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Biennial report of the North Carolina State Library (reorganized July 1, 1956) [serial] (Volume 1960/62) online

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THE LIBRARY OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF

NORTH CAROLINA




THE COLLECTION OF
NORTH CAROLINIANA



C027.5

N871

1956/58-

1964/66



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL



00034021718



This book must not
be token from the
Library building.




Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Ensuring Democracy through Digital Access (NC-LSTA)



http://www.archive.org/details/biennialreport196062nort



THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT
OF THE

NORTH UMUU
STATE UUm

(Reorganized July 1, 1956)




July 1, 1960— June 30, 1962

Raleigh
North Carolina



THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT
OF THE

NORTH CAROLINA
STATE IIRRARV

(Reorganized July 1, 1956)




July 1, 1960— June 30, 1962

Raleigh
North Carohna



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

Raleigh, North Carohna

To His Excellency Terry Sanford

Gove7'7ior of North Carolina, Raleigh

My dear Sir:

We have the honor to submit to you the third biennial report
of the North Carolina State Library covering the biennium end-
ing June 30, 1962. This is in compliance with the General
Statutes of North Carolina, Chapter 125,

Respectfully submitted,

Thad Stem, Jr.
Chairman, North Carolina
State Library Board



TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Service and Organizational Chart 5

Board Members 7

Staff Members 7

Appropriations and Expenditures — State Funds 9

Appropriations and Expenditures — Federal Funds 10

Functions of the State Library 11

Resources 13

Books 13

Serials and Microfilm 14

Documents 14

General Services 15

Reference and Research 15

Interlibrary 1 6

Film 17

Talking Book 18

Extension Services 19

Grants in Aid 19

Public Library Consultants 20

Adult Services 21

Public Library Development 21

Public Library Legislation 23

Workshops and Institutes 24

National Library Week 26

Cooperation with Agricultural Extension in Reading

Program 26

Institutional Consultant 27

Processing Center 28

Growing Needs 30



NORTH CAROLINA STATE LIBRARY

Service and Organizational Chart





GOVERNOR












|6 members appointed by Governor
joverning Board |Supt. of Public Instruction, ex officio
(Librarian. UNC Library, ex officio











Appoints



N. C. Certification
Board Member, G.S.
125-9



N. C. Interlibrary Re-
search Facility, ex
officio



N. C. Library Associa-
tion Headquarters



■tate Librarian



GENERAL
SERVICES
Functions:

Reference and
research

Genealogy

Interlibrary loan

General circulation

Materials selection

Shelf work

Exhibits



ADMINISTRATION
Inunctions:
Organization
Personnel
Budget
Policies

Public Relations
Publications
Janitorial services
Communications
Legislation
Processing Center



EXTENSION

SERVICES

B^unctions:
Consultant service tc

Public libraries

Institutional
libraries

Interested groups
organizations,
individuals

Adult education

Film Pro,gram

Workshops, insti-
tutes, etc.

Statistics

Federal Aid program

Trustee program



rECHNICAL

SERVICES

injunctions:

Acquisitions

Bibliographic service;

Main catalog

Union catalog

Materials selection

Coordination of re-
search materials
within State

Binding

Periodicals

Newspapers

Microfilm

Gifts, exchanges, etc

Documents

Library Services for
the Blind



NORTH CAROLINA STATE LIBRARY

Office; Library Building, Raleigh



BOARD



Appointed by fhe Governor:

Thad Stem, Jr., Oxford, Chairman Term Expires 1967
Clifford Peeler, Salisbury,

V ice-Chairman Term Expires 1965

Dr. Roy B. McKnight, Shallotte Term Expires 1963

Paul S. Ballance, Winston-Salem Term Expires 1963

Dr. Mark M. Lindsey, Hamlet Term Expires 1965

Mrs. Gordon Tomlinson, Mocksville Term Expires 1967

Ex Officio:

Dr. Charles F, Carroll, Raleigh
Dr. Jerrold Orne, Chapel Hill



STAFF

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Hughey, State Librarian

ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION

Mrs. Betsy N. Pearce, Secretary to State Librarian

Mrs. Ruby B. Holloway, Budget, Personnel, and Purchasing

Officer
Mrs. Billie Jean Wall, Typist
Mrs. Carolyn Smitherman, Typist
Lonnie Young, Janitor-Messenger
Jesse Moore, Janitor-Messenger

