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for a short space on the neck behind. Its weight was sixteen pounds.
The sex was not ascertained. Although this species is given in many of
the local lists as of occasional occurrence during the migrations, there
seems to be no previous record of its actual capture in Massachusetts.

At the time of the first settlement of the country, according to various
early writers, a Swan — presumably G, americanus — was common along
the Merrimack River and in some other parts of the State. — William
Brewster, Cambridge^ Mast.

Capture of a Fifth Specimen of the White-throated Warbler
(HehrUnthophaga Uucohronckialit). — I am indebted to Mr. £. I. Shores
for the opportimity of examining a specimen of the White-throated
Warbler, which was taken by him at Suffield, Conn., July 3, 1875. It it
an adult male in very worn plumage. In every essential particular it
agrees well with my type of the species, though exhibiting certain peculi-
arities of coloration not found in any of the three specimens which I have
previously examined. These differences are such as might be expected to
occur in a series sufficiently large to present the range of individual
variation, and do not tend to establish any closer connection with either
of the allied species. The most marked departure from the type is pre-
sented by the coloration of the under parts. The entire pectoral region is
washed with pale yellow, which extends down along the sides of the abdo-
men nearly to the tail This coloring proves upon examination to be a
merely superficial tipping to the feathers. In a good series of H. chrysop'
tera before me several specimens occur which are marked in a nearly
similar manner, though in none of them does the yellow wash extend so
iiBir down upon the sides. With this latter species it seems to be a purely
individual phase of coloration, dependent neither upon age nor season.
Several young males in newly completed autumnal dress do not show the
slightest trace of its presence, while a young female in fall plumage is
quite distinctly tinged across the breast. The spring specimens most
strongly marked are all apparently veiy adult birds.

Another point of difference, scarcely to be expected when the unusual
amount of yellow beneath is taken in consideration, is found in the
restricted area of the yellow marking upon the wing-coverts. In the
type specimen the wing-bands are nearly confluent, and present the
appearance of a single broad yellow band upon the wing, while in Mr.
Shores's specimen they are widely separated. This, however, seems to be
mainly due to the imperfect condition of the plumage, whereby the darker
bases of many of the greater coverts are exposed. No further differences
worthy of note occur, and the salient characters of white cheeks and eye-
lids, narrow restricted black line through the eye, etc., are all strongly



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200 General Notes.

presented. Mr. Shores's Bpecimen makes the fifth that has already been
brought to light, and is the second reported from Connecticut. — William
Brewster, Cambridge^ Mass.

Nesting of the Banded Three-toed Woodpecker (PicMes ameri-
ecmus) IN Northern New York. — Since the eggs of this species have
never been described, and do not exist, to my knowledge, in the cabinet
of any of our ornithologists, it is with no ordinary degree of pleasure that
I am enabled U> make the following extract from my journal.

" June 4, 1878. — Shortly after crossing Moose River this morning, en
route for the Fulton chain of lakes, Mr. C. L. Bagg and I were so fortimate
as to secure a set of the eggs, with both parent birds, of Picoides ameri-
canus (old hirmtus). We had just crossed the boundary line between
Lewis and Herkimer Counties, when Mr. Bagg called my attention to a
'fresh hole,' about eight feet from the ground, in a spruce-tree near
by. On approaching the tree a yellow crown appeared in the hole, show-
ing us that the nest belonged to one of the Three-toed Woodpeckers, and
that the male bird was *at home.' To prevent his escape I jumped
toward the tree and introduced three fingers, which were immediately
punctured in a manner so distasteful to their proprietor as to necessitate
an immediate withdrawal and exchange for the muzzle of my friend's guiL
A handkerchief was next crowded into the hole, but was instantly riddled
and driven out by a few blows from his terrible bill. It was then held
loosely over the hole, and as the bird emerged I secured and killed him.
Through the kindness of a friend my pocket contained one of those
happy combinations of knives, saws, and button-hooks, — a sort of tool-
chest in miniature, — which one sometimes sees in the shop windows, and
is apt to regard with awe rather than admiration, but which constitutes,
nevertheless, one of the most useful articles in a naturalist's outfit. With
this instrument we were enabled to saw a block from the face of the nest,
and to secure, uninjured, the four nearly fresh eggs which it contained.
While wrapping up the eggs the female bird returned, and as she alighted
on the side of the tree was killed by Mr. Bagg. The orifice of the hole
was about eight feet high and an inch and a half in diameter, and the
cavity was about ten inches deep."

