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MAC MURRAY



COLLEGE




From the collection of the



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San Francisco, California
2007



JInry






NATIONAL RECREATION ASSOCIATION APRIL 1952 35c




1952 EDITION

It's New!

It's Fun!

It's Full of Good Ideas!



Same size 12 weekly issues

Same time Beginning

April 25, 1952

Same Price $ 1.50




SUBSCRIBE NOW

For Every Playground For Every Playground Leader

USEFUL? Ask the subscribers!
Ask these communities bon nnttiy subscriptions they used. . .

Auburn. Me.
Pal* Alto. C.I.

( .trrn. K h. ( onn.

R.hw.. \ I 12 ....I.

f*o. N I
Ai*w. S -\

I ,mlrn N I 13

Jackson, Mich. 14

Davenport, Iowa and Salina, Kansas 15

Evanston, III. 18

Salisbury, N.C. and Jackson, Miss 20

( I ..nil >t It-. N.C. 30



JOIN THE PARADE





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quickly and effectively

wiffc Gulf Sani-Soil-Set



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the many good reasons why it will pay you to in-
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HIGHLY EFFECTIVE-Gulf Sani-Soil-Set eliminates dust
annoyance completely immediately after application.
No long waiting periods are necessary before the ground
is ready for use. The dust allaying effect is accomplished
by the action of the compound in adhering to and weigh-
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LONG LASTING Because of its extremely low volatility
and insolubility in water, Gulf Sani-Soil-Set remains
effective for long periods. One application per season or
year is usually sufficient.

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GULF BUILDING, PITTSBURGH, PA.



Sales Offices - Warehouses
Located in principal cities

and towns throughout
Gulf's marketing territory



APRIL 1952




EASILY APPLIED-Gulf Sani-Soil-Set is free-flowing,
easy and pleasant to use. It can be applied by hand-
sprinkling or by sprinkling truck, and spreads quickly.

SAVES MAINTENANCE EXPENSE-Gulf Sani-Soil-Set
prevents the growth of grass on areas treated, and mini-
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stores, and laundries.

Write, wire or phone your nearest Gulf office
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have not yet received a copy of the booklet which
gives further information on this quality Gulf
product, mail the coupon below.



Gulf Oil Corporation Gulf Refining Company R

719 Gulf Building, Pittsburgh 30. Pa.

Please send me. without obligation, a copy of the booklet, "Gulf
Sani-Soil-Set the modern, proven agent for controlling dust."



Name

Title
Address







Time is FLYING . . .



Soon you will start planning

your summer vacation, and if

you are looking for new ideas,

or

If you want to try something

"different" . . .

WATCH FOR THE NEW






PREPARED BY THE EDITORS OF




magazine



This special publication, planned to supplement our usual ten issues of RECREATION, will
tell you, your family and your friends how you may have BETTER summer vacations, for LESS
MONEY at home, in the community and nearby recreation areas, and in the state and na-
tional parks throughout this country. Here is a chance to become familiar with exciting and in-
teresting information on the subject. Do you know, for instance, that there is an organization
which will give you information on farm vacations; that pack trips in the Eastern mountains
can be arranged for you; what "treats" to plan if you stay at home; what to take on a camp-
ing trip; how to keep your children amused on a long drive? Are you an expert car packer?
Would you like to know about dude ranch visits, wilderness trail rides, or special events in
different parts of the country? Would you like your trip to be an adventure in leai ning?

SPRING 1952 mil with a new mogai>ne >wbcripfion or a renewal $.5O per Copy



U. S. Fofetl Service



FREE offer with new subscription or renew-
al of a subscription to RECREATION mag-
azine will be available for a limited period
of time only so ORDER NOW. Magazine
$3.00-One Year; $5.50-Two Years; $.35
per copy.

NATIONAL RECREATION ASSOCIATION
315 Fourth Avenue, New York 10, N.Y.




RECREATION



#&***********#**#***#*******#* ***************

Because of narrow back margins this volume
has been sewed to cords No covers or
advertising can be removed except double page
cCdvr? -iisements when this type of sewing is used.
NEW METHOD BOOK BINDERY, Inc.