GENERAL SERVICES DIVISION

Gladys Johnson, General Services Librarian

Mrs. Margaret Price, Genealogy Reference Librarian

Georgia H. Faison, Reference Librarian

Annie Lee Yates, Reference Librarian

Mrs. Lois Neal, Reference Librarian

Mrs. Marian Leith, Reference Librarian

Elizabeth D. Middleton, Library Assistant

Jean Glosson, Stenographer

Dan Woodall, Clerk



8 Third Biennial Report

EXTENSION SERVICES DIVISION

Elaine von Oesen, Extension Services Librarian
Frances Gish, Library Consultant
Phyllis Snyder, Library Consultant
Dorothy Kittel, Adult Services Consultant
Madge Blalock, Institutional Consultant and Editorial Libra-
rian
Mrs. Stella Sanders, Stenographer
Mrs. Pauline Hartofelis, Stenographer

TECHNICAL SERVICES DIVISION

Ann D. Galusha, Technical Services Librarian

Mrs. Carmen Zaic, Assistant Technical Services Librarian

Margaret Sangster Parrott, Serials and Documents Librarian

Dorothy C. Grigg, Head Cataloger

Mrs. Davora Nielsen, Cataloger

Mrs. Margaret Quance, Library Assistant

Mrs. Betty Smith, Library Assistant

Mrs. Eva Hocutt, Typist

Mrs. Betty Ballard, Typist

Mrs. Melda Arnold, Typist

Kenneth Lee, Clerk

Library Services for the Blind

Evelyn Peeler, Librarian

Mrs. Barbara Garrison, Assistant Librarian

Mrs. Rebecca Ferrell, Library Assistant

Patricia Glover, Typist

W. C. Haynes, Clerk

Daryl Brevier, Clerk

PROCESSING CENTER

Mrs. Marion Johnson, Librarian

Mrs. Doris Talley, Assistant Librarian

Mrs. Ruth C. Beck, Typist

Mrs. Mary Cameron, Typist

Mrs. Betty Bass, Typist

Mrs. Lalene Washburn, Typist

Mrs. Doris Harron, Typist

Eugene Spence, Duplicating Equipment Operator

Steven Driver, Clerk

Mrs. Martha Jo Johnson, Clerk



North Carolina State Library



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
State Funds





North Caroluia
State Library


State Aid to
Public Libraries




1060-61


1961-62


1960-61


1961-62


Salary — State Librarian


$ 9.500


$ 10,000


$


$


Salaries «S: Wages — Staff


86,515


110,412


3 0,292


35,332


Supplies and Materials


1.674


1,857


493


483


Postage, Telephone, Telegrams,
Express


1.581


1,600


125


125


Travel Expense


520


847


2,000


2,500


Printing and Binding


3.448


3,430


99


72


Repairs and Alterations


245


196


53


52


General Expense


312


329






Books


20.571
597


18,299
3,8 97


227




Equipment


263


Attending Board Meetings


286


540






Payments to Counties







424,272


412,529


Estimated Receipts


4,407


7,989






Total Expenditures


$12'5.249


$151,407


$457,561


$451,356


Total Appropriations


1125.178


^150,984


^457,562-


$466,519



10 Third Biennial Report

APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
Federal Funds



ADMINISTRATION

Salaries and Wages

Supplies and Materials

Postage, Telephone, Telegrams

Travel Expense

Printing and Binding

Repairs and Alterations

General Expense

Books and Materials

Equipment

Federal Aid to Counties

Contributions to Retirement and Social Security
Scholarship Grants

TOTAL ADMINISTRATION

PROCESSING CENTER

Salaries and Wages

Supplies and Materials

Postage, Telephone, Telegrams, Express

Travel Expense

Printing

Repairs and Alterations

Books and Materials

Equipment

Insurance

Motor Vehicle Operation

Contributions to Retirement and Social Security
TOTAL PROCESSING CENTER

Estimated Receipts

Balance Previous Year*

Total Expenditures



1960-61



$ 34.570


$ 38.355


342


714


813


1,153


1,638


3,274


701


778


26


213




730


17,500


27,999


3,791


251


179,371


214.887


1,898


2,303




9,600



240,650



1961-62



300,257



27,358


32,196


12',271


6,22'3


823


422


90




182


533


212


348


145,098


175,023


2.376


30


87


53




21


1,758


2,173


190,276


217,001


$488,511


$532,953


37,763


95,348


$430,926


)517,258



-Federal Funds may be carried from one liscal year to the next if fully
earned.



