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BULLETIN



OF THB



A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.



PROSPECTUS.

The need in this country of a periodical devoted exclusively to Orni-
thology has long been apparent. To meet this want will be the object
of the Bulletin. While its contents will consist mainly of communi-
cations from the resident and corresponding members of the Club, it
will embrace occasionally selected articles of special interest or value.
It will also include reviews of recent ornithological publications, digests
of papers read before scientific societies, announcements of works in
progress, notices of ornithological explorations, and a department of
general notes and miscellany, thereby assuming the character of a gen-
eral magazine of Ornithology.

Each number will consist of not less than twenty-four pages, to be
increased as soon as the receipts from subscriptions shall warrant the
additional expense. Two more numbers will be issued during the pres-
ent year, in order that the second volume may begin with January,
1877.

The membership of the Club already includes all the leading orni-
thologists of the country, who have generously offered to give the Bul-
letin in every way their hearty support. The Publishing Conmiittee
hence feel confident of being able to make the Bulletin worthy of the
patronage of all interested in the branch of science it represents. Con-
tributions to the present volimie have been promised by Professor S. F.
Baird, Mr. George N. Lawrence, Dr. Elliott Coues, Mr. Robert Ridgway,
and others already well known to the public. Professor Baird and Dr.
Coues have also kindly consented to act as Associate Editors. Its
chief editorial management will be under the direction of Mr. J. A.
Allen, of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass., to
whom all communications intended for publication should be sent.

Terms. — Subscriptions, $1.00 a year; single numbers, 30 cents.
Subscriptions should be forwarded to Mr. H. B. Bailey, No. 13 Exchange
Place, Boston, Mass.



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BULLETIN



OF THE



NuTTALL Ornithological Club:



% djttarterljg |0ttrftal nf (Jrnit^ologg.



Vol. I. — SZSPTEIKEBER^ 1876. - No. 3.



CONTENTS.



- Paob
Decrbasb of Birds ik Massachusktts.
By J. A. AUen 68

05 TflB NUMBKB OF PlUMAKIKS IN OSCIMBS.

By Dr. Elliott Coues, U. S. A 60

The Ybixow-bbixjsd Woodpeckkk (5pAy-
rofiemg voriiit). By WUiiam BrtwUer . . 68

RxcKXT Letkbatubb 70

Ornithology of the Wheeler Expeditioos. —
Field and Forest. ~ The Portland Tern.



Paqi

— The Birds of Ritchie Goanty, West
Virginia. — Brewer*8 Birds of New Eng-
land.

Gbubral Notes 74

The Philadelphia Vireo In New England. —
Geographical Viiriation in the Number
and Size of the Eggs of Birds. — The Nest
and E;g8 of Traiirs Flycatcher, as ob-
served i i Maine. — S'ngular Food of the
Least Bittern. — Intelligerce of a Crow.

— The Great Carolina Wren in Massachu-
setts.



PUBT-.ISHKD BY TIJE CLUB,



U Diversity Press, Cambridge : Printed by Welch, Bigelow, & Ca



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BULLETIN



'§xM\ #nut|ologital Ckb:

A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.



PROSPECTUS.

The need in this country of a periodical devoted exclusively to Orni-
thology has long been apparent. To meet this want will be the object
of the Bulletin. While its contents will consist mainly of communi-
cations ttom the resident and corresponding members of the Club, it
will embrace occasionally selected articles of special interest or value.
It will also include reviews of recent ornithological publications, digests
of papers read before scientific societies, announcements of works in
progress, notices of ornithological explorations, and a department of
general notes and miscellany, thereby assuming the character of a gen-
eral magazine of Ornithology.

£ach number will consist of not less than twenty-foiir pages, to be
increased as soon as the receipts from subscriptions shall warrant the
additional expense. Another number will be issued during the present
year, in order that the second volume may begin with January, 1877.

