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[LE

an



APPIAN'S ROMAN
HISTORY

ii

BOOKS VIII Part II XII







Translated by
HORACE WHITE



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THE LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY

FOUNDED BY JAMES LOEB, LL.D.

EDITED BY
fT. E. PAGE, C.H., LITT.D.

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L. A. POST, L.H.D. E. H. WARMINGTON, M.A., F.R.HIST.SOC.



APPIAN'S ROMAN HISTORY

II



First printed 1912
Reprinted 1932, 1955, 1962



Printed in Great Britain



CONTENTS

PAOK

BOOK VIII. PART II. NUMIDIAN AFFAIRS (FRAGMENTS) 1

BOOK IX. MACEDONIAN AFFAIRS (FRAGMENTS) .... 9

BOOK X. THE ILLYRIAN WARS 53

BOOK XI. THE SYRIAN WARS 103

BOOK XII. THE MITHRIDATIC WARS 239



APPIAN'S ROMAN HISTORY

BOOK VIII PART II

NUMIDIAN AFFAIRS

FRAGMENTS



AnniANOY POMAIKA



EK TH2 NOMAAIKH2

*

I

"On, Bo/uX^a? Karrjyopovfievos e<f)vy irpo Sl/
real 'loyopOas trvv avrw, rovro Srj TO
fjievov 6? Tov<f SaypoSoKOvvras elirdiv, on ^
rj TToXt? early tovia iracra, et rt? tovrjrrjs avrr<;
evpedeirj. Mai script, vet. n. coll. t. II p. 367.

II

"On MereXXo? dve&vyvvev e? Ai/3vi^v TTJV VTTO
'Pw/jiaiois ali-lav e^wv Trapa rc5 crrparu) ftpa&v-
T?}TO? 65 rou5 TTO\IJLIOV<$ teal eVt crfyicnv oojjLorrjro^'
a~(f)6Bpa yap roi;5 a^aprdvovra^ e/coXa^ev. Val.
p. 561.

Ill

f/ Ort MeVeXA^ Rayaiwv dvypei, rrjv j3ov\rjv
o\rjv o>5 Ti)v (frpovpav TrpoSovras 'loyopOa, teal rbv
TovpTrlXiov, av$pa 'P(i)fj,aiov OVK



APPIAN'S ROMAN HISTORY



BOOK VIII PART II

NUMIDIAN AFFAIRS

I. FROM THE VATICAN MSS. OF CARDINAL MAI
BOMILCAR being under accusation fled before his B.O

110

trial, and with him Jugurtha, who uttered that
famous saying about bribetakers, that " the whole
city of Rome could be bought if a purchaser could
be found for it."

II. FROM " VIRTUES AND VICES "

METELLUS went back to the African province, 109
where he was accused by the soldiers of dilatoriness
in attacking the enemy and of cruelty towards his
own men, because he punished offenders severely.

III. FROM THE SAME

METELLUS put the whole senate of Vacca to death ios
because they had betrayed the Roman garrison
to Jugurtha, and with them Turpilius, the com-
mander of the garrison, a Roman citizen, who had
surrendered himself to the enemy under suspicious

3



APPIAN'S ROMAN HISTORY, BOOK VIII



rfj ftov\fj. Spa/cas Be /cat Auyvas
avro/jio\ov<; \a/3a)v irapa 'loyopOa, rwv pev ra?
d'rrerepve, TOU? Be e? rrjv yrjv ^te%pt yacrrpos



KCLl 7TpiTOJ;6VCi)V f)
TTVp VTTGTlOeL. id. ib.



IV



"On rov Mapiov 69 }Liprav a



Trapr/crav, o'l TrepfyO rival TLVCLS e?



