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New York (State). Comptroller's Office.

New York in the Revolution as colony and state; these records were discovered, arranged, and classified in 1895, 1897, and 1898, by James A. Roberts, Comptroller online

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NEW YORK IN THE REVOLUTIO



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NEW YORK



IN THE REVOLUTION



AS



COLONY AND STATE



THESE RECORDS WERE DISCOVERED, ARRANGED AND
CLASSIFIED IN 1895, r8g6,- 1897 AND



BY



JAMES A. ROBERTS, COMPTROLLER



SECOND EDIT/ON

ilk



ALBANY, N. Y.

PRESS OF BRANDOW PRINTING COMPANY
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Enter*!, according to aci ot Congress, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight

Br BRANDOVr PRINTING COMPANY
In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington



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CONTENTS



Page.

INTRODUCTORY 7

INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS 16

THE LINE

IST REGIMENT. Col. Goose Van Schaick, Lt. Col. Cornelius Van Dyck 17

2ND REGIMENT. Col. Goose Van Schaick, Col. Philip Van Cortland, Lt. Col. Peter Reg-

nier, Lt. Col. Robert Cochran, Lt. Col. Frederick Weissenfels. . 29

3RD REGIMENT. Col. James Clinton, Col. Peter Gansevoort, Lt. Col. James Bruyn 40

4TH REGIMENT. Col. James Holmes, Col. Henry B. Livingston, Lt. Col. Pierre Regnier,

Lt. Col. Frederick Weissenfels 47

STH REGIMENT. Col. Lewis Duboys, Lt. Col. James S. Bruyn, Lt. Col. Marinus Willett, 55
ADDITIONAL REGIMENT (BATTALION)/ Col. James Livingston, Lt. Col. Richard Living-
ston 60

CONGRESS REGIMENT. * Col. Edward Antil 60

ADDITIONAL CORPS, GREEN MOUNTAIN BOYS. Col. Ethan Allen, Col. Seth Warner 61

ADDITIONAL CORPS.* Col. Oliver Spencer 62

ADDITIONAL CORPS.* Col. Moses Hazen 63

ARTILLERY, 2ND REGIMENT. Col. John Lamb 63

ARTILLERY, 3RD REGIMENT.* 65

ARTILLERY, PROVINCIAL. Capt. Alexander Hamilton's Train . . . . ( 65

ARTILLERY REGIMENTS. (Not identified). Lt. Col. Ebenezer Stevens 65

CAVALRY, 2ND REGIMENT LIGHT DRAGOONS.* Col. Sheldon 67

CAVALRY, 4 REGIMENT LIGHT DRAGOONS.* Col. Moylan 67

CAVALRY REGIMENTS. (Not identified). Capt. Jeromimus Hoogland 67

ARTIFICERS. Lt. Col. Luther Baldwin* 67

MINERS. (Not identified.) Capt. James Gilliland, Capt. Jonathan Lawrence 67

THE LEVIES

Col. John Harper . . . ., 68

Col. Frederick Weissenfels 70

Col. William Malcom 74

Col. Lewis Dubois, Lt. Col. Brinton Paine 77

Col. Morris Graham, Lt. Col. Benjamin Birdsall, Lt. Col. Henry Livingston 79

Col. Albert Pawling 82

Col. Marinus Willett, Lt. Col. John McKinstry 87

INDEPENDENT CORPS OF 1,000 MEN 93

THE LINE AND THE LEVIES

ENLISTED MEN (not identified by Regiments) 93

* Not in the first edition.

C 210



.



CONTEXTS



THE MILITIA

ALBANY COUNTY: Page.

IST REGIMENT. Col. Abraham Cuyler, Col. Jacob Lansing, Jr ............... 97, 221

2ND REGIMENT. Col. Abraham Wemple .................................. 97, 223

3RD REGIMENT. Col. PhiLp P. Schuyler, Lt. Col. Barent I. Staats ............ 101, 224

4TH REGIMENT. Col. Kilian Van Rensselaer, Lt. Col. John H. Beeckman ...... 104, 225

5TH REGIMENT. Col. Gerrit G. Van den Bergh, Col. Henry Quackenbos, Lt.