***********************#####*##*#****#*###***



APRIL, 1952





THE MAGAZINE OF THE RECREATION MOVEMENT



Editor in Chief, JOSEPH PRENDEHCAST

Editor, DOROTHY DONALDSON
Business Manager, ROSE JAY SCHWARTZ

ASSOCIATE EDITORS

Recreation Administration, GEOKGE BUTLER
Program Activities, VIRGINIA MUSSELMAN



Vol. XLV1



Price 35 Cents



No. 1



On the Cover

Two youngsters leaping through the spring sunshine
two boys expressing their joy of life this is April,
and children, anywhere. This happy spirit of fun
symbolizes playground aims of recreation leaders.



Next Month



Photo Credits



CONTENTS

General Features

What Community Recreation Programs Can Do for

Service Women ( Editorial) ,

Oveta Gulp Hobby 5

Declaration of Brothers, Otto T. Mallery 11

Congress Committees 32

Hobby Show at Boeing, Arthur G. Scott 33

Water, Seattle's Staff of Life. Lou Evans 34

Hot Dog. This is it! Bernard Ballantine 55

Administration

Blacktop for Apparatus Areas? 19



Please, Mister, May I Have a Ball? Ernest B. Ehrke 20

Filing Equipment for Playgrounds 22

In May, RECREATION matches the season, with article^ , , , , , ,-, i /-.

like Boy and Girl Anglers, It's Garden Time ano^\. New Ideas for Playground Equipment, A. J. Gatawakas 38

The Air Force Takes to the Farm. Other subjects Training Playground Leaders, W. C. Sutherland 42

range from swimming pool anil golf course operation ^v c r> *n

ttough painting as a hobby to another good article \Summer Recreation

golden agers. Look for The Value of Play in Summer Items 50

Children's Homes by Helen Dauncey and the second c ^L- IVT m j u i D j i i r

article of the series on photography. Something New in Playgrounds, Helena Braddock Lamp 53

A Safe Playground for Every Child, William F. Keller 58

Page 5, Houston Post; 13, Los Angeles City Recrea- Program

lion and Park Department; 14, 1950 Graflex Photo

Contest; 15. Department of Recreation, Oak Ridge, A Look at Our Playgrounds

I Vnne.s,,- ami .1. K Westcott; 16, Herald and Re- Weave in Some Singing, Arthur Todd . 17

anil Playground and Recreation Hoard, Decatur.

Illinois: 21. 22, Los Angeles City Department of Rec- A Summer Playground Production, John V. Smith

reation and Parks; 24, Carl Gustafson, Vancouver. and Minna B. Reichelt 23

Washington; 25 Park and Recreation Department. We H d Baseball League, Robert W. Ruhe 25

t.naneston. \\esl Virginia: 26. Aslieville Department

ol Ill-creation, courtesy of North Carolina Recreation Crafts in the Recreation Program, Viva Whitney 26

Society. Incorporated; 29 I'la^ionnd and Rec,,-:,- Young Anglers, Frank W. Bramhall . 29
linn Board, Decatur. Illinois; 28, Manitowoc. Wiscon-
sin Recreation Department: 29. Miller-Martin Siudio, Special Events Improved, Doreen 0. Kirkland 30

Torringlon. Connecticut; 31. Metropolitan Life Insur- The photographic Group, Irma Weber .. 36

ance l.unipany; .vi. Hoeing Airplane Company; 40, . D r

Recreation Commission. Long Head,. California: .">8, Lets Have More Play on Playgrounds,

Recreation Commission, Long Beach, California. Helen M. Dauncey 40

How To Do It! Make Sandals for Beach and

RECREATION is published monthly except July Swimming Pool, Frank A. Staples 56

and August by the National Recreation Association,
a sriviie organization supported by voluntary con-
tributions, at 315 Fourth Avenue, New York 10, Regular Features
New York; is on file in public libraries and is

indexed in the Readers' Guide. Subscriptions $3.00 I , 1 1,., ^ 7
a year. Canadian agency, G. H. Welch Company,

