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Annual report of the municipal officers of the town of Norway online

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E. F. Smith, trustee Hawkins Fund 12 78

State Stipend 70 00

Interest L. Ellen Frost Fund 15 00

Town order 350 00

$1,048 91



EXPENDITURES.

Paid To Library of Knowledge $ 1 75

S. W. Goodwin, insurance 57 00

Scribner and Literary Digest 5 50

Dura Binding Co 25 00

Dodd, Mead & Co 5 40

Librarian, supplies per list 2 99

Loring, Short & Harmon, record book. ... 7 50

Librarian, supplies per list 3 68

Loring, Short & Harmon, book 2 25

F. W. Sanborn, printing 3 00

W. C. Leavitt, paper 3 50

Mrs. Gates, typing 60

Librarian, supplies per list 2 11



IH ANNUAL TOWX REPORT



l>()iin - , Short & Ilaniion, books $199 43

riidcrwood & I'nderwood, Views of U. S. . 19 76
Mrs. Eva Kimball, compiling supplemon-

tary catalogue 10 00

F. W. Sanborn, printing catalogues 20 80

P. E. Hathaway, magazines 21 15

N. and P. St. Ey., wiring 2 01

Outlook Co., United States History 41 36

Lilirarian, supplies per list 3 62

Longlcy & Butts, 5 tons coal 36 25

Librarian's salary fifty-two weeks at $.j.00

260 00

J. O. Crooker, one year's rent 170 00

Cash on hand to balance 144 25



$1,048 91



W. F. JONES, Treasurer.



We l!a\c lliis <lay rxaniiiicd tlie foregoing accounts and find them
correct and properly vouched.

SELECTMEN OF NOEWAY.



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 17



Eeport of the

Superintending School Committee



Norway, Me., Jan. 31, 1916.

The superintending School Committee of the town of Norway, com-
posed of L. H. Trufant, member for one year, H. L. Home, member
for two years and W. F. Jones, member for three years, met and or-
ganized on March 23d, 1915. Dr. L. Hall Trufant was elected chair-
man of the board for the year.

On the 23d day of March, 1915, the joint committee of the two
towns of Waterford and Norway met at Waterford Flat, for organi-
zation. William F. Jones was elected chairman and Dr. L. Hall Tru-
fant, secretary.

The following accounts show the appropriation of money for school
purposes :

COMMON SCHOOL ACCOUNT.

DE.

To Balance 1914 appropriation $2,296 35

1915 appropriation 2,700 00

Keceived from State on Mill Tax Fund. . . 2,870 78
Keceived from State on Common School

Fund 2,505 81

Tuition from town of Waterford 30 00

$10,402 94



CE.

By Teachers' wages $6,667 50

Transportation 1,240 40

Janitor services 564 00

Fuel 434 90

Tuition paid Waterford 30 00

Unexpended balance in treasury 1,481 14



$10,402 94



18 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT



$4,222 35



FEEE HIGH SCHOOL ACCOUNT.

DR.

To Balance 1914 appropriation $ 246 99

1915 appropriation 3,000 00

Amount received from State 500 00

Amount received from tuition 230 00

Overdraft 245 36*

€R.

By Teachers ' wages $4,054 36

Fuel 150 00

Diplomas, etc 17 99

$4,222 35

*This account shows an overdraft, but there is enough due from the
different towns to give a balance of $44.64.



MUSIC AND DRAWING ACCOUNT.

DR.

To Balance 1914 appropriation $ 1 50

1915 appropriation 650 00

CR.

By Teachers' wages $560 90

Supplies 36 51

Team hire 13 00

Unexpended balance 41 09



$651 50



$651 50



REPAIRS ACCOUNT.

DR.
To 1914 appropriation , $1,500 00

CR.

By 1915 overdraft $465 59

General repairs and supplies for same 691 10

Unexpended balance 343 38



$1,500 00



$1,500 00



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 19



FEEE TEXT BOOK ACCOUNT.

DR.

To Balance 1914 appropriation $ 17 76

1915 appropriation 700 00

$717 76

CR

By Amount expended for texts $673 90

Unexpended balance 43 86

$717 76



INSURANCE, APPARATUS, APPLIANCES, ETC.

DR.

To Balance 1914 appropriation $ 1 09

1915 appropriation 1200 00

$1201 09

CR.

By General supplies $1166 05

Unexpended balance 35 04

$1201 09

We recommend the raising of the following amounts for the year
1916-1917.