The ^;g8 are cream-white, and of a texture like those of other Wood-
peckers. They are strongly ovate in outline (the largest diameter being
near the large end), and measure respectively 23.8 X 17.2 mm., 23.6 X
17.8 mm., 23.8 X 17.9 mm., and 23 X 17.8 mm.

So far as I am aware this rare Woodpecker is only found along the
eastern border of Lewis County, in the Adirondack region, where it is a
resident species ; and even here it is much less common than its congener,
the Black-backed Woodpecker. — C. Hart Merriah, Locmt Grove, Lewis
Co,, N. r.



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INDEX.



AcciPiTEB cooperi, 41.

JEchmoptila albifrons, 144.

^gialitis hiaticula, 51, 86.

'• meloda var. circamcincta, 94.
" wilsonia, 139.

Agelaous phoeniceus, 175.
" tricolor, 137.

Alca bruennichi, 86.

Aldrich, Charles, Red-headed Wood-
pecker eating grasshoppers, 189.

Allen, C. A., an albino Anna Hum-
ming-bird, 192: the Pvgmy Owl
{Glaucidium atli/omicum), 193.

Allen, J. A. , an inadequate " Theory
of Birds' Nests," 23 ; note on Pipilo
eryihrophUmlmus with spotted scapu-
lars, 42 ; note on the Fish Crow, 47 ;
the Lark Bunting {Calamosptza bi-
color) in Massachusetts, 48 ; late
capture of the Yellow-bellied Fly-
catcher in Massachusetts, 102 ; per-
sistency in nest-building by a pair
of city Rbbins, 103 ; notice of his
"List of the Birds of Massachu-
setts," 138 ; occurrence of three spe-
cies of Sea-Ducks at St. Louis, Mo.,
148; the Carolinian Fauna, 149 ; the
Glossy Ibis in Massachusetts, and
note on its proper generic and specific
names, 152; Rnfous-hcaded Sparrow
{Peucaa rtijiceps) in Texas, 188 ;
early nesting of the Shore Lark
(EremovhUa alj^estris) near Indian-
apolis, Ind., 189; the Snow-Bird in
summer on Mount Wachusctt, 192;
Sabine's Gull in Maine, 195.

Amazilia ceniniventris, 144.

Ammodromus bairdi, 2.

" caudacutus, 48, 98, 119, 147.
" maritimus, 48, 119.

Aropelis cedrorum, 64, 70.
•* garrulus, 46.

Anhinga, 101.

Anorthura troglodytes var. hyemalis,
53, 172,194.

Anous fuscatus, 143.
" rherminieri, 143.
" nigcr, 143.
" plumbea, 141.
** rousseaui, 143.
" spftdiceus, 143.
'* slolidus, 143.
" " var. frater, 143.



Anser hrperbopeus, 146.

Anthus ludovicianus, 35, 172, 194.

Antrostomus c^rolinensis, 1 65.

Aquila chrysaetus, 100.

Ardea casrulea, 145.
" candidissima, 145.
'* cinereus, 183.
" cocoi, 183.
" egretta, 145.
•* herodias, 53, 183, 184.
" lessoni, 184.
" lencogastra var. lencophrymna,

145.
" occidentalis, 183.
" rufa, 145, 184.
" wiirdemanni, 184.

Audubon, Miss Maria R., combat be-
tween an albino Robin and a mole,
184.

Auripanis flaviceps, 93.

Baoo, Egbert, Jr., Lincoln's Finch
{Mdospiza lincolni) breeding in Ham-
ilton County, N. Y., 197.

Bailey, H. B., some new traits in the
Red-headed Woodpecker (MelanerpeM
erythrocephalw), 97.

Barrows, S. J., notice of his Catalogue
of the Alcid(p, 86.

Batchelder, Charles F., spurious prima-
ries in the Red-eyed Vireo, 97.

Belding, L., nesting-habits of Pants
montanuSf 102.

Bend ire, Charles, breeding habits of
Geoccyx culifomianus^ 39; notice of
his Notes on some of the Birds of
Southern Oregon, 81.

Bemicla brenta, 86.

Bicknell, Eugene P., evidences of the
Carolinian Fauna in the Lower Hud-
son Valley, 128.

Bluebird, 19, 76, 169.

