New York (N.Y.). Alms House.

Annual report of the Governors of the Almshouse, New York online

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medical duties assigned to each of these gentlemen were
ably and satisfactorily performed.

To our Committee, Governors Pinckney, Brueninghausen,
and Townsend, I feel deeply grateful for advice, and for
many acts of personal kindness. No institution is free
from trials and petty annoyances, and the feeling that one
is warmly sustained in the right, aids greatly in assisting
him properly to perform his duties.

',1 . Some of your members are cognizant of the state of
affairs in this department when your Honorable Board
first came into power. Compare its condition then, with
the present, and no greater advance will be found in any
asylum or hospital in the State.

That there are defects existing now, and ever will be,

none can deny. This, however, should not discourage, but

stimulate to renewed action to lessen them if possible.
I

May yourffostering care be ever active, and the public
iastitutions [of New- York, from the imprint of progress,



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191

year by year, unfold an epitaph to future ages more praise*
worthy and durable than if written on granite.

MOSES H. RANNEY,
Resident Physician.

New- York City Lunatic Asylum,

December 31st, 1859.



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192



ADMISSIONS, DISCHABGB8, AND DEATHS, 1859.







....1

i
IS a


215




Total.


Number of Patients, Jan. 1, 1859.
Admitted during the year


260
165


378
216


9
1


8

7


656
389


Whole number in the course of
the year • *

Discharged during the year. . , .

Died ** •* ....


425

106

89


594

135

43


10
1
2


15
5
2
8


1044

247

86


Eemaining December 31, 1859.


280


416


7


711



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NATIVITY OP THOSE ADMITTED, 1859.



NATIVE.



New-York 65

Connecticut 6

Massachusetts 3

New- Jersey 4

Virginia 2

Pennsylvania 2

Ohio 1

New-Hampshire 1

Maryland 1



Total.



85



FOREIGN.



Ireland


177


Germany

England

Scotland


75

24

10


Prussia


4


Switzerland ....


3


Wales


3


Sweden

Poland


* ^

.... 1
1


Norway 1

France 1


Holland 1


Russia 1


Hungary 1

Canada i


Nova Scotia 1


Total


.... 304



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199

CIVIL CONDITKMI OP THOSE ADIOTTBD.

MALB3. PKMALES.

Single 89 77

Married 73 117

Widows 29

Widowers 4

Total 166 223

PBOPESSION OP BELIGION OP THOSB ADMITTBD.

Catholics 208

Protestants 171

Jews • 10

Total 389







AGES AT THE TMB OP ADMISSION.






MALES.


FEMALES.


Under 20 years




10


Under 20


years




...14


From 20 to 30 years...


61


From 20 to 30 years.


...70


»(


30"


40




49




30


" 40




...65


<(


40"


50




26




40


" 60




. ... 45


((


60"


60




. 14




60


" 60




11


a


60"


70




. 4




60


« 70




.... 10


It


70"


80




. 2




70


" 80




.... 8




Total,






166




Total....




. .. 223



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196



FORM OF mSAKITT OF THOSB D180HABGED.



usproTCd*



Unlmproyed



Mania

" Partial

" Puerperal ...

" Recurrens . . .

** a Potu

Dementia

" Acute . . .

" Senile...

Paralysie Generale.

Imbecility

Improper Subjects .



59

54

17

12

2

3

1



Total 148



8

35

2



68



2
8
2



4
4
3



31



69

97

21

12

2

30

1

3

5

4

3



247



TERM OF BESIDENCE OF THOSE DISOHABQED.





Itooorend.


Imprared.


DnlmpTOTcd


TOTAl*


licss than 3 months


61
40
34

18


12
. 10
12
17
10
7


15
6
4
2

" "4'


88


From 3 to 6 "


56


a 6 " 12 "


50


" 1 " 3 years


32


« 3 « 6 "


10


p « 6 " 12 "




11








TOTAl^


148


68


31


247







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197



CAUSES OF DEATHS.