TrapefcaXovv. real 7refji(f)6r]crav A5Xo? re
o Trpeo-fievrrjs ical Kop^Xto? SvXAa<? 6

o Bor^o? e^>?7 'Pw/iatot
Bta Mdpiov ryrjv jap fjv auro? 'loyopQav a
TT/oo? M.apuov vvv acj)r}pfi<r0a(,. Bo/c^o9
raura eveKakei, MaXXt09 3' 6^)77 r^ <yf)v

fyeKeaO at ^vfyaKa 7ro\/Jiov vofiw teal
Ma(T<Tavdcra"r) Swpedv, $L$bvai Be '

yziv ro?9 \a/3ovcriv ea>9 av
teal T<p Stj/jiG) Bo/cfj. ov ^Jr]V aXoyax;
Macra'avda'cr'rjv re yap aTroOavelv, KOI rovs
Macrcravdcro-ov 7ratSa9 'loyopOav KaraKaivovra
'Pwyctatoi? 7ro\/jLiov <yzv.<jQ on. ovtc ovv en, elvai
Sircaiov ovre rbv 7ro\efjLtov e-)(eiv Svpeav rjv eBo/jiev
<f)i\w, ovre ere BOKLV 'loyopOav afyaipelcrO ai, ra

KCLl MaXXtO9 /AV TaBc 7Tpl

Urs. p. 370.



NUMIDIAN AFFAIRS

circumstances. After Ju<nirtha had delivered up to ^-^

108

Metellus certain Thracian and Ligurian deserters,
the latter cut off the hands of some, and others he
buried in the earth up to their stomachs, and after
transfixing them with arrows and darts set fire to
them while they were still alive.



IV. FROM " THE EMBASSIES "

WHEN Marius arrived at Cirta messengers came to 107
him from Bocchus asking that he would send some-
body to hold a conference with him. He accordingly
sent Aulus Manlius, his lieutenant, and Cornelius
Sulla, his quaestor. To them Bocchus said that he
fought against the Romans on account of the acts of
Marius, who had taken from him the territory which
he himself had taken from Jugurtha. To this
complaint of Bocchus, Manlius replied that the
Romans had taken this territory from Syphax by
right of arms, and had made a present of it to
Masinissa, and that such gifts were made by the
Romans to be kept by those who received them
during the pleasure of the Senate and people of
Rome. He added that they had not changed their
minds without reason, for that Masinissa was dead
and that Jugurtha, by murdering his grandchildren,
had become an enemy of the Romans. " It is not
therefore right," he said, " that an enemy should
keep the gift that we made to a friend, nor should
you think that you can take from Jugurtha property
that belongs to the Romans." These were the words
of Manlius concerning the territory in question.



APPIAN'S ROMAN HISTORY, BOOK VIII



"Ori o B6V^o<? erepovs e7re/<n/re 7rpe<7/3et?, 01
[jLev efjie\\ov Trepl eiprfvr)*; SerjcrecrOai,
Se (W crv/jiTrpd^eiev e? ra9 StaXucret?.
S* ei/ 6Sw TOU? 7rpe<r/?et? roucrSe o
vTre&e^aro, KOL %evl^ei pe^pi Mdptov CITTO
TTave\,6elv. Trnpyvet, Se Bo/c^ov SiSd-
or i xprj ^.v\\a freidecrOaL irepl airdvrwv.
u? ovv ij$r) Trpo? rrjv rov '\o<yop0a irpoooaiav
6 Bo/c^o?, e? /u,ez^ viroKptcriv eV* d\\ov arparbv
TrepieTTep.'rrev e? At^tOTra? TOL/? -yeiTOz^a?, 04 evrt
eaTrepav CLTTO ra)v ktowv klOioTrwv Sit'/fcovcriv e? TO
Mafpoucriov opo? o Ka\ovcriv "ArXa^ra, Maptoi'
3* rj^iov ^v\\av ol irky^ai crvv\0eiv e? Xoyou?.
/cat Mapto? /lev eVe/z-Tre Toy 2v\\.av, "Atyapa Se
'loyopOa (f)i\ov, ev Bor^of KaTd\.\ifj,/AVov
tyopav ra yiyvo/uieva, atro? T6 Bo-r^o? teal
MaySaXcr?;? 0tXo? Bo/r^ou, A-at Ti? e%\fv0epo<;
ai'Spo? Ka/r^T/SoWoy, Kop^^'Xto?, evijSpeucrav u
id. ib.