North Carolina State Library 11

FUNCTIONS OF THE STATE LIBRARY

It has been said that "What memory is to an individual, A
LIBRARY is to a people." The North Carolina State Library
is both a people's library and a library's library. Its resources
and services are available to the people of the whole State. Those
who are employed by the State should look to this library for
information to help them with their on-the-job responsibilities.
This is the library for all State officials and members of the
Legislature. All citizens of the State are welcomed in the Refer-
ence service areas where they have access to the total library
resources, printed and on microfilm.

Through the existing network of public library systems, citi-
zens have access to the materials available for loan from the
State Library collection. A growing interlibrary loan service
is greatly extending the use of present limited informational re-
sources among all types of libraries in North Carolina.

Since 1956, when the reorganization of the State Library was
initiated, its responsibilities have included both consultant serv-
ices and financial assistance toward public library development.
These and the interlibrary service program were major functions
of the North Carolina Library Commission, 1909-1956.

The North Carolina State Library, established by the General
Assembly of 1955. is governed by a Board of Trustees. The mem-
bership of the Board consists of six appointed by the Governor
and two ex officio — the Librarian of the University of North
Carolina and the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Appointed
members serve for six-year terms on a staggered basis; two
terms expiring each year.

This Board, in addition to generally accepted policy and bud-
get requesting functions, has the responsibility for the adminis-
tration of State Aid to Public Libraries funds and the Library
Services Act funds. These are two grant programs to aid in the
extension and development of public library service in North
Carolina.

The State Library is an official library clearing house for
agencies and individuals outside the Stale. The State Librarian
serves as secretary to the State Library Board and is a member
of the North Carolina Certification Board as designated by the
General Statutes. Currently, the State Librarian is a member
of the Governor's Coordinating Committee on Aging, the Ad-
visorv Commiitee of the North Carolina Recreation Commission.



12 Third Biennial Report

the Governor's Committee on Juvenile Delinquency and Youth
Crime, the Library Committee of The National Council on the
Aging, and Resource Consultant for the American Association
of State Libraries' Committee on Standards.

Statutory responsibility continues with the State Library for
the collecting, compiling and issuing of statistics of North Caro-
lina libraries: public, college and university, and special. Other
regular publications include a biennial narrative report, a month-
ly news letter and an acquisitions list, a checklist of State docu-
ments issued bimonthly and jointly with the University of North
Carolina Library. For the latter publication the State Library
compiles, edits, types and distributes to North Carolina govern-
ment agencies in Raleigh and North Carolina public libraries.
The University Library contributes titles, reproduces lists and
distributes to exchange agencies and other out-of-state agencies,
also to college and university libraries within the State and out
of state.

The State Library serves as a clearing house for library per-
sonnel. It maintains a list of persons interested in securing
library employment and a list of job opportunities. This is a
referral service only. A certain amount of investigation is re-
quired to determine whether a candidate has the technical
qualifications required ; but a referral should never be construed
as a recommendation from the State Library.

The shortage of professional library personnel is acute through-
out the country. In an effort to encourage more qualified per-
sons to enter the profession, the State Library initiated a scholar-
ship program with the use of Library Service Act Funds. Since
May 30, 1961, $2,000 scholarships have been aw^arded to seven
persons for study to earn a Master's degree in Library Science.
In return the recipients agree to work at least two years in a
public library serving rural North Carolina. Legal contracts pro-
vide for repayment of funds if recipient fails to fulfill the contract
in full or any part.

The North Carolina State Library, along with other library
services at the state level, are included in the "Survey of Library
Functions of the State." This survey is sponsored by the Ameri-
can Library Association and financed by the Carnegie Corpora-
tion. Findings will be used by the American Association of
State Libraries to formulate standards for library functions of
the states. Reports of the Survey and a draft of recommenda-
tions are anticipated by mid-1963. A preliminary report by Dr.



North Carolina State Library 13

Phillip Monypenny, University of Illinois Professor of Political
Science and Director of the Survey, emphasized as a major func-
ton of a state library the provision of basic tools for information
on which many decisions of government must be based.

