Norman Harold Hepple.

Lyrical forms in English; online

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Online LibraryNorman Harold HeppleLyrical forms in English; → online text (page 17 of 17)
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268



INDEX OF FIRST LINES

PAGE

A breath, a sigh and March is fled 93

A cloud lay cradled near the setting sun 109

A Paradise on earth is found . .169

A Sonnet is a moment's monument . . . . . . .114

A spirit haunts the year's last hours ....... 80

A wet sheet and a flowing sea 64

Absent from thee, I languish still ! 36

All in the Downs the fleet was moor'd 38

And thou art dead, as young and fair ...... 239

April, April 88

Art thou poor, yet hast thou golden slumbers? 27

As we rush, as we rush in the train ....... 82

At the corner of Wood Street, when daylight appears ... 60
Avenge, O Lord, Thy slaughter'd saints whose bones . . .104
Awake, ^Eolian lyre, awake . .129

Begone, dull Care ! I prithee begone from me ! 19

Behold her, single in the field . . 187

Bird of the wilderness . 56

Blest pair of Sirens, pledges of Heaven's joy 118

Blow, blow, thou winter wind . 24

Boot, saddle, to horse, and away ! . 77

Break, break, break ! . 242

Captain, or Colonel, or Knight in Arms 103

Cherry-ripe, ripe, ripe, I cry 34

Come, dear children, let us away 203

Come down, O maid, from yonder mountain height .... 193
Come live with me and be my love . . . . . . .168

Come unto these yellow sands 25

Comfort thee, O thou mourner, yet awhile ! 242

Could we float thus ever 83

Crabbed Age and Youth 23

Does the road wind uphill all the way? 84

Drifted snow no more is seen 46

Drink to me only with thine eyes 29

Earth has not anything to show more fair . . . . . 106

Ere frost-flowers and snow-blossom faded and fell . . . -158

Eternal Spirit of the chainless mind ! . . . . . . .108

Ethereal minstrel ! pilgrim of the sky ! . . . . . .141

Fair Daffodils, we weep to see 33

Fair pledges of a fruitful tree . . . . . . . -33

Fair Star of Evening, Splendour of the West . . . . .107

Four seasons fill the measure of the year no

269



INDEX OF FIRST LINES

PAGE

From the forests and highlands 67

From you have I been absent in the spring . . . . . 101
Full fathom five thy father lies . . . . . . . 25

