Nicolas Pike.

A new and complete system of arithmetick. Composed for the use of the citizens of the United States online

. (page 14 of 43)
Online LibraryNicolas PikeA new and complete system of arithmetick. Composed for the use of the citizens of the United States → online text (page 14 of 43)
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make ISO at Leghorn : How many at Leghorn are equal to 144 at
Boston ? An^s. M4m.

' 3. If 12lfe at Boston mnke lOlfe at Amsterdam, and lOOfe at Am-
sterdam ISOIfe at Paris: How many at Parrs are equal to SOlfe at
Boston ? Ans. 80ft.

4. If 140 braces at Venice be equal lo 150 braces at Leghorn,
and 7 braces at Leghorn be equal to 4 American yards : How many
American yards are equal to 52|^^ Venetian braces?

Ans. 32 yard**.
^ 5. If 4()ft at Newbury port make 36 at Amsterdam, and 90fe at
Amsterdam ma!?e 116 at Djmtzick : How many pounds at Dant-
zick are equal to 244 at Newburyport ? Ans 283J|ft.

JiRBlTRATION OF EXCHANGES.

By this term is understood how to choose, or determine (he best
way of remitting money from abroad with advantage; which is
performed by conjoined preportion : Thus,



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FELLOWSHIP. loo

1. Suppose a merchant lias effects at AmBterdam to the aiaount
of $3530, which he can remit by way of Lishon at £40 ree« per
dollar, and thence to Boston, at 8s. Id. per milrce (or 1000 ree« :)
Or, hy way of Nantz, at 5| livres per dollar, and thence to Boston
at 6s. Od. per crown ; It is required to arbitrate these exchanges,
that is, to choose that which is most advantageous ?

1 dollar at Amsterdam = 840 rees at (iisbon.
1000 rees at Lisbon ^ 97d. at Boston.

3530 dollars at Amsterdam.

840X97X3530

l OOOxl — = ^^ 198 8s. Bj\6. by way of Lisbon.

1 dollar at Amsterdam == 5f livres at Nantz.
6 livres at Nantz = 80 pence at Boston.

3530 dollars at Amsterdam.

5} X 80x3530

jTTg = iJ1059 by way of Nantz.

Here it may be observed that the difference is £139 83. Bj^tl.
in favogr of remitting by way of {^isbon rather than by Nanlz,
which depends on the course of exchange, at that time ; but the
course may vary so, that^ in a short time by way of Nantz may
be better; hence appears tbe necessity and advantageof an ex-
tensive correspondence, to acquire a thorough knowledge in tbe
courses of exchange, to make this kind of remittance. ?

2. A merchant in Engjand can draw directly for 1000 piastres ih
Leghorn at 50d. sterling per piastre ; but he chooses to remit the
sum to Cadiz at 19 piastres for 7000 maravedies ; thence; to Am-
gterdam at 189d. Flemish for^^SO maravedies ; and thence to Liv-
erpool at 9d. Flemish for 5d. sterling : what is gained by this cir-
cular remittance, and i^hat is the value of a piastre to him ?

Ans. Gam £S8 Hs. sterling nearly.
Value of a piastre 56(i. 3*55qr. sterling.

3. A merchant in New York orders JC500 sterling, doe him at
London at 54d. sterling per dollar, to be sent by the following cir-
cuit ; to Hamburgh a^ 15 marks banco per pound sterling ; thence
to Copenhagen at 100 marks banco for S3 rix dollars ; thence to
Bourdeaux at one rix dollar for 6 francs ; thence to Lisbon at 125
francs for 18 milrees ; and thence to New York at $\\ per milree :
did he gain or lose by this circular remittance, and what was the
arbitrated value of a dollar by this^ remittance ?

Ans. He gained.
Value of a dollar was 69d. sterling nearly.



FELLOWSHIP.

THE Rules of Fellowship are those by which the accompts of
.several merchants or other persons, trading in partnership, are so
adjusted, that each may have his share of. tbe gain, or suiftain his



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156 SINGLE FELLOWSHIP.

share of the lou, in proportion to his share of the joint stock, to-
gether with the time of its continoaoGe in trade.

SINGLE FELLOWSHIP
Is, when the stocks are ^ qiplo^ed for any cefls^io equal time.

