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Biennial report of the North Carolina State Library (reorganized July 1, 1956) [serial] (Volume 1964/66) online

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THE LIBRARY OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF

NORTH CAROLINA




THE COLLECTION OF
NORTH CAROLINIANA



C027.5

N871

1956/58-

1964/66



H



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL



00034021718



This book must
be token from
Librory building.





Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive

in 2010 witii funding from

Ensuring Democracy tiirougii Digital Access (NC-LSTA)



http://www.archive.org/details/biennialreport196466nort



FIFTH BIENNIAL REPORT



OF THE



WORTH CAROLiy
nm LIBRARY



(Reorganized July 1, 1956)




July 1, 1964— June 30, 1966



Raleigh
North Carolina



FIFTH BIENNIAL REPORT



OF THE



ItOIITH UUUU
$Tm LIBRARY



(Reorganized July 1, 1956)




July 1, 1964— June 30, 1966



Raleigh
North Carolina



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

Raleigh, North Carolina

To His Excellency Dan K. Moore

Governor of North Carolina, Raleigh

My dear Sir :

We have the honor to submit to you the fifth biennial report
of the North Carolina State Library covering the biennium
ending June 30, 1966. This is in compliance with the General
Statutes of North Carolina, Chapter 125.

Respectfully submitted,

Thad Stem, Jr.
Chairman, North Carolina
State Library Board



TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Service and Organizational Chart 6

Board Members and Administration 7

Appropriations and Expenditures — State Funds 8

Appropriations and Expenditures — Federal Funds 9

Narrative Report 10

Administration Changes 11

Grovernor's Commission on Library Resources 12

Help for General Assembly 12

Processing Center 13

Archives — Library Building 15

Library Services for the Blind 16

South Carolina, Too 17

Reference Services Division 17

Interlibrary Services . 18

Service to Individuals 20

Technical Services Division 22

Documents 23

Help for Other State Agencies 24

Extension Services 24

Public Library Construction 25

Federal Construction Grants 26

Inadequate Support 28

Adult Film Project 28

Institutional Libraries 29

Shortage of Professional Librarians 30

North Carolinians for Better Libraries , . . 31

Ten-year Summary of Progress 32



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North Carolina State Library 7

NORTH CAROLINA STATE LIBRARY

Office: Library Building, Raleigh
BOARD

Appointed by the Governor:

Thad Stem, Jr., Oxford, Chairman Term Expires 1967

Dr. Mark M. Lindsey, Hamlet, Vice Chairman

Term Expires 1971

Paul S. Ballance, Winston-Salem Term Expires 1969

Mrs. Bernice Kelly Harris, Seaboard Term Expires 1969

Mrs. T. T. Potter, Beaufort Term Expires 1971

Mrs. Gordon Tomlinson, Mocksville Term Expires 1967

Ex Officio:

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, Raleigh
Dr. Jerrold Orne, Chapel Hill

STATE LIBRARIAN— Philip S. Ogilvie

ASSISTANT STATE LIBRARIAN— Elaine von Oesen



SECRETARY TO STATE LIBRARIAN-
MRS. Betsy N. Pearce



BUDGET, PERSONNEL, AND PURCHASING OFFICER-
MRS. Ruby B. Holloway



Fifth Biennial Report



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES



State Funds



North Carolina
State Library



1964-65 1965-66



State Aid to
Public Libraries



1964-65 1965-66



Salaries — Officers

Salaries — Staff

Supplies

Communication

Travel

Printing and Binding

Repairs and Alterations

General Expense

Per Diem and Expense — Members

Equipment

Books

Grants to Counties and Regions

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

Estimated Receipts

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS . . .



