New Bedford (Mass.).

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of the Commonwealth to inspect all elevators in their
respective cities annuallv, and a practical test made oi the
safety devises and other requirements coming under this
act. The inspector to make a detailed report thereof to
the Chief of the Mass. District Police upon forms furnished
by him and a complete record of each inspection to be kept
by such inspector.

The inspector of Buildings to issue licences to all
elevator operators after a thorough examination as to their
fitness, etc.

The inspection of all elevators in the city will be commen-
ced by this department early in the new year in compliance
with the new law.



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26 SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS

SIGN AND BILLBOARD INSPECTION:

Regulation as to signs on roof or side of any building
or upon any street, lane or alley or public place in the city.

SECTION 16, CHAPTER 22 OF THE CITY
ORDINANCES:

The inspector of buildings shall consider the construc-
tion of the sign, and the method of fastening it to its support-
ing surface and shall report to the Board of Mayor and Al-
dermen whether such construction is proper and whether
such method is sufficiently safe.

VIOLATIONS OF THE BUILDING LAWS REPORTED
AND CORRECTED DURING THE YEAR.

Building without permit, 44

Faulty construction and violation of the building laws, 175

Dangerous chimneys, 31
Safer construction in buildings after being damaged

by fire, 22



Total, 272

CONCLUSION.

In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation and
thanks to the Mayor and the various committees of the
City Council for their cordial co-operation in all matters
pertaining to the work of this department.

Respectfully submitted.

JOSEPH L. GIBBS,

Supt. Public Buildings.
Inspector of Buildings.



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TWENTIETH
ANNUAL REPORT



OP THB



Board of
Contetery Gommissioners



F€^r the Year Ending December 69
1914



Nbw Bbdpord, Mass.

The a. E. Coffin Prbss. Printbrs.

1915.



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CEMETEBT BOABD.



WILLIAM M. HIGHAM, Chairman.

JOHN G. NICHOLSON.

CHARLES H. VINAL, Swretary.

CliBRE OF THE BoABD.

PARDON A. MACOMBER.

Assistants.
MISS IVAH M. HUNT.
MISS ALICE Q. SHAW.



Assistant Superintendent.
HURLBERT E. THOMAS.



0EMETEBIE8.

RURAL Sexton, NELSON L. PIKE.

OAK GROVE. . . Sexton, EDMUND M. CORNELL.
PINE GROVE. GRIFFIN STREET.



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CITT OF NEW BEDFORD,
OFFICE OF OEMETEBT B0A3tD.



New Bedford, December 6, 1914.

To the Honorable, the City Council of the City of AVm>
Bedford.

Gentlemen:^ — Pursuant to the requirement of the
City 's ordinance relative to the Department of Cemeteries,
that tlie Board of Cemetery Commissioners shall annually
in the month of January render to the City Council a
report of its doings, I herewith submit its Twentieth
annual report, the same being for the year ending,
December 6, 1914.

CHARLES H. VINAL.

Secretary.



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CEMETERY REPORT



City op New Bedford
Office of Board of Cemetery Commissioners.



December 6, 1914.

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the City Council of the City
of New Bedford.

Gentlemen: — In compliance with the law and estab-
lished usage, we have the honor of presenting to you the
twentieth annual report of the cemeteries of the City of
New Bedford. It contains in detail, a report of the receipts
and expenditures, the deposits for perpetual care, the an-
nual care of lots, and an account of the maintenance and
improvements during the year. The appropriation by the
City Council was $20,000.00, the receipts from perpetual
care $6,138.75, from annual care, interments and other
work, $11,855.32. The expenditures of the year amounted
to $37,947.45, leaving an unexpended balance of $46.52.
$6,730.00 has been received from the sale of lots, and from
this and $1,965.10, balance from 1913, $7,852.57 has been
drawn for the improvement and embellishment in the sev-
eral grounds.

The past year has been one of no less activity in this
department than former periods. The continual growth of
the city necessarily increases the work, the demand and the
interest in this department. Death is certain, but it re-
mains with us to deal with this problem more in the interest
of the living than the dead. We should then make our
cemeteries places of beauty where we can go for rest and
reflection, and be spared the depressing influences existing
in most cemeteries. Death we cannot avoid, but we can
build our cemeteries so inviting that the grief and sufl^ering
of the survivors will be softened in the contemplation of



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CEMETERV REPORT



the quiet beauty which surrounds the last resting place of
the departed.