Col. Volkert Veeder .................................. 107, 226

6TH REGIMENT. Col. Stephen John Schuyler, Lt. Col. Henry K. Van Rensselaer, 108, 226
/TH REGIMENT. Col. Abraham J. Van Alstine, Lt. Col. Philip Van Alstine. . . 109, 228
STH REGIMENT. Col. Robert Van Rensselaer, Lt. Col. Barent I. Staats, Lt. Col.

Henry J. Van Rensselaer, Lt. Col. Asa Waterman ......... in, 229

9TH REGIMENT. Col. Peter Van Ness, Lt. Col. David Pratt ............... 116, 230

IOTH REGIMENT. Col. Morris Graham, Col. Henry Livingston ............. 117, 231

IITII REGIMENT. Col. Anthony Van Bergen, Lt. Col. Cornelius Dubois ........ 119, 232

i2Tii REGIMENT. Col. Jacobus Van Schoonhoven, Lt. Col. James Gordon ...... 120, 234

I3TH REGIMENT. Col. John McCrea, Col. Cornelius Van Veghten ............ 122, 234

i4Tii REGIMENT. Col. John Knickerbacker, Col. Peter Yates, Lt. Col. John Van

Rensselaer ........................................ 125, 235

I5TH REGIMENT. Col. Peter Vroman, Lt. Col. Peter Ziele .................... 128, 236

i6TH REGIMENT. Col. John Blair, Col. Lewis Van Woert ................. 130, 236

17x11 REGIMENT. Col. William B. Whiting, Lt. Col. Asa Waterman ........... 132, 237

1 NUEFENDENT COMPANY. Capt. Petrus Van Gaasbeck ......................... 133

CHARLOTTE COUNTY:

Col. (Dr.) John Williams ................................................ 133, 239

CUMBERLAND COUNTY:

Col. William Williams ...................................................... 134

COMPANY OF MINUTE MEN. Maj. Joab Hoisington, Capt. Joseph Hatch ......... 134

DUTCHESS COUNTY:

2ND REGIMENT. Col. Abraham Brinkerhoff, Lt. Col. Jacob Griffen ............ 135, 240

3RD REGIMENT.- Col. John Field, Col. Andrew Morehouse ................ 139, 241

4TH REGIMENT. Col. John Frear ........................................ 14! ; 243

REGIMENT. Col. William Humfrey, Col. James Van Deburgh ........... 141, 245



REGIMENT. Col. Morris Graham, Col. Roswell Hopkins, Lt. Col. Jaco



Griffin ............................................ 144, 247

7TH REGIMENT. Col. Henry Ludenton, Lt. Col. Reuben Ferris .............. 149, 252

ASSOCIATED EXEMPTS. Col. Zephaniah Platt, Lt. Col. Rufus Herrick ............ 152

ASSOCIATED EXEMPTS. Capt. Abraham Schenck ............................ 154

REGIMENT OF MINUTE MEN. Col. Jacobus Swartwout ........................... 154

RANGERS. Capt. Ezekiel Cooper ........................................... 156

ORANGE COUNTY:

IST REGIMENT. Col. Jesse Woodhull, Lt. Col. Elihu Marvin ................. 157, 253

2ND REGIMENT. Col. Ann Hawk Hay, Lt. Col. Gilbert Cooper ................ 157, 254

3RD REGIMENT. Col. William Allison, Lt. Col. Benjamin Tuston .............. 161, 255

4TH REGIMENT. Col. John Hathorn, Lt. Col. Joseph Hasbrouck, Lt. Col.

Henry \Yisner ..................................... 161, 256

ASSOCIATEH EXEMPTS. Capt. John Wood . . ..................... 168



CONTENTS 5

SUFFOLK COUNTY: Page.

IST REGIMENT OF MINUTE MEN. Col. Josiah Smith 169

3RD REGIMENT OF MINUTE MEN. Col. Thomas Terry 172

REGIMENT OF MINUTE MEN. Col. David Mulford 172

TRYON COUNTY:

IST REGIMENT. Col. Samuel Campbell, Col. Ebenezer Cox, Lt. Col. Samuel

Clyde 172, 257

2ND REGIMENT. Col. Jacob Klock, Lt. Col. Fetter Wagoner 175, 257

3RD REGIMENT. Col. Frederick Fisher, Col. Frederick Yisscher, Lt. Col.