Consumption , • • • 26

Paralysie Generale 11

Epilepsy 7

Congestio Cerebri 7

Seneotus 6

Typhomania 6

Apoplexia 3

Chronic Diarrhoea 2

Pneumonia 2

Exhaustion from Mania 2

Erysipelas

Fatty Degeneration of Heart ,

Submersion

Tuberculosus Cerebri

UroBmia

Diarrhoea

Dysentery

Paralysis

Gangrene of Lungs

Anemia

Disease of the Heart

CEdema of the Brain

Debilitas

Hydrocephalus

Total 86



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198



LIST OP OFFICERS, ATTENDANTS AND EMPLOYEES ON THE Slsr
OP DECEMBER, 1869, WITH THE AMOUNT OP THEIR SALARIES

PER ANNUM.



M. Harris Ranney

N. P. Anderson


Resident Physician

Clerk


$1,600
1,200

600




R. L. Parson


Senior Assistant Physi-
cian

Assistant Physician




L. A. Rodenstien


$216inUeuofboaid.

it 14 It (1 U


Zetos Searle


Chaplain


600
400
400
400
630
296
296
272
272
272
272
272
272
272
272
647
304
260
174
174
174
174
174
174
174
174
174
144
144
144
144

125
168
168
168
72




Mary Goodwin


Matron




Michael Cordial


Watchman




Stevens Chandler


it




Jamea Dodd


f^Bffineer




Richard Reed


Attendant




Richard Wilson


It




John Rohner




Robert Watson


(1




Andrew J. Mathews


t(




Patrick Donahae


It




Edward Robellaz


i(




J. A. Lasher


«




Squire Allen


i(




John Stephens


Gardener




Egbert B. Gumee

Margaret Toohey. . . .


Carpenter




Supervisor at Lodge

Attendant




R. Matilda Pinkney

Margaret Ray




«




Bridget GafFney


li




Bndget McDonnell

Anna Dopp


H




U




S. C. Lashar


a




Mary Neef


it




Eleanor Ray


ii




Judith Gieser


•i




Bridget Doyle


u




Louisa Froh


Attendant at Lodge

K ((
l< ((

Superintendent of Sewing
Room




Alice Reed




Eliza Bruton




W. Winke




Mary Welsh








Paschal Germain


Cook




James Bowley


Cartman




Charles Stephens

Margaret Thompson


Employed in general work.
" in Wash-house.





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199



Eliza Wilson

Catharine Carroll. .
Catharine Gillespie

Catharine Ruf

Julia Holligan

Bridget Manoney . .

Mary Hope

Margaret Lynch . . .
Bridget Jourdan . . .

Mary Johnson

Margaret Kenny. . .

Mary Gilli^an

Isabella Aiken ....
Mary Sheridan ....



Employed in Wash-house

U II II

" " Kitchen. . . .

« tt i(

(( « «

i< « «

u tt u

" " Laundry . . .

(( u u

Chambermaid



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APPENDIX.



The Association of Medical Superintendents of Ameri-
can Institutions for the Insane, have unanimously agreed
upon the following propositions relative to the Construction
and Organization of Asylums; and also requested their
publication by the members in their Annual Reports.

ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF HOSPITALS FOR

THE INSANE.

I. — Every hospital for the insane should be in the
country, not v\rithin less than two miles of a
large town, and easily accessible at all sestsons.

II. — No hospital for the insane, however limited its
capacity, should have less than fifty acres of
land devoted to gardens and pleasure grounds
for its patients. At least one hundred acres
should be possessed by every State hospital, or
other institution for 200 patients, to which
; number these propositions apply, unless other^
wise mentioned.



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201

III. — Means should be provided to raise ten thousand
gallons of water, daily, to reservoirs that will
supply the highest parts of the building.

IV. — No hospital for the insane should be built, with-
out the plan having been first submitted to
some Physician or Physicians, who have had
charge of a similar establishment, or are practi-
cally acquainted with all the details of their
arrangements, and received his or their full
approbation.

V. — The highest number that can with propriety be
treated in one building is two hundred and fifty,
while two hundred is a preferable maximum.

VI. — ^All such buildings should be constructed of stone
or brick, have slate or metallic roofs, and as far
as possible, be made secure from accidents by
fire,

VIL— Every hospital having provisions for two hundred
or more patients, should have in it, at least,
eight distinct wards for each sex, making six-
teen classes in the entire establishment.

VIII. — Each ward should have in it a parlor, a corridor,
single lodging rooms for patients, an associated



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dormitory communicating with a chamber for
two attendants, a clothes-room, a bath-room,
a water-closet, a dining-room, a dumb-waiter,
and a speaking tube leading to the kitchen or
other central part of the building.