Brachyrhamphus craveri, 81.

Brewer, T. M., nest and eggs of Zom-
trichta coronata, 42; the Seaside
Finch {Ammodromus maritimus) in
Eastern Massachusetts, 48 ; changes
in our North American Fauna, 49 ;
notes on Junco caniceps and the close-
ly allied forms, 72 ; note on eggs of
ilyiarchua erythrocercus, 100 ; the
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Pdioptila
ccBTulea in Massachusetts, 146 ; Apol-
ogetic, 147; the Stilt Sandpiper (A/uTo-



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202



Index.



palama hifnantopuit) , 148 ; interesting;
captures, 151 ; two more birds new
to the Fauna of North America, 152 ;
notice of his Supplement to his Cat-
alogue of New England Birds, 185 ;
the Skua Gull {Stercorariui ccUaV'
ractes) off the coast of Massachusetts,
188 ; song of Hepburn's Finch [Leu-
cueticU lUtoraiia), 189 ; the Black-
throated Bunting ( Euspiza atnericana ) ,
190 ; Wilson's Thrush, with spotted
eggs and nesting in trees, 193 ; the
Carolina Wren in Massachusetts,
193; the Titlark (Anthut ludovid-
anm) in Massachusetts in June, 193 ;
the White-crowned Sparrow breeding;
in Vermont, 195 ; eggs of the Soli-
tary Sandpiper (W^cophUus aoli-
torittf), 197.

Brewster, William, note on nest and
eggs of Carpodaau pwrj^urem var.
cuTt/omicuSf 10; descriptions of the
first plumage in various species of
North American birds, 15, 56, 116,
175; occurrepceofa second specimen
of Swainson's Buzxard {Buteo twain-
9oni) in Massachusetts, 39 ; breeding
of the Hooded Merganser {Mergtu
cucuUaius) in Florida, 40; note on
Dendroeca dominica^ 43; the White-
throated Warbler {Hetminthophaga
leucobronchialis) in Connecticut, 99;
nestins; of the Large-billed Water
Thrush (Stunts motaciUa)^ 133; note
on the breeding of the Woodcock in
Oeorgia and Florida, 151 ; note on
the occurrence of PhcUaropm hifperbo-
reus in Massachusetts, 1 52 ; tlie Pro-
thonotary Warbler {Protonotaria d-
trea), 153 ; the Short-tailed Tern (//y-
drochdidon Jissipes) in Massachusetts,
190; capture oif the Whistling Swan
( Cygnus americcmus) in Massachusetts,
198; capture of a fifth specimen of
the White-throated Warbler ( f/ie/nim-
thophaga Uucobronchiaiis), 199.

Brown, J. A. Harvie, notice of his pa-
pers on the distribution of birds in
North European Russia, p. 85.

Brown, Nathan Clifford, the Sharp-
tailed Finch in Maine, 98 ; the Stilt
Sandpiper at Portland, Me., 102 ; a
list of birds observed at Coosada,
Central Alabama, 168.

Bunting, Baird's, 1.

Black-throated, 45, 1 64, 1 90.
" Lark, 48.
<* Painted Lark, 92.

Bureau, Louis, abstract of his paper,
** De la Mue du Bee et des Ome-
ments Palp^braux du Macareux arc-
tique," etc, 87.



Buteo swainsoni, 39.
Buzzard, Swainson's, 39.
Calamospiza bicolor, 48.
Calidris arenaria, 86.
Calypte anna, 1 92.
Cardinalis virginianus, 131.
Caipodacns cassini, 66.

" purpureus, 116.

** califomicus, 8.
Catbird, 18, 76, 169.
Catharistes atratus, 1 66.
Catherpes mexicanus /3 conspenns^ 65
Cedar-bird, 70.
Centronix bairdi, 2, 3.

" ochrooephalos, 1, 2.
Cen turns carolinus, 146, 180.
Ceratorhina monocerats^ 87.

" suckieyi, 89.

Certhia familiaris, 171.
Ceryle alcvon, 92.
ChamaBpeleia passerina, 147.
Chal, Yellow-breasted, 174.
Chaulelasmus couesi, 81.
Chewink, see Towhee.
Chickadee, set Titmouse.
Chicken, California Prairie, 96. [164.
Chondestes grammaca, 43, 44, 66, 121,
Chordeiles virginianus, 178.
Chrysomitris lawrencei, 66.
pinus, 66, 117.
" trisiis. 66, 117.