As the whole stock is to the whole giain or loss, so is eacIvAMi's
particular stock to his particular share of the gain, or loss.

Proof. Add all the particular shares of the gpain or loss together,
and, if it he right, the sum will be equal to the whole gain or loss.

Examples.

1. Di?ide the nnmber 360 ^ioto four parts, which shall be to
each other, as 3, 4, 5 and s/

(S : 60)

As 3+4+5+6 : 360 :: <l\ j^> Answer.

360 Proof

2. A, B, Ct^nd D companied ; A put in £145; B, £219; C,
£378, and p,£417, with which they gained £569 : What was the
share of each ? £ s. d.

iiru 1 » ^u r. • ri45: 71 3 81 ffff A*s share.
Whole stock. Gam. Vom ^nn tn ->? Wa ii»« j;i»«
As 145+219+378+417: 569::^ 3^3. jg3^ J g^ VWV C's ^itto.

(417 : 204 14 5} ^^jV U's ditto.

£569 — Proof.

3. A, B, C» and D are concerned in a joint stock of $1000; of
which A's part is $150 ; B's $250 ; C's $275, and D's $325. Up-
on the adjiislment of th^ir accompts« they have l^t $337 50^.
What is the loss of each ? Ans. A's loss $50 624c. B's $84
37ic. C's «92 81Jc. and D's $109 68}c.

4. A and B companied ; A out in £45, s^nd took | of the gain ;
What did B put in ? 5—3=2. Then, As 3 : 45 :: 2 : 30 Ans.

5. A, B and C freighted a ship with 68900 feet of boards : A put
in 16520 feet; B 28750; and C the rest; but iqa storro^ (he cap-
tain threw overboard 26450 feet : How moch most each sustain of
the lo5s? Aos. A, 6341| feet. P, H036} and C, 9071^ do.

6. A gentleman died, leaving three sons and a daughter, to whom
lie bequeathed his estate in the following manner : To the eldest
son, he gave 312 moidores, to tlie second, 312 guineas, to the third,

* That theii; g;ain or loss, in this rule, is in proportion to their rtocks ia evi-
dent : For, as the times, in which the stocks arc in trade, are equal, if I put in i
of the whole stock, I Qtig:ht to have ^ of the gain : U my part of the stock be
4^ my share oi the gftin or low ou^ht to be ^ also. And generally the same ra-
tio that the whole stock has to the whole g:ain or loss, must a^uch pcrtou^s pt^f *
, 1 icolar sLock have to his i^pectiye gain or ioas.



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SINGLE FELLOWSHIP. * 157

312 pist^leSy tmd to the daugfater, 312 dollars ; but wbeD bis debti
Were paid, there were but 312 half joes left : What inu»t each
have io proportion to the legacies which had been bequeathed them?
Ans. Ist son £293 Oa. 3d. - 2d. son J&227 17s. lOjd.— 3d. son
£ 179 Is. 2^. and the daughter £48 IGs. 8^d.

7. A ship, worth }3000, being lost at sea, of which j^ belonged
to A, I to B, and the rest to C : What loss will each sustain, sup-
posing $460 to have been injured upon her?

Ans. A's Iqss }312 50c.
B*8 937 60

C*s 625

8. A and B ventoripg equal sums of money, cleared bj joint
trade j|140: By agret^ment, as A eiecuted the business, he was
to have 8 per cent, and B was to have 6 per cent. : What was A
allowed for his trouble ?

t $ $ $ $ $ i $ i $

As 84-5 : 140 :: 8 : 86^ And, as 8+6 : 140 :: 5 : 53fi.

Ans. J32 30c. l^m.

9. A bankrupt is indebted to A £120, to B £230, tq C £340.
tod to D£450, and his whole estate amounts only to £560 : How
most it be divided among the creditors ?

Ana. A, £58 }86. ll^d. B,£n2 19s.7|d. C,£167 Os. 4d. and D.
£221 Is. (^d.

10. A, B, and C pot their money into a joint stock ; A pot in ^40 ;
B and C together $170 : They gained |126, of which B took,^42 ;
What did A and C gain, and 6 and C put in respectively ?

. Ans. j|24 A's gain, $70 B^s stock, $100 C^s stock. $60 C's gain.

11. A, B, and C companied ; A put in £40 ; B 60, and C a sum
unknown : They gained £72 ; of which C took £32 for his share ;
What did A and B gain, and C put in ?

