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PUBLIC LIBRARY

IT WAYNE &. AtLCN CO.. mo.



QENEALOGY COLLECTION



%



HISTORICAL

ENCYCLOPEDIA

OF

ILLINOIS

EDITED BY

Newton Bateman. LL. D. Paul Selbv, A. M.




AND HISTORY OF



EVANSTON

edited by
Harvey B. Hurd, LL.D. Robert D. Shepfard, U.D.



VOLUME II



ILLUSTRATED.



CHICAGO:

MUNSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY

PUBLISHERS.

1906.



W. M U N S E I^ L ,

J Librarian of Coii^ress



I



436-47S

PREFACB



An analysis of the motives which have induced Evanstonians to join in the fur-
nishing of material for this record of local history would afford evidence, not only of a
feeling of obligation to the past and present, but also to future generations ; and this, it
is but just to say, has been the impelling force in the conception and preparation of this
volume.

Book-making is an expensive undertaking, and the limited sale which a work treat-
ing of a small community would obtain, would inevitably involve heavy financial re-
sponsibilities. The publishers of that excellent work, "The Historical Encyclopedia of
Illinois," have deemed it practicable to produce a special Evanston edition of that
work embracing, as a feature of added interest and value, a supplemental volume
largely devoted to Evanston history, prepared and edited by Evanstonians. The busi-
ness management of the enterprise rests with the publishers who have had a long and
successful experience in the publication of works of this character, and to whom
great credit is due for successfully financing the cost of production and carrying to
a faithful completion this important work.

This history has been written in the belief that it is needed ; that man's immor-
tal instincts revolt at the thought of the good of the past being buried in oblivion —
that the fruitage of lives which have accomplished results, epitomized in the word "his-
tory," should be forgotten — that lessons of faithful doing, accompanied by self-sacri-
fice, zealous faith and daring courage little short of the heroic, should fail of their
highest accomplishment by inspiration and example, because no one has recorded them
— that present and future generations should be deprived of these teachings, examples
and educational forces, simply for the want of a proper and available published record
of many facts now having an existence only in the memory of individuals who cannot
long remain, and whose passing away will place the foundation facts of our history
beyond the reach of those who come after them.

Hence this history, with the imperfections and shortcomings always incident to
human authorship, yet the results of the best thought and intelligent efforts of many
accomplished writers and contributors who have produced, in concise but comprehen-



sive form, a carefully prepared and faithful record of facts and events relating to the
various topics assigned to them. Without attempting to enumerate all of them by name,
I here wish to express my personal obligation to Robert D. Sheppard, D. D., as my
Editorial Associate, and to each author for the faithful and intelligent service ren-
dered in the preparation of this work, as well as the lasting debt of gratitude due
to them from the home-loving and Evanston-loving people of to-day and the future.

The conception that our city's history, together with the memoirs of its founders
and builders, was deserving of record, received its first practical suggestion in the
organization, about seven years ago, of the Evanston Historical Society, which is do-
ing such noble work in its chosen field of research and collection of historical material.
To the influence and labors of this association is due, not only the conception of the
need of an authoritative published History of Evanston, but, in a large degree
through the labors and co-operation of its members, the success which has attended
the preparation of such a work. Believing that it will have a permanent value, not
only to citizens of Evanston and Cook County, but to many others interested in State
history, I herewith bring my labors in connection with the volume to a close, with
thanks to my associates and co-laborers and hope that it will meet the expectation of its
patrons and have for them an interest corresponding with the labor required in its
preparation.

^ - " /f\ c — ^^^



FOREWORD



The preface to this work, written by the late Hon. Harvey B. Hurd, after the vari-
ous manuscripts furnished by the many contributors were well in hand, quite fully
sets forth the inception of this undertaking and the potent influences leading thereto.
It is self-evident that the preparation of so extended a history of Evanston was a more
formidable task than originally contemplated, and unavoidable delays were experi-
enced incident to receiving the completed manuscripts from some of our friends con-
tributing the same, and still further delays were occasioned by the sending to each
author a copy of the printer's proof of his or her portion of the work. To do this was
thought important in order, first, that each writer might thus have a last opportunity
to correct and make more complete his or her department ; and, second, that each chap-
ter might, by this means, receive any necessary additions extending its scope to a more
recent period.

