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THE LIBRARY OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF

NORTH CAROLINA




THE COLLECTION OF
NORTH CAROLINLANA



C917.05
N87in
1951
C.4




7482500



This book may be kept out one month unless a recall
notice is sent to you. It must be brought to the North
Carolina Collection (in Wilson Library) for renewal.



Form No. A-369



NORTH CAROLINA

/AANUAL

1951



5



NORTH CAROLINA MANUAL

1951




Issued by

Thad Eure

Secretary of State
Raleigh



1951



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^

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/I



TO THE

1051 MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF NORTH CAROLINA



TO THE

STATE, COUNTY, CITY AND TOWN OFFICIALS



AND TO THE

PEOPLE OF THE OLD NORTH STATE
AT HOME AND ABROAD



THIS MANUAL IS RESPECTFULLY
DEDICATED




Secretary of State



Printed by

WINSTON PRINTING COMPANY

Winston-Salem, N. C U. S. A.



CONTENTS

PART I
HISTORICAL

Page

The State 11

The State Capitol 19

Chief Executives of North Carolina

Governors of Virginia 21

Executives under the Proprietors 21

Governors under the Crown 22

Governors Elected by the Legislature 22

Governors Elected by the People 24

The State Flag 27

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence 28

The Great Seal of North Carolina 30

The State Bird 33

The Halifax Resolution 34

Name of State and Nicknames 35

The State Motto 35

The State Colors 36

The State Flower 36

The State's Most Famous Toast 36

Legal Holidays in North Carolina 36

Population of the State since 1675 37

State Song 38

The Constitution of North Carolina 39

The American's Creed 77

The American Flag

Origin 77

Proper Display 79

Pledge to the Flag 83

The National Capitol 85

Declaration of Independence 88

Constitution of the United States 93

PART II

CENSUS

Seventeenth Census, 1950

Population of State 117

Population of Counties 118

Population of Cities and Towns 118



North Carolina Manual



PART III
POLITICAL

Page

Conprressional Districts 127

Judicial Districts 127

Senatorial Districts and Apportionment of Senators 128

Apportionment of Members of the House of Representatives. 131

State Democratic Platform 132

Plan of Organization of the State Democratic Party 143

Committees of the Democratic Party

State Democratic Executive Committee 158

Congressional District Executive Committees 162

Judicial District Executive Committees 166

Senatorial Executive Committees 170

State Democratic Solicitorial District

Executive Committees 173

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 179

State Republican Platform 181

Plan of Organization of the State Republican Party 184

Committees of the Republican Party

State Republican Executive Committee 190

Congressional, Judicial, and Senatorial

District Committees 192

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 192

PART IV

ELECTION RETURNS

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1948 . . . 195

Popular Vote for President by States, 1932-1944 196

Vote for President by Counties, 1928-1948 198

Vote for Governor bv Counties, Primaries, 1948 201

Vote for Governor by Counties, General Elections, 1928-1948 . 204

Vote for State Officials, Democratic Primaries, 1940 and 1944 . 207

Vote for State Officials by Counties, Primary, 1948 210

Primarv Vote for Commissioner of Insurance, May 27, 1950. . 213

Total Votes Cast— General Election, 1948 214

Vote for Governor in Democratic Primaries, 1920-1948 215

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primary, May 27, 1959. 216

Vote for Congressmen in Second Primary, June 24, 1950 .... 218

Vote for Congressmen in Republican Primary, May 27, 1950. . 219

Vote for Members of Congress, 1936-1950 220

Vote for United States Senator, First Primary, May 27, 1950 . 235
Vote for United States Senator, Second Primary,

June 24, 1950 237

Vote for United States Senator, General Election,

November 7, 1950 239

Vote on Constitutional Amendments by Counties, 1950 241

Vote in Special Election on Road and School Bonds.