NUMIDIAN AFFAIRS

V. FROM THE SAME

BOCCHUS sent another embassy to solicit peace
from Marius and urge Sulla to assist them in the
negotiation. These ambassadors were despoiled by
robbers on the road, but Sulla received them kindly
and entertained them until Marius returned from
Gaetulia. Marius advised them to urge Bocchus
to obey Sulla in everything. Accordingly Bocchus,
who was by now inclined to betray Jugurtha, sent
messengers around to the neighbouring Ethiopians
(who extend from eastern Ethiopia westward to the
Mauretanian Mount Atlas) under pretence of raising
a new army, and then asked Marius to send Sulla to
him for a conference, which Marius did. Bocchus
himself, and his friend Magdalses, and a certain
freedman of Carthage, named Cornelius, deceived
Apsar, the friend of Jugurtha, who had been left in
Bocchus' camp to keep watch on his doings, in the
following way.



BOOK IX

MACEDONIAN AFFAIRS



FRAGMENTS



EK TH2 MAKEAONIKH2

I

"Ort 'Ptofjiaioi TOV <t>i\i7nrov TOV Matce&ovos TOV
avrot? Trepi TrdfjLTrav e7ro\v7rpay-



en T?)? 'Ira/u'a? L'TTO ' ' P^vvlftov TOV
(rrparriyov, /cal avrol



KOI atova rea



, /cal KaOia-rdfjLevoi ^.LKe\iav. avro?
e 4>/Xt7T7T05 apxn^ eirtOvfua fiei^ovos, ov&ev ri
v, eVe/^Tre TT/JO? 'Avvifiav e? rr/z^ '



rjyelro B.



eVt rr/i^ 'IraXtaz/, et
TW <Tvv6oiTO Karepjdcracrdat rrjv 'EXXaSa.
8* e? raura ro) 'Avvi/Sou teal eVt TT}



re



eVl TOL>? optcovs TOV <&i\LTr7rov, 'PayfjLaLcov

eXa/5e roy? etcaTepwv Trpecrfteis dvaTr\eovTa<s y /cal

<; 'Pcofirjv /e6/j,i(TV. e<^>' o5 ^tX^TTTro?

Keptcvpa TrpO(Te/3a\6v, 7) 'Pw/tatot?

U. p. 357.

10



BOOK IX

MACEDONIAN AFFAIRS

I. FROM " THE EMBASSIES "

THE Romans paid no attention to Philip, the Mace-
donian, when he began war against them. They
were so busy about other things that they did not
even think of him, for Italy was still scourged by
Hannibal, the Carthaginian general, and they had
large armies in Africa, Carthage, and Spain, and
were restoring order in Sicily. Philip himself,
moved by a desire of enlarging his dominions,
although he had suffered nothing whatever at the
hands of the Romans, sent an embassy, the chief of
which was Xenophanes, to Hannibal in Italy,
promising to aid him in Italy if he would consent to
assist him in the subjugation of Greece. Hannibal
agreed to this arrangement and took an oath to
support it, and sent an embassy in return to receive
the oath of Philip. A Roman trireme intercepted
the ambassadors of both on their return and carried
them to Rome. Thereupon Philip in his anger
attacked Corcyra, which was in alliance with Rome.

II



APPIAN'S ROMAN HISTORY, BOOK IX

II

'On evrjye TOV? 'Pco/jLaiovs ra %i{3v\\ia ets

TOV QlXlTTTrOV TToXe/JLOV. CTTl> $6 TCtVTa'

afyovvTes /3a<ri\ev(n, Ma/cj/Soz^ 'ApyedBrjcnv,
Vfuv Koipavewv dyaOov KOI Trr^jLa ^t'XiTTTro?.
TJTOL 6 fiev Trporepos -noKecnv \aolal T' avaKras
Orjaei, o ft oTrXore/oo? Ti^v airb iraaav oXecrcret,

^ f\ \ ^> t ' e ^ / '/D'S-'

o/j,r)Uets o ecrTrepioicriv UTT avbpacnv evvab
oKelrat,.