Yolkert Veeder 179, 258

4TH REGIMENT. Col. Peter Bellinger 182, 259

STH REGIMENT. Col. John Harper, Maj. Joseph Harper 184

BATTALION OF MINUTE MEN. Col. Samuel Campbell . ., . 184

ASSOCIATED EXEMPTS. Capt. Jellis Fonda 185

RANGERS. Capt. John Winn 186

RANGERS. Capt. Christian Getman 186

RANGERS. Capt. John Kasselman 186

ULSTER COUNTY:

IST REGIMENT. Col. Johannes Snyder 187, 259

2ND REGIMENT. Col. James McClaghry, Lt. Col. Jacob Newkirk 191, 261

3RD REGIMENT. Col. Levi Pawling, Col. John Cantine, Lt. Col. Jacob Hoorn-

beek I95> 2 &-

4TH REGIMENT. Col. Johannes Hardenburgh, Lt. Col. Jonathan Elmendorph,

Lt. Col. Johannis Janson 199, 26-,

INDEPENDENT COMPANY. Capt. Samuel Clark 203

LIGHT HORSE.* Capt. Salisbury . . 203

RANGERS.* Capt. Isaac Belknap 203

WESTCHESTER COUNTY:

IST REGIMENT. Col. Joseph Drake, Col. James Hamman 204, 266

2ND REGIMENT. Col. Thomas Thomas, Lt. Col. Gilbert Budd 207, 266

3RD REGIMENT. Col. Pierre Van Cortlandt, Col. Samuel Drake, Lt. Col. Gilbert

Drake, Lt. Col. John Hyatt 210, 267

4TH REGIMENT. Col. Thaddeus Crane 214, 268

ASSOCIATED EXEMPTS. Lt. Col. Joseph Benedict 217

SEPARATE EXEMPTS. Capt. Jonathan Horton 217

MISCELLANEOUS ORGANIZATIONS:

COL. JOHN LASHER. Lt. Col. Andrew Stockholm's Regiment 218

COL. JOHN NICHOLSON. Lt. Col. John Vischer's Regiment , .218

COL. CORNELIUS D. WYNKOOP'S REGIMENT 219

MAJ. JOHN WHEELOCK'S INDEPENDENT COMPANY 220

ENS. JOHN FONDEY, JR.'S PARTY 220

CAPT. JOHN A. BRADT'S RANGERS 220

CAPT. JOHN REILAY'S RANGERS 22

THE MILITIA (LAND BOUNTY RIGHTS)*

THE SEVERAL ORGANIZATIONS are referred to (by pages) above, in the order of their

respective counties. THE MILITIA (LAND BOUNTY RIGHTS) is grouped on pages 221-268
* Not in the first edition.



CONTENTS



NAVAL SERVICE



Hag*.



PRIVATEERS. Pay Mr. Henry Benton, Capt. Robert Castle, Capt. Thomas Cregier, Capt.
Wilkie Dodge, Capt. Thomas Grenell, Capt. John Harrison, Capt. Christopher Leffing-
well, Capt. William Mercier, Capt. Richard Puller, Capt. William Rogers, Capt. An-
thony Rutgers, Capt. James Smith, Capt. Samuel Tudor, Capt. Matthew Van Alstyne, 269



LISTS AND INDEXES

SUNDRY PERSONS whose service is evidenced by original documents and manuscripts on file
in the office of the State Comptroller, but whose names are not found on the papers of

any of the regular organizations 270

PENSIONERS and Applicants for Pensions 271

CONTENTS OF THE VOLUMES OF ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS in the office of the State Comp-
troller 274

INDEX TO COMMANDING OFFICERS 276

GENERAL INDEX, EXPLANATIONS 279



Abbreviations



Adjt, Adjutant

Asst., Assistant.

Brig., Brigade or Briga-
dier

Capt., Captain

Capt. Lt., Captain-Lieu-
tenant

Chap., Chaplain



Col., Colonel
Com., Commissary
Comr., Commissioner
Corp., Corporal
Dr., Doctor
Dy., Deputy
Ens., Ensign
Gen., General



Insp., Inspector
Jr., Junior
Lieut., Lieutenant
Lt., Lieutenant
Lt. Col., Lieutenant

Colonel
Maj., Major
Mar., Marines



Mr., Master
Mu., Muster
Qr., Quarter
Regt., Regiment
Serjt., Serjeant
Sr., Senior

