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.181
.376
.559
1.87
3.41



1.93



Depth in
inches on
drainage

area.



1.05

.79

1.05

6.62

6.32

2.42

.70

.21

.42

.64

2.09

3.93



26.24



Accu-
racy.



D
D
D
A
A
A
A
C
A
A
A
D



Note. — Discharge January, February, March, and December estimated from climatological
records and general conditions of run-off in northern New York.

St. Regis Riveb Drainage Basin.
Description,

The St. Begis river has its source in several small streams and lakes in
the western part of Franklin county at an elevation of about 1,500 feet above
the sea. It first flows in a northwesterly direction for about forty miles
and then somewhat east of north for about 28 miles to its mouth, in the
St. Lawrence river near the State line. It has a drainage area of 664 square
miles (State Water Supply Commission). The upper portion of its water
shed consists of swamp and mountains from which the forest has been largely
cut. Upon leaving the plateau the stream descends for 10 or 16 miles through
a rugged country with a succession of steep rapids and precipitous falls to
the low lands bordering the St. Lawrence.

There are excellent opportunities for developing power in the descent, only
a few of which have as yet been utilized. From the foot of the hills to the
St. Lawrence, the slope of the river is moderate and rock out-crop not
frequent, consequently favorable sites for power development are scarce^
According to report of the State Water Supply Commission for 1910, the
present limit of profitable development through this low country, except as
increased by regulation of stream flow has probably been reached in the
existing plants. A detailed description, showing all power developments
and future possible developments is given in the 1010 report of the State
Water Supply Conunission.

8t. RegtM at Brasher Center, N. y.
Locaii<m. — At the steel highway bridge in the village of Brasher Center,
5 miles downstream from Brasher Falls, 6^/4 ruiles below the junction of
East and West branches of St. Regis river, and about 12 miles above the
mouth.



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150



First Annual Report of the



Records available, — August 22. 1910. to DecemWr 31, 1911. Data also in
annual reports of the United States Geological Survey, State Water Supply
Comniiasion, and the State Engineer and Surveyor, State of New York.

Drainage area. — 621 square miles (measured on Post Route map).

Oage, — Chain, fastened to downstream side of bridge; read twice daily;
datum unchanged.

Channel. — Very rough; composed of gravel and large boulders; considered
permanent. Velocity of current at high stages very swift and water rough.

Discharge measurements. — At low stages made by wading about 500 feet
below the bridge; at high stages made from the bridge.

Winter flow. — Relation of gage height to discharge affected by ice.

Accuraey. — Discharge rating curve not yet developed.

Co-operation. — Established by United States Geological Survey in co-
operation with the State of New York Conservation Commission.

Dimrharfff measurements of Si. Regin River at Brasher Center, N. F., in 1911.



DATE.



Feb. 20 rt.
April 13. .
April 13. .
July 2..



Hydrographer.



Shuttleworth and Hoyt.

C. S. De Ciolycr

C. S. Do Golver

G. H. Canfieid



Width.



Feet.

220
221
209



Area

of

section.



Sq. St.
223
7-29
734
345



Ga«e

height.



Feet.
7.15
f>.30
6.26
4.57



Discharge.



Sec.'ft.

526
3.956
3.850

709



a Mo'.mirement made under complete ice cover about 400 feet above
ice 7.20 feet; average thickneaa of ice 0.85 foot.



Oage height to top of
Dail}/ gage height, in feet, of St. Regis River ai Brasher Center, N. F.. for 1911.



DAY.


Mar.


April.


f May.


June.


July.


Aug.


Sept.


Oct.


Nov.


Dec.


1




5.70
5.5,5
5.60
5.40
5.15
8.25
8.70
8.80
7.25
6.60
6.35
6.20
6.40
6.70
6.85
6.80
6.75
6.65
6.10
6.25
5.95
6.15
6.18
6.02
6.00
6.18
6.28
6.25
6.28
6.25


' 6.20

; 6.68

6.32

1 6.20

■ 5.90

, 5.80

' 5.55

, 5.50

, 5.42

, 5.35

1 5.30

> 5.30

. 5.12

5.05

5.15

4.55

4.85

4.68

4.75

4.55

4.58

4.65

4.78

4.70

5.95

5.55

6.25

5.05

5.05

4.85

4.75


4.75
4.72
4.82
4.80
4.74
4.80
4.85
4.65
4.68
4.90
4.65
4.80
4 92
5.12
5.15
5.25
5.12
4.95
4.72
4.60
4.72
4.82
4.65
4.52
4.38
4.38
4.58
4.61
4.55
4.59


