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Norton William Jipson.

A history & genealogy of the descendents [!] of John Jepson, of England and Boston, Mass., through his son John's two son's William and Micah, 1610-1917 online

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THE r!£Y/ YORK
I PUBLIC LIBRARY



ASTOR, LENOX
TILDilN FOUiNDATtONS I



ififi'lin tian^jtm^mtMrn




NORTON' W. IIPSON, M. D.



A History (^ Genealogy

' OF THE DESCENDENTS
OF

JOHN JEPSON

OF ENGLAND AND BOSTON, MASS.

THROUGH HIS SON JOHN'S TWO

SON'S WILLIAM AND MICAH ,

1610-1917



■y-



i » J »
• .« > >



» •






BY



NORTON W^. JIPSON, M. D.

FELLOW OF THE AMERICAN
MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, ETC.



THE GAZETTE PRESS
JANESVILLE, -WIS.



THE I;EV/ YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

823o4()

ASTOR LE.NOX AND

Itilden foundations



• *



COPYRIGHT, 1917
BY N. W. JIPSON






TO THE MEMBERS OF THE JEPSON
FAMILY, WHOSE CHEERFUL ASSIST-
ANCE AND ENCOURAGEMENT HAVE
SERVED TO LIGHTEN A HEAVY TASK,
THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED WITH
KIND REGARDS BY THE AUTHOR.



"Out of monuments, names, words, proverbs,
traditions, private records and evidences, frag-
ments of stories, passages of books, and the like,
we do save and recover somewhat from the del-
uge of time."

— Bacon.

"Striving so to live that our sons and our
sons' sons, for ages to come, might still lead
their children reverently to the doors out of
which we had been carried to the grave, say-
ing, 'Look, this was his house, this was his cham-
ber." "

RUSKIN.

"Breed is stronger than pasture."

— George Elliott.



PREFACE

o<>oco<xx>oooo

This work has extended over a period of nine years, but on account of pro-
fessional and other duties has been frequently interrupted. The interest mani-
fested by various members of the family has encouraged the writer to publish
the results of his search for records which have been gathered from various
sources; the public records consisting of town, church, cemetery, probate, land
and court records; the private records consisting principally of the Bible rec-
ords which were kept by nearly all New-England families. Family tradition,
especially as it refers to ancestors four or more generations removed from the
present, has been found unreliable, usually distorted and exaggerated, but fre-
quently having some fact as its basis. The writer has been careful to insert no
record and to make no positive statement if there could be any reasonable doubt of
its authenticity. To secure the public records, especiallj' the Boston data, a part
of which have not as yet been published, has necessitated a considerable finan-
cial outlay, a large part of the funds being donated by the late Webster C. Jip-
son, whose substantia! aid is hereby thankfully acknowledged.

It is manifestly impracticable to name each member of the family who has
assisted in gathering data, but to all of them the writer expresses his gratitude.
The late George E. Jepson, of Newton, Mass., who contributed a portion of the
introduction, gave the writer much encouragement and many valuable sugges-
tions.

The plan of this work is substantially the one adopted by the New England
Historic Genealogical Society. Each head of a family is first described and the
facts concerning his birth, death, marriage and wife's birth and death, where
obtainable, are given; also the place of residence, occupation and other facts
concerning both.

Then the children are taken up, in the order of their births and to each one
is assigned a Roman numeral, as i, ii, iii, etc. The daughters, unmarried sons
and married sons of whom a limited amount of information is obtainable are
then disposed of, including the descendants of the daughters down to the pres-
ent time. In addition to the Roman numeral, each son who became the head of
a family and carried on the line is given a number in large type and described
later in the book.

It is believed that the reader will have no difficulty in understanding this
method, especially if he will carefully read the table of contents.

As to the scope of this work: the writer has attempted to secure records of
all the descendants especially along male lines of John Jepson of Boston,
through his son, John, Jr., whose two sons, William and Micah, so far as known,
Vfere the forebears of all the present living members of the family.

William's son John, was the father of John, of Dover, Mass.; Benjamin of
S. Carolina and Georgia ; Samuel, who remained in Boston but whose records
have not been found, and Lemuel C. of S. Carolina, Tennessee, and Franklin,
Kentucky. Samuel, another son of William was the ancestor of that branch of



the familv still livint; in the vicinity of Boston. William's son Henry and his
desceiulents lived mostlx' in New London, Conn, anil no recent information of
tlietii can be obtained. Mirah removed to G«slien, Mass.; and his sons John and
Joseph lived in CJosiien until their deaths, and his sons David and Samuel re-
mo\ eil to Fowiial, \'t.