June 4, 1949 248

Vote on Prohibition, 1881, 1908, 1933 250



Contents



PART V

GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

, Page

Agencies, Boards and Commissions 253

North Carolina Institutions
Correctional

White 275

Negro 275

Educational

White 276

Negro 283

Hospitals

White 287

Negro 290

Confederate Woman's Home 290

Examining Boards 291

State Owned Railroads 298

PART VI
LEGISLATIVE

The General Assembly

Senate

Officers 301

Senators (Arranged Alphabetically) 301

Senators (Arranged by Districts) 302

Rules 303

Standing Committees 319

Seat Assignments 325

House of Representatives

Officers 326

Members (Arranged Alphabetically) 326

Members (Arranged by Counties) 828

Rules 330

Standing Committees 345

Seat Assignments 357

PART VII
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Executive Officials 363

Administrative Officials 371

United States Senators 391

Representatives in Congress 393

Justices of the Supreme Court 402

Members of the General Assembly

Senators 410

Representatives 441

Occupational and Professional Classification 505



North Carolina Manual



PART VIII
OFFICIAL REGISTER

Page

United States Government

President and Vice-President 513

Cabinet Members 513

North Carolina Senators and Representatives in Congress. 513

United States Supreme Court Justices 513

United States District Court

Judges 513

Clerks 513

District Attorneys 513

United States Circuit Court of Appeals

Judge Fourth District 513

State Government

Legislative Department 514

Executive Department 514

Judicial Department 514

Administrative Department 515

State Institutions 516

Heads of Agencies other than State 517

County Government 518

ILLUSTRATIONS

State Capitol 18

State Flag 26

State Seal 31

State Bird 32

State Song (Words and Music) 38

Map of North Carolina 76

The American Flag Opposite Page 71

Map Showing Congressional Districts 144, 145

Map Showing Senatorial Districts 176, 177

Map Showing Judicial Districts 208, 209

Seating Diagram of Senate Chamber 324

Seating Diagram of House of Representatives 358

Pictures

Governor 362

State Officers 367

Senators and Congressmen 390, 397

Justices of the Supreme Court 404

State Senators 411, 417, 425

Members House of Representatives

443,453,461,469,478,487,499



PART I
HISTORICAL



THE STATE

North Carolina, often called the "Tar Heel" state, was the scene
of the first attempt to colonize America by English-speaking peo-
ple. Under a charter granted to Sir Walter Raleigh by Queen
Elizabeth, a colony was begun in the 1580's on Roanoke Island.
This settlement, however, was unsuccessful and later became
known as "The Lost Colony."

The first permanent settlement was made about 1650 by immi-
grants from Virginia. In 1663 Charles II granted to eight Lords
Proprietors a charter for the territory lying "within six and
thirty degrees of the northern latitude, and to the west as far as
the south seas, and so southerly as far as the river St Mattias,
which bordereth upon the coast of Florida, and within one and
thirty degrees of northern latitude, and so west in a direct line as
far as the south seas aforesaid; . . ." and the colony was called
Carolina. In 1665 another charter was granted to these noble-
men. This charter extended the limits of Carolina so that the
northern line was 36 degrees and 30 minutes north latitude, and
the southern line was 29 degrees north latitude, and both of these
lines extended westward to the South seas.

In 1669 John Locke wrote the Fundamental Constitutions as a
model for the government of Carolina. The Lords Proprietors
adopted these constitutions and directed the governor to put into
operation as much of them as was feasible. In 1670 there were
four precincts (changed to counties in 1739) ; Pasquotank, Per-
quimans, Chowan, and Currituck. North Carolina now has one
hundred counties.

Carolina on December 7, 1710, was divided into North Carolina
and South Carolina, and Edward Hyde, on May 12, 1712, became
the first governor of North Carolina.

In 1729 seven of the eight Lord Proprietors sold their interest
in Carolina to the Crown and North Carolina became a royal
colony. George Burrington was the first royal governor. Richard
Everard, the last proprietary governor, served until Burrington
was appointed.