For Common Schools $3,000 00

Free text books 700 00

Repairs 500 00

Insurance, apparatus, etc 750 00

Free High School 3,000 00

Music and Drawing 700 00

Office of Superintendent 75 00

Respectfully submitted,

L. HALL TRUFANT, M. D., Chairman,
HERMAN L. HORNE,
WILLIAM F. JONES,

1 Superintending School Committee.

Norway, Maine, Jan. 31, 1916.



20 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT



. I Report of the

Superintendent of Schools



To THE Board of Education and Citizens of the Town:

111 submitting my fifth annual report I am impressed with the idea
tliat we have made creditable progress and improvement in our
schools for the year. Yet progress is only comparative. It has been
said that all progress is a series of blunders and that the advantage
lies with the individual or the nation that can reduce its blunders to a
minimum through the exercise of intelligence.

Tlie factors that make up a successful school system are: (1)
equipment, (2) pupils, (3) teachers, (4) patrons, (5) school officials.
Let us consider these factors in the order named. I have often said
and now repeat, that I believe that the rural school should have equal
advantages with the village school so far as circumstances will per-
mit. So far as texts, and general supplies are concerned I think
this has become an established f«,ct. Many of the school houses have
been put in first-class condition. Some, however, still need black-
boards which are to be installed during the next year. Other minor
repairs will be made. In the village more extensive repairs should
be made. I am authorized by the board of education to equip the
Academy building with adequate fire escapes. Those already at that
building are of ladder form which would not be usable when one was
not excited to say nothing of an emergency. The escape that leads
from the laboratory on the third floor past the high school room
should be constructed as stairs with doors leading to them.

It becomes more evidently necessary each year that it is impera-
tive to provide more room for those in our high school and grades at
the Academy building due to the increasing registration each year.

Various plans for providing more room have been under considera-
tion. It was thought advisable, at first, to recommend enlarging the
present building by building a wing of two rooms and increasing
the capacity of the heating plant which would cost about $5000.
Tliis plan, however, presents so many objectionable features it has
been abandoned.



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 21

Another alternative is to build a new high school buihling costing
not less than $25,000. This would be the ideal plan to adopt provid-
ed the to-*vni could better afford it at this time. This would present
an opportunity for some citizen of means to present such a building
to the town and perpetuate their name and at the same time do the
town a lasting service. I think that within fifteen years it will be-
come necessaiy to provide such a building.

The enlarging of the present building is not wholly desirable.
First: Because the basement facilities are not wholly adequate for
present needs. Adding more to the building would only complicate
matters. Second: Because a new heating plant placed tliere would
not be correctly located, provided another building should be built on
the lot for high school purposes. Such a plant should be located by
itself so as to accommodate both buildings. If at the end of fifteen
years it became necessary to build a high school, the $5,000 already
expended would then be in the wrong place. This amount of money
combined with what the Alumni is raising for a gymnasium, $1,500,
would be quite a beginning toward a high school building. This
would place the gymnasium in the basement of the new building whei'e
it should be.

But the urgent need at this time is for more room in the present
building and I will present the following two alternatives for consid-
eration. First: Concentrate tlie first two grades at the upper and
lower primaries which would make about forty-five pupils at each
school. An objection to this plan would be the long walk for those now
attending the Middle Primary. This plan would make the Middle Pri-
mary building available for the third grade, which grade is at present
in the Academy building. This could be done without extra expense,
but with inconvenience fo those who naturally attend the Middle Pri-
mary. Second: Build another room on the Middle Primary school
building, 'thus providing a room for the third grade. This would cost
about $1200. This plan seems to me to be the most desirable alter-
native, aside from building a new school building and the most econ-
omical way of solving a most urgent problem. If this can be done it
will place the present eighth grade room at the disposal of the high
school for a recitation room. We cannot continue to broaden the efli-
ciency of our high school without more room.

With more pupils in the school and no more room the coming year,
it almost seems that it will be necessary either to not admit tuition
pupils, which money now practically pays for the running of the com-
mercial department or, without the tuition pupils, for the town to ap-
propriate the $570, or more each year, or get along without the de-
partment.



22 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT



T1k> school consus of 1912 showed 428 boys and 364 girls in town
lii'twi'iMi the jiKOs of live and twenty-one years, a total of 792. In the
spriiiK of 191. i I made a card index of this list of names in town, to
avoi«l tlio possibility of omissions from the list and last spring I sent
.s:n names to the state. It would have been nearly impossible to
liave liad so complete a list but for the card system. Each name sub-
mitted means about $6.50 to the town. A glance at the tabular page
for school enrollment will reveal the fact that we have an unusually
large enrollment.