Credit is due to the publishers for the pecuniary outlay which they necessarily
have borne, and for the great care evidently taken by them in the preparation of the
whole work and in placing it in completed form before its readers.

I have every reason to believe that the various chapters, furnished by about forty
special contributors to the city's history, have been prepared with great care ; that
the completed work will constitute a valued addition to the library of all Evanstonians,
and will be accorded a prominent place in the historical collections of Illinois.






IN DEX



CHAPTER I.
INTRODUCTORY.
The Evanston of 1905 — Seat of Learning and Gem Suburb of a Great Me-
tropolis — Results Accomplished by Fifty Years of Development —
Contrast Between Past and Present — First Township Organization
Under Name of Ridgeville — Evanston Township Organized in 1857
— The Milage Platted in 1854 — Later Changes in Township and
Municipal Organization — Old Name of Ridgevilje Township Re-
sumed in 1903, with Boundaries Identical with City of Evanston —
Garrett Biblical Institute Precedes the University — City Govern-
ment Organized in 1892 — Early Evanston Homes and Their Occu-
pants — Advent of the First Railroad — Career of Dr. John Evans 15-20

CHAPTER II.
OUR INDIAN PREDECESSORS.
The First Evanstonians — Indian Relics — Stone Implements and What
They Indicate— Early Explorers— Joliet, Marquette, La Salle and
Tonty — Early Indian Tribes — The Iroquois, Illinois, and Pottawat-
omies — Ouilmette Reservation and Family — The Fort Dearborn
Massacre — Home of the Ouilmettes — Treaty of Prairie du Chien
— Indian Trails and Trees on the North Shore — Aboriginal Camps
and Milages — Indian Mounds and Graves — Reminiscences of Ear-
ly Settlers — Important Treaties — An Englishman's Story of
the Treaty of Chicago in 1833 21-52

CHAPTER III.
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY.
The Beginning — First Meeting of the Founders of the University — Prime
Movers in the Enterprise — Resolutions and Draft of Charter Adopt-
ed—The Legislature Acts— First Board of Trustees— Organization
Effected— Search for a Site for the New Institution— The Present
Location at Evanston Finally Selected — Acquisition of Lands — Val-
uable Real Estate in Chicago Retained as Part of the Endowment-
Election of a President is Decided Upon 53-59



CHAPTER lY.
INSTITUTION IN DE\'ELOPiMENT.
Dr. Clark T. Hinman Chosen First President — Sale of Scholarships Begins
— Career of the New President Cut Short by His Early Death —
Town Site Platted and Named in Honor of Dr. John Evans — Gar-
rett Biblical Institute Established — First Corps of College Profes-
sors Elected — University Assets in 1854 — Four-Mile Anti-Liquor
District Established by Act of the Legislature — Teaching Force of
the University Increased — Dr. Evans' Land Policy — The Institution
is Opened for Pupils — Some of the First Students 61-66

CHAPTER V.
CONDITIONS IN 1856-1860.
Trustees Meet in First University Building — Dr. R. S. Foster Elected the
Second President — The Faculty Enlarged — Absorption of Rush
Aledical College Projected — Competitors Enter the Field — Professor
Jones' "Fern. Sem." — President Foster X'isits the University, but
Obtains a Year's Leave of Absence — He Joins the Faculty in 1857
— The Assets of the Institution Increased to Nearly $316,000 — Re-
inforcement of the Faculty — First Graduated Class in 1859 — Dr.
Foster Resigns the Presidency and is succeeded by Dr. E. O.
Haven 67-72

CHAPTER VI.
PERIODS OF DEPRESSION AND GROWTH.
Changes of Faculty — Charter Amendments Adopted — Effect of the Civil
War on Number of Students — Accessions to the Faculty — Univer-
sity Land Debt is Liquidated — Orrington Lunt Land Donation for
Benefit of Library — University Hall Projected — Accession of Stu-
dents and Teaching Force Following the War Period — New Prizes
Serve as a Stimulus to the Students — First Honorary Degrees Con-
ferred — Corporate Name is Changed — Professors' Salaries Increased
and Erection of University Hall Prosecuted — A "Gold Brick" Dona-
tion — Encouraging Financial Development — Death of Acting Pres-
ident Noyes 73-?^

CHAPTER VII.