4.55
4.52
4.55
4.62
4.56
4.48
4.62
4.45
4.48
4 41
4.42
4.45
4.18
4.15
4.08
4.15
4.08
4.32
4.25
4.35
4.22
4.19
4.10
4.08
4.15
4.05
4.18
3.98
4.09
3.95
3 98


4.28
4.25
4.10
4.08
4.15
4.22
4.29
4.28
4.20
4.32
4.15
4.05
4.19
4.12
4.08
4.15
4.12
4.09
4.12
4.25
4.30
4.25
4.22
4.22
4.30
4.21
4.32
4.15
4-35
4.32
4.38


4.15
4.05
4 02
4.05
4.10
4.15
4.75
4.78
4.68
4.45
4.30
4.38
4.35
4.38
4.45
4.38
4.32
4.28
4.40
4.40
4.38
4.25
4.22
4.25
4.22
4.35
4.72
5.02
4.42
4.35


4.42
4.45
4.42
4.60
5.00
5.20
5.12
4.95
4.78
4.68
4.45
4.40
4.55
4.48
4.38
4.36
4.38
4.45
4.55
4.06
4.52
4.52
4.45
4.48
4.35
4.45
4.44
4.42
4.41
4.38
4.48


4.48
4.72
4.75
4.59
4.52
4.51
4.60
4.90
6.08
5.06
5.04
6.04
4.85
4.84
4.82
4.76
4.80
4.90
6.15
6.09
6.06
6.04
4.92
4.49
4.78
4.72
4.70
4.75
6.20
6.35


6.32


2




5.32


3




6.08


4




4.96


rt




4.86







4.71


7




4.78


8 . . .




4.72


9




4.96


10




6.10


11




6.36


12




5.62


13




6.10


14




6.08


15




6.82


16




6.72


17




6.35


18




6.28


19




6.40


20




6.32


21




6.26


22




6.18


23




6.66


24




6.60


25




6.42


26 ...




6.38


27




6.30


28


7.95
6.88
6.15
5.80


6.30


21


5.60


30


5.78


31


5.95



NoTR. — Relation of gage height to discharge probably afTected by backwater from ice during
the latter part of March, the first part of April, and the last few days of December. It is not
known when the ice passed out of Uie river.



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COIS^SEBVATION COMMISSION. 151

AUSABLE RlYEB DbAINAGE BASIN.

Description.

The Ausable river is formed by the junction of the east and west branches
which have their headwaters in the northwestern part of Essex county.
The east branch has its source in upper Ausable lake, at an elevation of
1,990 feet above sea level. The west branch is formed by several small
streams w^hich lie in the valley to the west and north of the east branch.
Both branches flow north and east to their junction in the village of Ausable
Forks, from which point the river flows northeast, entering Lake Champlain
about 10 miles south of Plattsburg and opposite and slightly north of the
city of Burlington.

Throughout the entire course, the river is fed by small mountain streams,
which enter at nearly right angles from the mountains on either side. There
are few lakes in this drainage area to act as a regulator on the flow and,
owing to the great diff'erences of elevation throughout the area, the stream
has what is called a flashy discharge, its fluctuations being large and rapid.

Owing to the fact that this basin lies on the eastern slope of the Adiron-
dack mountains, the average rain fall is less than for those basins whose
streams rise on the western and southern slopes, the mean yearly precipitation
being about 32 inches.

About 6,000 water horsepower is developed at the present time, principally
on the west branch. For additional development and storage possibilities on
this stream see Fifth Annual Report of Water Supply Commission, pages
88, 147, 267.

Ausable River at Ausable Forks, N. Y.

Location, — In the village of Ausable Forks, immediately below the junc-
tion of the east and west branches and about 15 miles above the mouth of
the river.

Records available. — August 17, 1910, to December 31, 1911. Data also in
annual reports of the State Water Supply Commission of New York and
New York State Conservation Commission.

Drainage orca.^470 square miles.*

Gage. — Chain, on the left bank, about 100 feet below the junction of east
and west branches of Ausable river; read twice daily; datum unchanged.