Chnck-will's-widow, 165.
Ciconia dicrura, 184.

" maguari, 184.
Cinclus mexicanus, 65.
Cistothorus stellaris, 22, 172.
Coccyzus americanus, 165.

** erythrophthalmus, 178.
Colaptes auratus, 67, 181.

" " y hybridus, 67.

" " fi mexicanus, 67.

Collins, W. L., tragic £Ate of a Summer

Warbler, 197.
CoUurio ludovicianus, 66, 174.

" ludovicianus var. excnbitoroi-
des, 53, 55.
Colymbus septentrionalis, 86, 146.

" torquatus, 53.
Contopus borealis, 53, 177.
" richardsoni, 67.
" virens, 177.
Cooper, William A., notes on the breed-
ing habits of Curpodacus purjmreua
var. cali/omicus, with a description of
its nest and cgg8, 8 ; on the breeding
habits of Hutton's Vireo ( Vireo hut-
tmi) and the Gray Titmouse (Lopho-
phanes inornatus)^ with description of
their nest and eggs, 68.
Coriphilus kuhli, 81.
Corvus americanus, 71, 94.
" corax, 53, 86.



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Index.



203



Coitus osslfrftgus, 45, 47, 181.

Cory, Charles B., the Olossy Ibis in

Massachusetts, 15S.
Cotnrniculus henslowi, S9, 118.

" passerinus, 118.
Cotjle riparia, 64, 1 64.
Cooes, ElKott, note on Pa$serctdu$ bairdi
and P. prince^, I ; the Northern
Fhalarope in North Carolina, 40;
the Willow Grouse in New York, 41 ;
Pipilo erifthropkthalmut with spotted
scapulars, 41 ; melanism in Turdus
mi(/ratorim, 47 ; on the moult of the
bill and palpebral ornaments of Fra-
, tercnla arrtica, 87 ; habits of the King-
fisher {Cerjflecdcjfon)^ 92; nest and
eggs of SAuphtirui platycercw^ 95 ;
nesting of Vireo ulivacens, 95 ; mean-
ing of the word *'Anhinga." 101 ;
the Eave, CliiF, or Crescent Swallow
{Petrockplidon lunifmnn), 105; Swal-
low-tailed Kite in Dakota in winter,
147; a hint to egg-collectors, 191;
nest and eggs of HelmintAopkaga
pinuSf 194.
Creeper, Black-and-white, 22, 172.

Brown, 171.
Crow, Blue, 112.
" Common, 71.
'* Fish, 45. 47, 131.
Cvanocttta cristata, 1 65.
Cyanospiza cyanea, 1 22.
Cygnns amcricanus, 198.
Cyrtonyx raassena, 94.
Day AN, A. J., notes on birds of North-
em New York, 53.
Deane, Rathven, CotKmicnlus henslowi
in New Hampshire, 39; the Blue-
^ray Gnatcatcher ( PolwptVa ccentUa)
m Massachusetts, 45 ; deadly combat
between an albino Robin and a
mole. 104; the Blue-winged Yellow
Warbler (Helntinthophaga pinus) in
Massachusetts, 1 88 ; the Sooty Tern
in New Hampshire, 195.
Dendrocygna fulva, 138.
DendroDca asstiva, 173, 197.

" blackbumias, 53, 58, 93.

" caerulea, 46.

** caernlescens, 53, 57, 173.

'' castanea, 58.

" coronata, 53, 58, 65, 76, 173.

" discolor, 59, 173.

" dominica,43. 146, 173.

albilora, 144, 163.
. ** maculosa, 53, 59.
** occiden talis, 65.
'* palmarum, 173.
" '* var. h^vpochrysea, 173.

" pennsylvanica, 59, 71.
" pinus, 173.
'< striata, 105, 138.



Dendroeca virens, 57.
Dichromanassa rufa, 145.
Diver, Red-throated, 145.
Dove, Ground, 146.
Duck, Pied. 79.
" Surf, 149.
Eaolb, C. R, the Fish Crow ( C'orrtis
Msi/ragus) on Long Island, 47 ; cap-
ture of JEgiaUtin mefoda var. ciratm-
eincUt on liong Island, 94.
Eagle, Golden, 100.
Elanoides forficatus, 147.
Elliot, D. G., notice of his «* Review of

the Jhidina, or Ibises," 182.
Embeiiza bairdi, 2.

