N.Y.). Ladies Church of the Good Sheperd (Binghamton.

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^gg- Shake the pan until it begins to thicken then let it
stand a few seconds to brown. Run a broad bladed knife
around the omelet, fold over and turn on a hot dish. Serve
at once.

CHEESE OMELET.

Proceed as in plain omelet. As it begins to thicken scat-
ter over it three spoonfuls of grated cheese. Fold up and
serve on a hot dish.

Ham, tongue or chicken may be chopped fine and made
the same as cheese omelet. They may bestirred into the egg
before it is cooked if preferred, adding a little parsley.

SWEET OMELET.

Add to the plain omelet four tablespoonfuls of powdered
sugar, two tablespoonfuls of butter and one tablespoonful of
vanilla. Beat the eggs separately and add to the yolks the
sugar gradually until smooth and thick. Add the whites
beaten very stiff at the last. When done sift powdered sugar
over the top. Serve on a hot dish.



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BREAD, ROLLS, ETC.

POTATO YEAST.

Put two quarts of water and a handful of hops (in a
bag) on to boil. When boiling add six potatoes. When the
potatoes are soft, mash through a colander, pour over the
boiling hop water, add one cup of sugar, one-fourth of a cup^
• of LeRoy salt. When it is blood warm add one cupful oi
good yeast. Set in a warm place and let it rise five or six
hours. When well risen turn into a stone jug, cork tightly
and set in a cool place. Mrs. Mary Stuart.

POTATO BREAD.

Three medium-sized potatoes, washed, pared and boiled
in one quart of water. Mash the potatoes through a colan-
der and pour over them the water in which they were boiled ;
add one teaspoonful of LeRoy salt, one tablespoonful of
sugar, one tablespoonful of butter. When blood warm stir
in one-half cuijful good yeast or one-half yeast cake dissolved
in tepid water; set in a warm place to rise. If this is started
at no6n, at four o'clock stir in enough flour to make a stiff
dough. It will be ready to mix at bedtime. In the morning
mould into loaves, when risen to twice the size bake in a
good oven. • Mrs. Mary Stuart.

Note. — Bread made with potato sponge keeps fresh
longer and is more nutritious.

SOFT YEAST AND YEAST CAKES.

Boil one pint of hops in three pints of boiling water
twenty minutes. Have one pint grated raw potato, strain
the hop water and turn boiling hot over the potato, stir
briskly to a smooth paste, put on the stove and boil one
minute. Let stand until lukewarm, then add one-half tea-
cupful of sugar, one tablespoonful of ginger, one tablespoon-
ful of LeRoy salt, and one well-soaked cake of any kind of
good yeast and put in a warm place to rise. Stir down






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142 Cook Book

and let rise the second time. It is then ready for use. For
the yeast cakes, knead into the soft yeast enough com meal
to make a stiff dough. Form in a roll the size of your wrist.
With a sharp knife slice the roll in little cakes and dry them.
They will keep good till used up. If#ou are afraid that your
yeast cakes are a little stale, put one of them in a cup of
warm water with a good pinch of hops ; let this stand for
an hour or so before using; it will have an excellent effect on
he yeast and will insure good bread. Mrs. Talbot.



SOUR MILK BREAD.

Take one pint of whey from sour milk scalding hot, and
stir in enough flour to make a stiff batter. When blood
warm add one-half a gill of yeast and let it rise five or six
hours. When light, stir in one tablespoonful of LeRoy salt,
two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, one teaspoonful of soda
dissolved in a little hot water. Mix in just enough flour to
handle the dough, let it rise; then mould into pans (it should
be kneaded both times thoroughly to make fine bread), let it
rise to twice the size and bake in a moderate oven. This
makes very white, excellent bread. M. D. G.

BREAD STIRRED WITH A SPOON.

One quart of milk, one quart of water, one tablespoonful
of LeRoy salt, two tablespoonfuls of lard, three tablespoon-
fuls of sugar, one-half yeast cake. Stir with a spoon ; when
it is light, put in pans and bake. Mrs. Ives.