Ans. £16 A's gain, £24 B's gain, and £80 C's stock.

12. A, B, and C put in $720, and gained $540, of which, so oft-
ten as A took up $3, B took 5, and C 7 : What did each put in and
gain?

Instead of the above role, you m^y find a common multiplier to
multiply the proportions by, or ipultiplicand to be multiplied by the
given proportions, thus, 15)720(48 multiplicand to find the stocks.
And 15)540(36 multiplicand to find the gains.

48x3=144 AV stock- ) C 36x3=108 A's jratn.

48X6=^240 B'« ditto. > And < 36x5=180 B's ditto.
48X7=336 C's ditto. } ( 36x7=252 C's ditto, as before.

13. A, B, C, and D companied : and gained a sum of nFM>ney of
which A, B andC took£ll^0,B. C and D, £180, C, D and A, £160,
^nd D, A and B,£l40 : What diJ^tinrt gain had eoch ?

The sum of those 4 niiml)pr«.i.s£6G0, and as each man's mooey

i^ named 3 times. th«»rer«>re ^. v'lT, £200 is th*= whole gain

Therefbre:£900— £120 AV R'w and C'a pain=£80 D's gain ;^
And £200— £ 180 IVg, C's and D\s rroir.=:.€20 A'»* jjain.— £5>00—
£160 C's. D's, and A's gain=£40 B's gain.— And £200~£ 140
D's, A's and B's gain=£60 C's gain.



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ld« SINGLE FELlrOWSHlP-

14. Two merchants companied ; A put in£40, aad H 288 do-
caU. Thev gained JS135, of ivhich A took £60. What was the
value of a ducat?

As jecO^A'sgain : £40, his clock :: £135 the whole gain— £60,
A's gain : £60> B's atock.

Due. £ Due. s. d.
And, ai 288 : 50 :: 1 : 3 5f Aos.

15. Four mdn spent, a#a reckoning, 20 shillings, of which they
agreed (hat A should pa^ j, B, ^, C, ^, and D, i. What must each
paj in (hat propor(ioo ?

s. d.
9 2||)A

^ 'H(B Answer

16. A, B,andC compauicd ; A put in £40-25; BX80-6; and Q
£ 161 : they gained £120. What is each man's share ?

££££££
40 25+80*5+161 : 120 :: 40-25 : 17142475=A's

34-28495 =B*s
C8-5699 =C's



Proof £119-997325

17. A, B, C, and D gain ^200 in trade, of which as oAen as A has
^6, B must have ^10, C |l4, and D ^20 : What is (he share of
each ? Ans. A's share $24, B's ^40, C's $56, and D's $80.

18. An insolveni estate of ^633 60c. is indebted to A, j[312 75c.
to B, ^297, to C, $50 25c. to D, $p25c. to E, J200. to F, $142 50r.



and to G,


jj21


25c. ;


what proportion will pach creditor


receive ■










i €.








Ans.


A's share =

irs - .

C's - -
D'4 . -
irs . -

F's - -


193 51 41

183 76 S7

31 09-2:5

15-41

123 75-

08 17-18

13 14-S7





Proof 5J633 59-97

\9. A skip nas driven on .«hore in a gale, and in lightening an^
getting her aOoat again and in reloading, an expense of $763 was
incurred ; the ship tvas valued at $10000, Ireight at $3200, molas*
968 owned bj A, at $5200, 8uga# owned by B, at $47Q0, and rum
owned by C, at $2500 : how much is this loss on every 1^100, and
how much must each parly pay of it ?



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DOUBLE FELLOWSHIP. 16»

$ $ $ $ $

J0000+3200+5200+4700+2600=:26600. As 25600 ; 768 :: 100:^
$ $ $ $ Ans. OD each ^100.

^ Then, As 100 : 3 :: 1000 : 300 to be paid by the ship,

320 : 96 - - freight,
5200 : 156 - - A.

4700 : 141 - - B.

2500 : 75 ^ - C, Ans.