I am encouraged by hearing that the pupils from the grades are
coming each year better prepared to do their work in the high school.
I mean by this that they have a better knowledge of all the subjects
tak(?n rather than over-developed in some one or two subjects, and I
am also pleased to note that the apt students are not trained to the
expense of those who need the most attention. I encourage my teach-
ers to group their teacliing around the average pupil in the class and
not direct their main efforts to the brightest pupil which is naturally
the way of least resistance.

Not long ago I heard that a teacher said that she would not do
work not directly connected with her school work because she wasn't
l)aid for it. There are two kinds of service: that which is not worth
having at any price and that for which no money can pay. I am not
in sympathy witli the teacher who is determined to give her services
for just what she is paid for in so doing she cannot extend her in-
lluence beyond the schoolroom walls. If she be imbued with the idea
of service and influence then she cannot afford to put less than her
best efforts into her work. Service is considered an opportunity of
life by tlie most progressive and successful teachers.

I am very grateful for what has seemed for the past year to have
been a greater unity of purpose between parents and teachers in the
towtj than any year since serving as your superintendent. My best
teachers are never satisfied with the results they are getting and
that is the attitu<le that gets tlie best results. Schools are the most hu-
man institutions on earth and so will succeed or fail in the same de-
gree with the success or failure of individuals. I find that most par-
ents realize that the factor of the unity of purpose in working in
symi)atliy with the teacher promotes the best interests of the school
and their ciul.jren. Then when they have a real grievance they know
it will receive i>r()mi)t and sympathetic attention.

I am of tiie same opinion as last year concerning the desirability
of a centralized school at Swift Corner. The present school building
at that i)lace could be used aa a primary room. A two-room build-
ing to accommodate Intermediate grades (IV, V, VI), and Grammar



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 23



grades (VII, VIII and IX) could be constructed near-by. Such a
group of schools would accommodate the pupils from the schools of
Pierce, Chapel, Center and Noble's Corner. It would be possible to
have music and drawing in such a group of schools and even to
teach the first year of high school subjects in the grammar room.
School gardens could be developed as well as manual training, and a
domestic science department could attend to the noon lunch problem.
This plan of work has been carried on so long in the Middle West
that it an established fact and thought to be as necessary as the
school itself is thought to be necessary here. I mention this again
this year for consideration, as I believe it will become an established
fact sometime.

GYMNASIUM.

I believe that the movement inaugurated by the alumni of Norway
High School for the building of a gymnasium is a most commenda-
ble one. I believe that it should receive the moral if not the finan-
cial support of every citizen of the town. Such a building could be
the social center for the school without the necessity of paying hall
rent for rehearsels and staging of school functions. I believe 'in or-
ganized athletics for a school, for those of athletic abilities and ten-
dencies must work off the surplus of physical energy either by a sys-
tem of organized exercise or have a disproportionate education. Ed-
ucation is not merely book knowledge. When a pupil is graduated
from high school he should have not only a fund of useful informa-
tion but also a well developed body and a well balanced mind capa-
ble of clear thinking, unbefogged and with a finely developed char-
acter. Can such possibilities be developed without physical train-
ing? Athletics appeal to the ambition and to self-restraint; they
give crude youth tasks in which it can attain finish and skill.

I have asked the teachers of the High School to make reports for
their several departments, as I believe they are doing a work of which
the citizens of the town will be pleased to learn.

I desire to call the attention of the voters of the town to the fact
that the School Board in its recommendations is asking for the
raising of $1,725 less than last year for the support of the different
school accounts.

I am truly grateful for the helpful support of an efficient school
board and to the citizens of tlie town who have shown their apprecia-
tion of what I am trying to accomplish for the schools in my work.
I trust that in the following year we may accomplish as much as in
the past year.

Ee'spectfully submitted,
TRUE C. MORRILL, Superintendent of Schools.



24



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT



SCHOOL CALENDAE.

Till' t'iill tcMin at Norway Higli School begins the second Monday in
Si'ptenilicr for a fourteen- week term. The winter term begins the
lirst Monday in January for a twelve-week terih. The spring term
begins after a two week recess following the winter term, for a ten-
week term. The common schools begin one week after the opening of
tlie liigh school year, and close one week before the high school year
closes making 36 weeks for tlie High School and 34 weeks for com-
mon sdiools.



TUITION PUPILS IN HIGH SCHOOL.