In compiling this work every effort has hccn put forth to avoid errors and
the proofs have been carefully corrected; if in spite of this care, some mistakes
have crept in, the writer feels that they will not materially detract from the
reader's interest in the work.

With these explanatory remarks, the book is sent forth, with the hope that

it will be reail with pleasure by the members of the family.

N. W. JIPSON.
Chicago, Illitiois,

Sept. 24, 1917.



CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION : p. 13. Origin of the name Jepson ; Name
as found in old English records. The Jephsons of England and Ireland,
Jepsons of Lincolnshire, Scotch-Irish Jepsons who emigrated to Amer-
ica, American Jepsons from Darwin, Lincolnshire, — from Yorkshire;
Colonial Jepson Families of Connecticut, of Rhode Island, Nottingham
Jepsons, Dr. Henry Jephson of Leamington, England, Pilgrim Jepsons
of Amsterdain and Leydsnt. Jeprons of Boston. The Boston of our An-
cestors, by Geo. E. Jepson, p. 16, Armorial Bearings, p. 23.

JEPSON HEADS OF FAMILIES

(Note: Daughters, unmarried sons and sons who married, but of whose
children little can be learned, are not named in the table of contents. See
index.)

1. JOHN JEPSON OF BOSTON p. 25

2. John Jr p. 26

2. Thomas p. 27

2. JOHN JEPSON, JR., OF BOSTON p. 26

4. William p. 27

5. Benjamin p. 28

6. MiCAH p. 28

3. THOMAS OF BOSTON p. 27

4. WILLIAM JEPSON OF BOSTON. p. 27

7. John p. 29

8. Benjamin p. 30

9. Samuel p. 30

10. Henry p. 30

5. BENJAMIN JEPSON p. 28

'6. MICAH JEPSON OF HINGAM AND GOSHEN,

MASSACHUSETTS p. 28

11. John p. 31

12. Joseph ^ p. 31

13. David ! p. 32

14. Samuel ,..: .p. 33

7. JOHN JEPSON OF BOSTON p. 29

15. John p. 33

16. Lemuel, C. (Jesse) .- p. 34

17. Benjamin p. 37

8. BENJAMIN JEPSON OF BOSTON p., 30

9. SAMUEL JEPSON OF BOSTON p. 30

18. Samuel p. 38

19. William p. 39



10. HKNR^ jKPSON OF BOSTON p. 30

JO. Hesrv p- 39

11. JOHN JKPSON OF GOSHEN, MASS p. M

21. Forrest p- 40

22. t'VRM p. 41

12. jOSKPH JKPSON OF GOSHKN, MASS p. 31

J3. U'ebster p 43

24. Joseph. Jr p. 44

r> DAVID IKPSON OF GC^SHKN AND POWNAL,

VT. ! p. 32

J5. Harvev p. 45

26. David, Jr p- 46

27. James p- 48

28. Benjamin- p. 49

29. Lorenzo Dow p- 49

14. SAMUKL TKPSON OF GOSHEN AND POWNAL,

VT - P- ^^

30. Eli p. 50

31. Luther p. 51

32. Sale.m p. 54

33. Joel p. 54

34. Thomas p- 56

15. JOHN JEPSON OF DOVER, MASS p. 33

35. John p. 57

16. LKMUEL C. (JESSE) JEPSON p. 34

"The Jepsons of the Border States.''

