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New York in the Revolution as colony and state; these records were discovered, arranged, and classified in 1895, 1897, and 1898, by James A. Roberts, Comptroller online

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cities of New York, Albany and Schenectady were ordered to wear their swords during divine
service under a penalty of twenty shillings.

Rum, sugar and tea were regular rations, and the amount was gauged by the rank. A
major-general was deemed to require, and was allowed eac'i month, four gallons of rum, six
pounds of sugar, and half a pound of tea. A brigadier-general, three gallons of rum, four
pounds of sugar, and six ounces of tea. A colonel, a lieutenant-colonel, and a major, two and
one-half gallons of rum, and the same amount of sugar and tea. A chaplain, ditto as to sugar
and tea, but only two gallons of rum. The scale was continued until a noncommissioned officer
and a private received one pound of sugar, two ounces of tea, and one pound of tobacco, but no
rum. A colonel's pay was $75 per month, or one York per day; a lieutenant-colonel's pay was
$60 per month; a major's pay was $50 per month; a captain's pay was $40 per month;
an adjutant's pay was $40 per month; a lieutenant's pay was $26 2-3 per month; an ensign's pay
was $20 per month; a sergeant's pay was $8 per month; a corporal's pay was $7 1-3 per month;
a private's pay was $6 2-3 per month.

Nor was this, by any means, always in money. It was sometimes in State notes and some-
times in authority to " impress " articles or animals under supervision of some designated
officer, who should give a receipt, in the name of the State, to the impressee. As late as 1784,
the large majority of the soldiers were still unpaid for their services in 1776-7-8-9-80-81-82.
On April 27 of 1874, the legislature passed "An act for the settlement of the pay of the
Levies and Militia for their services in the late war." This statute provided that abstracts and
pay-rolls of the different regiments and separate commands should be certified by the State
auditor; he deducting for advances made to officers or privates by " impressing" or otherwise,
and an allowance be made for the depreciation of the pay of such as had been in captivity, for
the time they were in captivity. Upon receipt of these accounts from the auditor, the treasurer
of the State was required to issue to persons, to whom pay should appear to be due, or to
their legal representatives, certificates of indebtedness bearing five per cent, interest, and such
certificates should be receivable for purchases of forfeited estates, or in payment for waste or
" unappropriated lands," taxes, etc. Officers could not " throw up or quit " their commis-
sions until they had served fifteen years.

All slaves 'killed in the service were to be paid for. In time of invasion, any slave,
not in the military service, found one mile from his master's abode, without a certificate from his
master showing his business, might be " shot or otherwise destroyed without fear of censure,
impeachment or prosecution for the same." In 1781, it was provided that any slave who should
enlist and serve " for three years, or until discharged," should be declared a freeman of the State.



12 XLW YORK IN THE REVOLUTION-

LAND BOUNTY RIGHTS.

In the same year, a bounty of "Land Rights " - so-called (a "Right" being 500
r.cres) was offered to officers and men for two regiments then to be raised, for the defense of
the State. To a colonel, lieutenant-colonel and major, four Rights. To a captain and a surgeon,
three Rights. To a lieutenant, ensign or surgeon's mate, two Rights, and to a noncommis-
sioned officer or a private, one Right. Any master or mistress who should deliver an able-
bodied slave to serve, one Right. By an act of April I, 1778, each Militia regiment was
divided into " classes " of fifteen men each. When soldiers were needed to recruit the
line regiments, each class must, within nine days, furnish a man fully armed and equipped.
In case they neglected so to do, the designated officer proceeded, at once, to draft one of the
number by lot. By an act of March 11, 1780, every regiment was again divided into " classes;"
this time of thirty-five men each, and when soldiers were required as before, these " classes "
were also called upon to furnish a man as before, and in case of failure so to do within fifteen days,
were fined a sum equal to double the amount of the highest bounty which had then been given.
This fine was collected by distress and sale of goods and chattels of those refusing to pay, or,
if not possessed of property, they were committed to jail " without bail or mainprize '' until the
sum was paid. If a " class " furnished a man as the law required, it received a money bounty,
sometimes as much as 80. As the war progressed, and the needs of the government became
more pressing, land "Rights" were added to the money bounty, and on March 23, 1782, an
act was passed providing that any " class " or any person who furnished an able-bodied man
to serve " for three years or during the war," should be entitled to 600 acres; or 350 acres for
a two years' enlistment; and any person or " class " who should deliver a man within twenty
days from the time C>f notification, 200 acres extra.

