoculated IV with M. chelonae developed focal granuTomas detectable
in the liver on post inoculation day (PID) 2 through PID 50. Intensity of lesions
peaked by day 7. AF organisms were rarely seen in sections after day 11. AF
bacteria were isolated from livers on PID 2, 4, 7 (5/5), 11 (3/5), 14 (1/5), 21
(2/5), 35 (2/5), 50 (0/5).

Spontaneous liver lesions will be searched for AF organisms. This work is signi-
ficant because of the focal lesions of undetermined origin observed in livers of
rodents on chronic bioassays conducted under the NTP. Identifying water-borne
bacteria and a Mycobacterium sp . in particular as the cause would allow for
corrections in management practices.



174



f



I



PHS 6040 (Rev 1/84)



CPO 91 4-9<l



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES - PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



PRC\.EZ' \LM6E =



ZOl ES 22107-01 CMB



PERIOD COVERED

October 1, 1985 to September 30, 1986



TITLE OF PROJECT (80 characttrs or lass. Title must fit on one tine tjetween the borders.)

Natural History of PVM



PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (List ottier professional personnel below the Principal Investigator) (Name, title, laboratory, and institute affiliation)

P.I.: C. B. Richter Chief CMB, NIEHS



Others: J. E, Thigpen
E. H. Lebetkin
M. L. Dawes



Head, Quality Assurance Lab CMB, NIEHS
Biol. Lab. Tech., QAL CMB, NIEHS
Biol. Lab. Tech., QAL CMB, NIEHS



COOPERATING UNITS (H any)

Center for Electron Microscopy, Dept. of Microbiology, School of Agriculture and
Life Sciences, North Carolina State University (J. MacKenzie, C. S. Richter,
D. Flynn)



LAB/BRANCH

Comparative Medicine Branch



SECTION

Office of Chief



INSTITUTE AND LOCATION

NIEHS, NIH, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709



TOTAL MAN-YEARS:
.4



PROFESSIONAL:

.2



OTHER:



.1



CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX(ES)

D (a) Human subjects
D (a1) Minors
n (a2) Interviews



D (b) Human tissues [S (c) Neither



SUMMARY OF WORK (Use standard unreduced type. Oo not exceed the space provided.)

The objective of this project is to study the natural history of pneumonia virus
of mice (PVM), an endemic/epidemic respiratory pathogen of laboratory rodents
including mice, rats, hamsters, guinea pigs, and probably others. Little Is
known about the pathology, patent period, epidemiology, and target cell popula-
tion of this virus. PVM is currently classified as a Pneumovirus of the family
Paramyxoviridae . It shares this classification with respiratory syncitial virus
(RSV) of man, and bovine respiratory syncitial virus (BRSV) of cattle. Minor
differences are seen in the electrophoretic mobility patterns of the polypep-
tides of various isolants of RSV. These differences are not distinguishable
with human convalescent serum but are distinguishable with individually prepared
antisera. Similar statements may be made about BRSV, although the information
is not as strong. Furthermore, RSV and BRSV have similar polypeptide profiles
indicating close relatedness. PVM on the other hand has several major differ-
ences. We have observed, and will report for the first time, fatal wasting
disease in athymic nu/nu mice naturally infected with PVM. Immunofluorescence
studies of lung materiTT from index cases indicate that the target cell in late
stage natural infection in the nu/nu mouse is located in the pulmonary
parenchyma rather than the lung airways. Because of the broad spectrum of
rodent hosts, PVM has the potential to influence many experimental results,
notably, those studies involving the cell dynamics of pulmonary parenchyma.



175



PHS 6040 (Rev t/84)



aPo 9 1 4-»ia



176



BIOMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENT PROGRAM



177



178



BIOMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENT PROGRAM
Summary Statement

The Biometry and Risk Assessment Program (BRAP) plans and conducts basic and
applied research in the areas of quantitative and biochemical risk assessment,
statistics, biomathematics, and epidemiology. A major focus of this research
effort is the qualitative and quantitative estimation of adverse health effects
resulting from exposure to hazardous environmental agents, and the development
of methodology useful in this estimation process. Attention is also directed
toward the identification of environmental risk factors and the elucidation of
the biological mechanisms that underlie their action. Due to the complexity of
many of the issues under investigation, an increasing proportion of this
research is being conducted on a program-wide basis, combining the scientific
expertise found in BRAP's different organizational units.