A DECADE OF CHANGE.

Chicago Medical College Merged in the University — A "Town and Gown"

Contest — Dr. Erastus O. Haven Enters Upon the Presidency —

Women Admitted to College Classes — ■ Addition to the Faculty — •

Greenleaf Librarv — Advent of Collef^e T'^urnali-m — .\nother



Change in the Presidency — Dr. Haven Succeeded by Dr. C. H.
Fowler — Increase of Students and Growth of College Catalogue —
Co-Education Established and Miss Frances E. Willard Joins the
Faculty — Gymnasium Erected — Financial Embarrassment — Presi-
dent Fowler Retires and Dr. Oliver H. Alarcy Becomes Acting
President^The University Wins on the Taxation Issue — Life-Sav-
ing Station Established 79-85

CHAPTER VIII.
AN ERA OF PROGRESS.
Dr. Joseph Cummings, the Nestor of Eastern Educators, Succeeds to the
Presidency — Indebtedness Wiped Out and the Institution Enters
Upon a More Prosperous Era — Munificent Gifts and Improvements
— Changes in Faculty and Trustees— Illinois School of Pharmacy
and School of Dentistry Added — Celebration of University Day
Inaugurated— President Cummings' Successful Career and His
Taking Away — Dr. Marcy Temporarily Assumes the Position of
Acting President — Dr. Henry Wade Rogers Succeeds to the Pres-
idency in 1890 — Other Changes and Improvements — Department
Schools and Colleges — Real Estate Investments 87-91

CHAPTER IX.
SOME SIDE ISSUES.
Athletics and College Societies — Women's Educational Associations —
"The Settlement" and the University Guild — Dr. Rogers Resigns
the Presidency in 1899, and is Succeeded by Dr. Bonbright as Act-
ing President — Long List of Notable Friends of the University
Who Have Passed Awa} — Tribute to Their Memory — Dr. Edmund
J. James' Two Years' Administration — He is Succeeded by Dr.
Abram W. Harris 93-98

CHAPTER X.
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL.
Object of its Organization — Early Conditions and Methods of Medical
Education — Dr. N. S. Davis Begins the Agitation for Graded In-
struction and Longer Courses — Lind University Established in 1859
— Institution Affiliated with Northwestern University in 1869 —
Changes of Name and Location — Growth, Present Conditions and
Methods of Instruction — South Side Free Dispensary — Hospitals:
Mercy, Wesley, St. Luke's and Provident — Clinical and other Ad-
vantages — Influence of the Founders of the School Shown in its
Growth and Character of its Graduates — Positions Won by its
Alumni 99-I03



CHAPTER XL
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL.
Historical Sketch — -Law School Founded in 1859 — Hon. Thomas Hoyne
Leads in Endowment of First Chair— Only Three Law Schools then
West of the Alleghenies — First Faculty — Notable Faculty Members
of Later Date — Union College of Law Result of Combination of
Northwestern and University of Chicago — First Board of Mana-
gers and First Faculty Under New Arrangement — • LTniversity of
Chicago Suspended in 1866 — Northwestern Assumes Control of
Law School in 1891 — Subsequent History — Changes in Require-
ments of Supreme Court as to Law Course — Present Home and
Conditions — Acquisition of Gary Collection — Present Outlook 105-108