In laying out, developing and embellishing the ceme-
teries, particularly as is now in progress in Pine Grove
Cemetery, the Board have in mind that they are preparing
for the burial of the dead for several generations to come
and that the population of our community is constantly in-
creasing. This suggested the advisability of selecting this
location, when additional ground was required; the site
was well out in the suburbs, and bu<^ little or no objection
was anticipated by adjoining property holders, and where,
should indications warrant, additional territory may be
acquired at reasonable cost. The feature of access, by trans-
portation, is also a vital factor in locating entrances and
our cemeteries are now accessible by trolley lines leading
from the center of the city, and by carriage or automobile
by at least one good road to the cemetery gates.

Pine Grove Cemetery has received a generous part of
this year's appropriation, it being the desire of the Board
to push the work of developing that part of the new grounds
between Acushnet Avenue and Bowditch Street, that the
same may be plotted into sections, lots and avenues, and
accessiBle to the public who desire to purchase lots in the
new portions of this cemetery. Last year, the new entrance
from Acushnet Avenue was beautifully embellished with
trees, conifers and flowering shrubs, all of which now pre-
sent an attractive and park-like appearance.

Rural and Oak Grove Cemeteries have received their
warranted care and embellishment, which is fully given in
detail in the Assistant Superintendent's report to the
Board, which is herewith attached.

The usual ceremonies of Memorial Day, Flower Day,
and at frequent periods during the year the exercises of
many orders, societies and associations in placing tributes
to the memory of their departed members, have all been
conducted in a dignified and characteristic manner, and
their impressive observances emphasized by the beautiful



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CEMETERY REPORT



tributes of flowers and plants placed on the graves ; all are
influences which are in beautiful harmony which pervades
our spirit and leads us to these gatherings from year to
year with a deeper interest in these observances.

There is a growing tendency in some lot owners in the
several cemeteries for the erection of mausoleums. There
are seven in Rural Cemetery and two in Oak Grove, and
plans are now on file at this ofiSce for other constructions
of this character in the spring. The Board are particu-
larly cautious in passing on the erection of these buildings,
and require that high technical skill should be brought to
bear in their designing and construction, and that they
should represent modern eflBciency and a wonderful stabil-
ity. A modern mausoleum building requires a keen under-
standing of how to combine beauty and permanency. The
true mausoleum mtist convey none of the vault feeling.
It must give the impression of first, a home; second, a
monument, and must harmonize with its surroundings, and
the very best of material and construction work is required.

During the year, the city purchased land skirting the
west boundary of Oak Grove Cemetery, and the same was
turned over to this Board for cemetery purposes. While
this land is not desirable for cemetery purposes (being low
and wet), it nevertheless serves the purpose for which it was
bought, that is, it protects the drainage of this cemetery,
the natural water shed of which has been to the west on to
this land. Also the wild growth will later become a shield
from the resident sections and form a permanent enclosure.

In March, the Legislature passed the following enact-
ment : —

[Chap. 122.]
AN ACT TO PROVIDE THAT CITIES AND TOWNS SHALL

CARE FOR THE GRAVES OF SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.
Be It enacted, etc., as follows:

Section 1. In every city and town there shall annually be
appointed by the mayor of the city or by the selectmen of the



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CEMETERY REPORT



town a citizen of the city or town, preferably a veteran of the
Civil war or of the Spanish war, whose duty it shall be to see
that the graves of all soldiers and sailors who served in the
Civil war or in the Spanish war are suitably kept and cared
for. If the cost of such care and maintenance is not paid for
by private persons, or by the trustees of the cemetery where
any such graves are situated, it shall be paid by the city or
town; and cities and towns are hereby authorized to appro-
priate money for this purpose. Money so appropriated may
be expended directly by the city or town or may be paid over
to the trustees or manager of any cemetery in which any such
grrave is situated; but the sum so paid over in any year shall
not exceed for each grave the sum charged for the annual
care and maintenance of like graves in the same cemetery; or,
if no such charge is made in that cemetery, then it shall not
exceed the sum charged in other cemeteries In the same city
or town for the said service.

The wisdom of the Mayor conceived that such work
should be kept within the province of the Cemetery Board,
and he appointed the Assistant Superintendent, Hurlbert
E. Thomas, to act in this capacity at no increased compen-
sation. There has been expended from the cemetery funds
for this purpose, as shown in our financial report, as
follows : —

Rural Cemetery $99.42

Oak Grove Cemetery 85.91

Peckham West Cemetery 6.19

Sacred Heart Cemetery 2.80

St. Mary's Cemetery 70.57

Pine Grove Cemetery 3.05

Congregational Church Cemetery..* .35

Total $268.29

An appropriation will be called for from the City
Council to reimburse the Cemetery Department for this
output.