Ltd., 1149 King Street West, Toronto 1, Ontario; Frlitnrinllv Sripakinp
Canadian subscription rate $3.85. Re-entered as

,',;. i <'', '"-"t-r April 25 1950, at the Post Things You Should Know 10

Office in New York, New York, under Act of

March 3. 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special Sntro-pstinn Rnv ^Q

rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act

of October 3, 1917, authorized May 1, 1924. Personnel

rf^Ws3?j8L^WTSta^ Services of the National Recreation Association,

Spun- Representatives: H. Thayer Heaton, 415 W. C. Sutherland . 44

Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York; n r T-> /- i T

Mark Minahan, 168 North Michigan Avenue, Recipes lor r un Games and Parties 51

Chicago, Illinois; Keith H. Evans, 3757 Wilshire r n,r i IVT

Boulevard, Los Angeles 5, California. Recreation Market INeWS 60

Natioua, &S' AToeiaX'tcorporated =1 fi ' > ? PI B ks Received ..62

rrinied in the U.S.A. 3 iigii 2 - 5 v J New_ Publications 64

* Trade mark registered in the U. S. Pl^lKOffice. , Pf i f f f. ol i L\-Kia V 11 j i /^

*" " " "V I ' ReeiJeStiBft Leadership Courses Inside Back Cover

Mac IVI.i- ray Colleg-e

* i. O



APRIL 1952



NATIONAL RECREATION ASSOCIATION

A Service Organization Supported by Voluntary Contributions
JOSEPH I'lII M>I KGAST, Executive Director




OFFICERS

Ono T. MALI tar Chairman of the Board

PAUL Mooar. Jt First Vice-President

Mtt. OCOCM L. MILM Second Vicc-Prnidcnt

SUSAN M. LIE. .Third Vice-Preiident and Secretary of the Board

AMIAN M. MASIU Treasurer

GUITAVL-S T. KtRBT Treaiurer Emeritui

jourtt PKKKDtacAtT Secretary

BOARD OF DIRECTORS




f. W. H. AOAWS New York, N. Y.

. BIMII Boston, Miss.

Ma . RoaisT Vooos Butt Vathiagton, D. C.

Mt . AKTHI a G. CLUMII Jacktonville. Fla.

Vt tuu H. DAVIS New York, N. Y.

HA T P. DAT ISO K Ntw York. N. Y.

GA LOU> OOMMBLLST Chicago, 111.

Ma . PAUL GAIIACHIB Omaha. Ncbr.

Roaiar GAUITT Baltimore, Md.

ALSTIN E. Gairmm Seattle. Vh.

Mi t NCMMAM Haaaovta Fitchburg, Mail.

Mat. CHAaitt V. HICAOI Michigan City. Ind,



Mm, JOHN D. JAMISON Bcllpon. N. Y.

SUSAN M. LK New York, N. Y.

OTTO T. MAI irar Philadelphia, Pa.

CABL F. MlLLlKEN Augutla, Me.

MRS. OCDZN L. Mm J Voodbury , N. Y.

PAUL Mooat. Ja Jersey City, N. J.

JoitrH PaCNDEaCAST New York, N. Y

Mas. Slcwt'ND STUN Sao Francitco, Calif.

GaANT TmwoKTH Noroton. Conn.

Mai. WILLIAM VAN ALIN Philadelphia. Pa.