In addition to conducting its own research effort, the BRAP also provides
statistical, mathematical, data processing, and computer engineering and user
support to other programs of the Institute. It assists the Office of the
Director in addressing specific health issues that bear on the welfare of the
general public; and maintains an active association with peer groups in other
federal agencies, academic institutions and private organizations with similar
research interests.

The Biometry and Risk Assessment Program is organized into an Applied Pathology
Section and a Molecular Modeling Section within the Office of the Director, a
Statistics and Biomathematics Branch (SBB), an Epidemiology Branch (EB), a
Laboratory of Biochemical Risk Analysis (LBRA), and a Computer Technology Branch
(CTB).

The Statistics and Biomathematics Branch conducts a broad research effort in a
variety of areas such as statistical studies in carcinogenesis and genetic
toxicology, biomathematical modeling, risk assessment methodology development,
and the generation of biostatistical procedures applicable to epidemiology and
toxicology. Branch scientists also provide a comprehensive consulting service
for the research staff of the Institute.

The Epidemiology Branch carries out field studies of chronic disease which may
be attributable to environmental pollutants; investigates the effects of
environmental toxins on fertility, fetal and child development; and applies
experimental laboratory methods in the monitoring of human populations.

The Laboratory of Biochemical Risk Analysis is primarily concerned with the
development of laboratory procedures for quantifying exposures in terms of the
biologically effective dose, and with the adaptation of these procedures for
application to human populations and to the enhanced extrapolation of
toxicologic outcomes across species.

The Computer Technology Branch operates the Institute's central Vax computer
system; coordinates data communication activities; develops laboratory
computers and related scientific software, administrative information systems.



179



and NTP scientific information systems; provides an extensive user services
program for the Institute; manages the Institute's word processing and office
automation activities; provides support for a variety of computer-based work
stations; and manages the formal administrative systems associated with
computing at the Institute.



180



PROJECT NUMBER

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES • PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE



NOTICE OF INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



ZOl ES 43009-03 BRAP



PEBIOO COVERED

October 1, 1985, to September 30, 1986



TITLE OF PROJECT (BO chancttra or last. n«# must tit on ont lira tMtwatn tfis OorOers.)

Role of Kidney & Nutritional Factors in Metabolism of Toxic & Essential Metals



PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (Lit omtr protassional parsonnal Oe/ow frte Pnncipl Invastigator ) (Name. tm». labontoty, and instrtuta atfiliauon)

PI: Robert A. Goyer Deputy Director NIEHS

Others: Winona Victery Expert EB, BRAP, NIEHS

Chris R. Miller Bio. Lab. Techn. EB, BRAP, NIEHS
Rong-fang Hu- Visiting Fellow EB, BRAP, NIEHS



COOPERATING UNITS (H any)







"


LA8/8RANCH |

Office of the Director, Biometry and Risk Assessment Program


SECTION

Applied Pathology Section


INSTITUTE AND LOCATION

NIEHS, NIH, Research Triangle Park, North Carol


ina 27709


TOTAL MAN-YEARS;

3


PROFESSIONAL.

2


OTHER:

1

■ ■ t



CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX(ES)

G (a) Human subjects D (b) Human tissues d (c) Neither

G (al) Minors
G (a2) Interviews



SUMMARY OF WORK (Uia stanaartj unm<]uca<3 rypa Do not axcaad tha space provKJaC) \

The cellular pathology of the kidney is studied in rats following exposure to

toxic metals. A series of experiments is being conducted to determine the {

influence of essential trace metal metabolism on metal nephrotoxicity. Metabolic '

parameters and indicators of toxicity measured include cell ultrastructure, toxic j

and trace metal burden and excretion, changes in metal-binding protein, e.g.,

metallothionein.

I
Results to date indicate that: j

Lead exposure increases urinary zinc in a dose and exposure length-dependent j
manner; urinary calcium is increased at the highest lead dose only. i

Calcium content of kidney is normally low, but there is a discontinuous
increase in calcium concentration, indicative of renal cell injury, if blood
lead concentration exceeds 45 yg/dl.