768 Proof.

20. A vessel, valued at ^13000 iiras laden with hardware for E
valoed at ||3000> with cordage for F, at ^5000, with dry goodft for
G, at <;3!S00, with goods for H, at ^7900, and (br (, at ^4400 ; the
captaia was obliged to prevent sinking in a storm to throw over-
board three fifths of the hardware, and two AAbs of the cordage^
with goods of H valued at ^2700; allowing the freight to be |$3500«
what will be the average of the loss on 100 dolls, and what must
be paid to E, F, and H, for their properly thrown overboard ?

Ans. ^IG 25cts. on }100» and E, F, and II must receive togeth-
er $5443 75cts.

Aole. If the property of E» F, and II, had t>een insured, the re-
mainder of their loss must be paid by the insurers. See Policies;
of iosurancc.

DOUBLE FELLomrnp*

Or, Fellowship with Time, is occasioned by the shares of part*
Bers being continued unequal times.

Rule.
Multiply each man^s stock, or share by the time it was continu-
ed in trade. Then,

As the whole sum of the products, is to the whole gain or loss,
to is each man^s particular product, to his particular share of the
gain or loss.

Examples.
1. A, B, and C hold a pa<<ture in common^ for which they pay
£40 per annum. A put in 9 oxen for S weeks ; B, 12 oxen for
7 weeks, and C 8 oxen for 16 weeks. What must each pay of the
rent?

Dx5=ts45. 12x7=84, and 8x16=128, then 128+84+45=257.
As 257 : 40 :: 45 As 257 : 40 :: 04 As 257 : 40 :: 128
45 84 40

— £ s. d.

200 160 . 257)5120(19 18 bj^^L

16b 320

£ s% d. JG 8. d.

257)1800(7 0|fj 257)3360(13 1 5Jf|

• When times arc equal, the €harea of the gain or loss are evidently as t}ie
stocks, as in Single Fellowship ; and when the stocks are equal, the shares Me
as the timea ; wherefore, when ncith'»raro rq^^nl. the shares must br» a.^ th*!-*
product?.



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360



DOUBLE FELLOWSHIP


£
A's= 7
B'« = 13
C'8 = 19


a. d.

18 6,W


Proof 40






2. Four merchanU traded in company ; A pot in J{400 for five
Tuonthfiy 6, $600 for 7 months, C, $960 for 8 months, and D, $1^00
for 9 months ; but by roisfortnnes at sea, they lost §750. What
mast each man sustain of the loss.

Answer 5 ^' *^* ^^' ^*t^' ^ ^^^^ ^^^- ^^"* i
Answer, ^ g j^g ^^^ ^^^ ^ 23^ gj ^^ ^

3. A, with a capital of XlOO began trade January Ist, 1787, and
meeting with success in his business, he took in B as a partner, on
the 1st day of March following, with a capital of £150. Three
months after that, they admit C as a third partner, who brought
into stock £180, and after trading together until the 1st of Janua-
ry, 1768, they found there had been gained since A'« commencing
business £177 13s. How must this be divided among the partners ?

Ans. A, £53 168. 8d B,£67 58. lOd. C,£56 lOn. 6d.
4^ Two merchants entered into partnership for 18 months ; A,
at first, put into stock $400, and at the end of 8 months he pot in
$200 more ; B, at first, pot in $1100, and at 4 months* end took
out $280. Now at the expiration of the time, they found they had
gamed $1052. What is each man's just share ?

Ans. A, $385 90c. B, $666 10c.

5. A and B compaoied ; A put in the 1st of January, £150 * but
B could not put in any until the 1st of May : What did be then put*
in, to have an equal share with A at the year's end ?

Ans. £225.

6. £, F, and G companied ; E put iii, the first of March, £30,
F. the first of May, put iu 80 yards of broadcloth ; and on the 1st
of June, G pot in $120. On the 1st of January following, they
reckoned their gains, of which £ and F took £228. F and G £21*5
10s. and G and E £187 10s. What was the whole gain, and tl«
gain of each ? What did they value, a yard of cloth at ? and, what
w^ G's dollar worth ?

2281.+215I. 10s,+ 187l. 103=6311: and 6311^2=3151. lOs. the
whole gain ; then, 3151. 10s.— 228=871. 10s. GV gain. 3J5I. 10s.
—2151. 10s.=IOOI. E's gain, and 3151. 10s —1871. 108.= 128l. F's
gain. To find the value of one yard of cloth, say, A* 1001. E*8
gain : 301. his stock :: 1281. F's gain : 381. 8s.; then, inversely.
As 10 months : 381. 8s. :: 8 months : 481. the value of the whole
cloth.