CHAPTER XII.
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY DENTAL SCHOOL.
Dental Education as a Distinct Branch of Professional Training — First
Dental School Established in 1839 — Development Due to State Leg-
islation — Dental Schools in Eastern Cities — Chicago College of Den-
tal Surgery Graduates its First Class in 1885 — Dr. Thomas L. Gil-
mer Leads Movement for Establishment of Northwestern LTniver-
sity Dental School- — Consolidation with American College of Dental
Surgery — Dr. Theodore Menges Chief Promoter — First Faculty of
the Consolidated School — Present Condition — Finds a Permanent
Home in Historic Tremont House Building 109-115

CHAPTER XIII.
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF PHARMACY.
Founding of School of Pharmacy in Connection with Northwestern Uni-
versity — Promoters of the Movement — School Opened in 1886 — Its
Extensive Equipment — Instruction Rooms and Laboratories — Num-
ber of Students in Eighteen Years — They are Drawn from Practi-
cally All the States and Territories^Present Location of the Institu-
tion — Library and \'alue of Equipment — Annual Expenditures —
Faculty of 1905 1 17-1 18

CHAPTER XR-.
THE WOMAN'S MEDICAL SCHOOL.
Demand for Higher Education for Women — First Steps in Founding
Woman's Medical College — Promoters of Movement in Chicago —
"Woman's Hospital Medical College" Founded in 1870 — First Fac-
ulty — Story of "The Little Barn" — Career of Dr. Mary H. Thomp-
son, Drs. Bvford, Dvas and Others — Some Notable Graduates — A



Period of Struggle — Institution Reorganized in 1877 as Woman's
Medical College — President By ford Dies in 1890 — Institution Affil-
iated with Northwestern University — • Is Discontinued in 1902 —
Graduates in Foreign Missionary and Other Fields — Alumnje Or-



I 19-129



CHAPTER XV.
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC.
Sphere of Music in Higher Institutions — Its Influence on Character and as
the Hand-Maid of Religion — Higher Aspects of the Art — Its
Growth in the Universities — History of its Connection with Ev-
anston Educational Institutions — Northwestern Female College
Merged into Evanston College for Ladies in 1871 — The Latter Be-
comes a Part of Northwestern University in 1873 — Struggles,
Changes and Growth of Later Years — Some Notable Teachers — In-
crease in Roll of Pupils — Need of Ampler Buildings — Music Fes-
tivals 131-148

CHAPTER XVI.
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ORATORY.
Professor Cumnock as Founder — Growth and Standing Due to his Labors
— First Class Graduated in 1881 — Its Aim and Branches Taught —
Building Erected — Is Dedicated in 1895 — Location and Description
— Advantage over Private Institutions of Like Character — Training
in English Composition and Rhetoric — Enrollment According to
Last Catalogue — Promising Outlook for the Future 149-150

CHAPTER XVII.
UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS.
Evanston Life-Saving Crew — Tragic Fate of the Steamer "Lady Elgin"
Leads to Its Organization — Its First Members — List of Notable
Rescues — Service Rewarded by Issue of Medals to the Crew by Act
of Congress — Baseball History — The Old Gymnasium — Tug of War
Teams — Football Records — Athletic Field and Grand Stand — Track
Athletics and Tennis Games 151-162

CHAPTER XVIII.
GARRETT BIBLICAL INSTITUTE.
Historical Sketch — Origin of the Institute Due to the Munificence of Mrs.
Augustus Garrett — Building Erected in 1855 and Institute Opened
in 1856 — Additional Buildings Erected in 1867 and 1887 — The Re-



publican "Wigwam" of i860 Becomes the Property of the Institute
— Reverse Caused by Fire of 1871 — Disaster Averted in 1897 —
Growth of the Institute — Personal History — Large Number of the
Alumni in Missionary and Other Fields — Alembers of the Faculty
and Board of Trustees 163-167

CHAPTER XIX.
EARLY DRAINAGE.
First Steps in Organization of a Drainage System for Evanston — Natural
Conditions — Early Legislation of 1855 — The Late Harvey B. Hurd
Member and Secretary of First Board of Commissioners — Construc-
tion of Ditches Begun — Drainage Amendment of the Present Con-
stitution Adopted in 1878 — Extension of the System — Local Opposi-
tion — A Tax Collector's Experience — A Flood Converts the Oppo-
nents of the System 169-172

