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Annual reports of the president and the treasurer online

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languages which the student presented for admission credits. The recom-

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mendation of the College officers is unifonnly for the continuance in Col-
lege of subjects presented for entrance. There were i8 students who
elected these least desirable combinations, but twelve of this number pre-
sented only one language (Latin) for admission, and dropped it to take up
modem language work.

One hundred and eight students presented two languages for entrance.
Of this number 43 elected the same languages, 38 dropped one of the
original languages to take up a third, 23 dropped one of the languages to
take work in sciences, and 4 dropped both languages, electing in their
place a third language and a course in science.

Thirty-four students presented three languages, and of this number
27 continued two of them, 4 continued one of the languages and elected
science, 3 continued one of the languages and elected the fourth language,
and I dropped all three languages presented for entrance and elected the
fourth language and science.

One student presented four languages for admission to the College
and elected two of them in the Freshman year.

Non-return of College Students

Referring again to the table on page pg, it appears that 154 men and
175 women, a total of 329 students, who had been in the College depart-
ment during the year 1902-03, returned for the year 1903-04. Five of these
were graduates in June, 1903.

The following table gives the details of losses in the various classes :

In Catal
1902-(

Graduates 13

Seniors 1Q2

Juniors 102

Sophomores 142

Freshmen 176

Specials 43

578 109 324 14s

Five of the Seniors who received degrees returned for graduate work
in I903-<M.

Of the 578 students enrolled in 1902-Q3, 109 received degrees. De-
ducting this number and also deducting the six post-graduates who did not
return, we have a total of 41^ students who should ideally have returned
to Oberlin for College work in 1903-04. Three hundred and twenty-four of

111



Beotived
DegreeBlSOS


Betnraed
1908-OA


DidnotBetnra


6


I


6


100


2





3


83


16




IQ2


40




124


52




12


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this number returned, and 139 did not return. The loss of 139 out of a
total of 463 seems to be entirely too large, the percentage of loss being 30^
as compared to 23.6 per cent, during the preceding year.

In my report of last year I mentioned my purpose to write to the
students who had not returned asking for the reasons which had influenced
them. T6 my inquiries a good proportion of the students made careful
replies, and I present at this point a tabulation of the reasons, tiie informa-
tion tabulated being either given directly by the students, or by college
officers who were in touch with the students :





Men


Women


Total


Men


Womeo


Total


Lack of Money








II

9

I
16


10

16

3

14


21


Health








25

4
30


Illness at Students* Homes..








To other Colleges








Because of orevious olan




4
2
2
I

3
4


4


I
I
5
I
2


4
4
3
3
6

4
6


To enter professional schools

To enter technical schools














To live nearer students' homes..








Dissatisfied in Oberlin








To get I year away from Oberlin
No reasons given








2

6

I

7
2

I
II


3


I

2
3

2
18




To Oberlin Conservatory of Music
To go into business


5
6








Tocro into missionarv work








2


Faihire in scholarship or otherwise
tmdesirable








9

5

3

29


Married (not allowed to return^ ....








Came merelv for one vear








No reason Icnown
























67


72


139



Of these 139 students, 18 have enrolled in the College department dur-
ing the present year of 1904-05, having dropped their work merely for the
year 1903-04.

I suspect that a considerable number of the students who gave no
reason for their non-return dropped their college courses either because
of poor work done while in Oberlin or because of lack of money. I suspect
also that several of those who assigned ill health as a reason for non-
return were probably more influenced by these two considerations than
by that of health.

The losses to other colleges were not so many in number as the gains
from other colleges.

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Statistics of Instruction in the College Department, Year of 1903-04

As used in the following table, an "Instruction Unit" means the in-
struction furnished to one student in which recitations are held once a
week for one semester— in other words, an "Instruction Unit" represents
one student in a one-hour course for one semester. To illustrate — z. five-
hour course in Political Economy enrolling 55 students is here counted as
representing 275 instruction units; a three-hour course in Surveying, en-
rolling 10 students, represents 30 instruction units. The table which fol-
lows shows the instruction furnished during the year 1903-04, and I have
added for comparison the corresponding figures for the three preceding
years.



Departments



Anatomy

Astronomy

Bible, Theol. and Evidences

Bibliography

Botany

Chemistry and Mineralogy ..