North Carolina, on April 12, 1776, authorized her delegates in
the Continental Congress to vote for independence, and on Decem-
ber 18, 1776, adopted a constitution. Richard Caswell became the

11



12 North Carolina Manual

first governor under this constitution. On November 21, 1789, the
state adopted the United States Constitution, being the twelfth
state to enter the Federal Union. North Carolina, in 1788, had
rejected the Constitution on the grounds that certain amendments
were vital and necessary to a free people.

A Constitutional convention was held in 1835 and among several
changes made in the Constitution was the method of electing the
governor. After this change the governor was elected by the peo-
ple for a term of two years instead of being elected by the Legis-
lature for a term of one year. Edward Bishop Dudley was the
first governor elected by the people.

North Carolina seceded from the Union May 20, 1861, and was
readmitted to the Union in July, 1868.

A new State Constitution was adopted in 1868 and since that
date the governor has been elected by the people for four-year
terms and he cannot succeed himself. There has not been a new
constitution since 1868, but numerous amendments have been
added to it.

North Carolina has had a democratic administration since 1900,
during which period it has made its greatest progress.

North Carolina has had two permanent capitals — New Bern and
Raleigh — and there have been three capitol buildings. Tryon's
Palace in New Bern was constructed in the period, 1767-1770,
and the main building was destroyed by fire February 27, 1798.
The first capitol in Raleigh was completed in 1794 and was de-
stroyed by fire on June 21, 1831. The present capitol was com-
pleted in 1840.

The state in 1790 ceded her western lands, which was composed
of Washington, Davidson, Hawkins, Greene, Sullivan, Sumner,
and Tennessee counties, to the Federal government, and between
1790 and 1796 the territory was known as Tennessee Territory,
but in 1796 it became the fifteenth state in the Union.

In 1738, the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act
authorizing the establishment of district courts which served as
appelant courts. These courts were authorized to be held in Bath,
New Bern, and New Town — now Wilmington. In 1746, the Gen-
eral Assembly repealed the act of 1738 and established district
courts to be held at Edenton, Wilmington, and Edgecombe. From
1754 until 1790, other districts were formed as the state expanded



The State 13

in territory and developed needs for these districts. By 1790, there
were eight judicial districts divided into two ridings of four dis-
tricts each. In 1806, the General Assembly passed an act estab-
lishing a superior court in each county. The act also set up
judicial districts composed of certain contiguous counties, and this
practice of expanding the districts has continued from five dis-
tricts in 1806 until now there are twenty-one districts.

When North Carolina adopted the Federal Constitution on
November 21, 1789, she was authorized to send two senators and
five representatives to the Congress of the United States accord-
ing to the constitutional apportionment. In 1792, when the first
federal census had been completed and tabulated, it was found
that North Carolina was entitled to ten representatives. It was
then that the General Assembly divided the state into ten con-
gressional districts. In 1812, the state had grown and increased
in population until it was entitled to thirteen representatives in
Congress. Between 1812 and 1865, however, the population de-
creased so much in porportion to the population of the other states
of the Union that North Carolina was by that time entitled only
to seven representatives. Since 1865 the population of the state
has shown a slow but steady increase, and now there are twelve
congressional districts. The state, therefore, has two senators and
twelve representatives in the Congress of the United States.

North Carolina supports a nine-month school for every child of
school age and maintains a fleet of 6,130 busses by which it trans-
ports 410,000 children to school each school day in the year. Dur-
ing a nine months term these 6,130 busses travel approximately
42,910,000 miles.