CHAPTER XX.
PUBLIC UTILITIES.
Area and Topography of the City of Evanston — The Drainage Problem —
A Period of Evolution — Municipal Development — Electric Light
System Installed — Street Improvements — Parks and Boulevards —
The Transportation Problem — Steam and Inter-urban Railway
Connections — Heating System — Telephone Service — Evanston as a
Residence City 173-180

CHAPTER XXI.
WATER SUPPLY— LIGHTING SYSTEM.
Conditions Prior to 1874 — First Movement to Secure an Adequate Water
Supply — Charles J. Gilbert Its Leader — Holly Engines Installed in
1874 and 1886 — Annexation of South Evanston — The Consolidated
City Incorporated in 1892 — Increase in the Water Supply in 1897 —
Source of Supply — Revenue — Extent of System — Street Lighting
by Gas Introduced in 1871 — Introduction of Electric Lighting in
1890 — Installation of the Evanston-Yaryan Light and Heating Sys-
tem 181-185

CHAPTER XXII.
EDUCATION.
The Public Schools of Evanston — Day of the Log School House — Early
Schools and their Teachers — Sacrifice of School Lands — Present
School Buildings — Township High School — Preliminary History —



School Opened in September, 1883— Prof. Boltwood its First Princi-
pal — Present School Building — Manual Training — A Moot Presi-
dential Election — Drawing Department — List of Trustees 187-200



CHAPTER XXIII.
EVANSTON AUTHORS.
Establishment of N'orthwestern University the Beginning of Evanston Lit-
erary Life — Effect of the Gathering of Professors, Instructors and
Students— Growth of Literary Activity — Some Notable Authors —
Edward Eggleston and Frances E. Willard Begin their Careers in
Evanston — Miss Willard's "A Classic Town" — Miss Simpson's Cata-
logue of Evanston Authors for 1900 — Growth of Nine Years — Al-
phabetical List of Authors with Bibliography and Biographical Rec-
ords '. 201-215

CHAPTER XXIV.
LIBRARIES— PUBLIC AND PRIVATE.

Evanston's First Librar) Major Mulford the "Gentleman Pioneer of

Evanston" — Some Specimens of His Library — First Sunday School
Library — Private Libraries of Today — Unique Collection of Curios
— History of Evanston Free Public Library — Edward Eggleston
Prime Mover in Its Founding — First Step in Organization — Later
History and Growth — Roll of Librarians and Other Officers — Cata-
loguing and Library Extension — Internal Management and Condi-
tions — Site for a Library Building Secured in 1904 — Carnegie Gift
of $50,000 — Erection of New Building Commenced in June, 1906. . . 217-231

CHAPTER XXV.
UNIVERSITY LIBRARY.
First Step in the Organization of a University Library — President Foster's
Gift — Advance of Fifty Years — The Greenleaf Library — University
Library is Made a Depository for Government Publications — Re-
cent Notable Donations — Orrington Lunt Library Building is Dedi-
cated in 1894 — The Orrington Lunt Library Fund — Internal Ad-
ministration — List of Those Who Have Served as Librarians —
Libraries of Garrett Biblical Institute and Professional Schools.... 233-236

CHAPTER XXVI.
EVANSTON NEWSPAPERS.
The Newspaper as a Necessity — Introduction and Growth of Local Jour-
nals — The "Suburban Idea," The "Evanston Inde.x" and Other



Early Papers — Story of the "Evanston Press" — Advent of the
Daily— Effect of the Chicago Printer's Strike of 1898 — Tem:.er-
ance Organ — College Journals — A "Frat." and "Barb." Advertising
Contest — Quarterly and Monthly Publications — High Standard of
Evanston Journalism 237-243