36. Willis p. 57

37. Benjamin p. 59

38. Lemuel p. 62

17. BENJAMIN JEPSON OF BOSTON, S. CAROLINA

AND GEORGIA p. 37

39. Lemuel p. 63

18. SAMUEL JEPSON OF NEWTON, MASS p. 38

19. WILLIAM JEPSON OF BOSTON p. 39

40. William p. 64

41. Samuel p. 64

42. Joseph B p. 64

20. HENRY JEPSON OF BOSTON AND NEW LON-

DON, CONN :\ p. 39

21. FORREST JEPSON OF ASHFIELD, MASS... p. 40

43. Orren p. 65

44. George R • p. 65

22. CYRAL JIPSON OF GOSHEN, MASS. AND WIN-

FIELD, N. Y p. 41

45. Seth Sears p. 65

46. SA.MUEL F.ayette p. 66



23. WEBSTER JIPSON OF GOSHEN AND MADISON

CO., N. Y p. 43

47. Almon p. 67

48. Manus p. 67

49. Orrin Webster p. 68

50. Henry -. p. 70

24. JOSEPH JEPSON, JR., OF GOSHEN, MASS p. 44

25. HARVEY JEPSON OF POWNAL, VT p. 45

51. George W p. 71

52. Myron p. 12

53. Harvey p. 72

54. JoHx '. p. 72

55. Joel p. 72

26. DAVID JEPSON, JR., OF POWNAL, VT p. 46

56. John Bates p. 72

57. Andrew p. 73

27. JAMES JEPSON OF POWNAL AND BENINGTON,

VT p. 48

58. Henry p. 74

59. George p. 74

60. Reuben Wright p. 74

28. BENJAMIN JEPSON OF POWNAL, VT p. 49

61. Enos Palmer p. 75

62. Lewis R p. 75

29. LORENZO DOW JEPSON OF POWNAL, VT p. 49

63. Lorenzo Dow-, Jr p. 75

30. ELI JEPSON OF BRIDGEPORT, N. Y p. 50

64. Henry Hudson p. 76

65. Chas. Burrington p. 76

66. Jefferson Hall , p. 76

67. John p. 76

3L LUTHER JEPSON OF HAMxMOND, N. Y p. 51

68. Alfred King p. 77

32. SALEM JEPSON OF POWNAL, VT. AND HART-

FORD, CONN p. 54

33. JOEL JEPSON OF ROSSIE, N. Y p. 54

69. Warren p. 78

70. Anson p. 78

71. George p. 78

34. THOMAS JEPSON OF POWNAL, VT. AND WEB-

STER, MASS p. 56

72. Vernon, M p. 79

35. JOHN JEPSON, JR., OF DOVER AND NORFOLK,

MASS , p. 57

36. WILLIS JEPSON OF FRANKLIN, KY. AND JACK-

SON CO., MO p. 57

73. Ephraigm M p. 80

74. Willia.m Lemmon p. 80



M. HENJAMIN JKPSON OF FRANKLIN, KY p. 59

75. Simpson M p. 82

"6. Casswder L p. 83

77. Jesse p. 84

78. Benjamin p. 85

38. LEMUEL TKPSON OF SIMPSON CO.. KY., AND

CALIFORNIA p. 62

39. LEMUEL JEPSON OF COLUMBUS AND ATLANTA,

GEORGIA p. 63

40. WILLIAM JEPSON OF HOSTOxN p. 64

79. George Edwin p. 85

4L SAMUEL JEPSON OF BOSTON p. 64

80. Samuel Greenwood p. 86

81. Charles E p. 86

42. JOSEPH BUCKMINSTER JEPSON OF BOSTON... p. 64

43. ORREN JEPSON OF ASHFIELD AND BELCHER-

TOWN, mass; .'. p. 65

82. Henry M p. 87

44. GEORGE R. JEPSON .....p. 65

45. SETH SEARS JIPSON p. 65

83. William p. 87

46. SAMUEL FAYETTE JIPSON p. 66

84. Norman Josi.ah ". p. 88

85. Norton William p. 88

47. ALMON JIPSON p. 67

48. MANUS JIPSON p. 67

49. ORRIN WEBSTER JIPSON ..p. 68

50. GEORGE JEPSON p. 70

5L GEORGE JEPSON ^ p. 71

86. George F p. 88

87. La Fayette p. 89

52. MYRON JEPSON p. 72

53. HARVEY JEPSON, JR p. 72

54. JOHN JEPSON OF POWNAL, VT. p. 72

55. JOEL JEPSON p. 72

56. JAMES BATES JEPSON p. 72

88. Edson a p. 89

89. Merton K ; p. 90

57. AN'DREW J. JEPSON p. 73



58. HENRY JEPSON p. 74

59. GEORGE JEPSON p. 74

60. REUBEN WRIGHT JEPSON p. 74

61. ENOS PALMER JEPSON p. 75

62. LEWIS R. JEPSON p. 75

63. LORENZO DOW JEPSON, JR p. 75

64. HENRY HUDSON JEPSON p. 76

65. CHARLES BURRINGTON JEPSON p. 76

66. JEFFERSON HALL JEPSON p. 76

67. JOHN JEPSON p. 76

90. Lowell Ellsworth p. 90

91. Frank Newton p. 91

92. John Harry p. 91

68. ALFRED KING JEPSON p. 77

69. WARREN JEPSON p. 78

70. ANSON JEPSON p. 78

71. GEORGE JEPSON p. 78

72. VERNON M. JEPSON .' p. 79

73. EPHRAIGM JEPSON p. 80

74. WILLIAM LEMMON JEPSON p. 80

75. SIMPSON JEPSON p. 82

76. CASSANDER JEPSON p. 83

77. DR. JESSE JEPSON p. 84

78. BENJAMIN W. JEPSON p. 85

79. GEORjGE EDWIN JEPSON p. 85

93. William Austin p. 92

80. SAMUEL GREENWOOD JEPSON ...p. 86

81. CHARLES EDWIN JEPSON p. 86

82. HENRY M. JEPSON p. 87

83. WILLIAM S. JIPSON p. 87

84. NORMAN JOSIAH JIPSON p. 88

94. Albert M p. 92

95. Harry p. 92

85. NORTON WILLIAM JIPSON p. 88



86. GEOR(;i FRANK JK1'S(^X p. 88

87. LA FA^ F/rrE J EPSON p. 89

58. EDSC^N A. j EPSON ' p. 89