Graduating
Name Year Town

Adams, Tliankful 1916 Albany

Andrews, Frances G 1916 Waterford

Barker, Carlton H 1919 Stoneham

Barker, Errol 1919 Stoneham

Barker, Carlton F 1919 Stoneham

Gammon, Beatrice 1 1916 Waterford

Gammon, Hyacinth M 1916 Waterford

Tracy, June 1917 Greenwood

Dudley, Mattie E.. 1918 Winthrop

Heatli, Elsie M 1918 Waterford

Maxim, Flora E 1918 South Paris

Durell, Bessie R 1919 otisfield

Duroll. Mildred F 1919 otisfield

Martin. Li„,|:, B 1919 Greenwood

McAlistcr. Milo E 1919 l^^.^h Center

McKeen, Muriel B 1919 gtonenam

Noyes, Walter F 1919 Greenwood

Pottle, Bessie 1917 West Burke, Vt.,

Scribner, Georgia E 1919 Harrison

In Common Schools:

Farrington. Theona (ninth grade) Lovell

Everett, Victor and Lillian (Sodom) Waterford

Howe. Julia (Holt) Waterford



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT



25



NORWAY VILLAGE TABULAR STATEMENT



School



Teachers





■u>


;


s


a

a




<o


o


^


H


l^






a


>
<






High



Ninth

Eighth

Seventh

Sixth

Fifth

Fourth

Third

Upper Primary
Middle Primary
Lower Primary



P. E. Hathaway .



Haliberton Crandlemire, Science
Florence A. Rideout, English.
F. Marion Lougee, Latin, History
Edith M. Kniglit, Commercial .
Supervisor of Music and Drawing,
Anna M. Mealand

Helen R. Cole

Lilla B. Young

Marion Smith, Assistant

Dora F. Goldrup

Lola D. Smith

Emmie J. Young }

Harriet J. Smith (

Arlettie M. Richardson f

Mary L Whittredge )

Tessa R. Thibodean )

Gertrude Gardner )

Elizabeth O. Lasselle }

Mildred J. Holmes <



w


107


s


lOti


F


101


W


ir.


s


14


F


35


W


40


s


39


F


41


W


4(1


s


41-


F


34


W


36


s


34


F


32


W


31


s


31


F


36


W


36


s


36


F


37


W


37


s


33


F


31


W


SO


S


31


F


33


W


32


S


27


F


32


W


20


S


18


F


21



102
103

98



14.
13.
32.4

36 6
37.1

37 3
37.6
36.8
32.9
32.8
31.5
29.4
26.7
29.5
32.7
32.2
33.5
34.2
33 9
31. S
28.2
25.
28
29
22
25
30
15
17
19



$41.66



24.00
16.66
16.25
15.00

15.70
12.00
12.00
12.00
10.00
5.00
10.00
11.00
11 00
11.00
11.00
11.00
11.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
11 00
11.00
11 00
11.00
12.00
12.00
12.00
12.00
12.00
12.00
12.00
12.00
12.00
12.00
12.00



26



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT



RURAL SCHOOL TABULAR STATEMENT



School



Lake



Center



Swifts



Chapel



Pierce



Teacher



Noble's Corner
Crockett Ridge

Sodom

Holt

Millettville..





4J


73


s


B


-JJ

<


H


t-i






a


>




W


<



02



C Chrystal B. Harriman

( Katherine L. Flint. . .

) Myra H. Noble

( Winnifred I. McKeen.
[ Beryl B. Young

\ " " " :::;:;

( Marion C. Noble

( Ora Howe

( Edith G. Millett

I :: :; " ;:::;:

( Dorothy F. Noble

( Marion C. Noble

( Ruth Holgate

( Katherine T. Delano. .

I - " - ;;

Eleanor F. Kneeland

\ Eleanor F. Kneeland . ,



w


14


12.7


S


17


15 4


F


18


17.


W


12


11.1


S


13


12.7


F


11


10.2


W


14


13.2


8


14


12.9


F


14


11.9


VV


15


9.7


S


17


16.2


F


11


9 5


W


7


6.5


S


8


7.1


F


9


8.3


W


13


11.7


S


11


8.5


F


9


8.4


W


21


18.3


S


22


19.6


F


23


21.4


W


12


11.2


S


11


9.6


F


15


12.5


F


9


8.2


W


3


2.9


S


8


3.



^9.0U
9.00
9.50
8.00
7.00
7.. 50
8.00
8.00
8.00
7.50
7.50
8.00
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
8.00
9.00
9.00

10.00
7.50
7.50
8.00
7.50
7.00
7.00



MUSIC AND DRAWING DEPARTMENT.