The meaning of Militia is "The military force of a nation."

In this connection it may not be out of place nor uninteresting to trace this branch of
the public service from its inception to the commencement of the Revolutionary War.

The Militia of this continent had its origin in a law promulgated in 1664 by James, Duke of
York and Albany; the owner, by a grant from Charles the Second, of a large territory, which
included the territory which is now eastern and southern New York. ' The Duke's Laws," as
they are still called, covered numerous subjects and were most paternal and creditable. As to
militia, they provided that: "All males above the age of sixteen shall be enrolled and be sub-
ject to military duty. Each person must provide himself with a good, serviceable gun to be kept
in constant fitness, with a good sword, bandoleer and horn, a wormer, a scourer, a priming wire,
a shot bag, a charger, one pound of good powder, four pounds of pistol bullets and twenty-four
bullets fitted for the gun, four fathoms of serviceable match for match lock gun and four good
flints for the fire lock gun."

Four local and one general training days per year were prescribed for each " Ryding "
and once in two years, a general training day " for all the soldiers within the government."
The Militia were to be taught " in the comely handling and ready use of the arms, and in all
postures of war and in all words of command." In case of failure of anyone to appear for duty,

as to be fined, and the fines were to be divided; one-third going to the commanding

ral and the remaining two-thirds to be divided amongst the other officers. Ample power

;^iven the general for collecting the fines. This code seems to have held, in most of its
features, until 1702, when Queen Anne modified and amended it. She ordered that all males
between the ages of sixteen and fifty be liable for military duty and, in case of an invasion, all
between fifteen and sixty. She generously allowed, even ordered, each captain to fur-



INTRODUCTORY 13

nish drums, bugles and colors for his company, and emphasized the order by n fine of iz for
each month he was in default.

This was also provided: " Every soldier belonging to a troop of horse shall appear twice
a year for a drill and muster, provided with a good, serviceable horse, not less than fourteen
hands high, covered with a good saddle, housings, breast-plate and crupper, a case of good
pistols, a good sword or hanger, one-half a pound of good powder and twelve siz ble bul
lets, a pair of boots and suitable spurs, and a carbine well fixed with a belt, swivel and
blanket, under penalty of ten shillings for the want of a sizable horse, and ten shillings for
want of each or either of the other articles." " New York County Horse " must have blue
coats and breeches and scarlet waistcoats, and their hats laced with gold. "Albany County
Horse " must have blue coats, but their hats laced with silver. " Every foot soldier must
provide himself, and appear and muster with a good, well-fixed musket or fuzee, a good sword,
belt and cartridge box, six cartridges of powder, a horn and six sizable bullets. At home, he
must always have on hand one pound of good gunpowder and three pounds of sizable bullets."
For \vant of these articles a fine of twenty shillings and prison charges were imposed till the
fine was paid. At his discretion, the captain was allowed and authorized to levy upon and
sell the delinquent's goods. " In case the offender be unable or refuse to pay, and
he have no goods to distress, he shall ride the wooden horse, or be laid by the neck and heels
in a public place for not to exceed an hour."

For seventy-three years, or until 1775, nearly the same law was re-enacted each year,
the title almost invariably being: "An act for settling the Militia of this Province, and the
making of it useful for the security and defense thereof." No mention of compensation for mili-
tary service was ever made, and when the number of articles which- each soldier must
furnish ,are taken into consideration, it will be seen that the tax was, by no means, an incon-
siderable one.

This was the condition of the Militia when the cloud of the Revolutionary War threw its

shadow over the land.

JAMES A. ROBERTS,

ALBANY, N. Y., November, 1897. Comptroller.



ADDITIONAL NOTE FOR THE SECOND EDITION.

Owing to the great demand for the first, and very limited, edition of this book, the Legisla-
ture of 1898 granted an appropriation for a second edition. By this means I have been enabled
to make a most thorough search of all the papers in this office that could have any possible bear-
ing on the Revolutionary War. All the resources of the office on this subject have been ex-
hausted; and I believe that, so far as the documents in this office are concerned, the record of
every soldier of that war has been found and his name properly placed in this edition.