59. MFRFON K. j EPSON p. 90

90. E(nVFI.[. FM.S\VOR'I-H JFPS(^N p. 00

9E FRANK NEWTON JEPSON p. 90

92. JOHN HARR> JEPSON p. 90

9,v WILIJA.M AUSTIN JEPSON p. 92

94. ALBERT M. JIPSON p. 92

95. HARRY JU'SON p. 92

APPENDIX p. 93



INTRODUCTION



oooooooooooo



The English name Jepson, in common with Jephson, Jefferson,
Jeffers, Jeffery. and so forth, is derived from the Teutonic name Geof-
frey, which, by many authors, is said to be derived from Godfrid or
Godfridus, meaning "God's Peace." The name is a patronymic or sur-
name derived from a given name, and means Jeff's son. While proof
is wanting that all names ending in son are Scandinavian, it is undoubt-
edly true that the prevalence of such names in England is a relic of the
Danish conquest.*

Surnames were probably formed in the fourteenth and fifteenth cen-
turies, therefore the name does not appear in the Domesday Book of
William the Conquerer, neither does the name Godfrey, or Geoffrey.
However, during the Angevin dynasty, beginning in the middle of the
twelfth century, the name Geoffrey became quite popular, the grand-
father, brother and son of King William the Second, having that name.
TTie Danish equivalent of Jepson is Jepsen or Jeppesen ; while the Swed-
ish is Jepson or Jippson. Various transition forms and modifications of
the names, such as Jeffreson, Geffrayson and Jepheson occur in English
records of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. The names Jepson
and Jephson are both frequently used in the same family, the latter form
being considered more aristocratic. Thus in Shaw's "Knights .of Eng-
land" w^e find William Jepson of Hampshire created a Knight, April 23,
1603, while in Berry's "Hampshire Genealogies" the same man is re-
ferred to as William Jephson. In the counties of Lincoln, Nottingham
and York, more Jepson records are found than in any other counties of
England. After the Danish invasion, the Danes are known to have
made permanent settlements in the above named counties and perhaps
that fact furnishes some proof of the Danish origin of the naine.

In the records of Nottinghamshire, we find mention of the name
as early as the year 1475. In that year, one Robert Echard, Rector of
East Bridgeford, mentioned Richard Jephson as one of the beneficiaries
of his will. The name is also found in Chancery proceedings of the
time of Queen Elizabeth. In the "Visitation of Nottingham" in the
second year of the reign of King James, John Jepson is spoken of as
Alderman of East Retford. It seems probable that the name originated
in the above named counties as it is today more common in that local-
ity and that several families of that name moved to other counties, and
also to Scotland and Ireland.

In 1534, King Henry the Eighth granted, by patent, the manor of
Froyle in Hampshire County, to William Jephson, Esq., and Mar}', his



*See Ferguson's "Teutonic Name System," Page' 32.



14 JEPSON FAMILY



witr. His ert-at irramlson, Sir John jcphsini, KiULiht ot Fn)\ Ic, born in
IdO.v was Major (rcnt-ral and Pri\y Counofllor in Iri'land, and elected
M. 1'. tor llanipshirc in 1()20. Hr luarrit'd I",li/ahrrli, dausrhter and
heiress ot Sir 'IMiomas Niorreys. H\ this marriai^e, the Mallow Estate
came into tlic Jephson family. Sir jolin Jephson had four sons; the eld-
est, William of Mallow', was Major (icneral and envoy to Sweden in
lt:57. anil his M'cond son. William, was private secretary to Kin^j Wil-
liam. -A descendant of Willirm of Mallow, William, Lieut. Col. in
the army, married Elizabeth. dauf2;hter of Col. John Appey, Sec'y. and
Judfie Advocate of His Majesty's forces in America, and by her had
William Henry of New York, born April, 1782; died March, 1867;
who married Maria Alsop, dauL^hter of James Farquhar and had two
daughters, one of whom, Laura, married Cicor^e Elliot Taylor, son of
W^illiam TaNlor. Chit-f Justice of Jamaica, and by him had William
Jephson Tax lor, born 1820; died 1872.