Go, lovely Rose !........... 34

God of our fathers, known of old 89

Green fields of England ! wheresoe'er . . . . . . -75

Green little vaulter in the sunny grass . . . . . .112

Hail to thee, blithe Spirit ! . 141

Happy the man whose wish and care 39

Hark ! ah, the Nightingale ! 157

Hark ! hark ! the lark at heaven's gate sings . . . . .24

Hear the sledges with the bells 71

Hence! loathed Melancholy 172

Here, a sheer hulk, lies poor Tom Bowling . . . 51

How happy is he born and taught . . ... . .26

How sleep the brave who sink to rest . . . . . .129

How sweet the tuneful bells' responsive peal !..... 105

How vainly men themselves amaze . . . . . . .176

I cannot change, as others do 35

I heard a thousand blended notes -59

I sorrowed that the golden day was dead . . ... .90

I wander'd lonely as a cloud ........ 58

I was thy neighbour once, thou rugged Pile . . . . .236

I would live, if I had my will 209

If aught of oaten stop, or pastoral song 127

If doughty deeds my lady please .... .... 44

If thou must love me, let it be for nought. . . . . -113

I'm wearing awa', Jean 51

In such a night, when every louder wind . . . . . . 179

In vain to me the smiling mornings shine 105

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan 188

It was a dismal and a fearful night . . . . . . .223

It was a thicky shade .......... 166

I've heard them lifting at our ewe-milking 47

Leather the heart o' me, leather the rind o' me . . . 91

Let me not to the marriage of true minds .102

Let others strive for wealth or praise 207

Lett no man cum into this hall . . . . . . . 19

Life of life ! thy lips enkindle . . . 69

Like two cathedral towers those stately pines 113

Little fly 53

Loud is the vale 1 the voice is up ... .... 235

Mine be a cot beside the hill 186

Much have I travell'd in the realms of gold ..... 109

Music, when soft voices die 68

My banks they are furnish'd with bees . . . . . 185

My fairest child, I have no song to give you . . . -75

My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains . . . . .150

My heart leaps up when I behold 58

Mysterious Night ! when our first parent knew . . . . . 1 1 1

270



INDEX OF FIRST LINES

PAGE

No, no ! go not to Lethe, neither twist 152

Nuns fret not at their convent's narrow room . . . . .106

O Joy of Creation 85

O Mary, go, and call the cattle home 75

O my Luve's like a red, red rose . 48

O sing unto my roundelay 45

O wild West Wind ! thou breath of Autumn's being . . . -145

O'er the smooth enamell'd green 32

Of all the girls that are so smart 40

Oft in the stilly night 63

Oh, blessed ease ! no more of Heaven I ask 1 1 1

Oh, that those lips had language ! life has passed . . . .231

Oh, to be in England 77

On either side the river lie 197

One day I wrote her name upon the strand 100

Others abide our question Thou art free ! 114

Over hill, over dale 22

Pack, clouds, away, and welcome day 30

Phyllis is my only joy 37

Pibroch of Donuil Dhu 53

Queen and Huntress, chaste and fair 29

Rarely, rarely comest thou 70

Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky 81

Royal and saintly Cashel ! I would gaze 108

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness ! 147

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? 101

She dwelt among the untrodden ways 235

She stood breast-high amid the corn . . . . . . .190

Silent Nymph, with curious eye! 181

Sing we and chant it 20

Soldier, rest ! thy warfare o'er 5^

Somer is yeomen in 18

Star that bringest home the bee 62

Stern Daughter of the Voice of God 133

Sweet and low, sweet and low . . . . . . . -78

Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright! . . . . . .31

Sweet Echo, sweetest Nymph, that livest unseen . . 32

Swiftly walk o'er the western wave 68

Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean . ... -79

Tell me not, sweet, I am unkind 35

Tell me, thou soul of her I love . 43

Tell me where is fancy bred . 23

The beauty of Israel is slain upon thy high places . . . .214

The cock is crowing 186

The curfew tolls the knell of parting day . . . . . .227

The day is cold, and dark, and dreary . .... -76

The Lady of the Hills with crimes untold 115

The lovely lass o' Inverness 48

The man of life upright 26

2 7 I



INDEX OF FIRST LINES

PAGE

The merchant to secure his treasure 37

The poetry of earth is never dead . . . . . . .116

The sea awoke at midnight from its sleep 112

The Sea ! the Sea ! the open Sea ! 65

The soote season, that bud and bloom forth brings .... 100

The splendour falls on castle walls 80

The world is too much with us ; late and soon ..... 107

The year's at the spring 78

There be none of Beauty's daughters 66 -

There is a garden in her face . . . . . . . -31

There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream . . . -135

Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness ! 148

Three fishers went sailing away to the west . . . . .190

'Tis the last rose of summer 64

To me, fair friend, you never can be old . . . . . .102

'Twas at the royal feast for Persia won . . . . . .119

Under a spreading chestnut-tree . . . . . . . .191

Up, then, Melpomene ! thou mournefulst Muse of nyne . . .215

Waken, lords and ladies gay 55

Wee modest crimson-tipped flow'r 50

Weep you no more, sad fountains . . . . . . .28

Welcome, wild North- Easter ! 155

What beck'ning ghost, along the moonlight shade . . . .225

What is so rare as a day in June? 202

What power is this? what witchery wins my feet . . . .115

When Britain first at Heaven's command . . . . .42

When I consider how my light is spent . . . . . .104

When icicles hang by the wall .... ... .20

When maidens such as Hester die 238

When Music, heavenly maid, was young . . . . . .123

When runnels began to leap and sing 86

When the green woods laugh with the voice of joy . . . 52

Where the bee sucks, there lurk I 25

Where the pools are bright and deep -57

Where the remote Bermudas ride 178

Whither, 'midst falling dew 153

Who can live in heart so glad . .165

Who is Sylvia? What is she? 21

Winter reigneth o'er the land 83

With blackest moss the flower-plots 194

With lifted feet, hands still 88

Ye banks and braes o' bonnie Doon 49

Ye Mariners of England . . . ... . . . 61

Ye spotted snakes with double tongue 22

Yet once more, O ye laurels, and once more 218

Yonder in the heather there's a bed for sleeping .... 92



CAMBRIDGE: PRINTED BY JOHN CLAY, M.A. AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS.



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Online LibraryNorman Harold HeppleLyrical forms in English; → online text (page 17 of 17)