IX. — No apartments should ever be provided for the
confinement of patients, or for their lodging-
rooms, that are not entirely above ground.

X. — No class of rooms should ever be constructed with-
out some kind of window in each, communicat-
ing directly with the external atmosphere.

XL — No chamber for the use of a single patient should
ever be less than eight by ten feet, nor should
the ceiling of any story occupied by patients
be less than twelve feet in height.

XII. — The floors of patients' apartments should always
be of wood.

XIII. — The stairways should always be of iron, stone, or
other indestructible material, ample in size, in
number and easy of ascent to afford convenient
egress in case of accident from fire.



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203

' XIV. — A large hospital sbould consist of a main central
building with wings.

XV.— The main central building should contain the
offices, receiving-rooms for company, and apart-
ments entirely private for the Superintending
Physician and his family, in case that officer
resides in the hospital building.

XVI. — The wings should be so arranged, that if rooms
are placed on both sides of a corridor, the cor-
ridors should be furnished at both ends with
movable glazed sashes, for the free admission of
both light and air.

XVII. — The lighting should be by gas, on account of its
convenience, cleanliness, safety and economy.

XVIII. — The apartments for washing, clothing, &c., should
be detached from the hospital building.

XIX.—- The drainage should be under ground, and all the
inlets to the sewers should be properly secured,
to prevent offensive emanations.

XX.— "AH hospitals should be warmed by passing an
abundance of pure, fresh air £rom the external



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^'atmosphere over the pipes or plates contain-
ing steam under low pressure, or hot water, the
temperature -of which, at the boiler, does not
exceed 212 degrees Fah., and placed in the
^ basement or cellar of the building to be heated.

XXI.^ — A complete system of forced ventilation in con-
nection with^the heating, is indispensable to
give purity to the air of an hospital for the in-
sane, and no expense that is required to effect
this object thoroughly, can be deemed either
misplaced or injudicious.

[XXIL— ^The boilers for generating steam for warming the
building, should be in a detached structure, con-
nected with which may be the engine for pump-
ing water, driving the washing apparatus, and
other machinery.

XXIII.-^All water closets should, as far as possible, be
made of indestructible materials, be simple in
their arrangement, and have a strong down-
ward ventilation connected with them.

XXrV. — The floors of both rooms, water-closets and base-
ment stories, should, as far as possible, be made
of materials that will not absorb moisture.



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. 205

XXV. — The wards for the most excited class should [be
constructed with rooms on but one side of a cor-
ridor, not less than ten feet wide, the external
windows of which should be large, and have
pleasant views from them. ^

XXVI. — ^Wherever practicable, the pleasure grounds of a
hospital for the insane should be surrounded by
a substantial wall, so placed as not to be un-
pleasantly visible from the building.



ON THE ORGANIZATION OF AN HOSPITAL FOR

THE INSANE.

i I. — The general controlling power should be vested ip
a Board of Trustees or Managers, if of a State
Institution, selected in such a manner, as will
be likely most effectually to protect it from all in-
fluences connected with political measures or
political changes, if of a private corporation, by
those properly authorized to vote.

II. — The Board of Trustees should not exceed twelve in
number, and be composed of individuals posses-
sing the public confidence, distinguished for lib-
erality, intelligence, and active benevolence ;



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above all political influenooy and able and wilUog
faithfully to attend to the duties of their station.
Their tenure of office should be so arranged, that
where changes are deemed desirable, the terms
of not more than one-third of the whole number
should expire in any one year.

III. — The Board of Trustees should appoint the Physi-
cian, and on his nomination, and not otherwise,
the Assistant Physician, Steward, and Matron.
They should, as a board, or by committee, visit
and examine every part of the Institution at
frequent stated intervals, not less than semi-
monthly, and at such other times as they may
deem expedient, and exercise so careful a super-
vision over the expenditures and general opera-
tions of the Hospital, as to give to the commu-
nity a proper degree of confidence in the correct-
ness of its management.

IV. — The Physician should be the Superintendent and
Chief Executive Officer of the establishment.
Besides ^being a well-educated Physician, he
should possess the mental, social, and physical
qualities, to fit him for the post. He should
serve during good behavior, reside on, or very



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207

near the premise?, and his oompensation should
be so liberal, as to enable him to devote his
whole time and energies to the welfare of the
Hospital. He should nconinate, to the Board,
suitable persons to act as Assistont Physician,
Steward, and Matron; he should have entire
control of the medical, moral, and dietetic treat-
ment of the patients, the unrestricted power of
appointment and discharge of all persons en-
gaged in their care, and should exercise a gen-
eral supervision and direction of every depart-
ment of the Institution.