The above named Jephsons, descended from Sir John, were through
the Norreys family, descended from Kin^ Henry the Third of England
and Louis the Eighth of France. Several Jephsons of note, among them
Robt. Jephson, born in Ireland in 1736, a writer of dramas and poems
of considerable merit, and the Mountenay-Jephsons, one of whom ac-
companied Stanley on his search for Livingstone, and several of whom
were prominent in public affairs, have made the name quite well known
in Great Britain. A Lincolnshire family of considerable prominence,
was founded by William Jepson of Lincoln, born in 1668, and died in
1721. His son, William, was connected with the Cathedral at Lincoln
and was buried there in 1792. His eldest son, Thomas, w^as Mayor of
Lincoln, and died in 1825. The descendants of this family Include sev-
eral Surgeons and prominent Clergymen. Henry Jepson, Mining En-
gineer of Durham, and his brother, Edward, AL D. ; William F., Vicar
in London, ?nd George, Curate in London, are the present representa-
tives of the family.

Of the families which emigrated to America, a Scotch-Irish family
went from England to Scotland and from there to Ulster, in the North
of Ireland in 1610. W^illlam Jepson, a member of this family, emigrated
to Massachusetts in 1718; moved to Kennebunk, Maine, in 1720 and
presented a letter from the Presbyterian Church of Magwater in 1721.
H'e was killed b\' Indians in 1723. Jedediah, his grandson, was a mem-
ber of the Society of Friends. Descendants of this family have lived at
various places in Maine and Massachusetts and a genealoG:\- is given in
"Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to Families of Boston
and Eastern Mass." by William R. Cutter, A. M. Probably knowl-
edge of this Jepson family gave rise to the erroneous idea that our fam-
ily was of Scotch Irish origin.

An American family, descended from John Jepson, w^ho emigrated
in 1827 from Darwin, Lincolnshire, England, is represented by his sons,
N. H., now of W^ashington, Indiana; George, President of the Bank of



JEPSON FAMILY is



St. Clairsville, Ohio, and Dr. Samuel L. of Wheeling, W. Virginia,
who is a prominent member of the W. Va. State Medical Society, Sec'y.
of the State Board of Health, and Editor of the State Medical Journal.
The above mentioned John Jepson was accompanied to this country by
two brothers, Edward, who never married, and Timothy, who had two
daughters and one son, John, who lived in Utica, New York.

Another American family is descended from John Jepson who emi-
grated from Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, accompanied by his son, Ben-
jamin in 1832, and settled in New Haven, Conn. H. B. Jepson, Pro-
fessor of Music in Yale University, is a member of this family.

Of the Colonial Jepson families, besides the one whose genealogy is
given in this volume, Savage mentions the family of Roger, of Saybrook
and Middletown, Conn. Samuel, son of Roger, was a deacon in the
Middletown Church, and died in 1748. A John Jepson was a resident
of Newport, R. I., in 1716, and the name is found in early R. I. rec-
ords, including those of the Revolutionary War, but efforts to connect
this family with the Boston Jepsons, have been futile.

In Nottingham County, England, the name has been and is fairly
common. Hawthorne, in "Our Old Home," mentions a Dr. Jephson
of Leamington, England, who gave a botanical garden to his adopted
town. Dr. Henry Jephson, of Leamington, was born near Mansfield in
Nottingham in 1798, and died in 1878. An obituary- in the British
Medical Jouirnal describes him as one 'of the most remarkable physicians
of the century, his annual income for years having exceeded twenty thou-
sand pounds.