J. C. WALSH Yonker.. N. Y.

FREDEBICR M. TARVL-H. New York, X. V



t*e*ulive Dtrevtor'i Ofice

E. UiLi.it THOUAS E. Rivtas

tin D rUaaitOM ARTHUR VILI IAUI

Ai raco H. '*



VMCINLA MUIRLMAN

GaariUDC BoacMAio

R*if*tion Mataiint

DotXOTHT DONALA>ON

Social Public a tiom

Ron JAT SCNVARTI MLRIIL UcGANM

PrvaBl Service

Viti ar> C. StrTHiaiAMO Airaio B. jlNttM
MART GCRUMAT



UK \DQUARTERS STAFF

Research Department

GcoacR D. BLTLIR
ELRAIKTH CLIFTON DAVID J. DtBoit

Work with Volunteers

E. BIATRIU STEARNS
MART QuiaE MARCARET OANRVORTH

Field Department

CHARLB* E. Ruo JAUEI A. MAOIION

GroacE T. ADAM* HELENA G. Horr

RiciiAao S. VRITCATE



Srrn



.\rtti **J ftcilititt PUmiimi **4 Sariryi

H. C. HCTCHINS ALAN B. ButRirr

LESLIE LYNCH



fint f. B-f*/r Mrmurul
SffTtttry for Women imJ Girli

HILKN M. DAUHCIV



Jxitrul Rfcrrstio*



C. E. BaivtR



Hfcrfttiom Lt*4evtki} Trtimimf COMTIM
RUTH EHLCRS ANNI LIVINGSTON

MIIORED VANION FRANK A. STAPLJS

GRACR WAIRIK



New E.|UJ Diairict
R- HAiNtvoeiH . . BotroM, MAIS.
fewnt a44r*u . . . New York)

Middle Atlantic I>,.ir ..

H V. FA< 1 1 f jit Orange. N. J.

A Nistm New York. N. Y.



Cfwal Leke D.itrm

)eiM J. Couau Toledo. On,o

ROMRf L. HoaNtT Midiion. T.I,



DISIUK T UI:IKI:>I \ i \n\i-

Southern District

MISI MARION Pauct Aleiandria, Va.

R*i m VAN hi HT Clear witer. Hi

VIU.IAM M. HAT Nathvillt. Tnn.



Midw.n District

AITHLR Tooo Kansas City. Mo,

HAROLD LATtiaor Denver, Colo.



Southwest District
HAHOI n VAN AasDAia Dallas, TCI.

Paciic Northwest District

VIIIAKD H. SHI MAUD Seattle, Wash.

Pacific Southw.it District
I.TNM S. ROONRT Los Angelei, C *l.l



Affiliate Membership

Aw,l,ic wmberihip in the National
Recreatiee) Aaaociettoo. it ofs to all non-
f4t feivate a*d pmblic orgsnualiosis
when fwactseej i* whoJIf or prinstnl? the
Meatiosi oe oroawMio* of mreatton ttrr*
KOS or which incloeW recrtatiosi ai a* ins-
oorsoat oert mf their total oewgras* and
hsisi CMoirxtoei U the work of the **o-
cittHMi wwottt. In the ofintoo of the MO-
<i*te'i IWaed ol Directors, teriher the
ewalf el the MJowel rocreacton Movtusent,



Active Associate Membership

Active associate membership in the
National Rrcrcxton Association is open to
all individuals who are actively engaged
on a full-time or part-time employed bam
or a* volunteers in nonproAt private or
publ ic r*c r r a i inn org in 1 1 a t ion and whose
cooperation in the work ol the association
would, in the opinion of the associstion'i
Ward ol Directors, further the ends of the
national recreation movement



Contributors

The continuation of the work of the
National Recreation Association tr
to rear is made possible by the iplrnJid
cooperation of several hundred vol untwr
sponsors throughout the country, and the
generous contributions of thouund<
porters of this movement to bring health,
happiness and creative living to the boy*
and girls and the men snd women f
America. II you would like to join in the
lupport of this movement, you msy send
your contribution direct to the association.



The National Recreation Axorialion it nation-
wide, nonprofit, nonpoliliral tnd nonvcltriin civic
oriimialion. ril.!,.hr.| , n 1906 mil *upported by
voluntary roninl.uiionv and dedicated to the MTV-
ice ol all recreation necativea, leaden and agen-

further Information regarding the auocialion'i xrn-irri and mtmbrnhip. pirate vritr ti, thr
IHrertor. \aiional Recreation Auocialion. 315 fourth Avenue. Netr ) -r*, 10. \ew York.



ciw. public and private, to the rnd that every child
in America *hall have a place to play in nafety anil
that every perton in America, young and old, nhall
have an opportunity for ih> l.r-i and nnt Mtisfy-
ing ue of Hi rxpandiiifi leisure time.