January 1, 1951, the state had under its direct jurisdiction 65,-
676 miles of highways, roads, and streets in North Carolina, this
length being roughly equivalent to the distance of two and one
half times around the world at the equator. This vast mileage is
divided into three basic systems as follows:

The Rural State Highway System which covers the U. S. and
N. C. routes for a length of 10,521 miles of which 10,064 are hard
surfaced. It includes 52,822 miles of county or secondary roads
under the exclusive jurisdiction of the state of which 10,795 miles
have been hard surfaced. Phenomenal growth was noted in this
respect in 1950. The figure 10,795 having been increased from



14 North Carolina Manual

n,372 niiks within twelve months and representing a paving pro-
gram on this system (lining the year of 4,423 miles. This great
liaving j)rogram was financed by a special bond issue approved
by the people in an election held in June of 1949; and represents,
by far, the greatest paving program in the history of the state —
this 4,423 mils of new roads is equivalent to the distance from
Raleigh to Berlin, Germany.

In addition, the state has exclusive or co-ordinate jurisdiction
over 2,333 miles of city and town streets which form a part of
the state highway and county road system in municipalities of
which 1,841 miles are paved.

All told, the state operates a system which includes 22,700 miles
of paved roads and streets, and 42,976 miles of unpaved roads
and streets. In terms of state size, population and wealth, there
is no state in the nation which can exceed these highway and road
services to its people.

The entire program since 1921 has been financed exclusively
from the gasoline tax, motor vehicle license fees and federal aid
without recourse to property taxation or aid from the general
state fund. During the last fiscal year the state expended $80,-
502,737.00 for construction, maintenance, betterments and improve-
ments, including the operation of the Motor Vehicle Bureau, High-
way Patrol, the Highway Safety Division, several other state
agencies, and the retirement of debt.

The $200,000,000.00 secondary road improvement program men-
tioned above was but about half completed as of January 1, 1951.
Unless war shortages or other adverse influences develop, the re-
maining half of this program should be completed within the next
eighteen to twenty-four months.

North Carolina from its earliest time has always been an agri-
cultural state. In the early period the chief exports were beef,
pork, tobacco, corn, and of course, naval stores such as tar, pitch,
and turpentine, which gave an additional income to the farmers.
Some of the principal agricultural products now are corn, cotton,
tobacco, wheat, barley, oats, peanuts, soya beans, various types
of hay, potatoes, garden truck, dairy products, beef, pork, poultry,
and fruits. The production of flue-cured tobacco in 1950 totaled
857,150,000 pounds; also there was produced 16,000,000 pounds of
hurley tobacco, making a total crop of 873,150,000 pounds. Dur-



The State 15

ing: the same year North Carolina produced 248,040,000 pounds of
peanuts valued at approximately $31,501,000.00. The cotton crop
for 1950 amounted to 180,000 bales and brought approximately
$36,450,000.00. The production of hay, including- all types,
amounted to 1,246,000 tons valued at approximately $35,511,000.00.
The corn crop amounted to 81,955,000 bushels valued at $118,835,-
000.00, produced from 2,215,000 acres. Irish potatoes for 1950
amounted to 10,368,000 bushels valued at $8,294,000.00. These
potatoes were produced from a total of 64,000 acres. Sweet pota-
toes produced during the year amounted to 6,785,000 bushels pro-
duced from 59,000 acres and valued at $12,552,000.00. Soya bean
production during the year amounted to 5,117,000 bushels pro-
duced from 301,000 acres and valued at $12,537,000.00. North
Carolina produces much fruit and nuts. Commercial apple pro-
duction during the year amounted to 1,296,000 bushels valued at
$2,053,000.00; 548,000 bushels of peaches valued at $2,247,000.00;
150,000 bushels of pears valued at $300,000.00; 5,500 tons of
grapes valued at $908,000.00, and 2,047,000 pounds of pecans
valued at $618,000.00 were produced.

In addition to the agricultural products produced in North Caro-
lina, the state is becoming to be known as an industrial state.
The state manufactures furniture, textiles, tobacco, and almost
any kind of manufacturing done in any other section of the Na-
tion. There are in North Carolina eight tobacco manufacturing-
establishments, not including stemmeries, which employ 23,300
persons whose annual income is $111,900,000.00. The value of the
tobacco products produced during the year of 1949 was $538,400,-
000.00. The tobacco factories manufactured cigarettes, cigars,
smoking- tobacco, chewing tobacco, and snuff.