Supt., Superintendent
Surg., Surgeon




<;u\ l l; J( il,' GEi IRGE CLINTON



ARCHIVES



OF THE



COLONY AND STATE OF NEW YORK



IN THE



REVOLUTION



[From the First Edition ]

DURING my first term of office as comptroller, the work of putting the old records
of the comptroller's department in systematic order for purposes cf 'easy reference
was undertaken. This work in its progress brought to light quantities of forgotten
papers relating to the services performed by NewYofti in the Revolutionary War. These
papers, long since detached from their original file pac'^ag-es, wert promiscuously scattered
through great masses of old vouchers and files. I realized at once then 1 great value and
importance, and my impression has been most amply confirmed by the judgment of Col. F.
C. Ainsworth, whose great work in arranging for the United States government the contribu-
tions of men made in the various wars by the separate states and colonies, is well known.
Competent men were, therefore, set at work searching out and arranging these papers, and
this task, though slow and laborious, is believed to have been thoroughly and intelligently
done. The success of this work is very largely due to the earnest and intelligent interest taken
in it by Col. Charles O. Shepard, and his efforts were greatly assisted by the efficient work of
Mr. William B. Wemple of this office.

These papers contain the muster and pay-rolls of different organizations, and the
historic value and importance of the papers is clearly proved by the fact that they alone
show New York to have furnished nearly one and a half times the number of troops with
which she is usually credited, and adding to these the names obtained from other reliable
sources, the aggregate is more than twice the number usually credited. General Knox, first
secretary of war, in his report to Congress of the number of troops furnished by each colony,
gave New York credit for but 17,781 men, and this report, copied into our histories, very
naturally has ever since been accepted as correct. We now find positive proof of the service of
41,633 men. [The corrected number is 43,645. See additional note in second edition, p. 15.]
I therefore submit the following pages containing the names, rank and organization of these
41,633 men, whose services can be shown beyond any question, with the greater satisfaction
for believing that a great historical injustice, reflecting in many minds on New York's patri-



8 XE\V YUKK I.N nit Rj-;voLUTio.\.

otic spirit in the Revolutionary struggle, will hereby be rectified, and she take her place,
second only to Massachusetts in number of troops furnished, and, under the circumstances
surrounding her, second to none in lofty patriotism.

It is true that lists of names of New York's Revolutionary soldiers have been heretofore
published, but these were derived almost entirely from other than original sources, the state
treasurer's books of account being the chief source, and their accuracy, for this reason, has
been a matter of grave doubt, and therefore the results could not be accepted in historical
works. All the names published in this volume are derived from that highest of sources, the
original muster and pay-rolls, and thus the services of the individual and the aggregate are
conclusively shown. Several thousands of the names, particularly of those belonging to the
regiments of the " Line," were obtained from rolls on file in the War Department at Wash-
ington, through the courtesy of Hon. Daniel S. Lamont, Secretary of War. And here it may
not be inappropriate to say that Col. Ainsworth, after personal examination of the records of
service found in the comptroller's office, was so well satisfied of their accuracy and value, that he
has had the same transcribed and placed in the records of the War Department, and the 41,633
names found here will now. appear to the credit of New York in the government's record of the
Revolutionary War; ,sopn to be published.

Nor do the rraiYie,? contained , in, this volume in all probability comprise all of those from
New York wh'o performed service' in' ^irt 'great struggle. Cases exist in which records of a
full quota oj field/ staff and line officers for a regiment have been found, but no enlisted
men. This.'st.te .of things was proof, positive, to any one with knowledge of military affairs,
that a deplorable 'deficiency in the recoYds existed. It was not uncommon, as I am credibly
informed, for'tjje 6,fficer commanding aft -organization to retain all the records relating to his
command. Ihcfe'ed,, 'the records t froHs.,, which the names of the men in Colonel Gansevort's
regiment, Third /Ne'^'.Y/ork Lirte^were, obtained, are still in the possession of the descendants
of Colonel Gansevb/'t,-' a$d the qrigina"! record of Alexander Hamilton's artillery company is
in the possession of the- .New- York Historial Society, to which body we are indebted for its
appearance here. Had New York, as several of the colonies did, published the record of her
Revolutionary service, while the records were still all existing and their location, and the
facts connected with them, were within the memory of living men, a far more accurate result
would have been reached. As it is, there can be little reasonable doubt that in some cases
records of service have been lost, and that New York can never show the full number of troops
furnished by her in the struggle. This is almost conclusively shown by the fact that the papers
relating to pensions granted by the state for injuries received while in service in the Revolu-
tionary War disclose many names which do not appear upon any roster in our possession.