V. — The Assistant Physician, or Assistant Physicians,
where more than one are required, should be
graduates of medicine, of such character and
qualiiioations as to be able to represent and to
perform the ordinary duties of the Physician,
during his absence.

VI. — The Steward, under the direction of the Superin-
twiding Physician, and by his order, should make
all purchases for the Institution, keep the ac-
counts, make engagements with, pay and dis-
charge those employed about the establishment ;
have a supervision of the farm, garden, and



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208

grounds, and perform such other duties as may
be assigned to him.

VII. — The Matron, under the direction] of the Superin-
tendent, should have a general supervision of the
domestic arrangements of the house, and under
thej|same direction, do what she can to promote
th^ comfort and restoration of the patients.

VIII. — In institutions containing more than 200 patients,
a second Assistant Physician, andean Apothecary,
should be employed, to the latter of whom, other
duties, in the male wards, may be conveniently



IX.— If a Chaplain is deemed desirable as a permanent
officer, he should be selected by the Superin-
tendent, and, like all others engaged in the care
of patients, should be entirely under his direc-
tion.

X. — In every hospital for the insane, there should be
_ one Supervisor for each sex, exercising a gene-
: ral oversight of all the attendants and patients,
and forming a medium of communication be-
tween them and the officers.



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209

XL — In no institution shonld the number of persons in
immediate attendance on the patients, be in a
lower ratio than one attendant for every ten pa-
tients ; and a much larger proportion of attend-
ants will commonly be desirable.

XII. — The fullest authority should be given to the Super-
intendent to take every precaution that can
guard against fire or accident within an institu-
tion, and to secure this, an efficient night-watch
should always be provided.

XIII. — The situation and circumstances of different insti-
tutions may require a considerable number of
persons to be employed in various other posi-
tions, but in every hospital, at least all those
that have been referred to, are deemed not only
desirable, but absolutely necessary, to give all
the advantages that may be hoped for from a
liberal and enlightened treatment of the in-
sane.

XrV. — Ail persons employed in the care of the insane,
should be active, vigilant, cheerful, and in good
health. They should be of a kind and benevo-
lent disposition, be educated, and in all respects
14



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810

trastworthy, and their oocnpensaticm i»l»>uld be
sufficiently liberal to secure the services of indi-
viduals of this description.



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NURSERY DEPARTMENT.



Randall's Island,

January 2rf, 1860.

To the GrovERNORS of the Alms House Department :

Gentlemen : — I would, in compliance with the rules of
your Honorable Board, respectfully report the Annual
Statistics of the Department, for the year ending Decem-
ber 31st, 1859.

Number remaining, December 31st, 1858 1,320

Admitted during the year 1859 1,148

2,468
Died 80

Discharged 1,217

Transferred 25

Eloped 4

1,326

Number remaining, December 31st, 1859 1,142

For more minute details, I would refer you to the table
marked A. You will find the ages of children admitted



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212

during 1859, under table B. For the ages of cluldren dis-
ohargedy see table C.

The following gives the disposition of the children dis*
charged:

For Indenture —

Boys 233

Girls 46

279

For Adoption —

Boys 76

Girls 91

167

To Relatives —

Boys '. 398

Girls 233

621

Total 1,077

Table D gives the cost of each inmate, clothing, provi-
sions, salaries, &c.

On assuming the duties of Warden, upon the 16th day
of May, 1859, I found the grounds, buildings, and all ap-
pertaining thereto in very good condition, and the internal
arrangements of the Department -working satisfactorily.



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213

During the year that has closed, several improvements
have been made, which will prove highly beneficial
throughout all time to this Department.

We have erected a Boat-house 34 by 40 feet, which was
very much needed, and which is a good substantial build-
ing, the carpenter's work of the building being entirely
performed by the inmates without any expense to the
Board.

I am happy to inform you,^ that increased accommoda-
tions for the care of the sick have been made, in adding a
new wing to the North Hospital, which will give greater
facilities to the Resident Physician for improving the
sanitary condition of the children.