The membership of the Club already includes all the leading orni-
thologists of the country, who have generously oflered to give the Bul-
letin in every way their hearty support. The Publishing Committee
hence feel confident of being able to make the Bulletin worthy of the
patronage of all interested in the branch of science it represents. Con-
tributions to the present volume have been promised by Professor S. F.
Baird, Mr. George N. Lawrence, Dr. Elliott Coues, Mr. Robert Ridgway,
and others already well known to the public. Professor Baird and Dr.
Coues have also kindly consented to act as Associate Editors. Its
chief editorial management viH be under the direction of Mr. J. A.
Allen, of the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, Mass., to
whom all communications intended for publication should be sent.

Terms. — Subscription, $1.00 a year; single numbers, 30 cents.
Subscriptions should be forwarded to Mr. H. B. Bailey, No. 13 Exchange
Place, Boston, Mass.



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yi



41 1 / '^ ^



BULLETIN



OF THE



NuTTALL Ornithological Club:



% (^uarterljT |0urnal of #rnil^0lo0g.



Vol. I. - nrOVBMBER^ 187©. - No. 4.



CONTENTS.

Page | Paob

Oim PRESKNT Kno\Cledgk of thk Nidifi- 1 Recent Publications , . 98

CATION OT THK MssTKiCK^ KiNGLETS. Bj Lawrence's Birds of Southwestern Mexico. —

ErwU JngersoU 77 Jordan»8 Manual of Vertebrate Animals.

Nesting Habits of the Californiaw

Hov^^yfH^^iTroghdytesaedony^v.park- ; General Notes 94

Bwimi). By Dr. J. G. Cotter 79 ^ . , ^ , «, , .

. Capture of the Orange-crowned Warb er in
On Geographicai. Variation in Dendrceca Massachusetts. - Variable Abundance of

PALMABUM. By Bobert Rulgway .... 81 g.^^, ^^ ^j,^ ^^^^ Localities in ditferent
Notes on Tkxan Birds. By/. C, Merrill, Years. — Occurrence of the Wood Ibis in

i/. /)., Assistant Surgeon U. S. A. ... 88 Pennsylvania and New York. — Peculiar
Birds of Nkw England. By Thomas M. Nesting site of the Bank-Swallow.

Brewtr 89



I>IJBT^ISHEr> BY THE CLUB.



University Press, Cambridge : Printed by Welch, Bigelow, & Co.

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BULLETIN OF THE NUTTALL ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB:

A QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ORNITHOLOGY.



ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 1877.

As the present number closes Volume I. of the Bulletin, the first
number of Volume II. will appear in January, 1877, and the succeeding
numbers of the volume will be issued on the first of each following
Quarter. In closing Volume I. the Publishing Committee take pleasure
in announcing that the publication of the Bulletin has met with encour-
aging success. Not only have contributions to its pages been received
from the best ornithological talent of the country, but subscriptions
have come in with reasonable frequency. Since, however, the continu-
ance of the Bulletin is necessarily contingent upon the pecuniary sup-
port it receives from the public, we trust that our present patrons will
not only all promptly renew their subscriptions, but will use their influ-
ence to extend its circulation. It is hoped that with the second volume
it will be possible to increase the number of pages from twenty-four to
thirty -two in each issue. In order to do this a considenible increase to
our subscription list will be necessary, and we therefore appeal strongly
to all friends of ornithology to aid in extending its circulation.

In order to assist in defraying the expenses of publication, advertising
sheets will be issued with future numbers, relating mainly to Natural
History, and especially to Ornithology. The attention of dealers in
specimens of Natural History and collectors' and taxidermists* material,
and of publishers of works relating to Natural History, is hence called to
the Bulletin as a desirable advertising medium.