THE BATTLE GROUND OF AMERICA.

In any consideration of what was contributed by the separate colonies to the success of
the war, it is proper that the situation in each colony should be taken into account. New
York, more than any other colony, was the battle-ground of the war, as indeed, from its
position, it always will be in any conflict with Great Britain. The first forts captured from the
English in the war were Ticonderoga and Crown Point, May 10 and 12, 1775; and the first
attempt to construct an American navy was made by Arnold on Lake Champlain in June,
1775. Johnson's last raid through the Mohawk valley, in which the battle of Johnstown and
various smaller encounters were fought, took place in 1781. Between those dates were the
expedition from New York into Canada, resulting in the siege and capture of the fort at St.
John's, September 25, 1775, followed by the capture of Montreal, and ending in the disaster



INTRODUCTORY 9

at Quebec; the expedition to Johnstown, resulting in the surrender of three hundred armed
Scotch Highlanders, January 19, 1776; battle of Long Island, August 27, 1776; battle of
Harlem Plains, September 16, 1776; battle of White Plains, October 28, 1776; attack upon
and capture of Fort Washington, November 16, 1776; naval battles on Lake Champlain,
October n and 13, 1776; the various manoeuvres of the eventful year 1777, which preceded
the famous battles of that year; the battle of Bennington, fought on August 16, 1777, on
New York soil, but largely by Vermont boys, and which prevented the British from receiving
needed supplies; the successful defense and sortie from Fort Schuyler, and the bloody bat-
tle of Oriskany, August 6, 1777, which prevented the junction of St. Leger with Burgoyne,
and made the latter's surrender inevitable; the glorious battles of Saratoga, September 19
and October 7, 1777, leading to Burgone's surrender, October 17, 1777; the destructive
expedition up the Hudson under Sir Henry Clinton, October, 1/77; Johnson's Indian raid
through the Mohawk, Schoharie and Susquehanna valleys, 1778; Sir Henry Clinton's second
expedition up the Hudson, May, 1779; Mad Anthony's capture of Stony Point with 543
prisoners, July 15, 1779; the expeditions under Colonels Willett and Van Schaick against
Onondagas, and the horrible retaliatory raids made by the Indians, 1779; Sullivan's expedition
against the Indians in 1779, and the battle near the present site of Elmira; Johnson's raid into
the Mohawk valley, 1780, and Governor Clinton's pursuit; the destruction of the Canajoharie
and Fort Plain settlements by Brant, August, 1780; the extended raid of Sir John Johnson,
Brant and Cornplanter, in the autumn of 1780, with the battle near Stone Arabia, and Carle-
ton's raid on the upper Hudson, 1780. The surrender of Cornwallis in 1781 was the practi-
cal end of the conflict, and the foregoing list of military movements shows that every year dur-
ing the conflict New York was the scene of very active service.

The extensive fighting done within our borders brought into active and honorable ser-
vice branches of military which in colonies where no fighting was done were relieved. Our mili-
tia were the heroes of many hotly contested fields. The battle of Oriskany, in its percentages
of killed and wounded, the bloodiest battle of the war, was won by the militia, and Bur-
goyne's surrender thereby made sure. The militia bore a highly honorable part in the ever-
memorable battles of Saratoga. But many men undoubtedly performed splendid service in the
emergencies which called ,out the militia and then retired quietly to their homes, leaving no
record of their service which can now be found.

Again, the portions of New York occupied by the whites were surrounded on almost all
sides by tribes of hostile Indians, who were incited and led by still more savage whites.
Brant was sometimes humane, but Butler never. The Hurons had inherited from many preced-
ing generations the disposition to make hostile raids upon the territory of their ancient foes,
the Iroquois. At the breaking out of the war the influence of Sir William Johnson over the
tribes of the Iroquois was almost boundless. His position as Indian agent had brought him
into close relations with these tribes, and this position he seems to have honorably used and
to have succeeded in convincing them that he was their friend. His mantle, at his death, fell
upon his son, Sir John, and his son-in-law, Col. Guy Johnson, and that they used their influence
to the fullest extent to stir up Indian hostility to the patriotic citizens west of Albany is a sad
page in the history of the war. It required something more or less than patriotism to induce the
frontiersman to leave his family with the prospect before them of that most horrible of fron-
tier experiences, an Indian raid.