$ 11,925

135,867

2,027

1,790

842

3,566

198

302

681

600

33,999

$191,797

21,243

$170,554



$ 12,600

148,001

2,054

4,503

1,000

3,394

193

285

562

3,331

33,400



40,175

488

125

2,271

98

46



42,747

492

95

2,153



227



$209,323

21,208

$188,115



425,000



$468,430



$468,430



57



259



636,250



$682,053



$682,053



North Carolina State Library

APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES

Federal Funds



ADMINISTRATION

Salaries — StaflF

Supplies

Communication

Travel

Printing

Repairs and Alterations

General Expense

Equipment

Books

Grants to Counties and Regions

Contributions to Retirement and Social Security
Grants for Scholarships

TOTAL ADMINISTRATION

PROCESSING CENTER

Salaries — Staff

Supplies

Communication

Travel

Printing

Repairs and Alterations

Equipment

Books

Insurance and Bonding

Motor Vehicle Operation

Contributions to Retirement and

Social Security

TOTAL PROCESSING CENTER

Transfer to Special Clearing Account

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS

Balance Previous Year



1964-65



570,362

55,065

13,390

571

3

228

399

2,312

306,488

80

3,909



1965-66



$ 44,140


$ 56,955


1,692


1,955


3,418


3,208


1,446


3,607


1,268


674


293


246


216


864


2,664


3,722


1,395


14,995


495,200


473,035


3,105


6,258


15,525


7,782



$382,445
10,690

963,497

972,513

21,204



573,301

62,119

9,762

653

1,391

466

8,464

316,706

70

6,847



$406,478

979,779

979,164

30,220



10 Fifth Biennial Report

FIFTH BIENNIAL REPORT OF THE

NORTH CAROLINA STATE LIBRARY
July 1,1964 - June 30, 1966

Now we are ten. Completion of the fifth biennium brings to
a close a full decade of service of the new North Carolina State
Library as established effective July 1, 1956, by an act of the
General Assembly of 1955. It also marks ten years of Federal
Aid to public library development in North Carolina adminis-
tered by the State Library, These have been years of exceptional
library progress, and they are concluded fitly by a biennium out-
standing in its own right.

To cite the accomplishments of the fifth biennium and the
first decade without paying tribute to decisions made and actions
taken prior to as well as within their own time spans would be,
however, to neglect by exclusion an essential element of those
achievements. It is the case that most of the progress of the
fifth biennium rests heavily upon decisions made and actions
taken earlier in the decade. Moreover, the attainments of the
entire decade are firmly rooted in the more remote pasts of the
North Carolina Library Commission and the old North Carolina
State Library which were reorganized and combined to form the
new State Library in 1956. They reach back to the days of the
late Misses Marjorie Beal and Carrie Broughton and beyond.

Goals, principles, and policies formulated and adopted in those
now distant days by wise and imaginative librarians, library
trustees, and other friends of libraries are today, with some
adjustments for current applicability, the reliable bases upon
which plans for the future are built and in the light of which
present library policies and procedures are evaluated. They are,
therefore, the sources of the general soundness of the State
Library program, and that soundness in its turn gives to the
State Library an openness to new ideas as well as a certain
desirable stability for these times of rapid and revolutionary
changes in information sciences and services.



North Carolina State Library 11

ADMINISTRATION CHANGES

Both openness and stability were sources of needed strength
for the State Library in the several changes in top level admini-
strative positions that occurred in the fifth biennium. Mrs.
Elizabeth House Hughey, last director of the North Carolina
Library Commission, became State Librarian on July 1, 1956,
and continued to serve in that capacity through the first eight
months of this biennium. Miss Elaine von Oesen ably carried
the dual responsibilities of Head of the Extension Services
Division and Acting State Librarian for the next nine months.
Philip S. Ogilvie, appointed State Librarian effective December
1, 1965, administered the State Library for the final seven
months of the biennium.

There v^^ere also changes in the membership and officers of the
North Carolina State Library Board of Trustees and on the
staff of the State Library. Mrs. T. T. Potter of Beaufort in
Carteret County v^^as appointed by Governor Dan K. Moore to
succeed Clifford Peeler of Salisbury in Rovi^an County as a
member of the Board, and Dr. Mark M. Lindsey of Hamlet in
Richmond County was elected to the vice-chairmanship of the
Board. Then, near the end of the biennium. Miss Evelyn Peeler
retired as Head of the North Carolina-South Carolina Regional
Library for the Blind, and Mrs. Marian P. Leith of the Reference
Services Division staff was appointed to replace her.