'* leucophrys, 105.
Empidonax aeadicas, 131, 177. [187.
" flaviventris, 101, 165. 178,

** difficilis, 137, 166, 168.

" hammondi, 66.

** minimus, 178.

** obscurus, 66.
" pusillus. 66, 137.

" trailli. 177, 188.

Eremophila alpestris, 40, 53, 54, 16.*^.
Euspiza americana, 45, 122, 164, 190.
Falcimbllus guarauna, 145, 183.
•* i^neus, 183.

** ndgwavi, 183.

** thalassina, 183.

Fako candicans, 86.
" communis anatnm, 32.
" " nsevios, 165.

** polyagrus, 112.
" spadiceus, 105.
Fanna, Carolinian, 128, 149.
Feilden, H. W., notice of his List of the

Birds of Smith's Sound, etc., 86.
Finch, Bachman's. 164.
" California Purple, 8, 10.
" Grass, 164.
" Hepburn's, 189.
" Lark, 43, 44, 164.
" Lincoln's, 177.
** Seaside, 48.
'' Sharp-tailed, 48, 98, 146.
Fisher, A. K., Robin's eggs spotted,
97 ; the Kentucky Warbler (O/xww-
nit/ormotug) at Smg Sing, N. Y., 191.
Fratercula arctica, 87.
Fringilla hudsonias, 105.
*' unalaskensis, 3.
Flycatcher, Acadian, 131.

" Great-crested, 99, 165.

*' Small-headed, 139.

" Yellow-belKed, 101, 165, 187.
Gblochblidok anglica, 141.
** aranea, 141.

" balthica, 141.

** macrotarsa, 141.

*' meridionalis, 141.

Gentry, Thomas G., notice of his ** Life-



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204



Index,



Histories of the Birds of Eastern
Pennsylvania," 36.
Gleoccyx califomianus, 39.
Geothlypis macgillivrayi, 62.

Philadelphia, 53, 61, 69.
" trichas, 62, 65, 174.

Glaucidium califomicum, 193.
" fen*agineum, 144.

Gnatcatcher, Blue-gray, 19,45,145,170.
Goose, Snow, 146.
Goss, N. S., breeding of the Duck

Hawk in trees, 32.
Grebe, Crested, 52.

Grinnell, G. Bird, the Ground Dove
( Chamcepeieiapasserina) in New York,
147.
Grouse, Sharp-tailed, 76.

»* Willow, 4J.
Guiraca caerulea, 139.
Gull, Sabine's, 107, 195.

" Skua, 188.
Gyranokitta cyanocephala. 1 1 2.
Hardy, Manly, nesting habits of the

Red-bellied Nuthatch, 196.
Harelda glacialis, 86.
Haliplana anosthastus, 143.
" discolor, 143.
" fuliginosa, 143.
" fnliginosa var. crissalis, 143.
" panayensis, 143.
Harporhynchus crissalis, 93.

rufus, 18, 170.
Hawk, Cooper's, 41.
" Duck, .32, 165.
" Sparrow, 4 1 .
Head, J. F., Breeding of the Woodcock

in Georgia. 151.
Helinea swainsoni, 163.
Helmitherus swainsoni, 172.

'* vermivorus, 23, 56, 129.

Helminthophaga celata, 46, 96, 173.
- " celata 3 lutesccns, 65.
" chrysoptera, 56» 130.
" leucobronchialis, 44, 99, 1 99.
" peregrina, 53, 71.
" pinus, 130, 163, 188, 194.
" ruficapilla, 54, 65.
Helopus caspius, 143.
Henshaw, H. W., on the species of the
genus Passerella^ 3; additional re-
marks on SeUisphorus allenif 1 1 ; nest
and eggs of the Blue Crow ( Gymno-
kUta Ci/anocepfta/n), 1 12 ; notice of his
Orfiithological Reports of the Whee-
ler Expeditions for 1876, 1877, 136.
Hesperipnona vespcrtina, 66, 93.
Heteroscelus incanus, 137.
Hirundo fulva, 106.

" horrcorum, 63, 135.
" horreori-lunifrons, 135.
" lunifrons, 106.
opifex, 106.



Hirundo republicana, 105, 106.1
Howey, John M., breeding of the Shore

Lark in Western New York, 40.
Humming-bird, Anna, 192.