It is a matter of regret that these records do not present a complete roster of all the men
from New York engaged in the Revolutionary War. Many rolls are missing, and many are
defective, but such names as could be found are given. In some cases no enlisted men ap-
pear; only the officers of the organization.

The printed book, of course, is simply a roster, or roll-call. Of the documents, and their
arrangement, mention will be made below.

Acknowledgment is due to Col. William J. Morgan, the first deputy Comptroller, for
advice and assistance: also to Mr. Hugh Hastings, State Historian, for suggestions, and to Mr.
George R. Howell, State Archivist, for material.



3il NEW YORK IN THE REVOLUTION

The work of classifying and arranging the additional material, and of compiling and super-
vising the second edition of this book, has been in the hands of Mr. Frederic G. Mather.

The issuing of a second edition has made it possible to use several valuable documents that
had come to hand since the first edition was published. Among the most important of these
are the certified copies from the archives of Massachusetts, of the muster-rolls of the field, staff
and other commissioned officers (also of several of the companies), in the First regiment of the
Line belonging to this State. In these certified copies are the names of about 100 soldiers, of
rank below that of colonel the said names not having appeared in such shape either in the
records from Washington or in our own records. The same copies also show the names of 160
soldiers that had hitherto appeared in the records from Washington, but not in the original docu-
ments in this office.

THE LAND BOUNTY RIGHTS.

While numerous sources have contributed to the perfecting of the work, yet the main
source of information, in this latest inquiry, has been the Land Bounty Papers. Of these, a
word should be said in addition to what has preceded on page 12. The usual form of a
"Class Right" for a Land Bounty was this:

" We, the subscribers belonging to Daniel Cantine's class in Col. Jesse Woodhull's regi-
ment of Orange county militia, do hereby transfer and assign to Hezekiah White, of the pre-
cinct of Cornwall, in Orange county and State of New York, carpenter, and to his heirs and
assigns forever all our right and title to the annexed certificate and the gratuity or bounty
of 200 acres of land to which we are entitled by reason of an act entitled ' An act for raising
troops to complete the line of this State in the service of the United States, and the two regi-
ments to be raised on bounties of unappropriated lands and for the further defense of the
frontier of this State/ passed the 23d day of March, 1782. As witness our hands and seals."

Not only did the signers affix elaborate seals, but the witnesses to the signatures and
sealings were required tp make affidavit that the signatures and sealings had been made in their
presence. Accompanying every Class Right is a certificate of the Muster Master of the United
States troops that the head of the class had delivered to him an able-bodied man (usually
mentioned by name) " duly armed and equipped." The man, so mustered, was certified to have
been enlisted for either the Line or the Levies; and, usually, the regiment in which he served
was designated. The names of all men mustered in this way have been added to the several regi-
ments as they appeared in the first edition of this book.

But the case of the militiamen who signed the Class Rights is somewhat different. They
signed directly before the close of the war, and there is no evidence in these documents to show
that they ever saw actual service. They were, however, ready to serve; and the fact that they
may not have been called upon to serve should not detract from the credit due them. Still it
would be 'unfair to incorporate their names in the regiment proper; and so, with this explana-
tion, they are now placed on pages 221-268 of the book, to count for whatever they are worth.
Among the names so placed there are some that, perhaps, should appear as full members in
active service; but the real standing of all cases of this sort must be settled by consulting the
original documents, and from additional proof.

A very important subdivision of the Land Bounty Rights relates to the applications for
locations of the land. The applications were worded " In consequence of a certificate and
transfer herewith delivered, and agreeable to the law of 1782 [noted above], I do locate the fol-
lowing tract." The name of the county in which the land was situated was generally named in
the application; but this referred to the ten counties as they were at the time of the Revo-
lutionary War. Many valuable maps are filed with the applications.

" Deserter " written after a name, in the original documents, must not be taken too
seriously. Frequently a man absented himself to gather crops, to attend a sick wife, or to



INTRODUCTORY 15

bury a child; but if is found that the soldier generally returned, and was again taken up on
the rolls. In the case of the Land Bounty Rights it is often a question whether the word
" deserted " applies to the soldier or to the claim.