Each of these changes was an important one. Each person
replaced had a long record of distinguished service and a basic
familiarity with the workings of the State Library that no new-
comer could possibly possess. And yet, each change was effected
with hardly any slowing of progress. Instead of a series of
crises, attention to details and the fundamental soundness of
the overall program of the State Library produced smooth
transitions from one administrator to another and from one
member of the State Library Board to another.

As a matter of fact, the fifth biennium was marked by a
pronounced acceleration of meaningful activities and dependable
progress. This was partly the result of increases in State Aid
and Federal Aid and related program expansions. It was also
a result of the recommendations of the Governor's Commission
on Library Resources.



12 Fifth Biennial Report

GOVERNOR'S COMMISSION ON LIBRARY RESOURCES

The Governor's Commission on Library Resources, appointed
by Governor Terry Sanford late in the fourth biennium of the
new North Carolina State Library, pursued its designated tasks
into the fifth. It surveyed library resources of all kinds through-
out the State, evaluated them in terms of present and future
needs, and issued a report, Resources of North Carolina
Libraries, edited by Dr. Robert B. Downs, Dean of Library
Administration, University of Illinois. Recommendations from
the report were incorporated as an "Appendix" in the Fourth
Biennial Report of the North Carolina State Library . . ., and
they were looked upon in the fifth biennium as a general direc-
tive for continuing library development and furthering co-
ordination among libraries of all types in the state.

Particular attention was paid to implementing the recommen-
dations specifically directed at the State Library itself. For
example, the State Library, acutely aware of the limitations
of its general collection of books and related materials, requested
the recommended increases in its regular budget (Code 18461)
from the Advisory Budget Commission and the General
Assembly of 1967. Concern was also shown in the fifth biennium
for the highly important matters of improving communications
between and among libraries of all kinds and of acting to the
fullest extent possible upon recommendations relative to research
needs and activities of State Government.

HELP FOR GENERAL ASSEMBLY

Along with working for the overall improvement of its re-
sources and services, the State Library felt a very special con-
cern for increasing and improving its services to legislators.
Emphasis was placed upon meeting the research needs of the
1965 General Assembly and preparing to meet an even greater
proportion of those needs of the General Assembly of 1967. An
aspect of this emphasis was the effort to guarantee State Library
receipt of copies of all official publications of State Government.
This was part of a concerted effort to correlate more effectively,
as a means of strengthening each of them and making better
service possible for all of them, the research activities of other
agencies of the State and the State Library itself. Thus it



North Carolina State Library 13

happened that, while cooperation with the Interlibrary Center's
union catalog at Chapel Hill was continued, a more inclusive
union catalog of public and state agency library holdings was
being sought with the ultimate goal of making all research re-
sources in North Carolina accessible to all North Carolinians.

A statewide catalog in book form was discussed as one means
of making resources in general more accessible. A proposal for
such a catalog of public library holdings was presented at the
1965 North Carolina Library Association Conference in Winston-
Salem. Then, later in the biennium, the Automation Committee
of the Public Libraries Section of the North Carolina Library
Association requested that the State Library investigate the
possibilities of such a catalog as well as other automated pro-
cedures that might be practical and economical. In the mean-
while, the State Library had already prepared a budget request
for the 1967 General Assembly for the funds to initiate a book
catalog of the State Library collection with a view to increasing
the use of the collection as supplementary material for local
libraries all across the State. Thought was being given also
to the long-range possibilities of such a State Library collection
catalog that might be expanded gradually to include other
libraries beginning perhaps with those libraries contracting
with the State Library Processing Center.