Increased blood pressure occurs in rats after moderate exposure to lead for
12 months (mean blood lead, 45 pg/dl).

Animals injected with cadmium have increased metallothionein content of liver
and kidney with liver metallothionein concentration two-fold greater than
kidney. Zinc deficiency results in less increase in kidney metallothionein |
with cadmium exposure, greater increase in non-metal lothionein bound cadmium,]
and increased susceptibility to cadmium nephrotoxicity. |

The purpose of these studies is twofold: one is to determine biologic indicators j
of renal toxicity in response to toxic metal exposure. The second is to determine
the role of metal binding proteins and essential metals on toxicity. From these
studies the influence of various factors on risk to exposure to toxic metals may be
estimated. The identification of indicators of exposure and biologic effect may
have application in prevention of toxicity.

131



PHS 6040 (R«v 1/84) <:po»i«-»i«



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES • PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE
NOTICE OP INTRAMURAL RESEARCH PROJECT



PflOoECT M0MBE='



7m Fs 4^mn^ni brap



PERIOD COVERED



nrtnhPP 1, igRJi tn ^Pptomhor ^n, lOflfi



TITLE OF PROJECT (80 cfianctun or /•«. TIH* must fit on ont lint Mlwttn m» OorMra.)
Macrnmn lpriilar Mnriplint] »nti Tarri nngonogi <;



k



\ PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (Lst otrmr promssionti ptrsonnai oaiow tnt Pnnapai lnvestig»ior ) (Nama. titlt. laDontory. ana instituta attiliation)



I



PI: David G. Hoel

Others: Marshall W. Anderson
Tom Garden
Lee G. Pedersen



Director



BRAP



Research Chemist LBRA
Sr. Computer Scientist BRAP
Research Chemist BRAP



COOPERATING UNITS (it any)



LAB/BRANCH



Rinmptry and Risk Assessment Program



SECTION



Office of the Program Director



INSTITUTE AND LOCATION



NTFHS, NTH, Rpsparrh Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709



TOTAL MaTTyEARS'



PflOPESSIONAL.

-0^



OTHER:



CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX(ES)

G (a) Human subjects
[_ (ai) Minors
n (a2) Interviews



G (b) Human tissues [il (c) Neither



SUMMARY OF WORK (Usa stuwaro unraoucac typa Do not atcaaa tna spaca provioac.)

This project is concerned with exploring theoretical factors involved in
mutagenesis and the initial steps in carcinogenesis. Recent experimental advances
in the area of genetic engineering have provided new possibilities for studying
the dependence of chemically induced mutational events on DNA sequence. We hope
to use computer modeling to examine the physical chemical factors (charge
distribution, chemical reactivity, and stereochemical and thermodynamic
relationships) contributing to site specificity of chemical agents at the level of
DNA damage. An additional area of interest is the effect of amino acid
substitution on protein function.



i



182



OHS 6040 (R«v 1/84)



SPO SI «••<• >



COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY BRANCH
Summary Statement

As well as developing overall strategies for computing at the Institute, the
Computer Technology Branch (1) manages and operates the Institute's central
VAX computer system including hardware development and systems programming;
(2) coordinates data communications activities associated with the central
system, workstations, and remote facilities such as NIH/DCRT; (3) develops
laboratory computers and scientific software to support Institute research;
(4) develops administrative information systems (application software) for the
Institute; (5) develops scientific information systems for the NTP; (6)
provides services to VAX users including consulting, problem investigation,
training, manuals, and information distribution: (7) manages the Institute's
word processing and office automation activities: (8) provides support for a
variety of workstations including text and graphics terminals, personal
computers, and stand-alone word processors; and (9) manages the formal
administrative systems associated with computing at the Institute.

Management of the central VAX computer facility includes hardware development,
systems software development, and traditional operations functions for the VAX
processors and peripherals including management of computer accounts,
invoices, supplies, storage media, and disk space. Hardware design, procure-
ment, installation, and maintenance are managed for computer equipment, power,
air conditioning, and physical security. Computing capacity is continuously
being increased to meet increased demand from the Institute. Systems software



Online LibraryNational Institute of Environmental Health ScienceAnnual report : National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (Volume 1986) → online text (page 20 of 31)