To THK SUI'ERINTE.VDEKT OF SCHOOLS:

Tliis year the music in the schools has attained a higher standard
than ever before. The primary children are further advanced in
their work than last year at this time. The intermediate grades are
about where they should be, and the seventh and eighth grades are
doing excellent two and three part work.

We are working very hard to get a Victrola for school use. In
this way the children can learn not only to understand but to like
the very best music. Each room will have the machine for a certain
length of time each day. It will benefit them in their work, for in-



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 27

stead of having to listen to monotonous counting for writing exer-
cises, it will be much more enjoyable to keep in time with the steady
rhythm of a stirring march or a slow waltz song. With its help the
children will be quieter when marching in and out of the building.

The lower primary already has a small machine and several re-
cords with which they vary and brighten their day's work.

No up to date city school room is considered complete now with-
out a machine of some sort to help the mental growth of the children.

The drawing this year has gone well. The upper grades have
made some very original and striking stencil designs which we hope
soon to have on public exhibition.

Eespectfully submitted,

ANNA MAEY MEALAND, Supervisor of Drawing and Music.



PEINCIPAL OF HIGH SCHOOL.

To THE Superintendent and Superintending School Committee:

At your request I am submitting the following brief report con-
cerning the work and needs of Norway High School.

The enrollment for the present year is one hundred two (102).
In June of the present year a class of twenty-one (21) girls and
boys will be graduated and in September a class of (at least) forty
(40) will enter the High School.

The problem of seating a school of one hundred twenty (120) in
a room already crowded, is one which must be solved in the near fu-
ture.

Three ways of releaving the congestion might be suggested: 1st.
To limit the school privileges to boys and girls of the Town of Nor-
way. 2nd. To provide seating arrangements in another room for one
or more classes, and 3rd. To provide for an enlargement of the pre-
sent High School assembly room. The first method, I hope, will never
be resorted to, as it has always been the policy of the school to try
to attract to it as many out of town boys and girls as possible. Al-
most without exception they are studious and hard working, and to
bar them out would be a big mistake. Fifty per cent, of the pre-
sent freshmen class are students from other towns.

The second method has already been tried and will serve as a tem-
porary arrangement; this would call for an extra room, probably the
present eighth grade room, which is very much needed as a recitation
room. If a new High School building is out of question for the next
few years, probably the third method would be the best.



28 ANNUAL, TOWN REPORT



The broadening of the course of study to include a complete busi-
ness course has been very successful, and I hope that the near future
may find Domestic Science, Manual Training, and Agricultural Cours-
es also added to our curriculum.

All the work in the various departments is going nicely, and it
seems to me that, as the years go by, the attitude of the young peo-
ple toward tlieir school is steadily improving. They seem to realize
more and more what privileges and opportunities are theirs, and to
be resolved to make the most of them.

In the English Department, in particular, great progress has been
made in the last two years. I say in particular because while Eng-
lish is, in my opinion,' the most important of all the subjects, it is
tlie one which least of all attracts the average high school student.
Improvement in this respect is especially gratifying, much credit be-
ing due to our present eflScient English instructor.

The reports of the different departmental instructors accompany
this.

During the past year our library has been growing rapidly, and
the cataloging of the books, which is being done by the Junior girls,
will add much to its usefulness. Many of the best magazines, too,
are now coming to the school each month, and are proving an added
source of interest and instruction.

Respectfully submitted,

PERCIVAL E. HATHAWAY.



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH.
To THE Superintendent of School.^;:

During the last twenty-five years the course in English in high
schools has changed more than any other branch with the exception of
a few scientific subjects. In order to measure up to present day
standards in this department, we have altered the course at Norway
High to meet as far as possible the changed requirements. The aim
of English work today is two-fold: cultural education and practical
training.

These two aims are combined in the work of the first two years.
Tliis consists of careful training in advanced grammar, including
parsing, analyzing and diagraming; a study of rhetoric with special
att<»ntion to word study and accurate forms of expression; also prac-
ti<-p in the simpler fonns of composition, such as sentence and para-
graph structure, simple letter writing, description and narration.



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 29



In addition most of the students enjoy the study of such books as
Ivanhoe, Lady of the Lake and The Merchant of Venice with einplia-
sis placed on beauty of style, the value of the vi\ id word, historical
backgrounds, as welj as the portrayal of life and character, the pur-
pose of the author, the central thought, and whenever possible the ap-
plication of the latter to modern life and problems.

The two-fold aim of the course is more aiiparent in the last two
years. In order that students who are not planning to enter gradu-


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