Copyright
Newark (N.J.).

Records of the town of Newark, New Jersey, from its settlement in 1666, to its incorporation as a city in 1836 online

. (page 1 of 31)
Online LibraryNewark (N.J.)Records of the town of Newark, New Jersey, from its settlement in 1666, to its incorporation as a city in 1836 → online text (page 1 of 31)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


^^



B



Santa Barbara



^-J




° JO AJiViian 3H1 o.



2 sr - T'^ »



o AJ.lSa3MNn 3H1 •»



THE UNIVERSITY o



ii£



S==B



SANTA SARBaRA



THE IIBRARY OF a



CP



— ES-



n



viNiiojnvD io



o wavaava vinvs o



9



5f>



o AllSaSAINO 3Hi o



V!JV88V8 VXNVS o



a



5f\



o AilSajAINfl 3H1



THE LIBRARY OF o







^S



o



VINSOJIIVD JO



o THE UNIVERSITY o



O
<



o SANTA BARBARA "



VHVailVB VINVS o



a



SS



o AllS»3AINn 3Hi o



O OF CAIIFORNIA o



W



3-t



ii



JO Aiiviian 3Hi



THE UNIVERSITY o




° SANTA BARBARA



o THE UNIVERSITY o






o OF CAIIFORNIA o



^


^


p


3


<d


n



o VUVBJjya ViNVS e



a



3f\



xllSJJMNn 3Hi o



\



THE UNIVERSITY o




" SANTA (ARBARA



o THE IIBRARY OF o











r)



/ \



o viNaojnvD JO •>



o vavauva vinvs o



9



I



3^



o AllSaSAINn 3H1 o




<

z
o

<

o



OF CALIFORNIA



U



eQ



3^



o THE UNIVERSITY o





<

I



o 5ANIA BARBARA °



\



vavsMva vinvs o



5



o UIS>l3AINn 3Hi



e VDVSKVfl VINVS o



/



<
Z

o

<

o



o AilSK3AINn 3H1 O



\




iW i MTi ' i Oi tWIWWM^cq



[nr iiiiMroMiiiii .




COLLECTIONS



NEIY JEESET



r



HISTOEICAL SOCIETY.



VOLUME VI.



NEWARK, K J.

PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY
1864.



OFFICERS

OF THE

NEAV JERSEY HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

ELECTED 1SG4.



JOSEPH C. HORNBLOWER, LL. D., President.
Hon. JAMES PARKER, 1st Vice Pkesident.
Hon. RICHARD S. FIELD, 2d Vice President.
Hon. HENRY W. GREEN, 3d Vice President.
WILLIAM A. WHITEHEAD, Corresponding Secretary.
DAVID A. HAYES, Recording Secretary.
SAMUEL H. CONGAR, Librarian.
SOLOMON ALOFSEN, Treasurer.



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
SAMUEL H. PENNINGTON, M.D.,
Rev. HENRY BEERS SHERMAN,
Hon. CHARLES S. OLDEN,
Rev. RAVAUD K. RODGERS, D. D.,
N. NORRIS HALSTED, Esq.,
Rev. SAMUEL M. HAMMILL,
LYNDON A. SMITH, M. D.



COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS.
RICHARD S. FIELD,
WILLIAIVI A. WHITEHEAD,
HENRY W. GREEN,
SAMUEL H. PENNINGTON.
Rev. JOHN HALL.



^5



te




e^



\A MAP of the Town of NEW-ARRin the State of NEW-JERSEY Published iu latVS




RECORDS



TOWN OF NEWARK,



NEW JERSEY,



FROM ITS SETTLEMENT IN 1G6G, TO ITS INCORPOEATION
AS A CITY IN 1836.



NEWARK, N. J. :

PRINTED FOR TUE NEW JERSEY UISTORICAL SOCIETY,

AT TUE DAILY ADVERTISER OFFICE.

186-i.



bAWAA 13/



F



INTRODUCTION.