In connection with the above, I am pleased to announce
to the Board, that through the goodness and mercy of
Divine Providence we have been afflicted with but 80
deaths, which is 64 less than the mortality for 1858.
Credit is due the Resident Physician and his Assistants,
for the zeal and watchful care they have ever evinced in
the discharge of their duties.

In accordance with a resolution adopted by your Body,
July 19th, 1859, I have appointed as Matron of the
Idiot House, Miss Ji Whelply, who, I am convinced, has



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214

devoted all her time to the best interests of those unfor-
tunates placed under her charge.

The subject of the condition of the Idiot Children on
this Island, has always enlisted the sympathies of the
Grovemors, and in order to promote, as far as possible,
their comfort and welfare, I proceeded to the State Idiot
Asylum, at Syracuse, by your directions (for details of
which I would respectfully refer to my report of that visit)
and I am in hopes by the contemplated addition to the
Idiot House, we may be enabled to improve the physical
and mental condition of the children in that Department.

The children in general are in the enjoyment of excel-
lent health and spirits, and after having passed through
the festivities of the holiday season, are prepared to enter
upon their duties with renewed ardor. They have been
made the recipients of testimonials from bodies who have
visited them, and have been pleased with their behavior
and appearance.

The average attendance at school has been 668, and
will compare favorably with any of our "Ward Schools.
One feature deserving of notice, is the introduction, by the
Trustees, of pianos in each of the school rooms, and they
have been instructed in the art of music twice each week,
by a competent teacher. The progress made by the children
convinces me that the expense is well bestowed.



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215

I ara happy to say, that a great amount of labor has
been performed, both on the farm and in improving the
grounds, the great extent of which constantly demand re-
pairs and watching. The products of the farm, on this
Island, will, it is gratifying to state, compare favorably
with those of preceding years. The following are the pro-
ducts of farm and garden for 1859 :

Bushels potatoes 1,470

" parsnips 450

" carrots 375

« beets 500

" turnips, Russia 580

<« " red topped 460

" « white " 150

" onions • , 320

" beans, Lima 180

" string 100

" cranberry 20

" squash 100

" spinach 500

melons, water 40

" musk 20

parsley 50

cucumbers 20

egg plants 20

peppers 14






ii



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216

Bushels sweet corn 250

" shaUots 180

" tomatoes 300

** radishes ^ 60

" peas 80

Heads cabbage, early 4,000

" " late 25,000

" cauliflowers 2,500

" lettuce 13,000

'' leeks 8,000

" celery 5,000

" pumpkins 400

Bushels apples 100

" " cider 122

" pears 40

•* [quinces 4

" grapes 12

** gooseberries 7

" currants.. 9

" cherries 30

" strawberries 6

Bunches asparagus 35

" rhubarb 30

" thyme 300

" sage 100



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217

List of Flowering Shrubs and Trees^.

Althea 1,500

Willow trees 150

Currant shrubs 400

Grooseberry shrubs 100

List of Garden Seeds.

Pounds parsnip 10

" beet 12

" spinach 9

** leek 5

" turnip 7

" lettuce 2

" celery 1

" parsley 5

" caraway 7

Bushels, oats 156

Tons, hay, upland 60

" " salt 30

Bushels yellow Corn 250

Tons straw 6

Our larger boys in the Tailor Shop, under charge of Mr.
Torrey, are composed principally of those who are lame
and crippled, to the number of thirty. These work, on an
average, three hours per day, and are becoming fast adepts



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218

in the art of sewing — especially is this the case with the
boys who are defective, and who, probably, will here lay
the foundation of the trade that will become their support
through life. It pleases me to say that six of our larger
boys who are lame, and unfitted for any other labor,
have obtained good places, with tailors, in New-Tfork.

The following articles of clothing have been manufac-
tured by the boys :

Boys' pants 1,336

" jackets. 1,305

Mens' coats 23

" vests 15

" pants 32

Flannel shirts , 11

Drawers, pairs. 35

Suspenders, pairs 848

Total articles 3,605

In addition to the above, the weekly repairing of the
clothing for male adult inmates was done, averaging 30
pieces per week.

A class composed of a few of the larger girls in Nursery
Department, under supervision of Miss Robinson, have.



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219

durmg the year, made and turned into the Store the an-


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Online LibraryNew York (N.Y.). Alms HouseAnnual report of the Governors of the Almshouse, New York → online text (page 9 of 12)