The present Volume embraces one hundred pages of original mat-
ter, contributed largely by leading authorities on American Ornithol-
ogy. The department of "General Notes" is particularly rich in notices
of rare or little-known species, and the volume as a whole forms an
important contribution to American Ornithology. As the maga-
zine will continue under its present editorial management, — Mr. J. A-
Allen acting as Editor-in-Chief, and Professor S. F. Baird and Dr.
Elliott Cones as Associate Editors, — and as it has the assurance of con-
tinued support from the best writers, the Publishing Committee do not
hesitate to announce that Volume II. may be expected to be equally
rich in important contributions. The Bulletin is intended to be national
in its character, and for the present will be exclusively devoted to
North American Ornithology. It being the only journal in this coun-
try devoted especially to ornithology, it is hoped that our appeal for
pecuniary support will meet with a prompt response, and that we shall
be able to enter upon the publicution of Volume II. with feelings of
confidence respecting the permanence of the Bulletin as an Ornithologi-
cal Magazine.

Terms. — Subscription, $ 1. 00 a year (including postage), strictly in
advance ; single numbers, ^0 cents. Subscriptions should be forwarded
to Mr. H. B. Bailev, Newton, Mass.

Advertising Rates. — Fiist insertion, 30 cents a line (Bourgeois),
or $ 12.00 per page ; §0.50 per halfptige. A discount of twenty-five
per cent, will be made for each subsequent insertion.

Communications intended for publication, as well as advertise-
ments, should be sent to Mr. J. A. Allen, Museum of C^ompai-ative
Zoology, Cambridge, Mass.



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BULLETIN



OF THE



NuHALL Ornithological Club:



% <$ttarierl|2 |0umal d ^tnitljokys.



VOLUME IL



flfbttor,"
J.' A. ALLEN.

S. F. BAIRD ANB ELLIOTT COUES.



CAMBRIDGE, MASS.:
PUBLISHED BY THE CLUB.
'^1877.



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UirnmsiTY Pbsss: Wblch, Bigbutv, ft Co,
Cambkidob.



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CONTENTS OF VOLUME U.



NUMBER I.

Paob
Thk BiJiCK-Aifi>-YKrxt>w Warbleb. By William Brewiter ... 1

Geographical Variation m Turdub siigratorius By Bobert Ridgway 8
Unusual Abumdakcb of thk Snowt Owl in New England. By Buthven

Dtan€ 9

Distribution of New England Birds. — A Reply to Dr. T. M. Brewer.

By n. A. Purdie 11

OccuRKENCK OF THE Barnacle Goose (Btmicla kucoprit) ON Long Island,

N. Y. By 6*. JV. Lawrence 18

Cattube of a Second Specimen of Helmintbophaga lawrencei. By

Harold Herriek Id

Notice of a few Birds of barb or accidbmtal Occubbencb in New

England. By //. A, Purdie 20

RECENT UTERATURE.

Notices of five recent Ornithological Papers, 28. ~ Vennor's Rapacious Birds
of Canada, 24.

GENERAL NOTES.

A HnminiDf^-Bird new to the Fauna of the United States, 26. — Note on Podicepe
</oMtfi]eiw, 26. — Eastward Range of the Fermginons Buzzard {ArchibtUeo
ferrugineus), 26. — Occurrence of Leconte*8 Bunting ( Cotumicuim UamUi)
in Iowa, 26. — Audubon's Warbler in MasBnchusetts, 27. — Occurrence of
the Sooty Tern in Massachusetts, 27. — The Black Gvr-Fnlcon (Faleo ntcer
Tar. labradora) in Massachusetts, 27. — Notes en Birds new to the Fauna of
Maine, etc., 27. — Northern Range of the Sharp-tailed Finch {Ammodromu$
eaudacMimM)^ 28.



NUMBER II.

COBBECnONS OF NOMENCLATUBB IN THE GkNUS SiUBUS. By Dt. ElHott

Qmes, U. S. A * . . . »

Notes on the Brezding of the Black Tern {HydrocheKdon iariformis).

Bv T. a. RobaHt 84

Two Undescribed Nests of Caufobnian Bibds. By WUHam Bretctter 87
A Contribution to ^the Biogbaphy of Wilson's Phalabope. By E.

W.Nelmm 88

A Defence of his Catalogue of New England Bibds. By Dr, T. M,

Brewer 44

RECENT LITERATURE.

Bnrrongfas's ** Wake-Robin,*' 48.— Minot*s **Land and Game Birds of New
England," 49.