Early in the month of May, 1666, a few small vessels
entered the Passaic Eiver and steered their course towards the
uplands that loomed in the distance towards the west. The
low meadows, through which the river winds its way to its
confluence with the Ilackensack, must have possessed then, as
now, little that was picturesque or attractive, although those
on board the vessels referred to may have estimated the
"plains of good Hay of 50 acres of Ground, with hardly one
tree to be seen upon the whole Spot — and several Places so,"
as highly as did the early settlers elsewhere in New Jersey,
who pointedly alluded to them as among the natural objects
that wooed them hither. But the higher land beyond, to
which the voyagers were destined, then lying in all its orig-
inal beauty, varied with hill and dale, plain and forest, must
have presented so many unmistakable advantages for the loca-
tion of a town, that it is not remarkable they should have
looked towards it with bright anticipations ; although we
cannot reasonably suppose that the most sanguine among
them, when their thoughts rested upon the probabilities of the
future, ever fancied results so great as have flowed from the
settlement they were about to make — for these vessels bore to
New Jersey the pioneers of those who founded Newark.

Since then, while Time has been unrolling his eventful
scroll of nearly two hundred years, the successors of the first-
comers have diligently labored to cover the site selected for
their " town upon the Passaic River " with all the utilitarian
adjuncts and appliances wliich the world's progress has ren-



VI INTRODUCTION.

derecl essential to the comfort and happiness, physically and
mentally, of a population of 80,000 souls. Success has
crowned their labors, and the New Jersey Historical Society
present in this volume, the official record of the public meas-
ures by which the first adventurous spirits and those who
came after them, secured good order, peace and prosperity
from the settlement of the town until its incorporation as a
City in 1836 ; confident that the duty thus performed cannot
but prove serviceable to the people of the State through all
time.

In the month of August, 1665, Philip Carteret — the
commissioned governor of his brother Sir George Carteret
and Lord John Berkley, the first proprietors of New Jersey
under the grant from the Duke of York^ — arrived in the
Province on board the " Ship Philip," bringing with him
" about thirty people," who, with four families who had arrived
a short time j)reviously, formed the nucleus of the settlement
at Elizabethtown. Immediately after his arrival, the governor
despatched messengers into New England to publish "the Con-
cessions," so called, of the Lords Proprietors — being the terms
upon which settlers would be admitted — and to invite emi-
grants to the rich and virgin soil of New Jersey.

The prppositions of the governor appear to have received
immediate attention from the people of Milford, Connecticut,
and Egbert Treat, a prominent man among them, and sub ■
sequently governor of that province, was delegated, in conjunc-
tion with others from adjoining plantations, to visit New Jersey
and examine into its actual and prospective advantages. Their
first intention was to settle on the Delaware river, near the
present site of Burlington, but not being favorably impressed
with that location they returned to Elizabethtown, and were
induced by Gov. Carteret to select lands lying nortli of that
place. Some negotiations had already taken place with the
aboriginal owners looking to the acquisition of the tract, and



INTRODUCTION. VI 1

the governor furnished Mr. Treat with a letter to their chiefs,
requesting them to perfect the sale directly to him.

These arrangements must have been made in the autumn of

1665, but no interview with the Indians seems to have taken
place at that time. The following Spring, as we have seen,
the vessels bearing the first company of settlers, arrived in the
Passaic. "But,'' said Mr. Treat, twenty-three years thereafter,
" no sooner was the company present got on the Place and
landed some of their goods, than I with some others was by
some of tlie Ilackensack Indians warned off' the Ground, and
[they] seemed troubled and angry that we landed any of our
goods there, tho' first we told them we had the governor's
order ; but they replied the land was theirs, and it was unpur-
chased ; and therefore we put our Goods on board the vessels
again and acquainted the Governor with the matter."* This
conference with the governor, and subsequent negotiations
with the Indians, led to the purchase and quiet possession of
the lands ; although in after years a disinclination on the part
of many of the settlers to obtain from the Proprietors the
confirmation of their titles by Patents for the property, was
the occasion of many disorderly acts and harrassing legal
proceedings.