In North Carolina the State Library, the Department of Public
Instruction, the Supreme Court Library, the Department of Ar-
chives and History and the Secretary of State cooperated in
filling in survey questionnaires and discussing service with the
member of the survey team who did some followup work. Dr.
Mary Edna Anders, Special Research Scientist, Georgia Institute
of Technology, a graduate of the University of North Carolina,
did the followup interviews in this State. The final recommenda-
tions of library activities and responsibilities at the state level
are eagerly awaited.

RESOURCES
Books

Two major changes in policy relate to books. (1) The juvenile
book collection was discontinued September 1960. Retained, how-
ever, are those titles by North Carolina authors, those about
North Carolina and others which may be useful reference vol-
umes. (2) The sending of general collections of books to enlarge
local public library resources was discontinued. The widespread
coverage of public library service and the development of basic
book collections for adults and children in the county and regional
libraries curtailed the need for borrowing such collections from
the State Library. On the increase is the need for supplementary
information in specific subject areas as indicated by the nature
of interlibrary loan subject requests.

These changes have been reflected in the acquisition policy
and weeding program of the Library. Duplication of titles has
been reduced and careful weeding has helped make room on
shelves for some of the 7,704 volumes purchased and the 508 gift
volumes received during the biennium. Even so it was neces-
sary to store some of the bound New York Times, 1915 through
1951, to make way for book shelving. As of June 30, 1962, the
total recorded State Library book stock was only 145,127 volumes.

Recataloging of the merged book collections to provide useful
subject arrangement continues steadily along with the catalog-
ing of new books which must have priority'. The total number
cataloged during the biennium reached 12,665 and Library of



14 Third Biennial Report

Congress cards purchased for same amounted to $2,000. Where
feasible the services of the Processing Center have been used for
duplication of cards. This has been extremely helpful and satis-
factory for the recataloging of many of the older titles.

Serials and Microfilm

Lists of the periodicals currently subscribed to were sent to
the State Agencies with the request that they make suggestions
for additional titles to be considered for purchase. There was a
.staff study of this list which resulted in some titles being dropped
and others being added. Periodical titles received at the State
Library now number 488 and of this number 270 are paid sub-
scriptions and the remainder gifts or exchanges.

The Library continues to cooperate with the Department of
Archives and History in the microfilming of North Carolina
newspapers, as well as with commercial firms and has received
many reels of film free in return for letting them use the papers
for microfilming.

At this time the library is receiving 115 North Carolina news-
papers as gifts from the publishers. Of these, seven are being-
bound. The library also subscribes to 16 North Carolina news-
papers on microfilm as well as the New York Times. Since com-
plimentary newspaper subscriptions no longer may be mailed
at second-class rates, in some cases the postage would be greater
than the subscription costs. This poses another problem for a
limited book budget.

Documents

During the biennium the use and resourcefulness of both the
State and Federal documents collections have increased as indi-
cated by daily records of these valuable research materials. This
agency has accepted the responsibility of providing the Library
of Congress with two copies of all State documents. These are
used frequently by Congressmen. Of the two copies kept by the
State Library one is for reference and one is a circulating copy.

Continued personal contact with the personnel in charge of
publications for the State agencies has provided a basis for en-
larging the State documents collection and making available to
the public and government essential research studies published
by the State.

In an effort to provide necessary resource materials for the re-



North Carolina State Library 15

search projects of the various legislative study commissions, the
State Library with the Institute of Government has entered into
an agreement with the National Legistlative Conference to parti-
cipate in its program of '^Interstate Exchange of Legislative Serv-
ice Agency Publication." Participation in this program provides
legislative publcations in printed or processed form from 25 of the
50 states. In addition to this program, the Library subscribes to
the microcard edition of ihe legislative research publications list-
ed in the quarterly LEGISLATIVE RESEARCH CHECKLIST
published by the Council of State Governments. With the pur-
chase of a microcard reader, research publications from most of
the 50 states have been provided for use by state agency personnel
and legislative study commission personnel. The Library contin-
ues to purchase or secure through gifts and exchanges many pub-
lications not available through either of the previously mentioned
programs.

With the addition of many new items to the documents col-
lections (approximately 7,500 federal documents and 2,000 state
documents have been received during the biennium), space be-
comes an even greater problem. Adequate space and facilities
for preserving the printed materials of the State and Federal
government is greatly needed.