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CBMBTBRY REPORT



The advantage of the perpetual care system is still per-
sistently advocated by the Board, and is being quite gen-
erally adopted by new purchasers of lots. Once arranged
for, the general care of the lot becomes the duty of the
cemetery ofScials. It is only necessary to draw attention
to the improved appearance of lots under perpetual care,
compared with those in the older sections of the cemeteries,
when no one is apparently left to care for them, to em-
phasize the value of this provision.

The Board devoted much time to the personal super-
vision and care of the cemeteries, visiting them often and
studying their needed requirements and directing their
general improvement ; under its management, the cemete- '
ries have gradually developed from ordinary burying
grounds to the condition of parks. In its efforts to do
this, it has received the personal co-operation of many in-
dividuals, the untiring service of the City Engineer and his
associates, the ready response of the City Solicitor in
solving such legal questions as often confront this depart-
ment, and the city government who have annually pro-
vided for the needs of this department.



Respectfully submitted.



W. M. HIGHAM, Chairman.
JOHN G. NICHOLSON,
CHAELES H. VINAL, Secretarv.



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CEMETERY REPORT



ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT.

To the Cemetery Board of the City of New Bedford,

Gentusmen: — In compliance with my usual custom
and for your information, I herewith submit a summary
report of work accomplished under my supervision and
direction in the city's cemeteries during the past year. I
trust the results have fully met your anticipation, and
that you will feel that the cemeteries, under my direction,
show an amount of progress and improvement, equal
to previous years. Because of the general business de-
pression which has been so marked throughout the coun-
try, it has been the Board's wish to give employment to
the men as long as the weather conditions would permit
and funds were available. I have therefore kept nearly
our full corps of employees busy from March until early
in December, when the severe weather made it necessary
to suspend general work, and we reduced our working
force to those only who are permanently employed.

The results of the year's work show additional de-
velopment of new land, repairs and improvements when
needed, and marked progress made in preparing the new
Pine Grove Cemetery that it may sooner become available
for burial purposes.

In Rural Cemetery, sections M and W have been dug
over to the depth of a grave and all obstructions removed.
Section M has been graded and seeded and is now ready
for burials, while section W has been cleared of all ob-
structions, but will not be graded and seeded until spring.
Approximately 25,000 tons of stone were removed from
these sections. This has been broken to sizes to fit the
department crusher and it is intended as early as possible
in the spring to move the crusher to these grounds, crush
the stone and macadamize the main avenue leading from
Oak Avenue east of the receiving tomb to the arch gate



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10 CEMETERY REPORT



at Rural, the Board being fully conscious of the im-
portance of finishing this avenue.

At this time I would call the Board's attention to the
fact that we have reached the west line for drainage in
Rural Cemetery, and it is absolutely imperative that a
permanent drain be laid along this line of the cemetery,
of sufficient capacity to take care of the water at all sea-
sons of the year. Under present conditions, the spring of
the year will show much of the new sections all ready
prepared, flooded with water. In previous years, this land
has been ditched and has partially taken care of this
water, but as the cemetery is spreading in this direction,
it makes the need of thorough drainage an absolute neces-
sity. I would suggest that a drain of not less than 18 inch
capacity be laid. The measured length of this line to the
entrance of the Stackhouse street sewer is 2,210 feet, the
estimated cost of which would not exceed $3,000.00

A narrow section along the north wall and west of
the arch gate for a distance of two hundred feet has
been graded and seeded, and embellished with shrubs and
trees. Seven years ago, the entrance of Rural Cemetery
was beautifully embellished with conifers, trees and
shrubs, at the time of planting of which the selection was
made to provide immediate effect. This embellishment
has served its purpose and many of the conifers have
grown to such proportions as to quite materially change
the general effect for a cemetery entrance. I would sug-
gest that these be removed to other locations in the
grounds, and that other and younger growth be substi-
tuted for them. There should also be like changes made
in planting on the slope of the pond.

The sexton's house should be re-shingled and painted.

Oak Grove Cemetery has received its usual careful
attention. The main avenue, north from Parker Street,
leading up through the center of the grounds and east
to the Robeson Street entrance has been macadamized
and automobiles are now allowed to use this avenue.