Classical Archaeology

Economics, Sociology and

Pol. Science

English Composition

English Literature

French

Geology

German

Greek

History

Italian

Latin

Mathematics

Oratory

Philosophy and Pedagogy...
Physical Training (for credit)

Physics

Physiology

Spanish

Zoology

Teachers' Course in Physical

Training



o

SI

H

I

2

5
3
9

8

4

II

18

14
22

5
14

8

14

I

i6

16

7

15
12

7
I
o
7



OH

re



I
8

II
6

86
138

10

30
34
36
60
20
46
26
37
4
50
54
18
48
36
99
5
o
97

26



Students



5

9

204

14

52

190

24

182

341
188
141

26
167

35

176

2

95
309

52

209

142

91

7

o

103

5



9
268

47

79

130

107

69
462
356
244

22
242

82

243
6

295
252
28
201
218

9

21

O

138

68



13
18
472
61
131
320
131

251
803

544

385
48

409
117
419

8

390'
561;

80
410
360
100

28

o'

241

73



65

2'as
5^



39
54
954
122
408
1556
262

769
1557
1358

IIQ7

174
1333

439

1141

32

1236

1624

211
1327

360

455

140

o

776

13s



2a8



36
27

757

68

172

1212

108

696

I2;)I
1434

866
167

1208
425

1523
o

1276

1798
323

1340
323
418

125

36
598






24
48

679
14
187
960
179

650
848

1241
902
178

1082

477
1419

o

1058

1715

432

1042

o

335

130

o

514



a-

o

36
338

92
381

533
290

621
691
934
839
160
880

573

1240

12

1 105

1393

305

984

o

327
o
o

227



Totals 231 986 276936046373 17655 16177 14114 11961

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The column marked 'Tiours of teachers' time" includes all the time
spent by the teachers, whether in class room recitations or in laboratory
instruction.

In the two semesters of 1903-Q4, there were 231 classes. The total
enrollment of students in these classes was 6,373, the average being slightly
more than 27. The corresponding figure for 1902-03 was 28.

A gain of nearly 10 per cent, in the total amount of instruction fur-
nished by the College was to be expected, corresponding to the gain of that
amount in the enrollment of the College department. In some departments,
however, there have been increases far in excess of the normal 10 per cent
above mentioned. The greatest increases in the amount of instruction fur-
nished were as follows:

Botany 137 per cent.

Astronomy 100 "

Bibliography 79 "

French 38 "

Zoology 31 "

Bible 26 "

English Composition 17 "

Economics 11 "

The amount of instruction furnished in Anatomy, Geology, Greek, and
Physiology remained about the same as for the preceding year. There were
slight losses in English Literature, Philosophy and Pedagogy, and Latin,
and decided losses in History and Mathematics. The large losses in these
two departments are explained by the absences of Professor Johnston and
Professor Andercgg.

In comparison with the corresponding figures for three years ago
(1900-01), there are the following striking increases in the amount of in-
struction furnished:

In Zoology, a gain of 244 per cent.

In Chemistry and Mineralogy, a gain of 192 "

In Bible 182 "

In English Composition 125 "

In German 52 "

The gain in enrollment in the College department during the same
period of three years was 47 9-10 per cent.



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Instniction Ghren in Oberlm Academy, Year 2903-04 .

The instruction furnished in Oberlin Academy during the year I9Q3-<H
is shown in the table which follows. The Academy is still on the term plan
and the table is figured accordingly. An Academy instruction unit means
the instruction furnished to one student in a one-hour course for one term.
It represents two-thirds of a College instruction unit

The total number of different classes taught in the Academy during the
year was 175, and the enrollment in them was 3,845, an average of 22 to
each class.



Bible

Botany

Declamation..

English

French

German

Greek

History

Latin

Mathematics .

Physics

Zoology



•^1

S5



15

3

7

45

II

14
6
6

32

28
5
3



Ji2 o
2



15
27
12

135
55
70
30

24
162

"3
56
27



Studbmts



409
22

64
611

37

136

52

95

305

364

56

28



Totals 175 726 I 2179 ^^6 3845 12596 12520 10480



J



259

23

25

524

102

120

47

75

241

223

19

8



668

45

89

1135

139

256

99
170

546

587

75

36






4S-



668
180
168

3247
595

1280

495
680
2755
2084
300
144



IIpI



573
o

116
3022

840
1320

785

336

3040

2012

476

o



570

o

91
2309

545
1460
1045

376
2520
1380

184
o



The increases are in Sciences, History, Mathematics, and English.
There are decreases in all foreign languages.