" Broad-tailed, 95.

" Green-backed, 11.

" Rufous-backed, 11.

Hydranassa tricolor, 145.
Hydrochelidon fissipes, 141, 190.
" lariforrais, 141.

" leucoptera, 141.

" niger, 140.

'* nigra, 141.

** plumbea, 141.

'* soroalensis, 143.

Hydroprogne caspica, 143.
Hylotomus pileatus, 53.
Ibis alba, 166.
" falcinellus, 151.
" ordi, 151,152, 183.
Ibis, Glossy, 151, 152.
Icteria virens, 56, 60, 174.
Icterus baltimore, 176.
Ictinia mississippiensis, 166.
Jay, Blue, 165.
Jones, H. T., breeding of the Shore

Lark in Western New York, 189.
Jordan, David S., notice of his ** Man-
ual of Vertebrated Animals,'' 145.
Junco aikeni, 73.
" caniceps, 72.
" cinereus, 73.
" dorsalis, 53. 73, 94.
" hyemalis, 120, 192.
" oregonus, 73.
Kino, F. H., the Winter Wren breed-
ing in Southern New York, 194.
Kingfisher, Belted, 92.
Kinglet, Golden-crested, 19, 170.

** Ruby-crowned, 170.
Kite, Swallow-tailed, 146.
Laoopos albus, 38, 41.

" rupestris, 38, 86.
Langdon, F. W., notice of his Cata-
logue of the Birds of the Vicinity of
Cincinnati, 34.
Lanivireo cassini, 66-

** solitarius, 65.
Lark, Horned, 40, 53, 165.
•* Meadow, 164.
" Shore, see Homed Lark.
Laropis anglica. 141.
Larus affinis, 185.

" argentatoides, 186.

" argentatus, 187.

** brachyrhynchus, 186.

" califomicus, 186.

" can us, 50, 185, 186, 187.

" chalcopterus, 186.

" cucullatus, 187.

" franklini. 187.

" fuscus, 186.



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Index.



206



Lams glancescens, 166.
" glaucopterus, 186.
" glauciis, 86, 1 86.
" hntohinsi, 186.
** ichthyaetus, 187.
'* kittlilzi, 187.
'* leiicophseus, 187.
" leucopterus, 187.
** meruiinius, 141.
" michahcllesi, 187.
" niveus, 186.
** occidentalism 186.
*' polo-candor, 142.
** ridibundus, 187.
" schimperi, 187.
" septentrional is, 186.
" sterna, 142.
" sucklevi. 186.

Lawrence, N. T., the European Wid-
geon {Mareca peneiope) in the United
States, 98 ; the Ipswich Sparrow on
Long Island, N. Y., 102.

Lobipes hyperboreus, 40, 54, 151.

Lophophanes bicolor, 19, 54, 129^ 170.
*' inornatu»», 68.

Loxia curvirostra americana, 53, 117.
" leucoptcra, 53, 117.

Mareca pcnelope, 98.

Maynard, C. J., notice of his "Birds of
Florida," 145.

Meams, Edgar A., capture of several
rare birds near West Point, N. Y.,
45 ; description of unusually devel-
oped individuals of three species,
and remarks on uncommon plu-
mages in several others, taken near
West Point, N. Y., 69 ; the Golden
^aglo in Hudson Highlands, 100;
capture of two rare birds in the Hud-
son River Valley, 146.

Megalopterus stolid us, 143.

Melanerpes ervthroccphalus, 97, 123,
189.
" forraicivorus, 97.

Melospiza fasciata, y fallax, 66.
" " ^ guttata, 66.

'* ** 5 heermanni, 66.

" insienis, 3.
" lincolni, 66, 197.
" melodia, 120.
" palustris, 120.

Mergulus alle, 86.

Merganser, Hooded, 40.

Mcrriam, C. Hart, correction, 47 ; re-
marks on some of the birds of Lewis
County, Northern New York. 52,
123; nesting of the Banded Three-
toed Woodpecker {Picoides avieri-
canus) in Northeni New York, 200.

Merrill, J. C, occurrence of Myiarchus
crinitus var. erythrocercus at Fort
Brown, Texas, 99.



Micropalama himantopus, 148.
Mimus carolinensis, 18, 76, 170.

" polyglottus, 65, 93, 129, 169.
Mniotilta varia, 22, 172.
Mocking-bird, 129, 169.
Molothrus ffineus, 144.