It was while these preliminary measures were being taken
that the meeting was held, either on board of one of their
vessels, or on the land "near to Elizabethtown," on 21st May^

1666, the result of which may be seen in the opening docu-
ment of the records, providing for the common occupancy of
the new tract by the people from Milford, Guilford and Brand-
ford, should the latter so determine before the ensuing Novem-
ber. It is thought that the first party consisted of about thirty
fimilies, but it is probable that only a few remained on the
ground the first summer.

On the 30th October of the same year, 1666, the inhabitants

* EliKabethtown Bill in C'haucery, ]). IIS.



VIU INTRODUCTION".

of Brandforcl, previous to embarking, formally acceded to the
propositions for a common interest in tlie new " Town upon
Passaic River," and those already on the ground subsequently
joined in committing themselves to the "Fundamental agree-
ments," which are on the second and subsequent pages of the
book.

As yet the name of the new settlement does not appear in
any of the documents, but it seems from " Scot's Model of the
Government of East Jersey" (p. 274) that it was probably at
first known as " J/^^orf?;" but on the arrival of the people of
Brandford, bringing with them their Church organization, such
pre-eminence in the councils of the new settlement was secured,
that the name of Milford was dropped and that of Newark
conferred upon the town, in honor of the Rev. Abraham Pier-
son, their pastor, who had officiated, or been ordained, at New-
ark, in England.

To Robert Treat, the first Recorder or Town Clerk, we are
probably indebted for the preservation of the documents re-
lating to the settlement from its commencement until 1672,
when he returned to Connecticut; and the Treasurer, as
ordered by the Town in 1669, provided a Book, which is
still extant, in which Mr. Treat commenced the " Record of
Lands." The irregularity observable in entering the proceed-
ings of several Town Meetings in the Town Book is probably
attributable to the inadvertence of Mr. Treat's successor on
copying his papers.

In 1775, Joseph Hedden, Jun'r, agreed witb the Town to
purchase a Bound Book in folio, and to " transcribe the old
Town Book into the new one," in a legible fair hand. This
volume contains the Minutes of Town Meetings in Newark
from 1667 to 1775, as found in that book, with the exception
of the Meetings from April 12th, 1714, to March 8th, 1714-15,
which are omitted in that transcript. These are from the
original record made by John Cooper, Town Clerk, of which



INTRODUCTION. ix

a few leaves relating to the following year are lost. The Town
Patent of 1713, and also the Survey given in the Appendix,
are printed as recorded by him.

From 1775 to 1832 we have the books as written up by the
several Town Clerks, and it has been thought proper to follow
the originals as nearly as possible in orthography, abbrevia-
tions, capitals, and punctuation, except in the transcript from
the old book, in which some additional jiointing seemed neces-
sary. In a few instances, an explanatory word or name has
been introduced in brackets. The first part of the transcript,
or about six pages of this volume, was printed in November,
183-1, in the Newark Daily Advertiser, at which time the first
leaf containing the names of the signers of the fundamental
agreement was mislaid. In the substituted one, the name of
Zachariah Burwell is omitted. It is now restored to its place
as then printed, and as the Indian and the English Proprie-
tors' Deeds, given in the Appendix, have been carefully com-
pared with the record in the office of the Secretary of State,
it is believed they are as near correct as they can be made, as
the depositories of the originals, if they are yet in existence,
are unknown.

This brief introduction to the contents of the volume is all
that has been deemed necessary. It would have been rendered
of more interest to the general reader, and more useful in
some respects, had it been accompanied by notes and exjDlana-
tions, but it was thought more consistent with the objects of
the Society, to place the Eecords in the hands of the people of
the State in their original form, leaving to individual enquirers
the developement of obscure events or contemporaneous mat-
ter. The Genealogical and local information it contains must
render the volume exceedingly acceptable, not only to all in
any way connected now with the city to whose history it par-
ticularly refers, but also to the inhabitants of a large portion
of the State of which Newark is the centre, whose population



X INTEODUCTIOlSr.

and business relations, whose customs and manners, as well as
their political and religious opinions, have been in a great
degree drawn from it, or been framed in accordance with the
influences it may have exerted in the past.