GENERAL SERVICES
Reference and Research

The most impressive feature in reference service for the bi-
ennium is the increased use by State agencies, especially in the
off-legislative year. The departments of Archives and History,
Conservation and Development, Public Instruction, and the Gov-
ernor's Office, are the most frequent users ; though the average
month brings queries from as many as twenty different agencies.
For the first time, the compiling of bibliographies became a meas-
urable factor of service. Examples are: a comprehensive listing
of sources of Cape Fear River history at the request of the State
Advertising Agency, an exhaustive listing of materials on Fit-
ness and allied subjects for the Youth Fitness Commission, a
selective list of publications on juvenile delinquency for the
Governor's Committee on Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Crime.

In addition to the State agencies, local governmental units, local
offices of Federal agencies, local business and civic organizations
request reference service of the Library. Strong collections



16



Third Biennial Report



of State and Federal documents are invaluable adjuncts to the
regular reference tools in service to these patrons ; but to main-
tain quality service to the business — scientific — economic — indus-
trial — governmental complex, it is essential that more special
handbooks, directories, subject encyclopedias, registers, and vari-
ous business services be provided. These are expensive to buy
and to maintain, but there is a direct ratio between the caliber
of the tool and of the service.

Another specialized service is Genealogical Reference, used by
a considerable segment of the total clientele. Patrons come from
out of state and in state to the library. Many write for assistance.
One-third of the total reference transactions in this area during
the biennium was handled by correspondence.

The outstanding newspaper collection in print and on film, the
strong Civil War collection and the North Carolina material
bring many people to the State Library for research purposes.
Gaps in these collections are being filled as limited budgets permit.

Interlibrary

Through interlibrary services the total library resources avail-
able to North Carolinians are greatly enlarged. Teletype service




Fi'om library to library to you



North Carolina State Library



17



and union catalogs at the University of North Carolina Library
and the State Library facilitate the use of interlibrary resources.
The State Library serves as a clearing house for such requests
from the public libraries of the State and borrows from other li-
braries across the nation when warranted. Through teletype, 57
major librai-y resources of the nation are available quickly.
Generous cooperation of the college, university, and public li-
braries within the State has enhanced all interlibrary services.
As the number of interlibrary loan requests has grown, so has the
number of referrals made by the State Library to other libraries.
These referrals have been made chiefly on the basis of locations
available from the union catalogs and union lists. Referrals which
could not be filled indicate the continuing lack of informational
materials among the total library resources of the State. Seven-
teen public libraries have developed special subject collections
and have accepted responsibility for statewide lending as follows :



f<ubject

Architecture

Art

Automation

Business and Industry

Drama and the Theatre

Family Life and the Home

Foreign Languages and

Literatures
Furniture, Design and

Manufacture
Gardening and Landscape

Gaidening
Minerals and Mineral

Industries
Music

Natural History
The Negro
Recreation
Textiles: Knitting, Yarn

Manufacturing and

Machinery
Textiles: Weaving and

Design, Chemistry and

Dyeing, Synthetics
Vocational and Industrial

Manuals



Library

Pack Memorial Public Library
Olivia Raney Library
May Memorial Library
Greensboro Public Library
Wilson County Public Library
Durham Public Library

Cumberland County Library

High Point Public Library

Rowan Public Library

Mitchell County Library
Randolph Public Library
Sheppard Memorial Library
Richard B. Harrison Library
Kinston Public Library



Gaston County Public Library
Public Library of Charlotte
and Mecklenburg County

Public Library of "Winston-
Salem and Fnrsvth Coimtv



Toicti

Asheville

Raleigh

Burlington

Greensboro

Wilson

Durham

Fayetteville

High Point

Salisbury

Bakesville

Asheboro

Greenville

Raleigh

Kinston



Gastonia
Charlotte



Winston-Siilem



Film



During the biennium films from the Adult Film Project col-
lection were shown 11,636 times to a total audience of 479, 14L



18



Third Biennial Report



Most extensive use of the collection was made by community
groups such as study groups and PTAs, by church groups, busi-
ness and industrial organizations, and hospitals and rest homes.
Films in all subject areas were used but greatest use was made
of films in the areas of family life and child care, religion, foreign
history and government, nature study, music, art. space science,
and job improvement.

The Project, begun in 1952 to provide educational films for
adult use through the public libraries of the State, now has more
than 1,000 films in the collection. Films are selected by public
librarians at screening sessions held in various parts of the State.


1 3

Online LibraryNorth Carolina State LibraryBiennial report of the North Carolina State Library (reorganized July 1, 1956) [serial] (Volume 1960/62) → online text (page 1 of 3)