Ill t Kl \TION



What Community Recreation Programs
Can Do
FOR SERVICE WOMEN




A Guest Editorial



by Oveta Gulp Hobby



DURING WORLD WAR II. the whole
idea of women in uniform was so
new and to some still so shocking
that the problem of recreation was
only a part of a greater problem.

In the early stages, therefore, the
effort to provide recreation for the
women was sometimes misguided,
sometimes well intentioned, occasional-
ly ludicrous.

The WAG remembers with some
amusement in its official history the
post commander who was so startled to
receive a shipment of WAGS that he set
up what looked to be emergency rules
for them: they were to use the post
exchange and the post movie on Tues-
day and Thursdays, and with careful
segregation the soldiers to use them
on Wednesdays and Fridays.

As the army discovered that WAGS
were simply people the same kinds of
women they had known in civilian life
there was a swing to acceptance of
women in uniform as a normal thing.

But this, in turn, resulted in another
misconception: that women in uniform
are just like men in uniform, and can,
therefore, be given the same enter-
tainment and recreation.

Looking back on papers of World
War II, I find a notation: "One of the
main distinctions between successful
leadership of women and similar
leadership of men is that women need
to remain individuals to such an extent
that group activity, outside of office
hours, can very easily be overdone with
them."

Now, with women a permanent part

MRS. HOBBY, formerly director of the
If omen's Army Corps, is now executive
vice-president of The Houston Post.

APRIL 1952



of the armed forces, the time has come
to analyze their military situation, to
see their needs, and to plan a balanced
recreation program and facility for
them.

Because women are new to the
services, the average military post to
which a WAG, WAF, Wave or Wom-
en Marines' Unit is assigned does not
have as complete a recreational facility
for women as for men.

Though the station may try to in-
clude women in its baseball, football,
and other athletic programs, these at-
tract only the younger women. Most
stations share their swimming pools
and bowling alleys if they have them
with women, but as women are only
a small minority, only a few hours a
month can fairly be alloted to them.

Even for officers, the usual officers'
athletic club, such as the one in the
Pentagon, finds that men and women
cannot use the facilities at the same
time, and that the number of women
who would attend is not consistent
enough to justify giving them set hours
there.

If the armed forces cannot make
special provisions for the women, it
may fall to the community to help
make community facilities available to
the service women- golf, tennis, horse-
back riding, swimming, hiking and
other sports. Because enlisted women
may lack the funds to take advantage
of local clubs, or may lack transporta-
tion, the community help may be tre-
mendously important.

The community has much to offer
the service woman which the defense
department either cannot or has not
provided.



While the armed forces have made
all their special study courses by cor-
respondence and off-duty training
available to women, the majority of
these courses are more apt to appeal
to men only being on such subjects
as electrical engineering, welding and
other trades and occupations.

This lack could be met by the com-
munity, by arranging for service wom-
en to attend its classes in sewing,
cooking, languages, as well as arts and
social sciences. Though the armed
forces encourages company parties,
skits and "blackouts," again the ma-
terial is tailored for the all-male cast.

The service woman would enjoy
being included in community theatri-
cals, and in dance, music and drama
groups.

Despite the magnificent job done by
the national service agencies during
World War II, both here and overseas,
not all of them are equipped to pro-
vide for service women to the same
degree they provide for men. Another
factor has been that here and there, a
local representative of the agency has
not been indoctrinated to the needs of
the service woman.

Though the USO headquarters made
vigorous efforts, some USO local units
in World War II did not allow service
women to attend the dances and other
events planned for servicemen.

In Italy, England and Australia,
some Red Cross field workers turned
a deaf ear to headquarters' ruling that
they should provide equally for service
women. And not until the end of the
war were the rest camps made availa-
ble to women.

In the actual planning of military



installations, the question of recrea-
tion fur service women de-erve- -pe-
rial -tudv and especially adapted ar-
rangements for them.

\\ here the average barracks for men
needs only one day room, the women's
unit- need tun types, one for girl- re-
ceiving date-, anil the other for those
M|HI urr not dating and need a place
t<> lounge and write letters, in pajamas
if lhc\ like.