GRAHAM BREAD.

Two cups of sour milk, one-half cup of sugar, one tear
spoonful of soda, one-half teaspoonful of LeRoy salt, stir in
flour to make a stiff mass. Put in well-buttered basin, steam
two hours; put in oven to brown nicely; put it to steam
over cold water, it will give it time to rise. Mrs. F. Stuart.

GRAHAM BREAD.

Two teacupfuls of sour milk, one-half teacupful of molas-
ses, one teacupful of wheat flour, two teacupfuls of graham



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Cburcb of the Good Shepherd 143

flour, one teaspoonful of soda, one tablespoonful of melted
laj*d, LeRoy salt; raise and bake one hour, Mrs. Smith.

BRAN BREAD.
Two cupfuls of wheat flour, one and one-half cupfuls of
wheat bran, one cupful (4 sour milk, one cupful of sweet milk,
one-half cupful of sugar or molasses, one teaspoonful of soda,
one teaspoonful of LeRoy salt; bake in a flat tin three-
quarters of an hour. , Mrs, Smith.

BROWN BREAD. « ^

One even cupful of Indian meal, two heaping cupfuls of ^^
graham flour, one teaspoonful of LeRoy salt, one teaspoon-
ful of soda, one cupful of molasses. Mix very thoroughly
together the meal, salt and soda; add one pint of hot water
to the molasses and stir; pour the molasses and water into
the middle of the meal and stir till a smooth batter. Put in
a buttered tin boiler, cover tightly and set into an iron
kettle covered tightly and boil three hours, and bake fifteen

minutes.

OAT BREAD.

One cupful of oatmeal scalded in one pint of boiling
water. Let it stand one hour, then add one-half a yeast
cake dissolved in one-third cup of water; add one table-
spoonful of sugar or molasses, LeRoy salt, one teaspoonful
butter and one quart of flour ; mix all together. When very
light, divide in two loaves, put in pans, let it stand a little
while before baking; do not knead. Mrs. Heady.

STEAMED LOAF.

One quart of sweet milk, one cupful of molasses, two
cupfuls of white flour, four cupfuls of corn meal, two table-
spoonfuls of chopped suet or two cupfuls of butter, one tea-
spoonful of LeRoy salt. Steam three hours, then bake in
oven one-half hour. Mrs. Heady.

BRAN BISCUIT (FOR DYSPEPSIA).

One pint of wheat bran, one-half pint of wheat flour,
one-half pint of sweet milk, six tablespoonfuls molasses, one
teaspoonful of soda. Mrs. Heady.



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144 ' Cook Book

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT.

Sift with one quart of flour two teaspooofuls of Cleve-
land's baking powder and one-half teaspoonful of LeRoy
salt. Rub in shortening (butter and lard mixed) the size of
»ii egg, and wet with enough sweet milk to make soft dough.
Handle as little as possible and roll out about one inch thick.
Cut the desired size and bake twenty minutes. Do not have
the oven too hot at first; increase the beat.

^ ^ ROLLS.

Put one pint of sweet milk in the double boiler, stir into
it when it boils one heaping tablespoonful of lard, one of
butter and one of sugar, one teaspoonful of LeRoy salt; let
it just come to a boil. Take from fire and when lukewarm
add flour enough to drop from a spoon, then add one cake
of compressed yeast dissolved in warm water. Let it rise,
then roll on board and use butter instead of flour. Mary,
. PARKER HOUSB ROLLS.

Scald one pint of sweet milk, when cold add two table-
spoonfuls of sugar, two of lard, two of yeast, and a little
LeRoy salt. Let rise over night, knead down in the morn-
ing, let rise again, and at noon knead, roll out thin, cut with
large cutter, butter the top, fold over, let rise again and
bake. If wanted for tea, mix in the morning instead of

night.

COUSIN ANN'S RUSK, (1850.)