The Separatist movement from the Established Church of England
originated in Nottingham, and from a small district in that county, the
Pilgrims took their departure for Holland. According to Arber, in his
"Story of the Pilgrim Fathers," the Pilgrim Movement really originated
in Babworth and vicinity. The parish registers of several towns in the
neighborhood, Skegby, Mansfield, Worksop and others, contain the
name of Jepson, and there were several Jepsons in Amsterdam and Ley-
den. William Jepson from Worksop, married Rosamond Horsfield in
Amsterdam, April 28, 1609, and they were prominent among the com-
pany at Leyden until their deaths, a quarter of a century later (J).
William Jepson, in company with Pastor Johnson Robinson and two
others, bought a house and lot in Leyden in 1611 and twenty-ome houses
were built on this lot, probably all by Jepson, as he was the house build-
er of the company. William Jepson died of the plague in 1635, aged
52 years.

Henry Jepson, Sayweaver, a brother of William from Worksop.
was also in Leyden ; also Thomas, a leather worker. The records show
that John Jepson, cooper, of Yarmouth, was in Leyden in 1637 and he
was married to Helena Smith, May 9th of that year.

Our ancestor, John Jepson, appeared in Boston about 1638. He
was a Puritan and member of the First Church, and a cordwainer by



16 JEPSON FAMILY



occupation. That he was ch)scly related to the Jepsons of Leyden is
hif;hl\ prohahle, is borne out by a family tradition and also by a simi-
larity of the tiames of his children and the Le\clen family. That John
of Leyden and Hoston were identical i^ not improbable.

An absence of Leyden records relating to him subsequent to the
marriajie in \bM is si^jnificant. The Leyden Archivist states that he
probably left Leyden s(K)n after his marriage. The fact that his occu-
pation in Ix'xden was that of a cooper, while John of Boston was a
cordwainer. proves rothintr, as several of the Pil^rrims upon their ar-
ri\al in Holland, chanj^ed their occupations. The Dutch word Kooper,
also means trader or merchant. The fact that he was said to be from
^ armouth is immaterial, as many rej2:istered from the towns from which
they started for Holland. The Parish records of Yarmouth at that
time do not contain the name of Jepson.

John of Boston was granted a lot for three people in 1639, which
proves quite conclusively that he was married and had one child, al-
though his wife must have died soon after, as he was married in 1656.
A careful search of the available parish records of the Nottingham
towns has failed to give us any information, but that is not to be won-
dered at, as the parish records of the seventeenth century are incom-
plete and many were started subsequent to the year 1610, which was
about the date of John Jepson's birth. English Probate records are
also unsatisfactory, as the estate usually entailed to the eldest son and
the other heirs were scarcely mentioned. However, it is a known fact
that of the Pilgrims only a very few" left any records by w^hich they can
be traced beyond the beginning of the seventeenth century.

Cutter's "Historical and Genealogical Memoirs of Middlesex
County," gives a fairly accurate genealogy of one branch of the Jepson
family. However, they state that John Jepson's son, Thomas, born
Nov. 5, 1663, died 1722. The probate records show that the Thomas
who died in that year was the son of a William H. Jepson, who was
probably closely related to John and perhaps a younger brother.

For two hundred years the descendants of John Jepson took an ac-
tive part in the religious, political and social affairs of the City of Bos-
ton. A branch of the family lives in the suburbs of that City at the
present time. A member of that branch, the late George E. Jepson of
New^ton, who was thoroughly familiar with the subject, about two years
prior to his death consented to write a short introduction to this history,
which will give the reader a mental picture of the Boston of our ances-
tors and many interesting reminiscences of our family:

"A lively desire of knowing and of recording our ancestors so gen-
erally prevails, that it must depend on the influence of some common
principle in the minds of men," remarks Edward Gibbon in his famous
autobiography; and he further adds: "We seem to have lived in the
persons of our forefathers ; it is the labor and reward of vanity to extend
the term of this ideal longevity. Our imagination is always active to



JEPSON FAMILY 17



enlarge the narrow circle in which nature has confined us. — Our
calmer judgment will rather tend to moderate than to suppress the
pride of an ancient and worthy race. — Few there are who can sincerely
despise in others an advantage of wihich they are secretly nmhitious to
partake. The knowledge of our family from a remote period will he
always esteemed as an abstract pre-eminence since it can never be
promiscuously enjoyed."

England undoubtedly may be said to be the cradle of the Jepson
family, and Boston, New England, its nursery. There remain many of
the name still in the former domain. But the tidal wave of religious
and political persecution in the seventeenth century sw-ept the greater
part of them over to hospitable Holland and thence to the rockbound
shores of Massachusetts. One or two seceders may have (and indeed


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Online LibraryNorton William JipsonA history & genealogy of the descendents [!] of John Jepson, of England and Boston, Mass., through his son John's two son's William and Micah, 1610-1917 → online text (page 1 of 12)