NET RESULTS OF THE WORK.

In the course of this later investigation, several hundred original documents have been
added to the records relating to pensions, muster-rolls and demands for pay; and many of these
documents represent new names. In numerous cases the autograph signature appears for the
first time. New material has been added relating to several regiments that did not appear in the
first edition; and new departments have been created referring to courts-martial, aid fur-
nished to families of soldiers, American prisoners of war, and bounty pay and subsistence.

The nine organizations of the Line appearing in the first edition have been increased to
fifteen, with several fragments of regiments not identified. Instead of the four Privateers noted
in the first edition, the names of eleven, with their commanders, now appear; and the ma-
terial relating to this branch of the service has increased four-fold. More than 100 soldiers
hitherto unidentified, have been identified, and their names placed in, their respective regiments.

Of the sixteen large volumes of original documents, one volume of miscellaneous papers
has been cancelled, its contents distributed under the new classification, and more valuable
material has made up a new volume designated by the same number. On account of much
additional material, another volume has been rebound in two parts; and two others have been
enlarged. The large volumes now number twenty-nine, one of which is in two parts.
A brief table of the contents of the twenty-nine volumes will be found on page. 274.

The progress of this later inquiry has involved the handling of about 25.000 names,
one-half of which were already in the card index. To the 40,000 names already in that index,
15,000 have been added, many of which are simply different ways of spelling the same name.
There have been added to the Line, Levies and Privateers the names of 128 officers and 1,884
men a total of 2,012, all of them in good standing. Together with the 41,633 men, noted
on page 7, this makes a total of 43,645 soldiers in good standing, as the record- of the State of
New York, according to the documents examined. If to this number are added the 90 offi-
cers and 8,237 men named in the Land Bounty Rights, we have a total of 51,972 names that
have been dealt with in the whole course of this inquiry.

The most valuable of the many additions in the second edition is the General Index of
names at the end, which makes the contents of the book convenient for consultation.

FUTURE INVESTIGATION.

Many important documents have been laid aside, temporarily, in order to place this com-
pleted record of the soldiers before the public as promptly as possible. The work, if contin-
ued, will include several more of the large volumes of original documents. These will relate to
the conduct of the war, the claims against the State for services and for damages by the
enemy's raids, the proceedings of the Legislature and of the Committee and Council of Safety, the
records of the Committee for Detecting Conspiracies, and of the Commissioners of Prisoners,
the aid given to refugees, and the accounts of the Commissioners of Forfeited Estates. Nearly all
of this matter, including much that has already been put in proper form for preservation, is of
such interest and importance that it may seem best to publish selections from it after the man-
ner of the Documentary History of New York and the Documents Relating to the Colonial
History of New York; and, if published, they would make a valuable complement to those
works.

ALBANY, November, 1898. JAMES A. ROBERTS,

Comptroller.



INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS



PRIVATE SOLDIER OF THE CONTINENTAL ARMY IN FULL UNIFORM (OFFICIAL SKETCH) Coves.