The labor and responsibility of superintending the passage
of the work through the press devolved upon Mr. William
A. Whitehead, the Society's Corresponding Secretary, and
Mr. Samuel H. Congar, its Librarian. The Table of Officers
in the Appendix, and the Index to the Contents were con-
tributed by the former, and to the latter was deputed the diffi-
cult task of reading the proof sheets. It is due to Mr. Congar
to say that by no other person could the duty have been so
faithfully and intelligently performed, his intimate acquaint-
ance with names, localities and circumstances connected with
the town and its history, enabling him to solve doubts and
correct errors, where another person would have been entirely
at fault.

The Map appended to the volume shows the extent of the
town at two periods, being lithographed from a photographi-
cally reduced copy of one published in 1806, from surveys
made by C. Basham, then princij^al of the Newark Academy,
with additional lines, showing the first home-lots of the settlers.



RECORDS OF NEWARK.



1666.

IMPRIMIS, In the Province of New Jersey, near to Elizabeth
Town, and the Town Plotts on Passaic River, made choice of
by friends from Milford and other neighboring plantations, there-
abouts from New England, on the tAventy first day of May, one
thousand six hundred and sixty six, the above mentioned per-
sons had a meeting, together with the agents sent from Guilford
and Brandford to ask on behalf of their undertakers and selves
with reference to a township or allottraents, together with friends
from Milford ; at this meeting it was agreed upon mutually that
the aforesaid persons fi'om Milford, Guilford, and Brandford, to-
gether with their associates, being now accepted of, do make one
township, provided they send word so to be any time between
this and the last of October next ensuing, and according to fun-
damentals mutiially agreed upon, do desire to be of one heart
and consent, through Gods olessing with one hand they may
endeavor the carrying on of spiritual concernments as also civil
and town affairs according to God and a Godly government ;
there to be settled by them and their associates. Tliey then
mutually chose eleven empowered for a committee, viz : Capt.
Robert Treatt, Lieut. Samuel Swain, Mr. Samuel Kitchell, Michal
Tompkins, Mr. Morris, Sergt. Richard Beckly, Richard Harrison,
Thomas Blatchly, Edward Riggs, Stephen Freeman, and Thomas
Johnson for the speedier and better expedition of things then
emergent to be done ; then also six or more, at the least five of
the committee who might remain or be in the place, were mutu-
ally chosen and appointed to order and settle the concernments
and people of the place, till another committee be chosen and
settled ; all of the eleven above said, do in the name and behalf
of the inhabitants there being, or to come, do mutually covenant



2 RECORDS OF NEWARK. [1666.

and agree, that the agents from Guilford and Branford do take
up and hold till June in the year one thousand six hundred and
sixty seven, and fully to dispose of, provided it be possessed,
built upon, and settled according to order, for their associates, for
themselves, theirs and such as they shall send, provided that
these last bring due testimonials to the committee there for the
town, and they approve of them lots, allottments in every divis-
ion equally privileged as far as may be with the rest of the planters
then being or to be ; as also the aforesaid agents, and their asso-
ciates shall be respectively equalized in all privileges Avhatsoever ;
the town or limits thereof according to their fundamentals agreed
upon with the place may at any time afford or be capable for a
mutual benefit. To the true intention and performance hereof,
we whose names are underwritten, do subscribe or sign in the
behalf of the persons above mentioned in the year one thousand
six hundred and sixty six, the twenty fourth of May.

Signed
Copy enrolled per me ) ROBERT TREATT,

Robert Tkeatt, Recorder. \ SAMUEL SWAIN.



October 30th, 1666.