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION FINANCES

For the last six years I have held the graduate managership of the
Athletic Association, and I believe that the work has been of some value
to the College as well as of much pleasure to myself.

The Athletic Association lost money on its season of 1903-04, largely
on account of bad weather affecting the games scheduled for the spring
term. The year closed with a total deficit of $951.51. The surpluses and
deficits of the various teams for the year are as follows:



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' Sorplas Deficit

For Permanent Improvements $ 74 42

Foot Ball, 1903 151 20

Base Ball, 1904 \ $ 25 27

Track Team, 1904 509 42

Basket Ball, 1904 33 81

The Academy Teams, 1903-04 217 33

Interscholastic Meet, 1904 I5 34

The total deficit for the year was $506.93, which, added to the debt
at the beginning of the year ($444.58), made the net indebtedness of the
Athletic Association at August 31st, 1904, $951.51.

There are two improvements which ought to be made at the athletic
fields without delay. There is urgent need of a new cinder track for the
track athletics, and we shall at once go forward with this work at a prob-
able cost of $350. The students have contributed $50 from the proceeds
of the Mock Convention held last June, and the Athletic Association will
probably endeavor to raise the rest of the money by special subscription.

To complete the equipment of Dill Field for foot ball purposes a cov-
ered grandstand is needed, to be located on the west side of the field and
to accommodate about 1,200 spectators. Plans have been drawn for a new
stand such as is needed and preliminary bids have been secured. It appears
that the cost will be about $1,500, but the Association cannot undertake the
construction of the stand until the present debt is removed and the pay-
ments are made for the new cinder track.

Respectfully submitted,

GEORGE M. JONES.



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Report of the Librarian

To the President:

Sir: I hereby submit the report for the Library for the year 1903-
04.

GROWTH OF THE LIBRARY.

At the beginning of the year the Library possessed 58,618 bound
volumes, and 35,170 unbound volumes, a total of 93,788. During the
year, 5.120 volumes were accessioned, and 1,581 unbound volumes were
catalogued without accessioning, making the number September ist, 1904,
63,738 bound volumes, and 36,751 unbound volumes, a total of 100,489.

The number of bound volumes added during the year has only once
been exceeded in the history of the Library, and then by only a small
number.

The following table shows the additions by college years since 1894-95 •

1894-95 2,593 1899-00 4,002

1895-96 2,083 1900-01 4,689

1896-97 1,924 1901-02 5,591

1897-98 2,313 1902-03 3,833

1898-99 1,143 1903-04 5,120

In addition to the accessioned and catalogued volumes given above,
the Library has many collections not yet entered on our records or in
any way catdogued.

To get a more complete statement of the extent of the possessions
of the Library, the following table, is given:

CONDITION OF THE UBRARY SEPTEMBER I, I9O4

Boand Unbound Totid

Accessioned and catalogued 63,738 36,751 100,489

Waiting, not yet accessioned or catalogued. 1,078 i8»ooo 19,078
Volumes of newspapers, temporary bind-
ings 1,200 1,200

Maps and Charts 2,500 2,500



64,816 58451 123,267

Even this considerable total does not indicate the sum of the in-
dividual items which the Library possesses, for there arc coins, medals,
papor money, broadsides, photographs, manuscripts and the like which

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have never been counted, together with the collection of more than 50,000
duplicate volumes, maps and newspapers. More than 150,000 individual
articles are in the possession of the Library.

ADDITIONS OF THE YEAR.

The 5,120 bound volumes added during the year came from the fol-
lowing sources:

By purchase 1,524 volumes.

By gift and exchange 3,596 volumes.

The year has been marked by no single large gift, such as the Thayer
Library mentioned in my last report, but there has been a steady stream
of smaller gifts from a wide number of contributors.

The largest gift in number of volumes came from Mr. John Hawxwell,
of Sparta, Indiana, through the friendly intexxression of the Rev. Chauncey
N. Pond of the class of 1864.