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CEMETERY REPORT H



While these grounds are practically a closed cemetery,
it nevertheless requires a full force of employees to take
care of the work of its maintenance, to cut the grass and
care for the lots in annual and perpetual care, to build
foundations and prepare graves for burials.

The wash on some of the slopes requires the con-
stant re-fitting of the avenues.

Nearly 1,000 square feet of paving should be relaid
next year.

In this cemetery are the greenhouses which supply
embellishment of plants' and flowers to the several grounds.
At a nominal expense we are able to beautify the
cemeteries from this production. Two hundred flower
beds are annually filled, first with perennials, which last
until after Memorial Day, after which they are again re-
planted with annuals, which last until the frosts destroy
them. These are all raised from cuttings taken from our
own plants, seeds and bulbs being the only material neces-
sary to purchase.

A visit to these houses in the month of June will
fully illustrate their auxiliary benefit to the embellish-
ment of the grounds.

Much needed repairs should be made to the fences
skirting the older portions of this cemetery, between
Smith and Parker Streets. New stringers are required
as the old ones are rotted and broken, the pickets should
be re-nailed and many of them replaced, and the whole
fence should be painted.

Grifiin Street has had its annual care, two men hav-
ing been assigned to this work. The grass has been
regularly cut, the usual flower beds have been maintained,
and careful watch kept of these grounds to guard against
injur>' and trespass.

The new Pine Grove Cemetery has been the principal
center of operation in the work of this department.
116,397 square feet of new land has been dug over; 36,513



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12 CBMBTERY REPORT



feet of this have been graded. 2,500 feet of avenues
have been constructed and macadamized.

A substantial boundary wall, five feet in height, with a
3 ft. foundation has been constructed for a length of over
700 feet.

To accomplish as much as we have in this new work,
it has been necessary to transport men from other grounds
as often as they could be spared. The water supply to the
grounds has now given out; the tower has rotte<l and
would have to be re-built; the pumping engine is badly
worn and cracked, and repairs to this would necessitate
an expense of not less than $500.00. To connect our pres-
ent water system with the city's service will require the
laying of 1,050 feet of 4 inch main, with necessary
hydrants. I am grateful to know that the Board is
negotiating with the Water Department for the installa-
tion of this important service in the spring.

Respectfully submitted,

IIURLBERT E. THOMAS,

Assistant Superintendent.



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CBMBTBRY RBPORT 13



WHEN TO BUY A CEMETERY LOT.

Ever}' day may be heard the regret expressed that a .
lot in the cemetery was not purchased when conditions
were normal, and there was leisure and calm thought to
bring to such a task.

When death comes and grief warps the judgment and
often results in physical prostration, it is no time to de-
cide where or how a lot shall be purchased in which to
place the remains of those **gone before."

To purchase a lot in the cemetery except under the
pressure of immediate necessity seems to be something
from which we shrink in horror. This is a condition
which should not exist, and with the present manage-
ment and improvement of cemeteries, a few years will wit-
ness a great revolution in public sentiment.

The cemeteries of today are growing to be more and
more beautiful parks, embellished with beautiful flowers,
trees and shrubbery, with long stretches of green leaves,
with drives and walks. Knowing that some day we and
our loved ones will need a resting place of this character,
is it not better to provide for the inevitable when we can
bring to the task our best thoughts and energies. Too
often, the neglect of what should be considered a duty
involves the use of the receiving tomb, and then when
the purchase of a lot is made, there is the re-opening of
wounds by the interment which should have taken place
at once.

To have a lot selected and cared for and made beau-
tiful is a duty we owe to our home, and in many in-
stances would relieve the burden from those who suddenly
stricken with grief are unable to give the task its proper
attention.



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OONSTBUOnON WORE.



Sq. yds. land graded

Sq. yds. land dug over

Sq. yds. ladd seeded

Lineal ft. avenues fitted

Lineal ft. borders trimmed and fitted. . .
Lineal ft. avenues macadamized 20 ft.

15 ft.

14 ft.

Lineal ft. wall foundation laid

Lineal ft. wall built

Number tons stone broken for crusher. .