GENERAL NOTES.

Western Range of Cofmntt carolinemU^ 60. — Fecundity of the Carolina Wren, 50.
— The Louisiana Heron in Indiana, 51. — Note on the Cinnamon Teal
( Qfterquedula cvancptera)^ 51. — jEgiotkvt exUipet in Europe, 51. — Note on
Cupidotua cupiao var. palhdidnctMi, Kidgway, 52. — Capture of the Egyptian
Goose on Long Island, N. Y^ 52. — MacCown's Longspur in Illinois, 52.



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iv CONTENTS OF VOLUME IL

NUMBER IIL

Drsoription op a New Species op Hdmmino-Bird prom CALiPOBxaA.

Bv H. W. Henshaw 59

The biRDs OF Gdadaloupb Island discussed with befbrknce to the

PRESENT Genesis op Species. By Robert Ruigway .... 58

Ah Undescribed Hybrid between two North American Grouse.

By WilUam Brewtter 66

BECENT LITERATURE.

Nelson's " Birds of Northeastern Illinois/* 68. — Salvio on the ProoeUanidci^ 6«.
— Catalogue of the Birds of the Islands of Malta and Goto, 70. — RidgwayV
** Studies of the American Fakomda,^^ 70. — Recent Ornithological ArticJes
in American Joamals, 78. — Califomian Omitbok^, 76. — McOauley'a
** Notes on Texan Ornithology/* 76.

GENERAL NOTES.

Nest and Egirsof Towosend's Flycatcher, 77. — Persistency at Nest>BuiIding in a
House- Wren, 78. — A New Bird to Mnssachusetts, 78. — A New Form of
Sumia to New England, 78. — Capture of the Philadelphia Vireo in New
Hampshire, 78. — Occurrence of Passerculua princepi in New York, 78. —
The Pigeon-Hawk {Falco columbarius) at Sea, 79. — Capture of a Second
Specimen of Helminihophaga UuoobroHchicJit^ 79. — The Mottled Owl as a
Fisherman, 80. — Breediog of Leach's Petrel on the Coast of Maine, 80. —
Nest and Ems of the Alaskan Wren, 82. — Jw%oo ortgwmt in Illinois, 82. —
Leatoptila atbifroni, a Pigeon new to the United States Fauna, 82. — Melo-
peiialeucoptera in Colorado, 88.— The Ruff and the Purple Gallinule in Ohio,
88. — Notes on NyctaU acadica^ 63. — Probable Breeding of the Saw-Whet
Owl in Massachusett8,84.



NUMBER IV.

Notes on Moixxthrus iSasus. By J. C. JferriU, Assist. Surg« U. S. A. . 86

On Seventy- five doubtful West-Coast Birds. By J. G. Qx^^er, M. />. 88

Remarks on Sblasphorus alleni, Henshaw. By 2>. G. EUiot ... 97
The Yellow-throated Warbler (DendrtBca dominica). By WUUam

BrewtUr 102

RECENT LITER ATURF«

D*Hamonville*s Enumeration of the Birds of Europe, 106. — Merriam*s 'TRe-visw
of the Birds of Connecticut," 107.

GENERAL NOTES.

Note on Doricka enicurOj 108. — Occurrence of the Black Vulture or Carrion
Crow in Ohio, 109. — Occurrence of the Western Nonpareil and Berlandier*s
Wren at Fort Brown, Texas, 109. — A Cuckoo's Egg in a Cedar-Bird*8
Nest, 110. — Occurrence for the Arst Time in England of the Robin
{Twrdu* migratorimi), 110.



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BULLETIN

OF THB

NUTTALL ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB.

VoL IL JANUARY, x87% No. !•



THE BLACK-AND-YELLOW WARBLER (DENDR(SCA
MACULOSA).

BT WILLIAM BRfiWSTBIU

First impresBions are apt to be moBt lastidg) and in many cases
are engraved upon the memory with a vividness that defies the
effacing influence of time* Tims the Black-and-Yellow Warbler
was one of my earliest bird acquaintances, and I shall not soon for»
get our introduction.