Channel. — Sand and gravel ; liable to shift. Divided by an island.

Discharge measurements. — Made from a car hung on a cable about 1^/^
miles below the gage. At this place the river flows in one channel.

Winter flow. — Ice may form on the riffles below the gage and either divert
or cause back water.

Accuracy. — Conditions at the measuring section good. Discharge rating
curve not yet developed.

Co-operation. — Established by the United States Geological Survey in
co-operation with the State Water Supply Commission of New York.



* Measured on Post Route map.



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152



First Annual Eepoht of the



Discharge measurementt of Atuable River at Ausable Fork*, N. Y., in 1911.



DATE.


Hydrographer.


Width.


Area

of
section.


Gage
height.


Discharge.


Feb. 25 o


F. J. Shuttleworth


Feet.
245
186
186
171
156


Sq. ft.
207
680
690
254
169


Feet.
3.63
4.96
4.97
3.73
3.54


Sec.'ft.
188


April 14

Aprill4

June 28 6


C. S. De Golyer


2,130


C. 8. De Golyer


2,160


G. H. Canfield


308


Aug. 10 6


G. H. Canfield


152









a Measurement made by wading about 300 feet above gage. Section of cable frosen over.
Average thickness of ice 1.2 feet. Section of gage nearly clear of ice.
b Measurements by wading at cable section.



Daily gage height, in feet, of Atuable River at Auadble Forkt, N, Y., for 1911.
[H. Edward Miner, observer.]



DAY.



Feb.



Mar.



April.



May.



June.



July.



Aug.



Sept.



Oct.



Nov.



Dec.



1..

2..

3.,

4..

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
80.
31.



3.63
3.66
3.92
4.07



3.65

3.92

3.63

3.65

3.76

3.88

3.66

3.65

3.

3.63

3.66

3.92

3.86

3.90

4.02

3.98

3.72

3.64

3.68

3.73

3.70

3.82

4.70

3.91

4.18

4.46

4.85

4.36

4.14

3.98



3.90

3.9:

3.99

4.03

3.84

5.05

5.9

5.00

4.27

4.33

4.29

4.30

4.4S

5.10

5.6

6.00

4.60

4.45

4.28

4.38

4.34

4.28

4.28

4.22

4.44

4.76

4.96

5.35

5.56

6.65



5.7

7.1

5.15

4.70

4.36

4.26

4.30

4.66

4.80

4.80

4.65

4.75

4.66

4.14

4.09

3.93

4.47

3.94

4.C9

4.07

3.91

3,

3.92

4.03

4.11

4.09

3.95

3.83

3.83

3.72

3.69



3.87
4.01
3.87
3.79
3.81
3.71
3.77
3.67
3.88
3.94
3.91
3.99
4.62
4.31
4.17
4.23
4.16
3.96
3.83
3.79
3.76
3.73
3.71
3.75
3.56
3.86
3.69
3.66



3.69
3.59
3.67
3.60
3.58
3.68
3.60
3.67
3.53
3.67
3.56
3.62
3.66
3.48
3.48
3.54
3.66
3.61
3.70
3.62
3.56
3.66
3.49
3.63
3.64
3.60
3.79
3.56
3.55
3.56
3.60



3.52
3.53
3.53
3.54
3.50
3.49
3.66
3.68
3.60
3.65
3.66
3.51
3.52
3.63
3.52
3.56
3.52
3.50
3.48
3.54
3.66
3.53
3.56
3.56
3.62
3.55
3.54
3.56
3.64
3.68
3.63



3.61
3.67
3.57
3.57
3.68
4.00
4.18
3.84
3.63
3.64
3.62
3.64
3.66
3.62
3.62
3.67
3.61
3.70
3.62
3.62
3.56
3.66
3.62
3.68
3.72
3.64
3.68
3.62
3.64
3.68



3.64

3.72

3.68

3.70

4.35

4.16

3.94

3.76

3.78

3.76

3.76

3.69

3.64

3.63

3.64

3.63

3.68

3.69

4.36

4.19

4.06

4.10

4.20

4.06

3.92

3.82

3.78

3.7

3.6(

3.66

3.69



3.70
3.77
3.78
3.76
3.63
3.67
3.77
4.13
4.00
3.88
3.88
3.95
4.43
4.07
3.91
3.82
3.80
3.84
3.86
3.80
3.78
3.72
3.68
3.74
3.76
3.51
3.65
3.69
4.02
4.02



3.89

3.76

3.84

3.78

3.76

3.70

3.71

3.75

3.66

3.99

4.70

5.7

4.85

4.44

4.18

4.15

4.05

3.88

4.14

3.99

3.80

4.56

4.68

4.28

4.14

3.97

3.92

4.22

4.70

4.70



The relation of gage height to discharge wa& known to be affected by ice February 25. It is
probable that there was also backwater effect from ice from January 1 until some time in March.