Sq. ft. of sod laid

Lineal ft. gutters paved

Foundations for tablets

Foundations for mounuments

Cement bound posts set

Cement numbers set

Shrubs re-set and moved

Corner posts on lots set

Neglected graves fitted

Bodies entombed 1914

Bodies disinterred 1914

Interments in Friends Cemetery

Interments made in lots

Interments m4de in single graves

Interments made in public ground

Interments made in Soldiers' and Sailors'

Total interments, 1914

Total interments to Dec. 1, 1914

Bodies remaining in Public Tomb

Lots sold in 1914

Single graves sold in 1914

Prepared lots unsold

Value of lots unsold

Value of single graves unsold

Foundations re-built

Headstones re-fitted

Foundations for curbing

Graves fitted

Brick graves built

Lots in annual care

Lots in annual care (Friends)

Lots in perpetual care

Number of stones cleaned

Number of monuments cleaned

CurbinffS cleaned

Lots refitted and seeded

Lots refitted and sodded

Trees set out

Trees removed

Hedges removed

Curbings removed . . .•



Rural

1,627

3,299

428

100

1,150

wide ....

•wjde

wide. . . .



Oak
Grove



1,025
700



31,480

2,200

28

134

24



Pine
Grove
4,057
12,933



1,521
330
526

757
734



323



398

117

13

279



13



240
27



199
54



lot



8

24

7

2

259

6

320

10

595

16,539

3

47

3

192

$11,940



8
15

21
10

191

5



209

13,786

3

50

4

362

$44,875



19
29
60

"ios

893
1
7
30
73
$4,715
$2,370



21


10 .




4


8
1 .


3


268


150


13


56


31 .




711


590


38


10 .




, ,


793*


581**


38***


36


58


15


3


5 .




2


2 .




3


2 .




2 .







2 .


,




2


1 .




1 .






1 .







Friends, 21. Griffn Street, 1.
**St. Mary's, 57. Pcckham West, 12.
***Congregational Church Cemetery, 14.



•St. John's, 6
t. Ma



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CEMETERY REPORT 16



CUkSSIFIED STATEKENT OF EXPENDITURES.



RURAL CEMETERY.

General labor account $5,421 .23

Labor on Soldiers' and Sailors' graves, other
than those on Soldiers' and Sailors' lot, as
authorized by Chap. 122, Acts of 1914. . . 99.42

Distribution account 3,440. 60

Supplies 271.96

•^ (Brick cement, lime and sand) 590.88

" (Seed, sod, fertilizer) 160. 48

" (General) 247.61

Water 85.51

Embellishments, shrubs 165.20

New sections and extensions 2,991 .59

Pension 323.68

Police 79.51

$13,877.67

OAK GROVE CEMETERY.

General labor account $4,544. 66

Labor on Soldiers' and Sailors graves, as

authorized by Chap. 122, Acu of 1914. . . 85 .91

♦Peckham West Cemetery 6 . 19

♦Sacred Heart Cemetery 2.80

♦St. Mary's Cemetery 70.57

Distribution account 2,480.02

Supplies, tools 204.21

" (Brick, cement, lime and sand) 409.51

•* (Seed, iod, fertilizer) 205 . 86

" (General) 141.12

Water 87 . 98

Wall, (rebuilt) 259.31



$8,487.14



PINE GROVE CEMETERY.

General labor account $1,644.51

Labor on Soldiers' and Sailors' graves as

authorized by Chap. 122, Acts of 1914.. . 3.05

•♦Congregational Church Cemetery .35

Distribution account 572 . 04

Supplies, tools 174 . 19

" (Seeds, fcrtiUzer) 67 .43

" (General) 268.67

Water 16.43

Nursery 45.85

♦Work done by men from Oak Grove Cemetery.
♦♦Work done by man from Pine Grove Cemetery.



$2,792.52



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16 CEMETERY REPORT



PINE GROVE CEMETERY — NEW LAND.

Wall $2,206.96

Extension 4,104.47

Avenues 3,228.52

Pond 28.95

New approach 146.49

19,715.39

GRIFFIN STREET CEMETERY.

General labor account $335.92

Supplies .70

Water 5.00

$341.62

GREENHOUSE.

General labor account .• $2,091. 12

Maintenance, stock and supplies 372.47

$2,463.59



HORSES AND WAGONS.
Care and supplies, bay, grain, &c $337 .13



$337.13



OFFICE.

Supplies $436.29

Annual report 58 . 00

Telephone 73.46

$567.75

SALARIES.

Office $2,762.50

Assistant Supeiintendent 1,200.00

Sexton, Rural Cemetery 1,039.33

" Oak Grove Cemetery 954 .00

$5,955.83

TELEPHONES.

Oak Grove Cemetery $37.00



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