CHAPTER XXVH.
MEDICAL HISTORY.
(regular.)
Primitive Sanitary Conditions — Freedom from Malarial Diseases — Some
Old-Time Physicians — Sketch of Dr. John Evans — Drs. Lud-
1am, Weller and Blaney — Dr. N. S. Davis the Nestor of Medical
Education — An Early Drug Store — Sketches of Later Day Phy-
sicians — Drs. Webster, Bannister, Burchmore. Brayton, Bond,
Phillips, Haven, Hemenway, Kaufman, and others — Evanston
Physicians" Club 245-254

CHAPTER XXVIII.
MEDICAL HISTORY.
(homoeopathic.)
First Case of Homoeopathic Treatment in Evanston — Successful Results
— Early Homoeopathic Physicians — Dr. Havvkes First Local Prac-
titioner — He is Followed by Dr. C. D. Fairbanks — Sketch of
Dr. Oscar H. Mann — His Prominence in Local Educational, Of-
ficial and Social Relations — Founding of the Evanston Hospital —
Doctors Marcy. Clapp and Fuller — Roll of the Later Physicians and
Surgeons 255-260

CHAPTER XXIX.

EVANSTON HOSPITAL.
The Evanston Benevolent Society — First Steps in Founding a Hospital
— Organization is Effected in 1891 — First Board of Officers —
Medical Staff — Fund and Building Campaign — Enlargement of
the Institution Projected — Munificent Gift of Mrs. Cable — Other
Donations — The Endowment Reaches $50,000 — Hospital of the
Present and the Future — Internal Arrangement and Official Ad-
ministration — List of Principal Donors — Present Officers 261-274

CHAPTER XXX.
LOCAL MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS.
Evanston as it Existed in 1856 — Primitive Church Music — War Songs
— A Commencement Concert — The Hutchinson Family — Jules



Lumbard — O. H. Merwin Becomes a Choir Leader — Other
Notable Musicians — Evanston's First Musical Club — Some Fa-
mous Teachers and Performers — Thomas Concert Class Organized
— Mrs. Edward Wyman — Musical Department of Evanston Wo-
man's Club — Women's Clubs as a Factor in Musical Training —
Evanston Musical Club — Maennerchor Organized — Programs —
Officers 275-287



CHAPTER XXXI.
EVANSTON BANKS.
History of Evanston Banking Enterprises — Effect of the Chicago Fire —
First Private Bank Established in 1874 — Incorporated as a State
Bank in 1892 — • First Officers of the New Institution — Growth of
Deposits — It Successfully Withstands the Panic of 1893 — Pres-
ent Officers (1906) — A First National Bank Venture — The Panic
of 1893 Results in Disaster — The City National Bank of Evanston
Established in 1900 — First Officers and Leading Stockholders —
Its Prosperous Career — Condition in 1906 289-293



CHAPTER XXXII.

EVANSTON REAL ESTATE.

Primary Geological Conditions — Early Roads — The Indian Trail — A
Period of Growth — "The Path the Calf Made" — Influence of
the LTniversity — Evanston Over-boomed — Effect of the Chicago
Fire — Local Real Estate Rivalries — Notable Residences — The
Transportation Problem — The Park System — Ta.xation — • Ev-
anston Homes — Real Estate Values 295-302



CHAPTER XXXIII.
EVANSTON ARCHITECTURE.
Historic Progress — Influence of the Architect on the City's Growth —
The "Georgian" Style Follows the Log and Grout Houses —
Churches and Private Residences — Advent of the Victorian Gothic
Style — University Hall and Union Park Congregational Church
— Architect G. P. Randall the Designer — Asa Lyons Evanston's,
First Resident Architect — Others who followed him — Descrip-
tion of Some Notable Buildings and their Designers — Public Li-
brarv — Enumeration of Principal Private and Public Buildings.. 3<^3-309



CHAPTER XXXIV.
STREET NOMENCLATURE.
Origin of Street and Avenue Names in Evanston — Village Platted in
1853 and Named for Dr. John Evans — Postoffice Previous-
ly Known as Ridgeville. and Still Earlier as Gross Point — Ev-
anston Postoffice Established in 1855 — Street Names Derived



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