The fir-I -hould have a record plavei
or juke box, and if possible a snack
bar. The second should have com-
fortalile furniture of a home-like quali-
ty-

One advisor to the air force noted
that attractively furnished dav rooms
"go far toward offsetting the harmful
effect of regimentation on women." 1. 1.
( ioloiirl Margaret Craighill. a doctor
employed l>\ tin- >ur<:con (iencral (lur-
ing the war as consultant on women's
health and welfare, wrote that " Ml
women [H-r-ontiel nee<l a day room in
which they can lounge informallv t-
jfether, as well as a recreation or re-
i-eption room in which they can enter-



tain men.

"If adequate facilities are not availa-
ble, the incidence of pregnancy and
venom] disease i- likely to increase."

The Mriti.h women's services felt
the same need, saving "The gregarious
are well cared for \<\ wireless, games,
concerts and dances, hut more quiet
loom- are needed for women who wish
to relax."

This need of women for reasserting
their individuality is felt in the mat-
ter of social entertainment as well as
in facilities.

In WAC units all over the world,
it was found that the women very soon
lired of large parties or mass enter-
tainment, and would not willingly go
to such entertainment whether it was
arranged on the post or off.

In-lead. thev preferred social gather-
ings in small groups and where indi-
vidual choice played a part. A dinner
in a private home, or individual in
v itations to social events or concerts
or plays, meant more to them than
unit affairs to which they were taken
in mass groups.



No one can fail to reali/e llie deep
need for good recreation services for
women in uniform. Because their work
is sedentary, because thcv have little
outdoor training on their schedule.
and because they do not have the in-
centive of keeping fit for combat. the\
can easily overlook their own need for
exercise.

In thi.- strange period of wailing.
none of the armed forces has e]uite the
\i\id incentive and stimulus which
wartime j;i\e> to keep their morale
high.

This means to me that service wom-
en today need communitv help
coinmiiiiilv friendship more than thev
ever needed it before VJ Dav.

Women of all kinds, mam of them
niilv eighteen, far awav from home.
detached from all the hometown pat-
terns, set in a mililaiv installation
which seem- remote from everything
thev have known, need healthful, in-
telligent cordial recreational help from
lii'th the armed forces and from the
individual communities a- thev have
never needed them before.




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Hoard Members

Sirs:

You will be interested to know that
a copy of RECREATION magazine is
placed on the magazine stand in the
lobby of the General Tire and Rubber
Company each month.

Mr. Charles Burke, Chairman of the
Akron Park and Recreation Board, is
assistant to the president at General
Tire and Rubber Company. Each
month, after Mr. Burke has completed
the reading of his copy, he gives it to
the receptionist in the lobby, who
places it on the magazine stand. This
suggestion might prove of some value
for other board members who have
business connections.

A. E. CENTER, Superintendent of

Recreation, Akron, Ohio.



Sirs:

We saw an article, "Clowns Un-
limited," in the January 1952 issue of
RECREATION magazine. Enclosed is our
check to cover cost and mailing. Please
send a copy to our address.

"K.VKV, Chief Clown, Phoenix, /// .

Playground Accidents

Sirs:

In reference to the article by Dr.
Hollis Fait, "The Picture Isn't Com-
plete," appearing in the February,
1952, issue of RECREATION, I was much
interested in the suggestion made
therein that studies of accidents be
made by recreation people as a con-
tribution to the field of recreation.

To those who might be interested. I
wish to point out that such a study
was published in the RECREATION
magazine in the April issue of 1938,
or thereabouts, entitled "A Study of
Playground Accidents in Pittsburgh,"
of which I was the author. It was and
still is, as far as I know, the only study



of playground accidents made in the

past twenty-five years.

MICHAEL E. WARGO, Director of
Recreation, Clairton, Pennsylvania.

Menial Health

Sirs:

In the January issue of RECREATION
there was a wonderful article by Dr.
George E. Gardner, "Recreation's Part
in Mental Health." I have been work-
ing on a study similar to his theories
for the past seven years, "Introducing
Recreation as a Therapeutic Instru-
ment in Child Care Institutions," which
is almost finished.

I am very happy to see that there



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