There are in the state 373 furniture manufacturing- establish-
ments which employ 31,400 persons whose salaries amount to $77,-
600,000.00. The value of the furniture manufacturing in North
Carolina during 1949 was $58,800,000.00.

There are approximately 941 textile manufacturing plants in the
state. These plants employ 220,700 persons whose gross earnings
are approximately $782,900.00. During 1949 these 941 plants pro-
duced products valuing at approximately $549,700,000.00. Some
of the pi-oducts manufactured are cotton, yarn, thread, twine,
cordage, cotton woven goods, both broad and narrow; silk and



Ifi North Carolina Manual

rayon thread, yarn and woven poods, woolen and worsted yarn,
hosiery, both seamless and full-fashion made of cotton, silk, and
nylon.

There are approximately 737 food plants in the state. These
plants employ 17,200 persons whose gross earnings are approxi-
mately $54,600,000.00. During 1949 these 737 plants produced
products valued at approximately $69,200,000.00.

There are in the state 29 transportation equipment plants which
employ 1,200 persons whose salaries amount to $1,000,000.00. The
value of the sales products produced in 1949 was approximately
82,500,000.00.

Rural electrification began in North Carolina in 1917, but very
little progress was made until 1935. Cleveland County, however,
in 1925 built approximately 90 miles of rural electric lines to
serve the farmers of that county. In 1935, there were in North
Carolina 1,884 miles of rural lines serving 11,558 farms. The last
report of the Rural Electrification Authority in North Carolina,
July 1, 1950, showed there were 72,960 miles of rural lines serv-
ing 445,176 consumers. In addition to this there were 1,872 miles
of rural electrification lines under consti'uction and 4,872 miles
authorized but not yet under construction. North Carolina has
made its greatest progress in agricultural development and rural
electrification of the farms during the least quarter of a century.
When rural electrification first began in the state, it consisted
chiefly of lights for the home produced by some type of battery
system. Now farms are electrified and stoves, ranges, washing
machines, lights, sweet potato curers, milkers, hay curers, motors
for grinding grain, and many other items are in use. It is one
of the many good labor-saving devices for the rural homes and
farm activities.



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THE STATE CAPITOL

The original State Capitol of North Carolina was destroyed by
fire on June 21, 1831.

At the session of November, 1832, the Assembly resolved to
rebuild on the old site, and $50,000 was appropriated for the pur-
pose. Commissioners were appointed to have the work done. The
rubbish was cleared away, the excavations made and the founda-
tions were laid. On July 4, 1833, the cornerstone was set in place.

After the foundations were laid the work progressed more
slowly, and it was so expensive that the appropriation was ex-
hausted. The Legislature at its next session appropriated $75,000
more. To do the stone and finer work many skilled artisans had
been brought from Scotland and other countries. The Building
Commissioners contracted with David Paton to come to Raleigh
and superintend the work. Mr. Paton was an ai-chitect who had
come from Scotland the year before. He was the builder, the archi-
tect, and designer.

The Legislature was compelled to make appropriations for the
work from time to time. The following is a table of the several
appropriations made:

Session of 1832-33 $ 50,000.00

Session of 1833-34 75,000.00

Session of 1834-35 75,000.00

Session of 1835 75,000.00

Session of 1836-37 120,000.00

Session of 1838-39 105,300.00

Session of 1840-41 31,374.46

Total $531,674.46

The stone with which the building was erected was the property
of the State. Had the State been compelled to pui'chase this ma-
terial the cost of the Capitol would have been considerably in-
creased.

In the summer of 1840 the work was finished. At last, after
more than seven years, the sum of $531,674.46 was expended. As
large as that sum was for the time, when the State was so poor
and when the entire taxes for all State purposes reached less than

19



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