Six coffee cups of flour, one and one-half cups of sugar,

three-fourths of a cup of butter, one cup of milk, three eggs,

one-half cup of good yeast. Put the ingredients together

with half the flour and set to rise. When well risen put in

the remainder of the flour and a little LeRoy salt. Drop in a

buttered dripping pan and when light enough bake in a quick

oven from fifteen to twenty minutes.

MUFFINS.

One and one-half cups of flour, one cup of sw(»et milk, two
eggs well beaten and two teaspoonfuls of Cleveland's baking
powder. Bake in a well heated oven. Mrs, C, Moore.



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Church of the Good Shepherd 145

QUICK MUFFINS.

Two eggs, butter the size of an egg, one cup of milk, one
tablespoon of sugar, one heaping teaspoon of Cleveland's
baking powder, flour to make a stiff batter. A. K.

SWEET WAFFLES.
Three eggs, one cup of butter, one cup of sugar, one-
fourth cup of sour milk and a very little soda. Stir in flour
until it is stiff as cake. Very old and tried receipt.

Mrs. C. Moore.
WHOLE WHEAT GEMS.
One pint of milk, one egg, one tablespoonful of sugar,
one of melted butter, one-half teaspoonful of LeRoy salt, two
teaspoonfuls of Cleveland's baking powder. Flour to make
as thick as pancakes. Heat the tins pour in batter and bake
in a quick oven.

OATMEAL GEMS.
One pint of cooked oatmeal, one pint of sweet milk, four
tablespoonfuls of sugar, two beaten eggs, one teaspoonful of
LeRoy salt, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, two tea-
spoonfuls of Cleveland's baking powder and enough flour to
stick together. Bake in hot gem pans in quick oven.

CORN MEAL GEMS.

Two eggs, one-half teacup of sweet milk, two heaping
teaspoonfuls of Cleveland's baking powder, three heaping
tablespoonfuls of corn meal, three heaping tablespoonfuls of
flour, one-half tablespoonful of butter, one-half teaspoonful
of LeRoy salt. Beat the whites separately and add last.
Heat the gem tins pour in batter and bake in a quick oven.
JOHNNY CAKE, (1865.)

Two cups of Indian meal, one cup of flour, one cup of
buttermilk or sour milk, one egg, one teaspoonful of soda, a
little LeRoy salt, one tablespoonful of molasses.

Mrs. A. M. Dewey.

BUCKWHEAT CAKES.

One quart of buckwheat flour, four tablespoonfuls of



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146 Cook Book

yeast, one teaflpoonful of LeRoy salt, one handful of corn
meal, warm water enough to make a thin batter. Beat well
and set to rise in a warm place. In the morning take one-
fourth teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water, one table-
spoonful of molasses and stir in just before baking. Leave
enough each morning in the crock to serve as sponge instead
of fresh yeast. The cakes can be stirred up each morning and
put in a cold place instead of mixing at night. Should the
batter sour bake all out and start fresh. M. D. G.

CORN MEAL CAKES.

Three cupfuls of boiling milk poured slowly over one
cupful of corn meal. Take one cupful of flour, one teaspoon-
ful of LeRoy salt, one of cream tartar, one-half of soda, two
of sugar. Pub all through a sieve and when the milk is cool
add to it the flour and two well beaten eggs.

BATTER CAKES.

One quart of flour, three teaspoonfuls of Cleveland's bak-
ing powder, three eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately,
one quart of sweet milk, one tablespoonful of melted butter,
a little LeRoy salt. Add whites last. Bake at once.

CHEESE STRAWS.

Mix a cupful of grated cheese with a cupful of flour, one-
half teaspoon of LeRoy salt, a pinch of cayenne pepper, piece
of butter the size of an egg. Add enough cold water to en-
able you to roll the paste thin. Then cut in strips seven
inches long and one-half an inch wide. Put in tins and bake
in a quick oven five or ten minutes. Sara.



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COFFEE, TEA, ETC.

COFFEE.