In the summer of 1776 the control of New ^York city, of Long Island and Staten Island
and a part .of Westchester county passed into the hands of the British, there to remain until



10 NEW YOKK IK THE REVOLUTION

after the treaty of peace, the evacuation taking place November 25, 1783. Fully one-tenth of
the state's population, from which men could be drawn to recruit the armies, were thus locked
up. The population of New York state in 1790 was 340,120, and of New York city alone, 33,131.
These facts, briefly stated, show New York's trying position in the Revolutionary
War, and confirm what was said at the outset, that in lofty patriotic endeavor, New York
was second to none of the thirteen colonies.

CLASSIFICATION AND PAY OF THE MILITARY FORCES.

The military forces of the Colony and State during the Revolutionary struggle, were
divided into three classes.

The Line; which regiments were in the United States service under General Washing-
ton. There were also regiments of artillery and an organization of " Green Mountain Boys "
in the Line.

The Levies; which were drafts from the different militia regiments, and from the people
direct as well, and which could be called upon to serve outside the State during their entire
term.

The Militia; which (then, as now, could only be called out of the State for three months
at a time.

Of the Line, 9 organizations are traced by these records; of Levies, 7 organizations;
of Militia, 68 organizations; in all 84 organizations. [See additional note in second edition,

P- IS-]

Records are found of four privateers in the service and pay of the State the
schooner " General Putnam," the sloop " Montgomery," the sloop " Schuyler," and the frigate
" Congress." These armed vessels took many prizes, and records are found of the division of
the spoils.

Associated Exempts were a unique class and were authorized by an act of April 3, 1778.
They comprised: "All persons under the age of sixty who have held civil or military com-
missions and are not or shall not be reappointed to their respective proper ranks of office, and all
persons between the ages of fifty and sixty." They could only be called out " in time of in-
vasion or incursion of the enemy."

The Militia regiments were designated, first by the colonels' names and next by their
counties, as " Fisher's Regiment, of Tryon County." Instances crop up, here and there,
in which a number was given to a regiment; as, for instance, " The Sixth Albany County," but
it is a moot question if such was the general practice. Be that as it may, the name of the
colonel is found to be quite sufficient for full identification.

The Militia was called out when wanted; kept as long as wanted, and the soldiers then
sent to their homes. Sometimes a regiment or a part of a regiment would be called out half
a dozen times in the course of a year, and for half a dozen days at a time, and ajjain it might
not be needed in the entire year. Officers and men seem to have served in different organizations
almost indiscriminately. At one call, they were in one regiment or company, and at another call,
in another regiment or company. It is, therefore, very difficult to keep trace of them on the
different pay-rolls or " pay-books," as they were sometimes called. Nepotism, or family influ-
ence, was most marked, and some regiments contained as many as five and seven officers of
the same family. (See Colonel Brinkerhoffs regiment, and ,the Millers', in Colonel
Thomas' regiment.)



INTRODUCTORY n

Counties were divided into districts, and the colonel of the regiment in each district was
given almost unlimited jurisdiction in military matters. He was required to see that every
male between the ages of sixteen and fifty was enrolled. Later, the age limit was extended to
sixty. If an able-bodied man, he must serve when " warned " under penalty of fine and im-
prisonment; but if incapacitated, he must contribute toward furnishing and equipping another
man any person furnishing a substitute being exempt for the time that substitute served.
Quakers, Moravians and United Brethren were enrolled, but exempted from service upon pay-
ment of money, which varied in amount as the war progressed until, in 1780, they were obliged
to pay 160 per year. One miller to each grist mill, three powder makers to each powder mill,
five men to each furnace, three journeymen in each printing office, and one ferryman to each
public ferry, were also exempt. Each soldier must present himself armed, and with a blanket,
a powder-horn and a flint, and sometimes even a tomahawk was required. All officers in the



Online LibraryNew York (State). Comptroller's OfficeNew York in the Revolution as colony and state; these records were discovered, arranged, and classified in 1895, 1897, and 1898, by James A. Roberts, Comptroller → online text (page 1 of 80)