MAP OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK SHOWING THE BOUNDARIES OF THE SEVERAL COUNTIES DURING

THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR Frontispiece

OPP. PAGE

PORTRAIT OF GOVERNOR GEORGE CLINTON . 7

PORTRAIT OF COLONEL PHILIP VAN CORTLANDT.. 29

SIGNATURES OF OFFICERS OF THE 2D LINE 32

APPOINTMENT OF CHAPLAIN JOHANN DANIEL GROS.. 33

ACCOUNT CURRENT WITH MAJOR NICHOLAS FISH 33

PORTRAIT OF BRIGADIER GENERAL PETER GANSEVOORT. . . 40

MUSTER ROLL OF OFFICERS OF THE 3D BATTALION.. 42

PORTRAIT OF BRIGADIER GENERAL JAMES CLINTON 46

SIGNATURES OF OFFICERS OF THE STH LINE 55

RETURN OF OFFICERS OF THE STH LINE 56

PORTRAIT OF CAPTAIN ALEXANDER HAMILTON 65

PORTRAIT OF COLONEL MARINUS WILLETT 87

GENERAL WASHINGTON'S CERTIFICATE TO THE CHARACTER OF A SCOUT 104

PAY OF PRISONERS OF WAR 105

TESTIMONIAL FROM OFFICERS OF THE 30 LINE TO COLONEL PETER GANSEVOORT UPON PROMOTION

TO BRIGADIER GENERAL .' 120

A DISCHARGE FROM GENERAL WASHINGTON 136

PORTRAIT OF MAJOR GENERAL PHILIP SCHUYLER 152

CERTIFICATE OF INDEBTEDNESS BY GOVERNOR GEORGE CLINTON 168

PORTRAIT OF BRIGADIER GENERAL NICHOLAS HERKIMER 184

A LETTER FROM COLONEL PETER GANSEVOORT 200

A LAND BOUNTY RIGHT 221

A CLASS, OR BEAT, ROLL 222

BOUNTY PAY 232

AN ORDER TO IMPRESS WHEAT FOR BOUNTY 233

PORTRAIT or MAJOR GENERAL RICHARD MONTGOMERY. . .... 240

A PAROLE 256

A WIDOW'S DEMAND FOR PAY 256

ACCOUNT CURRENT WITH MAJOR GENERAL ALEXANDER McDouGAL AND SUITE 257

ASSIGNMENT OF PAY DUE A SOLDIER 269

A SURGEON'S BILL AGAINST THE STATE 270



NEW YORK COLONY AND STATE



IN THE



REVOLUTION



THE LINE



First Regiment



COLONEL GOOSE VAN SCHAICK
LIEUT. COL. CORNELIUS VAN DYCK
MAJOR JOHN GRAHAM
MAJOR BENJAMIN LEDYARD
MAJOR JOSEPH McCRACKEN
ADJUTANT JOHN BRODGDEN
ADJUTANT JOHN L. HARDENBERGH
ADJUTANT PETER BENJAMIN TEARSE
ADJUTANT JACOB H. WENDELL



ADJUTANT JOHN H. WENDELL

QUARTER MASTER HENRY VAN WOERT

PAY MASTER ABRAHAM TEN EYCK

PAY MASTER JEREMIAH VAN RENSSELAER

CHAPLAIN SOLOMON FRELIGH

SURGEON DANIEL BUDD

SURGEON WILLIAM MEAD

SURGEON DANIEL MENEMA

SURGEON CALEB SWEET



CAPT AARON AORSON
" LEONARD BLEEKER
" WILLIAM BROWN

JACOB CHEESMAN
" WILLIAM CODE

JOHN COPP

" ROBERT EDMONSTON
" ANDREW FINCK, JR.
" S. GILBERT

WILLIAM GOFORTH
" JOHN GRAHAM
" JAMES GREGG

JAMES GRIGG

BENJAMIN HICKS

CORNELIUS T. JANSEN
" JOHN JOHNSON

DAVID LYON

RO3RT McKEAN

MOSES MARTIN

" DANIEL MILLS

CHARLES PARSONS
JOHN QUACKENBOS
BARENT STAATS SALISBURY
GEORGE SYTEZ
GEORGE SYTVIS

" HENRY TEABOUT



CAPT. JOHN C. TEN BROECK
" DAVID VAN NESS
" JAMES VAN RENSSELAER

NICHOLAS VAN RENSSELAER
" ABRAHAM A. VAN WYCK
" RICHARD VARICK
" JOHN WANDLE

JOHN H. WENDELL
" JOHN WILEY
" JOB WRIGHT

GUY YOUNG
LIEUT. AARON AORSON

JOSIAH BAGLEY
" ABRAHAM B. BANCKER
" JOHN BARNS
" GERAURD BECKMAN
" VICTOR BICKER
" WILLIAM BLOODGOOD
" BENJAMIN BOGARDUS
" ABRAHAM E. BRASHER
" JAMES CLARK
" JOB COOK
" HENRY DEFFENDORFF
" DANIEL DENNESTON
" JOHN DENNEY
" HOLTON DUNHAM