As 80yds. : 481, :: 1yd. : 128. answer. Now, to find the value
of a dollar. As 1001. E's gain : 301. his stock :: 871. 10s. G's gam :
^61. 5s. ; then, inversely, As 10 months : 261. 6s. :: 7 months : 371.
108.=120 dollars. I^astly : As 120 dollars : 371. IDs. :: 1 dillar :
63. 3d. Answer.



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PRACTICE. 161

7. £, F and G companied ; £ pat io ^400 for -75 of a year ; F
^00 for '5 of a year, and G {500 for '25 of a year ; with which
they gained ^720 : Required the share of each.

400X-76=300
300X -6=150
500X-25=125

— $

675 : 720 :: 300 : 375if

lB7i|

156ii

Proof. 720 Dolla

8. A put in i for | of a year, B | for ^ a year,

for one year ; their joint stock was 1, and their g i

each share ? A



Proof. =1
9. A and B entered into partnersh'ip for 16 months. A put in
^1200 at first, and 9 months afterwards $200 more ; B put in at
first 1 1600, and at the end of 6 months took out {500 ; their gain
was f 772 20c. ? what is the share of each ?

Ans. A's share j^401 70c. B's share $370 60c..



PRACTICE,

IS a contraction of the rule of Three Direct, when the first
term Aia^ens to he a aBit, or one ; and has its name from its
daily use ^amoQg merchants and tradesmen, being an easy and con<*
cise methoi^ of working most questions which occur in trade and
business. .

The method of proof is by th^ Rule, of Three, Compound Mul-
tiplication, or b^ varying th^ order of them.

A Tariety of rules, adapted to particular cases, is osnally given
xmder Practice. Most of the sums, however, fall under two heads,
and may be wrought by two General Rules, adapted to these cases.
On account of their great practical importance, these two rales
should be thoroughly understood.

General Rule I.
When the price of 1 yard, life, 4*^. is given to find the value of any
TMmber of yards ^ ^c.

1. Suppose the price of the given quantity to be II. ID. Is. &c.
then will the quantity itself be the answer, at the supposed price.

2. Divide the given price into aliquot parts, either of the sup-
posed price or of one another, and find the quotients of the several
aliquot parts ; and their sum will be the trm answer.

w *:



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1$2



PRACTICE.
Example.



What is the value of 468 yards, at 28. Djd. per yard ^
£468 s. d. Answer at iCl a. d.



28. 66. is I = 58 10
3d. is A = ^ 17
id. is tV = 9 9



The full price =je64 16 9



ditto at 2 6
ditto at 3
ditto at Oi

2 9i



, that the qoantity 468 if the answer at
. is I of a pound, | part of that quanti-
at 2s. 6d. ; in like manner, as 3d. is the
: of £BQ 10s. or £S 178. is the answer
!o ^ of £6 178. or 98. 9d. is the answer
all these parts is equal to the whole
of the answers belonging to each price
II price required, and the same will be
rer.

eafter given, can be wrought, the fol-
lectly gotten by heart.



TABLES.

Aliquot^ or even part$ of Money.



Pts.of ashiLof a£. |


d.


8.


£


6


= i =


A


4


S= i =


A


3


=: i =


A


2


= 4 =:


TiT


n


;= i ==


Tiv


1


= A-=


^V


i


= tV =


lij


i


= A==


xU


i


= iV =


nilT


Farta of S Shill. |


d.




28.


1


=


^


H


=


tV


2


=


A


3


=


f


4


=


*



Parts of a Poaod.

8. d. £

0= i

8 = i

= i.

= i

4 = 4

6 = i

8 = ^

4 = A

3.= iV



10
6
5
4
3
2
1
1
1
1

10= A
"









= aV



8 = ^
5= ^V
4 = ^

2 = tH



6
8



X

a



Parts of a Dollar.



50

33^

26

20

16f

12i

5
4

?

1



= *



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1








"PRACTICE.








165




Alufw^, or ntnlSfittt of Wtight,






PartB of a Cwt.


PatboTiCwt


Parts of 4 Cirt


PartB of % Ton.


Qrs. m Cwf.


ft iCnt.


ft i Cwt.