My family was spending a fbw days in a quiet little country town
in New Hampshire, when, one hot summer afternoon, finding time
hang heavily on my hands, I borrowed an old gun, and at the coun-
try store, where everything was sold from a patent coffee-mill to
the latest specific for rheumatism, I purchased a supply of am*
munition, and, thus equipped, took to the woods and searched a
long time in vain for game. At length, entering a grove of thickly
growing young spruces, I sat down to rest on a mossy log» I had
been there but a short time when I became conscious of faint
sounds in the trees above and around me, — chirpings, twitterings,
and occasionally a modest little effort at song. Watching atteu'^
tively, I soon spied a movement among the branches, and a tiny
bird hopped out into the light, presenting a bright yellow breast
and throat for just a moment before flying into the next tree.
Here was a revelation I I already knew a few of the most familiar
birds, — the Robin, the Bluebird, the Sparrow, the Oriole, and som«
others ; but it had never occurred to me that dark forests like
these might be tenanted by such delicate and beautiful forms.



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2 BULLETIN OF THE NUTTALL

Only the tropics surely could boast such gems. With enthusiasm
now fairly aroused, and animated with the spirit of an explorer, I
went at once to work to investigate, and in the course of an hour
or two more my ammunition was nearly exhausted, and quite a
line of poor, lifeless, mutilated little birds lay arranged along the
old log. Resting my gun against a neighboring tree, I examined
long and carefully the results of my work. Scarcely .any two of
my specimens were alike, and as I contemplated in amazement their
varied forms and coloring, I felt like the discoverer of a new world,
and doubted whether human eyes had ever beheld the like before.
Finally, the deepening twilight brought Im end to my reveries, and,
collecting my prizes, I took my way homeward. Taxidermy being
to me then a sealed book, I had recourse to pepper and salt as pre-
servatives, but a few hot days settled the matter and proved the
ruin of my collection. I can recall witii^ufficient distinctness for
identification but a single bird of th A all, — a fine adult male
Black-and-Yellow Warbler, which at ^e time I considered the
handsomest, and which I still think cannot be surpassed in beauty
by any New England representative of the family. That afternoon
was an unlucky one for the birds. It laid the foundation for a
taste that has since caused the destruction of thousands of their
tribe.

The Black-and-Yellow Warbler arrives in Massachusetts from the
South about the 15th of May. During the next two or three weeks
they are abundant everywhere in congenial localities. Willow
thickets near streams, ponds, and other damp places, suit them
best, but it is also not unusual to find many in the upland wooils,
especially where young pines or other evergreens grow thickly.
Their food at this season is exclusively insects, the larger part con-
sisting of the numerous species of Diptera. The males sing freely,
especially on warm bright mornings. They associate indifferently
with all the migrating warblers, but not unfrequently I have fo\md
large flocks composed entirely of members of their own species, and
in this way have seen at least fifty individuals collected in one small
tract of woodland. By the first of June all excepting a few strag-
glers have left. If we follow them northward, we find a few pairs
passing the summer on the mountains of Southern Maine and New
Hampshire. In July, 1875, 1 found them breeding, in company with
the Blackbumian Warbler {Dendrceca blackbitmict), the Snowbird
(Junco hyemalis), the Golden-crested Kinglet {Regultu scUrapa), and



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ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB. g

Beveral other birds of the Canadian Fauna, on Mount Monadnock,
New Hampshire, within fifteen miles of the Massachusetts State line.
Throughout the White Mountains of New Hampshire they are
everywhere common during the summer, but it is not until we
reach the latitude of the Umbagog Lakes, in Western Maine, that,
we find them evenly distributed over high and low country alike.
In this region summer succeeds winter so quickly that there is
almost no spring. Thus when I reached Upton on the 25th of
May, 1876, I foiind that the lakes had broken up but four days
previously ; not a leaf had unfolded, even in the most sheltered
places, and snow lay in large masses everywhere in the hollows and
on northern exposures. Yet many species of Warblers had already
arrived, and among them the subject of the present sketch was well
represented. '