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Conservation Commission.



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COXSERVATION COMMISSION.



155



Rainfall Studies.
Acting on the suggestions of Mr. John R. Freeman, Consulting Engineer
of the State Water Supply Commission in 1907, experiments on comparative
results of three old types of rain gages — Smithsonian, Fueries and DeWitt
conical gage — were conducted at Ithaca under the direction of Mr. Wilford
M. Wilson, section director of the United States Weather Bureau. One each
of these gages was placed on the ground and one at an elevation of ten feet
above the ground. Daily observations were taken at each of these gages and
at a standard United States Weather Bureau gage located in the immediate
vicinity. The experiments were carried through three open seasons. The
results are published in the following tables, which have not been published
in full heretofore. The records tend to indicate that the percentage of error
due to the use of different types of gages is very slight and that data gathered
from any one of these gages would be comparable with those obtained by the
standard Weatlier Bureau gage now in use. Doubtless, the errors due to
improper location and irregular methods of observation were far greater
than by use of the different types of gages.



Summary of re^uUs 0/ experimenU with different typea of Tain-gage*

in inches.


Monthly recorded precipitation


MONTH.


Gage
No. 1.


Gage
No. 2.


Gago
No. 3.


Gage
No. 4.


Gage
No. 5.


Gage
No. 6.


Gage

No. 7.


1938.
May


•4.56

•1.33

•5.02

3.69

1.60

1.68

.97


5.13
1.82
4.81
3.62
1.53
1.67
.90


5.36
1.74
4.80
3.66
1.53
1.65
.91


4.80
1.67
4.77
3.42
1.48
1.76
.85


6.21
1.85
4.94
3.82
1.53
1.80
.93


6.37
1.81
4.87
3.82
1.56
1.64
.90


4.71


June


1.58


July


4.60


Auio.ift


3.48


September


1.36


October


1.61


November


.79






ToUl


18.84


19.48


19.66


18.75


20.08


19.97


18.03






Percentage of No. 1


100.0


103.4


104.4


99.5


106.6


106.0


96.7


1909.
April


3.48
2.39
4.14
1.70
1.72
2.96
2.29


3.36
2.39
4.14
1.73
1.76
2.97
2.33


3.67
2.37
3.97

i.e6

1.70
2.96
2.34


3.13
2.19
4.04
1.63
1.75
3.09
2.33


3.55
2.50
4.27
1.82
1.78
3.11
2.37


3.84
2.51
4.08
1.71
1.70
2.90
2.43


3.27


May


2.36


June


4.03


July


1.61


August


1.65


September


3.03


October


2.36






Total


18.68


18.68


18.67


18.16


19.40


19.17


18.20






Percentage of No. 1


100.0


100.0


99.9


97.2


103.9


102.6


97.4


1910.
April


3.90
4.34
1.24
1.64
2.48
4.76
2.38


3.93
4.31
1.20
1.66
2.34
4.64
2.03


3.99
4.34
1.21
1.72
2.41
4.87
2.32


3.61
4.22
1.15
1.48
2.28
4.65
2.28


3.94
4.53
1.35
1.73
2.43
4.96
2.20


4.07
4.57
1.24
1.72
2.48
5.50
2.23


8.67


N(ay


4.35


June


1.28


July


1.65


August


2.26


September


4.78


October


2.17






Total


20.74


20.11


20.86


19.67


21.14


21.81


20.16








100.0


97.0


100.6


94.8


101.9


106.2


97.2



Total inches I

Percentage of No. l|



68.26 I
100.0 I



FOR THE SERIES.
58.27 I 69.18 I 56.68
100.0 I 101.6 I 97.1



60.62
104.1



60.96
104.6



66.39
96.8



• May, June. July. 1908, interpolated from gage at Weather Bureau office by aeries of totals
ratioe. No. 1 i« a U. S. Weather Bureau standard gage. No. 2 is a Smithsonian gage, on

the ground. No. 3 is a Fuertes gajge, on the ground. No. 4 is a DeWitt conical gage, on

the ground. No. 6 ia a Smithsonian gage, 10 feet above the ground. No. 6 is a Fuertes

gage, 10 feet above the ground. No. 7 is a DeWitt conical gage, 10 feet above the ground.