This gift, which numbered several hundred volumes, contained many
quite out-of-the-way things, supplementing our Library in various parts
in a remarkable way.

Mrs. Emma F. Burroughs, widow of the late Prof. Geo. S. Bur-
roughs, D.D., gave us a very large number of valuable books from the
Professor's Library. These books strengthen particularly the department
of Old Testament, but there were many of a general character which were
very welcome.

Mr. C. N. Jones, class of 1871, gave us nearly 200 volumes, besides
many periodicals, from the Library of his mother, for many years a resident
of Oberlin.

From the Oberlin Mutual Benefit Association were received nearly
100 volumes, some of which proved to be of exceptional value and interest

Mr. and Mrs. N. Stone Scott, of Cleveland, of the class of 18S4, sent
a large number of books from the family Library. This gift was especially
strong in local guide books to places in England and on the Continent.
These were particularly welcome, and, have often proved of great service,
particularly to Club Women.

From Mrs. Geo. Gannett, of Needham, Mass., a box of books was
received, many of which proved to be additions to our collection.

President Henry C. King sent a small but exceedingly interesting
collection of i6th Century books, nearly all of which were additions,
which have already proved of great service to the class in the history of
printing.

From Doctors W. C. Bunce, Geo. E. Smith, and Ellen £. Hawkins,
have come very important gifts of medical periodicals and miscellaneous

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books. While for our immediate use these medical periodicals are of little
value, it has seemed worth while to accept such gifts and preserve them
for a possible much greater use in tiie future. The growth of the depart-
ment of Physical Training, together with the increased interest in the
classes in Physiology and Hygiene, make it not improbable that at least
the first year's work in a medical course may some day be given in
Oberlin. Even if this were not probable, it seems not unreasonable to
expect at some future time, if the plans now under consideration for
throwing open the College Library to the public should be carried out,
and a suitable building erected, that a room especially set apart for medical
books might prove of great service to the physicians of the village, and
might develop into a medical reading room for their use.

Miss Lillian Parker, of Cambridge, Mass., has sent us a considerable
number of books from the Library of her father, the late Leonard S.
Parker, D.D., of the theological class of 183&

From Mrs. J. E. Follansbee, Professor Chas. E. St John, Mrs. E W.
Lord, and Dr. D. L. Leonard, have been received important gifts.

From Rev. Horace S. Lyman, of the theological class of 1882, we
received a copy of his monumental History of Oregon, in four volumes, a
welcome and honorable addition to our alumni collection.

Dr. Denton J. Snider, of the class of 1862, has sent us his newly
published volumes as in the past years. One entire shelf of the Library is
now required to contain Dr. Snider's published works.

Important exchanges have been carried on with the Ohio State Library,
Boston Public Library, and the Library of Olivet College.

Through these gifts and exchanges very valuable additions to the
Library in the literature of the past have been secured. The College has
occasion for great gratitude in that year by year a large and ever in-
creasing circle of friends are thus adding to its resources.

It is obvious, however, that while this generosity is an important
supplement to the means used by the College to promote research, it can
never take the place of an expenditure of money to purchase the literature
of the present and of the past.

Through the generosity of the Trustees in appropriating $1,500.00
in addition to the income of the Library endowments it has been possible
for the Library to purchase a larger number of books than usual, and to
appropriate sums, in no case less than $50.00, to each department of
instruction in the College and Seminary. Such an expenditure carried on
from year to year, although altogether inadequate, would nevertheless
meet the absolute necessities of the student body in connection with class
room instruction. It does nothing, however, to meet the demand which

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most of all the Library should endeavor to meet, the furnishing of a
satisfactory equipment for research work to its corps of instructors.

Although in many ways our Library is far superior to that of ten
years ago, yet from this point of view, there has been no essential im-
provement. The average student undoubtedly receives more help from
the Library now than ten years ago, but the average instructor is no better
served than before.

Because of this fact, it seems to me that the one important necessity
which the Library now faces is, how to secure from .some friend the
gift of a large sum of money to be used for immediate expenditure, in
order that the Library may be equipped adequately to meet the necessities
of the teaching force.