Cwl.4


[jr. T.


5


Jf i


28 = 1


", : }


40 *» 1
6 = }


1


**: i


14 = *





16 = *


8 *s 1


4 =s 4


. 4 = i





14 = 1


7 = i


2 = A


2 2


! = i





8 = tV


4 * A


1 ' . .


2 C


• » tV


6


7 = tV






1 1


- A





4 = A




1 C


• = A




jJiiorter TaWe c^ olt^ P«rt» ef ••*>»»«»•


.!?•




Pwts of a duU.


Part* of


a Dollar.




•1. ».


C.




D.




10 =• 1


931


tA


H




9 = f


91}


=as


tt




9 »= .| . .


90


m


A




41 « 1


871
9H


9S
:9


}






m


ss


H






8a


«ft


t




Parts of a Pound.


76


SS




8. d. £


70


:^


1%




18 = ft


68«


ss


tt




17 6 « }


6«f


is,


}




16 8 = 1


60


as




16 = /r


St


as


iV




15 = J


3S


A




14 = -ft


43}


sa


A




13 4 = 1


41|


=


A




12 6 = 1


40


s=


i




12 = r%


37i


=


f




8 = A


»H


=3


A




76 = 1


30


^


A




60 = tV


r 181


Jfe


A




A TABLE OP DISC


JOUNT PER CENT,




£


8.d.l




&


■.d.l




IJ5




8.d.1




% U per C6iil=a0 3


§


81 per ceo


L=l 9


?


224pefcent,=4 6|


9


H"


=0 6


&


10


=2


f


26-




=6


4-


=0 9


O


\i\


=2 6


30 -




=6


L?


\ «


1 £\


•^


16


~f3


S'


3/i —




=7


1-4


9 "■

6i-


— =1 3


1


171


=3 6


i


40-




=8


I


V4 "


1 If


7i-


=1 6





20 — —


=»4




45 -




=9




'




f^l\ —




=10


















o%j •■






o



^



»9



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164



HIACTICE.



Examples.
1. What will 354^ yards cost, at }d. per yardf

s. d.
|^.|fV|^^4 6 Talae of 354^ yards, at Is. per yard.

Ans. £0 7 4| Talae of 354^ yard, at^. per yard.



Or thus.
S s. d. 8. d

8)17 14 6=364 6

6) 2 4 3J



Or diTide by 8 and 6, thus, 8)354 6

6) 44 3i



7 4^Ans.asbef.



7 4J Ans. as before.

2. What will 769} yards come to, at 3d. per yard ?
3d.|}[769 9 value at Is. per yard.

■ £ 8. d.

2|0)18|9 11| Or thas» |3d.|}|37 19 9 value at Is. per yard.

Ans. £9 9 11^ value at 3d. Ans. £9 9 1 1^ value of 759|yds. at
'■ per yard 3d. per yard.

3. What is the cost of 227yd8. at 60 ceoU per yard I

c. $ $

60|||227sxprice at $1 per yard,

<^113 60c. Ads.

4. What cost 927yds. at 63J cents a yard ? .
o i t



60
3i



927s=price at ^1 per yardi^^ .



463 60=price at 60 cents.
30 90= do. at 3-J cents.





$494 40c. Ans.








Questions. Answers. Quest.




Ans,


ydj«. " • £ yds.


cts.


$ c. m.


6. 918Jat -Id. per yard 1 18 3}


13. 266 a


tl24


33 12 5*


6. 739^ -Id.. - 317^


14. 269^.


IH


44 91 7


7. 6671 - Ud. ,- - 3 10 11 J


16.1050 -


H


66 63 ^


8. 4761 .2d.. - 5 14* 31


16. 618- .


87J


640 76


9. 4871 - 6 d. . - 10 3 li


17. 328 -


^-i


188 60


10. 668 . 7Xd. - - 17 15


18. 817 .


30^


245 10


11. 649} . 10 d. - - 27 1 Oi

12. 164 - llfd. - - 8 7


i9. 296 -


16


44 40


20. 3004 -


17i


62 68 7J-


21. 768}yd8. at Is. 9d. per yard.






d. £ s. d






6


J 37 18 6 = value at Is. per yard.






3


} 18 19 3 = do. at 6d-
9 9 7J= do. at 3d.