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156



First Annual Rbpoet of the



Recorded precipitation at the State of New York Conservation Commistion rain/all observaHon
stations, in the Adirondack Region, for the years 1910 and 1911.





Forked TjAirE.(b)


Kebpawa.(c)


MORBHOUSEVILUB.


NOBTH CbBBK.


MONTH.


Rain or
melted
snow.


Measured

depth
of snow.


Rain or
melted
(now.


Measured

depth
of snow.


Rain or
melted
snow.


Meabured

depth

of snow.


Rain or
melted
&now.


depth
of snow.


1910.
January


Inches.
3.79
6.21
2.43
2.87
6.03
3.30
3.23
3.87
3.60
3.91
2.63
4.(5


Inches.

3G.25

45.50

11.50

4.25

"■3.06
25.13
34.00


Inches.
3.80
8.24
2.17
2.37
5.43
4.62
3.24
5.21
3.72
4.87
3.34
5.04


Inches.

39.00

57.75

9.50

2.00

**4*.36
27.50
55.20


Inches.
3.80
5.05
1.08
3.50
5.44
3.77
6.40
6.02
6.45
3.65
3.21
2.07


Inches.

25.00

52.00

2.50

1.00

* "2.66
27.00
27.50


Inches.
5.73
5.35
0.78
3.56
3.53
2.71
1.99
4.74
4.11
1.67
1.87
1.98


Inches.
22.60


February


33 50


March


0.50


April




l^Iay




June




July




August




September

October




November


6.00


December


10.00






Year


45.92


153,63


52.05


195.25


50.44


137.00


38.02


72 50






1911.
January.


2.88
4.06
7.22
1.70
3.55
5.03
2.80
4.37
4.74
4.27
6.27
4.96


16.75

39.00

47.75

6.75

1.26

33.25
12.10


3.92
3.75
5.49
2.48
5.25
5.12
2.79
3.00
3.78
4.29
6.43
4.14


32.00
39.30
55.50
12.50
2.50

""9!46
47.30
12.60


4.00
3.69
4.90
2.17
3.47
4.45
2.73
4.66
6.05
6.88
5.64
4.89


17.00

54.50

4S.0O

8.60

"*3!66

49.50

6.25


1.53
1.43
2.20
1.06
1.80
2.73
2.74
3.03
3.82
4.14
2.47
3.81


5.00


FebruMy


12.60


March


15.60


April


1.60


M&y




June




July




August




September

October




November


(a)


December


4.00






Year


51.85


158.60


50.44


211.00


52.53


186.75


30.76


*38.50








* Record incomplete.

(a) No snow record given for November, 1911.
(6) Also published as Raquette Lake, in previous reports,
able at this station since November, 1892.
(c) Also published as Nehasane, in previous reports.



Privately taken records are avail-



Digitized by



Google



CONSERVATIOBT COMMISSION.



157



Recorded precipitation at the State of New York Conservation Commiaaion rainfall observation stations,
in the Adirondack Region, for the years 1910 and 1911.





Old Foroe.


Potsdam.


Blue Ridqb.


TUPPBB LAKE.(d)


MONTH.


Rain or
melted
snow.


Measured

depth
of snow.


Rain or
melted
snow.


Measured

depth
of snow.


Rain or
melte<i
snow.


Measured

depth
of snow.


Rain or
melted
snow.


Measured

depth
of snow.


1910.
January


Inches.
5.32
5.84
1.00
2.31
6.51
3.00
5.16
6.60
3.48
3.96
3.66
4.51


Inches.

38.60

51.40

7.20

0.75

*'24!66
42.80


Inches.
2.84
3.56
0.82
1.74
3.31
1.14
1.00
3.83
2.21
5.15
2.33
2.99


Inches.