PROCESSING CENTER

The State Library Processing Center, an established service
to local libraries headed by Mrs. Marion Johnson, started its
seventh year of operations near the end of the fifth biennium.
When it was established in 1960, the Center was thought to
have a destiny that included other than public libraries although
it was decided to delay the involvement of other types of librar-
ies, with the exception of one school library, until some experi-
ence had been gained. Resources of North Cai^olina Libraries
recommended renewed consideration of the possibility of expand-
ing to serve public schools, community colleges, technical insti-
tutes, etc., and the possibility was explored in the fifth biennium
only to be further postponed because the increase in materials
to be processed for libraries already contracting for services
precluded any additions to the number of libraries served. Indeed



14 Fifth Biennial Report

for the first time since it was started, the Processing Center
had to turn down new applications for participation from
public libraries.

The Center began the actual processing of books in April,
1960, and along with books, when they were delivered to con-
tracting libraries ready for loaning to borrowers, went complete
sets of catalog cards ready for filing in the local library's card
catalog. Cost of the service was only seventy-five cents a
volume, and with that amount the Center was self-supporting,
i.e., salaries of personnel, supplies, and postage were covered
by processing fees.

At the end of the fifth biennium this service, improved and
greatly expanded, was costing one dollar a volume in order for
the Center to continue to be self-supporting. Even with the
increase in cost the service continued to be a bargain. By
making use of equipment and mass production methods not
available in the average local library or small library system,
the Processing Center was able to perform the various aspects
of technical processing in a superior manner and to save local
libraries substantial amounts in book purchase costs by giving
them the opportunity of participating in consolidated book
ordering procedures.

The Center fulfilled its purposes of ordering, receiving,
cataloging, and preparing books for circulation for fifty-three
North Carolina library units in the fifth biennium. These fifty-
three units included fifty-two public library systems and one
school library, none of which possessed the personnel or the
equipment to perform these tasks satisfactorily and economically.
Altogether they were giving service in seventy-one North Caro-
lina counties. Thirteen of them were regional libraries serving
two or more counties ; thirty-two were county libraries ; four
were independent municipal libraries, and one was a public
school library.

186,699 books were processed and shipped from the Center
during the fifth biennium. In addition, catalog card duplicating
services were performed for the Technical Services Division of
the State Library and for the North Carolina Museum of Art,
and valuable, often fragile and irreplaceable reference materials
were photographed for the Reference Services Division of the



North Carolina State Library 15

State Library in connection with its services to public and
research libraries. Even so, at the end of the biennium the
Center w^as seeking ways of streamlining its procedures still
further as a possible means of extending services to a few
more libraries.

ARCHIVES-LIBRARY BUILDING

Procedures were not the biggest obstacles to taking on addi-
tional libraries, however. Space limitations were the major
problem. The space needs of the new North Carolina State
Library increased dramatically throughout its first decade and
especially in the fifth biennium because of the phenomenal in-
crease in informational materials and the expansion of much
needed services.

No immediate relief was in view at the end of the biennium.
The Archives-Library Building for which funds had been ap-
propriated by the General Assembly of 1963 was still not under
construction although plans had been drawn and a site had been
acquired and partially cleared on the north side of Jones Street
between Wilmington and Blount Streets in Raleigh.

More discouraging, however, than the delay were the plans
for the building. The members of the North Carolina State
Library Board of Trustees were seriously concerned because
the State Library was to occupy only forty per cent of the pro-
posed building (approx. 51,000 sq. ft.) which would not appre-
ciably relieve its space needs. It was obvious that the State
Library was not getting the adequate building designed to
guarantee efficiency in its functions as recommended in Resources
of North Carolina Libraries. As a matter of fact, there was no
possibility of squeezing all of the Divisions of the State Library
into the allotted space, and it was feared that rising construction
costs might further limit space or equipment or both.

In the face of this concern, the State Library Board instructed
the State Librarian to prepare a Capital Improvements Budget
request to the General Assembly of 1967 for a separate building
of approximately 130,000 square feet for exclusive occupancy by
the State Library and to ask the Property Control Division of
the Department of Administration for temporary, suitable
housing for the North Carolina-South Carolina Regional Library
for the Blind, a Division of the North Carolina State Library.



16 Fifth Biennial Report

Both requests were presented, and at the end of the biennium
desirable temporary quarters for Library Services for the
Blind had been located at 1124 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, and
plans were underway for moving from the old Mansion Park
location at the end of July.