-


£66 '7 4 J Acs,









Digitized by



Google



PRACTICE.



165



22. lOGjclfl. at 48. 9^.



48.


i


8d.


iof4.


J


i


i


i



106



21
3





4

10:

8:

4 ;



8

10

5



= Talue at£l per yard.

3valae at 49.
- - 8d.
. - Id.
. . id.



23.
24.
26.
26.
27.
28.



17flb9.
674

674
614
1674



£2S:}
d.



at



8.

4
.1

8
12
16
19



0|
:6|

H

2



:: 11

£

3,

2

27 :

41

491

163:



2 Ans.
d.



8.

10

6

11

: 1

: 4

6



:: BlAns.
::0-i
::84
:: 3
::
::3



Note, ff' there he pounds also in the price : Maltiply the qaantity
by the poand8, and to the product add the Talae of the quantity
for the other parts of the price as in the preceding examples, and
the sam will be the answer.

29. Find the value of 166yds. of cloth at £3 6s. 8d. per yard.-

£
68. 8d s:4|l66=£valoe at £1 a yard.
13.

|468==ya1ae at £3 a yd.

I 62 - - 68. 8d. a yd.

£^20 Ans.

30. What is the cost of 2244yd8. ati^ 78. 6d. a yard ?
£ • 8.



6s. =i

28.6d.=:4



224 :: 10
6




1122:: 10
66:: 2:
28 :: 1 :


: 6d.
: 3



=co8t at £l a yard.



£6 a y^.
66. a yd.

2s. 6d. do.



£1206 :: 13 :: 9 Ans.

Answers.
£ 8. d. £ 8. d.

6 :; per yard=2169 :: 7 :: 6
3 :: 6 :: 8 - - 199 :: 3 :: 4
6 :: 3 :: 4 - - 387 :: 10 ::
6 :: . . 292 i: 8 ::



31. 3464yd8. at 6

32. 69| -

33. 76 .

34. 68 - 4



1 Gen£ral Rvu II.

When ike price t^one hundred weighty kc. is given of sev^aide^'
nomincUions, to find the value of a quantity of sevetml def^f^inaiions
also. *



Digitized by



Google



16g PRACTICE-

Maltiply the price by the integers, aod takja parts for the rest
from the price of ao ioteger^ ^d the sam of the prodqct and qoo*
tients will be the aoswer.

f^I^lfPLBS.

I. If 1 Cwt. cost £i 178. 4d. wh^t wiH 9 Cwt. Sqjn. 1»H}. cost
at the same rate ?



4 17 4=:price of 1 Cwt.
9=N umber of Cwt.



43


16 0=co9tof9Cwf,


2


8 8:5=


2qrs.


1


4 4=


Iqr.





12 ^^


14ft



2qrs. Oft is |
Iqr. I
14 i



Ans. £48 I 2= Cwt 9 3 14ft
Cwt. qr. ft Je 8. d. £8. il.

Ex. 2. 8 f 16 Sugar at 6 17 9 per Cwt. =s49 8 2f

3. 7 3 19 - 7 12 8 - - 60 9 0|

4. 12 1 24 - 3 18 10 - - 49 2 7^ . '

5. 72 3 27 - 8 11 6 - - 626 11 lOJ

6. 16 2 17 Cofiee 2 16 11 - - 46 11 1

7. 27ft lOoz. 14 pep ft I 16 10

8. 13 10 12pwt. 8grs. silver at £4 78. 6d. a ft 60 14 I4

9. 17oz.6pwl. 16grs.ofGo)d£3168d.peres/66 & 10|
la 3 Tod 2bhd. 48gall. ofwioe at £6 16 9=s

11. 7 Acres 3 roods 16 rods 16 feet at £7 lis. 9d. ao acre=^

Though the General RoTes, given above, are sqfficient ibr an-
swering questions in Practice, yet some may |]terhaps be answered
more easily by other rules. Several case» fellows

CASE I.

Wlicn the price is any evtn number of skUlingt ttnder 24 : Sfqltiply
the given quantity by half the price, and double the first figure of
the product for shillings. The r^st of the product will be pounds>

N. B. If th&^price be 2s. you need only double the unit figure



Online LibraryNicolas PikeA new and complete system of arithmetick. Composed for the use of the citizens of the United States → online text (page 14 of 43)