Ten thousand dollars is the least sum at which we should aim, and if
some large-hearted friend could be found who could give this sum an-
nually for a considerable period of years, as has been done for Columbia
University, it would be a source of inspiration and of intellectual stimu-
lus to both instructors and students, the value of which would be beyond
calculation. If Oberlin is to take the forward step, which her present
equipment and future prospects would seem to warrant, this it seems to
me would be the first essential to that step, and I trust it may receive
your hearty endorsement.

WORK OF THE YEAR

During the year the library was open 308 days. The average daily
attendance during the school year was 458; during the Summer vacation
^7, The smallest number of persons using the Library in any one day was
29 (August 2y) ; the largest, 761 (April 27). The total number of readers
for the year was 104484. The number of books drawn for home use
was 16,609. The number of persons drawing books for home use during
the year was 1,104,

With the opening of the Library in the evening, of which I shall speak
later, it was necessary to restrict still further the circulation of reference
and "reserved" books. Instead of allowing such books to leave the
Library at 4:30 in the afternoon, as heretofore, they were not allowed to
leave the building until nine o'clock in the evening. It was expected that
this rule would very materially diminish the circulation of books, but this
has not proved to be the case. The number of volumes circulated during
the preceding year was 16,156; during the present year, 16,609.

The Catalogue department catalogued during the year 4,784 bound
volumes, and 1,581 unbound volumes. This required the preparation of
7,931 new cards for the catalogue. In addition 3,729 cards written in

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previous years were withdrawn from the catalogue in order to receive
additions or to be corrected.

The department was unable to keep up with the additions of the year,
and at least 2,000 unbound volumes and 1,000 bound volumes had not been
reached at the end of the year.

I have already referred to the important change made at the begin-
ning of the year, in that the Library was opened in the evening from 6 :oo
to 9 130. That such opening met a distinct need was at once manifest. The
first month in which the Library was open the average attendance eadi
evening was 95, although the electric light was not yet installed. During
the following month, however, owing to the poor quality of the gas
furnished by the local gas company, the attendance fell slightly, but wit^
the installment of the electric lights the number began to increase and
continued to do so each month until, during the last full month of the
College year, the average evening attendance was 166. Nor has this
evening attendance been secured by simply distributing the same number
of visits to the Library over a greater number of hours, because the
number of visits to the Library has been increased over last year by
nearly 25,000, showing either that more people make use of the Library,
or that the same number of people study there more hours per day.

The followmg table shows the attendance and averages by months for
the year:

MomlDflr Afternoon Evening

Total At's Total Av*fir Total Ay'g

September i,479 69 1475 61 413 82

October 4»27i IS8 3»377 125 2,087 95

November 4,208 179 3,370 140 1,858 92

December 3,740 144 3,027 116 1,653 no

January 3451 144 3,092 129 2,024 112

February 4,629 192 4,334 173 2,370 116

March 5,762 213 5,290 203 3,108 135

April 4,911 188 4,607 177 3,177 151

May 5,418 208 4,526 174 3,663 166

June 3,950 152 3,572 143 2,051 153

July 997 36 1,027 41

August 738 31 873 36

The Library is now open from 7:15 in the morning until 9:30 at night,
with the exception of an hour at noon, and one at supper time. There has
been considerable pressure from students to be allowed to remain in the
Library during these hours, and if the College could meet the additional
expense involved it would perhaps be well to keep the Library open con-
tinuously from 7:15 in the morning to 9:30 at night. This, however,
cannot be done with the present force nor with. the present expenditure.

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MCMUC ROOM sbcxtsed; more room nbeded

In my last report, I called attention to the very crowded condition
of the Library, and tihe impossibility of continuing longer without ad-
ditional shelving. I am glad to report that a yery great gain has been
made during the present year. The removal of the Bradley Auditorium
Lectures to Sturges Hall, arranged for by the Faculty in the Spring,
made it possible for Professor Wright to move the Museum from the
lower story of the Library building to the Bradley Auditorium in Peters
Hall. The space thus vacated was immediately filled with additional book
stacks, giving space for at least 10,000 volumes. By a re-arrangement of
the Library, it was possible with this additional space to so place the
books in the first and second stories of the building as to leave room for



Online LibraryOberlin CollegeAnnual reports of the president and the treasurer → online text (page 22 of 67)