At a meeting Touching the Intended design of many of the
inhabitants of Branford, the following was subscribed :

1st. That none shall be admitted freemen or free Burgesses

within our Town upon Passaick River in the Province
Kxod. 1*^31. of New Jersey, but such Planters as are members of
Deut. iT-15. some or other of the Congregational Churches nor

shall any but such be chosen to Magistracy or to Carry
on any part of Civil Judicature, or as deputies or assistants, to

have power to Vote In establishing Laws, and making
jerem. 3C-21. qj. Repealing them or to any Chief Military Trust

or Office. Nor shall any But such Church Members
have any Vote in any such elections ; The' all others admitted
to Be y)lanters have Right to their proper Inheritance, and do
and shall enjoy all other Civil Liberties and Privileges, Accord-
ing to all Laws, Orders, Grants •vrhich are, or hereafter shall be
made for this Town.

2nd. We shall with Care and Diligence provide for the main-
tenance of the purity of Religion professed in the Congregational
Churches. Whereunto subscribed the Inhabitants from Branford.

Jasper Crane Ebenezer Carafield

AbraPeirson John Ward, Senior

Saml Swaine Ed. Ball

Laurance Ward John Harrison

Thomas Blacthly John Crane



1666.]



Records of Newark.



Samuel Plum
Josiah Ward
Samuel Rose
Tliomas Peirson
John Warde
John Catling
Uicliard Harrison



Thomas Huntington
Delivered Crane
Aaron Blacthly
Richard Laui-ance
John Johnson

Thomas L Lyon



And upon the Reception of their Letters and Subscriptions, the
present Inhabitants in November following declared their con-
sents and readiness to do likewise ; and at a meeting the twenty
fourth of the next June following in 1667, they also subscribed
with their own Hands unto the two fundaniental agreements
Expressed on the other side their names, as follows :

Robert Treatt -u, - ^\ • ^ Robert Daolesh

/^i 1- 1 13 rrancis Jb Lmle tt *n

Obadiah bruen ,„„i; Hauus. Albers

Matthew Caratield Daniel Tichenor Thom. Morris

Samuel Kitchell John Bauldwin, Sen. Hugh Roberts

John Bauldwin, Junr. Eph'm Pennington



Jeremiah Pecke
Michael Tompkins
Stephen Freeman
Henry Lyon
John Browne
John Rogers
Stephen Davis
Edward Rigs
Robert Kitchell

hi!

J X B Brooks

mark

bli

Robert v Lymens



Jona. Tomkins
Geo. Day
Thomas Johnson
John Curtis
Ephram Burwell

his

Robert R Denison

Nathaniel Wheeler
Zachariah Burwell
William Camjie
Joseph Walters



Martin Tichenor
John Browne, Jr
Jona. Seargeant
Azariah Crane
Samuel Lyon
Joseph Riggs
Stephen Bond



Fiiudanientftl
Agieomeiit.



Item, it is fully agreed upon that every Man that comes to be
admitted an Inhabitant with us, shall first produce and
bring a certificate from the Chief of the Place from
whence he comes unless the Town be upon their
Knowledge satisfied in and about the Good Carriage and
Behaviour of them otherwise : then it is agreed upon by a full
Vote of the Town assembled, that all and every Man that comes
to be received . . an Inhabitant in our Town on Passaick
River, shall first subscribe his Name and declare his assent with
the rest of the Town, to all and every one of our fundamental
agreements on the other side recorded and here following
agreed upon, viz : That it is fully and unanimously agreed upon,
as a Condition upon the which every one doth reckon and
hold his Lands and accommodations in the Town, viz : that they
will from Time to Time pay or cause to be paid yearly in their full



■i Records of newark. ' [1666.

Proportions equally, to the Maintainance & allowance agreed upon
for the upholding of the settled Ministry and preaching of the
word in our Town, and that was agreed upon before any Division
of Land was laid out except Home Lotts — and Eighty Pounds
per the year was agreed on and allowed for the present Minister.