LIEUT. WILLIAM A. FORBES

" JOHN FURMAN

" DANIEL GAUS

" BENJAMIN GILBERT

ABRAHAM HARUENBERGH

" NATHANIEL HENRY

" EBENEZER HILLS

" JOHN HOOGHKIR

" JOHN HOUSTON

" SAMUEL LEWIS

RANALD T. McDouGALL

" PETER MAGEE

" CHRISTOPHER MILLER

" WILLIAM MOULTON

" CHRISTOPHER MULLER

" EDWARD NICOLS

DIGBY ODLUM

" JAMES WILLIAM PAYNE

" BENJAMIN PELTON

" JONATHAN PIERCY

" MICHAEL RYAN

" WILHF.LM RYCKMAN

" BARENT STAATS SALSBURY

" WILLIAM SCUDDER

" ADIEL SHERWOOD

" EPIIRAIM SNOW



18



NEW YORK IN THE REVOLUTION



LIEUT. HENRY SWARTWOUT

" PETER B. TEARSE

JOHN C. TEN BROECK

" ABRAHAM TEN EYCK

" SAMUEL THORN

PETER VAN BUNSCHOTEV
NANNING VAN DEHHIDEN
CORNELIUS VAN DYCK

" ARO.MDT VAN HOOK
JOHN VAN NESS
BARTHOLOMEW J. VAN
VALKENBURGH

" TOBIAS VAN VEGHTEN
ISAAC VAN WERT

" HENRY VAN WOERT

" PETER VERGEREAN

GOER'T H. VONWAGNER
PETER ISAAC VOSBURGH



LIEUT. JOHN WILLIAM WATKI.NS
JACOB H. WENDELL

ENSIGN LUTHER BISSEL

" WILLIAM BLOODGOOD

" JONATHAN BROWN

" ALEXANDER CLINTON

" WILLIAM W. DEPEYSTER

" JAMES FAIRLY

" Douw J. FONDA

" JOHN FONDA

" Douw FONDEY

" THEADOSIA FOWLER

" BENJAMIN GILBERT

" THOMAS HAIGHT

" BENJAMIN HERRING

THOMAS HICKS
" NICHOLAS KETTLE
JACOB I. KLOCK



ENSIGN GARRET G. LAMSING

GILBERT R. LIVINGSTON
" JOHN MCCLUNG

JOHN MARSH

JAMES MOORE

JOSEPH MORKELL

JEREMIAH C. MULLER

ELIAS PALMER
" GEORGE PALMER
" JOSEPH PUTMAN
" CORNELIUS C. ROOSEVELT
" WILHELM RYCKMAN
" ADAM TEN BHOECK

JEREMIAH VAN RENSSELAER
" JOHN WALDRON
" JOHN PERKINS WENDELL
" SAMUEL YOUNG



ENLISTED MEN



Abbee Samuel
Abcnather Jiles
Able Hendrick
Able John
Acker Albert
Acker Conrad
Ackerson Jacob
Ackinson James
Ackland Francis
Ackler John
Ackley Joel
Acklin Francis
Adaar Alexander
Adams Emanuel
Adams James
Adams John
Adams Matthew
Adams Samuel
Adams Thomas
Adams William
Adamy Henry
Addams Albertus
Adier Alexander
Africa Cask
Agard Joseph
Agard Judah
Agard Noah
Aim George
Aitkins Andrew
Akens Moses
Algoyer Bastian
Alhiser George
Alkinkrack John
Allen Amissy
Allen John
Allen Jonathan
Allen Richard
Allen Samuel
Althiser George
Altiser Jeremiah
Amarr John



Amerman Jam
Ammermain Obadiah
Amory John
Anderson Cornelius
Anderson David
Anderson Durias
Anderson Samuel
Anderson William P
Anson Lockward
Anthony John
Anthony Peter
Appart John
Arlow John
Armstrong Adam
Armstrong Archibald
Armstrong John
Armstrong Thomas
Artwick Cristian
Artwick Lawrence
Ash Henry
Atkinson James
Auston Lockward
Babbat Reuben
Babbitt John
Babcock Elias
Babtist John
Bacchus George
Bacchus John
Backer Christopher
Backhorn Jacob
Bacon Thomson
Badger Joshua
Badinger Philip
Baechus George
Bacchus John
Bagley David
Bailey John
Bailis Elias



Online LibraryNew York (State). Comptroller's OfficeNew York in the Revolution as colony and state; these records were discovered, arranged, and classified in 1895, 1897, and 1898, by James A. Roberts, Comptroller → online text (page 2 of 80)