The Use of Coffee.— It is asserted by men of high pro-
fessional ability that when the system needs stimulant noth-
ing equals a cup of fresh coffee. Those who desire to rescue
the drunkard from his cups, will find no better substitute for
spirits than strong, new-made coffee without milk or sugar.
Two ounces of coffee, or one-eighth of a pound, to one pint of
boiling water, makes a first-class beverage, but ^he water
must be boiling, not merely hot. Bitterness comes from
boiling it too long. If the coffee required for breakfast be put
in a granitized kettle over night and a pint of cold water
poured over, it can be heated to just the boiling point and
then set back to prevent further ebullition, when it will be
found that, while the strength is extracted, its delicate aroma
is preserved. As our country consumes nearly ten pounds of
coffee per capita, it is a pity not to have it made in the best
manner. It is asserted by those who have tried it, that ma-
laria and epidemic are avoided by those who drink a cup of
hot coffee before venturing into the morning air. Burned on
hot coals it is a disinfectant for a sick room. By some of our
best physicians it is considered a specific in typhoid fever. —
The Epicure.

Coffee should be carefully and evenly roasted. Much de-
pends on this. If even a few of the berries are burned, the
coffee will taste burned and bitter. To have the perfection
of coffee, it should be fresh roasted every day. Few however,
can take that trouble. Grind only just before using. Allow a
cupful of ground coffee for fire persons. Let the water be boil-
ing when poured on the coffee. Cover it as tightly as possible
and boil one minute, then let it remain a few minutes, on
the side of the range to settle. The French filter coffee pot
can hardly be improved upon for making good coffee; its only



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148 Cook Book

objection being that it requires more coffee than the ordinary
coffee pot.

An old-fa«hioned way to make coffee, and a good way,
is to scald the tin coffee-boiler and put in it one heaping
breakfast-cupful of ground coffee mixed with the yolk, white
and broken shell of one egg ; to this add about three pints of
briskly-boiling water; place on the front of the range and
allow it to boil fast for sixty seconds, then clear with a third
of a cupful of cold water and remove gently to the side of the
range. After a minute or two pour into the pot in which it
is to go to the table, having first scalded the pot thoroughly.
Coffee madfe in this way and served with cream and cut sugar
is particularly good.

The Use of Coffee.— It is asserted by men of high pro-
fessional ability that when the system needs a stimulant
nothing equals a cup of fresh coffee. Those who desire to
rescue the drunkard from his cups, will find no better substi-
tute for spirits than strong, new-made coffee, without milk
or sugar. Two ounces of coffee, or one-eighth of a pound,
to one pint of boiling water, makes a first-class beverage,
but the water must be boiling, not merely hot. Bitterness
comes from boiling it too long. If the coffee required for
breakfast be put in a granitized kettle over night and a pint
of cold water poured over, it can be heated to just the boiling
point and then set back to prevent further ebulition, when it
will be found* that, while the strength is extracted, its delicate
aroma is preserved. As our country consumes nearly ten
pounds of coffee per capita, it is a pity not to have it made
in the best manner. It is asserted by those who have tried
it, that malaria and epidemics are avoided by those who
drink a cup of hot coffee before venturing into the morning
air. Burned on hot coals it is a disinfectant for a sick roojn.
By some of our best physicians it is considered a specific in
typhoid fever.— TAe Epicure.

Coff^b; foij Twenty PERS0N9t-^Use one pound of freshly

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Cburcb of the Good Shepherd 149

ground coffee, one egg broken in the coffee, and enough cold
water with the egg to thoroughly wet the coffee. Boil one
gallon of water and turn over the coffee. Let it come to a
boil, and then set back on the stove. lu ten minutes settle
with one pint of cold water.

Boiled Coffee.— Use coffee mixed in proportions of one-
third Mocha and two-thirds Java. Buy whole grains, and
grind as needed. Take one large tablespoonful of coffee for
each cup, and allow one for the pot. Use the white and shell
of one egg, and wet with cold water. Allow one coffee cup
of boiling water, for each cup of coffee desired. Stop up the
nose of the pot with a cloth to retain flavor. Let boil up
three or four times (stirring down each time). Then pour in
a half cup of cold water, and set back on the stove to settle.
Pour off into pot in which it is to be served, and serve with
rich cream. Good coffee is poor without cream.