LIBRARY SERVICES FOR THE BLIND

The move to new quarters for Library Services for the Blind
came at just the right time. The space in the Mansion Park
Building had been inadequate for some time, and new forms
of materials such as magnetic tapes were being added by the
Library of Congress while the number of Talking Books was not
reduced. There were also growing pressures from some readers
and from the Library of Congress for the stocking of Braille
items which require considerable space. Furthermore, the advent
of such new forms of materials for the blind was certain to
generate a burgeoning demand for them just as the demand for
Talking Books had developed phenomenally when they first
became available.

As a matter of fact the demand for Talking Books asserted
itself decidedly and dramatically when, early in the first bien-
nium of the new North Carolina State Library, the Division
for the Blind of the Library of Congress, because of budget
limitations, was faced with curtailment of services to blind
residents of North Carolina and neighboring states. It was
announced that unless some means of organizing and rendering
service was found within the State by July 1, 1958, service
would be cut off from the Library of Congress. There was an
immediate reaction from blind readers, and the North Carolina
Association for the Blind agreed to fund the service through
fiscal 1958-1959. The North Carolina State Library Board of
Trustees also rose to the occasion by authorizing supervision of
the service by the State Librarian until something further could
be done.

A request for funds to continue the service as a part of the
services of the State Library was made of the General Assembly
of 1959, and the funds were granted. Thus, Library Services
for the Blind became an official part of the State Library pro-
gram on July 1, 1959. Talking Books and the machines for
playing them continued to be furnished by the Library of



North Carolina State Library 17

Congress, but circulation of the books began to be handled
through the North Carolina State Library after proper certi-
fication of visually handicapped patrons as legally blind.

SOUTH CAROLINA, TOO

In August, 1961, the service was extended to South Carolina
residents through a contractural arrangement with the South
Carolina State Library Board. Since that time the service has
been known as the North Carolina-South Carolina Regional
Library for the Blind, and over the years, with minor fluctua-
tions, the increase in readers and collection has been gratifying.
Good service as well as a broader variety of reading materials,
some of them in new forms, have accounted for the enthusiastic
response of blind readers in both states.

North Carolina blind readers numbered 1,683 at the end of
the fifth biennium, and total circulation for the biennium in
North Carolina was 136,832 of which 55,498 were periodicals.
South Carolina readers, although fewer at only 702, showed
some increase also and read 52,851 books or periodicals. Some
of the materials were magnetic tapes of which one copy of each
of thirty-one titles had been provided to the North Carolina-
South Carolina Regional Library for the Blind by the Library
of Congress. Readers provided their own tape players, but there
were hopeful developments in experiment and invention towards
the production of an easy loading machine of moderate cost and
suitable performance. Blind readers were kept informed of
these and other developments as well as of new titles through
Talking Book Topics published by the Library of Congress bi-
monthly and through a quarterly Newsletter prepared and
distributed by the staff of the North Carolina-South Carolina
Regional Library for the Blind beginning with the Fall of 1965.
The latter, reproduced in large type, was received with enthus-
iasm and resulted in scores of letters to the staff from blind
readers.

REFERENCE SERVICES DIVISION

Response to the performance of the Reference Services
Division of the State Library during the fifth biennium was
also generally favorable although such limiting factors as an
inadequate State Library book collection, staff shortages, and



18 Fifth Biennial Report

time-consuming communications problems did elicit occasional
murmurings of dissatisfaction especially from larger library-
systems capable of meeting most of their needs from their own
collections and turning to the State Library for rather specialized
materials not in its collection either. Even then, this Division
headed by Miss Gladys Johnson made every effort to identify
locations of the desired materials in other cooperating libraries
such as those of Duke University, North Carolina State Uni-
versity, and the University of North Carolina, and that done,
to refer the requesting library to the location in the case of
noncirculating materials or to send the request to the location
for circulating materials. Unfortunately valuable time w^as


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Online LibraryNorth Carolina State LibraryBiennial report of the North Carolina State Library (reorganized July 1, 1956) [serial] (Volume 1964/66) → online text (page 1 of 3)