They kept closely about the buildings, and although the day was
warm, maintained an almost perfect silence. Dozens at a time
were hopping about the manure-heap behind the stables and around
the sink-spout, while all showed a certain apprehensiveness of man-
ner, as if they feared the issue of their temerity in penetrating into
so bleak and dreary a region. Taking a short walk into the woods,
I found them untenanted, save by a few Titmice, Woodpeckers, and
some of the earlier Sparrows. But in the course of the next week
wonderful changes took place. The birches first, aftei*wards the
maples, beech-trees, and poplars, put on a feathery drapery of the
most delicate green. The shad-bush {Amelancliier canadensis) and
the ** inoose-wood " (Coi-nus circinata) became white with clustering
blossoms, and looked at a distance like fleecy summer-clouds en-
tangled among the trees. Underfoot, beautiful trilliums of both
the purple (Trillium erect um) and white (T. grandiflorum) species,
were conspicuous among a host of other wild-flowers. Bees hummed
among the blossoms, and butterflies flitted airily^ through the forest
glades. Everything was fresh, lovely, and suggestive of the calm,
peaceful security of summer. Thus in one week were consummated
changes that, farther south, are often extended through nearly
thrice the time. All this while the birds had kept ample pace with
the advance of the season. Hundreds were daily arriving, passing
on, or settling into their accustomed summer-haunts, and the woods
fairly rang with the first burst of their melody. During the next
week all the Warblers, and most of the smaller birds generally,
were occupied in pairiug aud constructing their nests. Then came



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4 BULLETIN OF THE NUTTALL

the harvest-time for the oologist, and rarities were in order. But
how brief it all was ! A dozen or so days only, and the young
were hatched out ; the woods swarmed with mosquitoes, black flies,
and other bloodthirsty insects, and " the season " was at an end.
Nothing remained but to pack up the accumulated treasures, and get
them safely home for future comparison and investigation.
^ Before taking out our cabinet specimens, however, and diving
into the dry details of description, let us return to the woods, and
contemplate for a few moments the undisturbed nest. We shall be
most likely to find one along this old wood-road, for the removal of
the taller trees has let in the sunlight a little, and birds love such
places.

You will rarely find the interior of a forest so well peopled as
the edges and little openings, and the birds are not singular in this
respect. Men always choose the shores of rivers, ponds, or the sea,
for their first settlements in a new country, and I fancy it is not
entirely from considerations of utility, but partly because they
crave an adjacent breathing-space, where the sun and wind may
have fair sweep. There are some exceptions to the rule ampng the
birds, of course, there being some morbidly disposed individuals
that can find no place too dark or too secluded.

As we follow the old wood-path, you shall take one side while I
make good the other. These little clumps of fir and spruce shrubs are
the likely places, and, judging from the numbers of Black-and- Yellow
Warblers that I hear singing, our ^chances are good, but you must
remember that not above one male in three or four of this species
is blessed with a mate, so do not let your hopes rise too high. They
are a gay lot of bachelors, though, are they not ] chasing one another
through the branches, more in sport than anger apparently, and ut-
tering their queer, emphatic little songs on all sides. She knew she
was right ; yes^ she knew she was riglUy they seem to say ; but what all
this means I never could imagine. Some idle gossip of theirs prob-
ably, which it will not profit us to inquire into. Ha ! I have it,
even so soon. I thought yon fellow singing so gayly in the fallen
tree-top had more the air of a Benedict than any we have pre-
viously seen, and here, almost imder my hand, sits his modest
little wife on her nest Be careful how you shake that branch, for
I would have you take a good long look ere we disturb her. See how
her dark little eye glistens, and note the rapid pulsating motion of
her back. Underneath those puffed-up feathers a poor little heart



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ORNITHOLOGICAL CLUB, 6

is beating "wildly with fear and apprehension, but still she sits
bravely on her trust. She would say, if she could, with the Roman
mother, '' These are my jewels," and would entreat us to spare them.
Now I will advance my hand cautiously. See ! I almost touch her



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