Coffee.— Allow one tablespoonful to each cupful.
Moisten with the whole or part of a well beaten egg ; pour
on boiling water, and let stand for five minutes where it will
keep at the boiling point, but not boil.

TEA.

Have the teapot clean and freshly scalded. Allow one
gill for five persons. Cover with freshly boiled water and let
stand for a few minutes on the back of the stove. Fill with
boiling water and serve. A china or earthenware pot is the
best.

Russian Tea.— Put a slice of lemon in the teacup and
pour over it the boiling tea.

Iced Russian Tea.— Make the tea in the morning, pour-
ing it off the leaves as soon as it is steeped. Set in the ice
chest till wanted and then squeeze in lemon juice. Sweeten,

ice and serve.

CHOCOLATE.

Use five squares of Huyler's chocolate cut fine, three table-
spoonfuls of granulated sugar, three tablespoonfuls of hot



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1 50 Church of the Good Shepherd

water, one-quarter of a salt spoon of LeRoy salt, one cup of
milk, one of cream heated in boiler. Beat until smooth
(chocolate) , add gradually one pint of boiling water. Serve
hot. Mrs. Hea^y.

Note. — The chocolate served at a certain New York table
has achieved a reputation among the partakers of the fam-
ily's hospitahty for its unusual richness and flavor. It is
compounded by the eldest daughter, who attributes its
excellence to the fact that it is made hours befope it is served.
Plain, unsweetened chocolate is used, a half pound cake for
ten cups. This is broken up and slowly dissolved in warm
water, whose heat is slowly increased. When the boiling
point is reached, it is allowed to boil fifteen minutes. It is
left in the porcelain or earthenware vessel in which it is
cooked for several hours, closely covered and standing on
some warm but not hot part of the range. Finally it is



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BEVERAGES.



ROMAN PUNCH.

Grate the rind of one lemon, add one quart of water,
one-half pound of sugar and boil five minutes ; add the juice
of two large lemons, one orange, strain and set aside; when
cold, freeze. Mixan well four tabiespoonfuls of Jamaica rum
and a meringue made of the white of one egg beaten stiff
with one tablespoonful of powdered sugar. Set aside till
needed. Serve in punch glasses.

ROMAN PUNCH.

Boil one and one-half quarts of water and one and one-
half pounds of sugar to a clear syrup. Strain through a
cloth and when cold add one quart of pineapple juice and
juice of one lemon. Freeze, and when quite firm qjake a rich
meringue with the whites of four eggs. Open the freezer
can and pour in one-half pint of Santa Cruz rum and niix
with the frozen ice, then the meringue. Close the can tightly
and turn the crank until quite stiff. Remove the dasher and
pack away until needed. Turn in a large glass bowl. Whip
in lightly one pint of champagne. Serve at once in glasses.

Louise Bunn.
CLARET PUNCH.

Slice two lemons and cover with one-half cup of pow-
dered sugar, let it stand ten minutes; add one-half a tumbler
of ice water and stir one minute ; pour into this one bottle
of claret. When serving, put pounded ice in each glass and
fill with the punch.

GRAPB WINE.

To every pound of grapes, picked from the stems, add
one-fourth pound of granulated sugar. Fill strong cask
with the same, let it stand one year, draw oft, strain and
bottle. Mrs. Robinson,



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152



Cook Book



GRAPB WINE.

Pick the grapes from the stems and mash them. For
each quart of mashed grapes add one quart of water,. mix
thoroughly, put in a jar and set away for four or five days.
Then squeeze the pulp through a cloth and add three pounds
of sugar for each gallon of liquid (brown sugar is best) ; mix
pulp and sugar and set away for three or four days more.
Stir every day, but do not skim off anything. Put in jugs,
but do not cork till it ceases to work. Then add a few rai-
sins and cork the jugs. Mrs. Burdette.
GRAPB WINE.

One quart of juice, three pounds of white coffee sugar ;
fill up with water to make a gallon. Let it ferment five or
six weeks, then bottle. Mrs. Sherman.