Item, it is agreed upon, that in case any shall corae into us or
arise up amongst us that shall willingly or wilfully disturb us in
our Peace and Settlements, and especially that would subvert us
from the true Religion and worship of God, and cannot or will not
keep their opinions to themselves or be reclaimed after due Time
and means of Conviction and reclaiming hath been used ; it is
unanimously agreed upon and Consented unto as a fundamental
Agreement and Order, that all and Persons so ill disposed and
affected shall after Notice giren them from the Town quietly
depart the Place Seasonably, the Town allowing them valuable
Considerations for their Lands or Houses as Indifferent Men shall
price them, or else leave them to make the best of them to any
Man the Town shall approve of

Item, it was ordered and agreed upon, in Case of changes of
Lands or any kind of obligation whatsoever by Gift, Sale, Ex-
change or otherwise that any new Inhabitant shall arrive or come
into Town to inhabit with us ; it is agreed and ordered that he or
they trom Time to Time shall in all Respects subscribe and enter
into the same engagements as his Predecessors or the rest of the
iown have done, before he or they can or shall be accounted

Legal Inhabitants in our Town, or have Title to their

Lands or Possession therein.

Item, it is solemnly consented unto and agreed by all the Plan-
ters & Inhabitants of the Town of Newark from their
Submit to law get^tiing together at first, and again publickly renewed

amongst t O 1 */

i.ursHive'f. as their joint Covenant one with another, that they

will from Time to Time all submit one to another to
be lead, ruled and governed by such Magistrates and Rulers
in the Town, as shall be annually chosen by the Friends from

among themselves, with such orders and Law whilst
tireVro'vincJ" they arc settled here by tliemselves as they had in

the Place from whence they came, under such Penalties
as the Magistrates upon the Nature ot the offence shall determine.
Item, the present Inhabitants of the Place for their better security
& Neighbourhood, desired Liberty to set down and take up their
Lotts in a Quarter together, which Motion of theirs was consented
unto ; and after the Line was run in the Center or Middle Street of
the Town by the Surveyor General, and the several Ranges of
Lotts agreed upon, and the Middle Highways both in the Length

and Breadth of the Town to be Eight Rods wide and the
Highwayn. Rcst four, with a full Power and Liberty to aj^point and

agree upon and set out High ways in the most conveni-



1667.] RECORDS OF NEWARK. 5

ent Places necessary for the publick uses and Benefits of
^8«ttge8. tlie Town, with the like Liberty for Passages for Drains,
Gripes, or Water Courses where they were needful ; yea
though it sliould fall out to be across or within any Mans Lands or
Meadows Avhat and wheresoever for the present untill the Town
shall see Cause to rej^ealthis order : the Intent whereof was not
but that every Particular Person or Persons should huve full
satisfaction otherwise for every such High way or Water Pas
sage that shall be taken from him ; which was consented unto by
the Inhabitants then present that had full Power to order mat-
ters for the Good of the Town.

Item, it was by a full consent agreed upon, that the Neighbour-
hood of Milford and New Haven should take up their
H„me r.„.u Home Lotts and Quartei-s in that Part of the Town
where now they are, and the Neighbours from Bran-
ford and Guilford then present, in Places where now they are ; and
the Neighbours from Milford and New Haven freely gave way
that Captain Robert Treat should chuse his Lotts, and they agreed
amongst themselves to go over and fix the Lotts, which was before
by the whole Cotnmittee agreed upon to be Six acres, according to
their Pattent [pattern] of the Surveyors Line, for the General . .

the Town : only Captain Robert Treat was allowed
^l«n«. to have Eight Acres to his Home Lott ; which

being done, they belonging to Milford Quarter
cast Lotts for tlie Places where they should have their Home
Lotts to settle upon ; and after the Lotts prepared, and how they
should begin and Succeed, the matter was solemnly submitted to
the Lord for his Guidance : and the first Lott next the Captain's
fell to , . . Gregory, upon Considerations that he come with
his Family to build, and inhabit the same about two Years, which



Online LibraryNewark (N.J.)Records of the town of Newark, New Jersey, from its settlement in 1666, to its incorporation as a city in 1836 → online text (page 1 of 31)