*• ater, 123.
Mormon grubs, 88.
Murdoch, John, effects of the warm
winter on the migration of birds, 75 ;
second capture of the Orange-crowned
Warbler {Helminthifphaqa celata) in
New Hampshire, 96 ; I^halarope, an
etymological blunder, 150.
Muscicapa striata, 105.
Myiadestes town sen di, 65.
Myiarchus cinerascens, 66, 100.
" crinitus, 94, 165.
" crinitus var. erythrocercus,
99, 100, 144.
Myiodioctes canadensis, 53, 60, 139.

" mitratus, 56, 71, 130, 164, 174.
Neison, E. W., notice of his observa-
tions on birds of Southern Illinois,
36 ; three additions to the Avifauna
of North America, 87; the Rock
Ptarmigan (fjagopm rupestris) in the
Aleutian Islands, 38.
Nuthatch, Brown-headed, 171.
" Red-bellied, 20, 196.
White-bellied, 171.
Nyctherodius violaceus, 145.
CEdemia americana, 54, 148.
" fusca, 148.
" perspicillata, 149.
Onychoprion fuliginosa, 143.
" panaya, 143.

" panayensis, 143.

Oporomis formosa, 60, 130, 164, 174,

191.
Osborne, S. D., nesting of the Yellow-
bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaci-
ve}Uris), 187.
Owl, Barn, 78, 132.
" Hawk, 54.
" Pygmy, 193.
Paoophila ebumea, 86.
Parula americana, 22, 172.

" nigrilora, 144.
Parus atncapillus, 19.
** carolinensis, 170.
" cinctus, 37.
" hudsonicus, 20, 105.
" montanus, 102.
" rufescens, 20.
Passerculus bairdi, 1, 2.
" guttatus, 80.
" princeps, 1, 2. 3, 102, 145.
" sandvichensis y alaudinns, 66.
" savanna, 118.
Passerella iliaca, 3, 6, 7.

" " megarhyncha, 7, 66.



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206



Index.



PasMiella iliac* schistacea. 7.
. " " townsendi, 7.

Pelodes sarinamensis, 141.
Fennock, C. J., relayini^ of Hawks in

the same nest when robbed, 41.
Perisoreus canadensis, 53.
Perissof^loBsa tigrina, 60.
Petrochelidon lunifrons, 63, 105, 135.
PeucflDa cassini, 144.
" roficepe, 188.
Pheno^pla nitens, 65.
Phfttnsia ele^ns, 142.
" trudeauii, 143.
" bicolor, 142.
Phalarope, Northern, 40, 64, 151, 152.
Fhalaropus, 150.

" fulicarins, 86.

" hyperborens, 151, 152.

Philohela minor, 17, 151.
Ficoides aroericanus, 53, 200.

" arcticus, 53, 180.
Picas nuttalli, 67.

" pubescens, 67, 71, 179.
" " fi gairdneri, 67.

" villoros, 179.

" harrifi, 179.
Pinicola enncleator, 116.

" " fi canadensis, 66.

Pipilo erythrophthalmns, 41, 122, 164.
** aberti, 93.
" chlorurus, 93.
'* fnscus, 93.
'* megalonyx, 93.
'* oregonus, 93.
Planetis gattatus, 143.
Platalea ajaja, 184.
" rosea, 184.
Plectrophanes nivalis, 86.

" omatns, 92, 118.

" pictiis, 92.

Plegadis falcinellus, 152.
Plover, Piping, 94.
" Ring^, 51.
Podiceps cristatus, 47, 52.
Polioptila caemlea, 19, 45, 146, 170.
Pooecetes gramineus, 66, 174.

" " /S confinis, 66.

Porzana jamaicensis, 85.
Frocellaria glacialis, 86.
Protonotaria citrea, 22, 139^ 153, 172.
Ptarmigan, Rock, 38.

White, 38, 41.
Ptychorhamphus aleuticas, 87.
PnflSn, Arctic, 87.
Puffinus (Nectris) nativitatis, 81.
Purdie, H. A., the Lark Finch {Chon-
destes grammaca) again in Massacha-
setts, 44 ; the Black-throated Bunting
(Euspizaamericana) in Massachusetts,



Online LibraryNuttall Ornithological ClubBulletin of the Nuttall Ornithological Club: a quarterly jjournal of ornithology → online text (page 49 of 50)