CURRANT WINE.

One quart of juice, three pounds of sugar, three quarts
of water, put in a jar or jug and let it work a week or longer
if na»essary, then rack it off and put in a dry cool place.

Mrs. Van Fetchen.



i



i^e(iPGS F0i^ (ANDies i^G^Qii^iNe

NO COOlJiNG.

(Prom The Correct Art of Candy Making, published by a«» at 6cL
(by post, 7 J^d.) or 16 Cents per Copy.)

The following candies are made without boilinp, rendering their
preparation easier and producing a confection equal to the best
French creams. The secret lies in the sugar used, which is the
XXX powdered or confectioners' sugar. Ordinary powdered sugar,
when rubbed between the thumb and finger, has a decided grain,
i)ut the confectioners' sugar is as fine as flour. Absolute success is
promised if the recipes are carefully followed. These candies are
better if allowed to stand for twenty-four hours before eating.

FRENCH VANILLA CREAM.— Break into a bowl the white of
one or more eggs, as the quantity you wish to make requires, and
add to it an equal quantity of cold water; then stir in XXX pow-
dered or confectioners' sugar until you have it stiff enough to mould
into shape with the fingers. Flavor with vanilla to taste. After it is
formed into balls, cubes or lozenge shapes, place upon plates or
waxed paper and put aside to dry. This cream is the foundation of
all the French creams.

CHOCOLATE CREAM DROPS.— Take French cream and mould
into cone shape with the fingers; then lay the cones on waxed paper
or a marble slab until the next day, to lirden, or make them in the
morning and leave until the afternoon. Melt some chocolate (con-
tcctioners' chocolate is the best) in a basin, which place in another
basinful of boiling water. When melted, and the creams are hard
enough to handle, take one at a time on a fork and drop into the
melted chocolate, roll it until well covered, then slip from* the fork
upon waxed paper and put them aside to harden.



COCOANUT CRKAMfi.^Take
quite softadd freshly grated cocoa
tectioners' sugar to mould into bal]
freshly grated cocoanut Theee m
drops of cochineal syrup and a f.
before rolling them in the grated
may be made into a flat cake and

LEMON CREAM DROPS. - ~G!
squeeze out the juice, being carefi
of tartaric acid, and stir in confe,
stiff enough to form into balls the

NEAPOLITAN CRBAM8.^f
divide it into three parta, leaviuje <
with a few drops of cochineal syn
with grated chocolate. Make a
the white cream, which may be d
slab, or shaping it into a flat ball i
ness on the platter with the hand
tion and lay it upon the ^^te;
same manner, pressing all togetb?
into slices or squares, as p^^fer
Each layer may be flavored dr ffer



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CANDIES.



CHOCOLATE CREAMS.

Dust the moulding board with the least bit of flour, roll
the cream on it, then cut in small pieces and form into balls
between the palms of the hands and set on parafine paper to
harden. It is better to do this part the day before you fix
the chocolate, as they will be firmer. Put a cake of Huyler
chocolate in a pan (set in another of boiling water) to melt.
When melted cut into it a piece of parafine the size of a small
hickory nut and a piece of butter half as large, add a few
drops of vanilla. Roll the creams in the melted chocolate
and set on parafine paper to harden. A fork or large hat pin
is convenient to dip them with. Now for that which is tinted
pink, first form into nice round balls the size of a twenty-five
cent piece, and press into the top of each a blanched almond,



a.



.rake «oine French cream, and while
cocoanut to taste; add suflSciont oon-
(0 bans, and then roll the balls in the
eBe may be colored prettily with a few
4 a few ppoonfuls of grated chocolate
;iated cocoanut. The cocoanut cream
;e and cut into squares or strips.
i — Grate the rind of one lemon and
careful to reject the pips. Add a pinch
confectioners' sugar until the whole is
t$ the size of a small marble.
3. — Prepare some French cream and
linpr one part white, color one part pink
i syrup, and the third part make brown
ke a cake about half an inch thick of
fbe done with a rolling pin on a marble


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