21.00

28.50

5.00

' ■ (a) ■ '
(a)


Inches. \ Inches.
No record


Inches.
2.08
4.79
0.52


Inches.
17.00


February


No record
No record
No record
No record
No record
No record
No record
No record
No record


45.00


March


3 50


April


No record


Nlay


No record


JuDe


No record


July


No record


August


No record


September

October


No record


November


0.97
2.40


ic)
19.25


1.92


13.00


December


2.25


12.25






Year


51.35


164.75


30.92


♦54.50


*3.43


♦19.25


♦11.56


90.75






1911.
January


4.12
3.56
4.43
1.33
3.17
7.35
3.01
3.75
3.76
3.63
6.54
0.88


24.40

45.10

39.20

4.50

"iiso

43.50
8.20


1.71
4.02
3.83
1.94
1.34
4.84
3.33
4.26
4.44
2.84
3.37
3.05


(a)
7.75
10. CO

'*6!25
4.00


1.85

2.12

1.54

1.24

1.75

3.85

2.06

2.63

3.50

4.48

(6)

(6)


13.25

22.00

15.50

3.00

lb)


2.28
2.30
2.73
0.73
4.04
4.73
2.05
2.38
2.49
3.10
2.62
3.50


7.00


Febniary


8.00


March


18.00


April


(c)


May


3.00


June




July




August




September

October


*'2!66


November


9.75


December


1.00






Year


45.53


166.20


38.97


*2S.OO


♦25.02


♦53.75


32.95


48.75







♦ Record incomplete.

(a) No snow record given for No\'«mber or December, 1910, or January, 1911.
(6) Discontinued November 1, 1911.
(c) Record not given.

id) January, February, and March record taken at Faust. Station re-esiabliahed in November
1910, at Tupper Lake village.



Digitized by



Google



158



First Annual Report of the



Recorded predpiiaUon at the State of New York Coneervation Commiesion rainfall obeervatioH
atationt, in the Adirondack Region^ for the yeare 1910 and 1911.



MONTH.



HOBSCSHOC.



Rain



melted
snow.



Measured

depth
of snow.



Knowelhurst.



Rain



melted
snow.



Measured

depth
of bnow.



NOSTHVIIXE.



^^ [Measured
meTted! ^^^^^



snow. I



of snow.



Wakelt Dam.



Rain



melted
snow.



Measured

depth
of snow.



1910.
September. .

October

November. . .
December. . .

Year...

1911.

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September. .

October

November. . ,
December. . .

Year...



Inches. Inches.
No record
No record

(a)2.18 (a)
3.62 35.50



♦5.80



Inches. Inches.
No record
No record
(c)2.00 10.12

2.95 13.50



♦35.50



♦4.95



12.50

15.50

24.50

3.50

2.00



1.52
1.43
1.65
1.07
5.63
4.53

2.7.

3.051

4.23
5.13
3.40
4.81



39.22



3.50
27.00
17.75



2.23
2.32
2.29
1.20
3.24
4.10
2.20
2.66
4.31
5.95
2.66
3.23



106.25



36.39



Inches.

(6)6.11
1.42
2.13
2.61



♦23.62| ♦12.27



8.25
25.00
17.75

8.75



I



5.00
5.75
5.00



75.50



2.45
1.80
3.39
1.74
2.29
4.63
3.23
5.05
6.74
6.95
6.87
2.29



46.43



Inches.



6.8C
9.60



Inches. Inches,

No record

No record

No record



(rf)2.65,



27.00



♦15.40



♦2.651 ^27. CO



9.00
15.50
25.25

4.50



3.08, 20.80
2.90| 3.75

No record(e)

No record

No record

No record
W1.77



5.00
6.00



4.35

3.60

4.12

No record (/)
No record (/)



64.25



♦19.82 ♦24.55



♦ Record incomplete. (a) Established November 4, 1910. (6) Record b^an Sep-

ember 1, 1910. (c) Established November 2. 1910. (d) Established December 11. 1910.

e) No record March 1 to July 15. 1911. (/) No record November 1 to December 31, 1911.

Recorded precipitation at the State of New York Consertation Commission rainfall observation
stations, in the Adirondack Region, for the years 1910 and 1911.





WAN-


EKENA.


WAHDfi


Creek.


W


BLUB.


Alt mab.


MONTH.


Rain

or
melted
fnow.


Measured

depth
of snow.


Rain

or

melted

snow.


Measured

depth
of snow.


Rain

or

melted

snow.


Measured

depth
of soow.



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