Mai p. 368.

Ill

1. f/ Ort TlroXe^tatoL' TOV fiaaCkevovTOs AlyvTrrov
7r/3ecr/3et9, /cat crvv avrols erepoi, Trapd re Xiwv KOI

'A/jivvdv$pov TOV
ev9a rrep ol AtrcoXot
e/cdXovv, crvvrfKOov eVt
KOI AtrwXw^ /cat Qikimrov.



OVK evai Kvpov Trep
eipqvrys TL /cplvai, teal 9 r^z/ (Bov\r)v
ort 'Pa>/iatot9 (rv/jityepei

77
, /cat rot9 At'ra)Xot9 e

/cat t7T7rea9 %ttof9, yLte wz^ ot
AtrwXot /careXa/3oz/ 'AjjiftpaKiav, TJV ov TTO\V
vcTTepov avTWV <&l\L7T7ro<; a7rorr\evcrdvTwv ave-
\alBev. ol Be Trpea-fteis avOis avvrfXOov, Kal
TroXXa (j>avepa)<; \eyov, ort < I ) tXt7r7ro9 /cat AtrwXot
roi'9



12



MACEDONIAN AFFAIRS

II. FROM THE VATICAN MSS. OF CARDINAL MAI

THE Sibylline books induced the Romans to make B.O.
war against Philip by these lines : " The Macedon-
ians boast their descent from Argive kings. Philip
will be the arbiter of weal or woe to you. The elder
of that name shall give rulers to cities and peoples,
but the younger shall lose every honour, and shall
die here, conquered by men of the west."



III. FROM "THE EMBASSIES"

1. AMBASSADORS from Ptolemy, king of Egypt, and 208
with them others from Chios and Mitylene, and from
Amynander, king of the Athamanes, assembled at
two different times at the place where the Aetolians
were accustomed to call their cities together for
consultation, to compose the differences between the
Romans, the Aetolians, and Philip. But as Sulpicius
said that it was not in his power to conclude peace,
and wrote privately to the Senate that it was for the
advantage of the Romans that the Aetolians should
continue the war against Philip, the Senate forbade
the treaty and sent 10,000 foot and 1000 horse to
assist the Aetolians. With their help the Aetolians
took Ambracia, which Philip recovered, not long
afterward, on their departure. Again the ambassa-
dors assembled and said openly and repeatedly that
Philip and the Aetolians, by their differences, were
subjecting the Greeks to servitude to the Romans,
because they were accustoming the latter to make

13



APPIAN'S ROMAN HISTORY, BOOK IX



Tretpdcrdac. efi ofc 6 fiev
dvrt\et;(t)V (ivicrraro, TO e 7rX?)$o? OVK JJKovcrev,
ttXX' KKpdy(rav rou? Trpeo-fieis ev \eyeiv.

2. Kal reXo? AlrcoXou re rrpwroi Kara <70a?, avev
t Pa)fj,ai(i)i>, ^iXtTTTTft) crvveftticrav, KOI Trpecr^et?
avrov $>i\L7r7rov Kal 'Pto/juiiwv eVl &La\\ayais dfyi-

KOVTO ? 'Pw/jLTJV. Kal yVOVTO <TVvQr\K(Ll 'PwfJLaiOLS

teal 4>iXt7T7ra), jJL^erepov^ dBi/celv roi)? e/carepuOev
e? fjiev Srj rovr e\r}ev rj QikiTTTrov Kal
9 aXX^Xou? irelpa Trpu>rr] t Kal ra<>
ovberepoi fieftalovs, ovS 1 air

$6/covv TreTTOirjadat,. U. p. 357.



IV



OV 7TO\V ^tXiTTTTO? [JiV TO)V

KOWV rot? eVl Oa\do~(nj^ (TTO\OV e7rayyeL\as,
Kal Xtov etXe, /cat yu,e/oo? TJ;? 'ArraXou 77}?
, Kal auri]^ aTreTreipacre Tlepyd/nov, pr)
iep&v rj rdfaw, rr)v re 'PoStw^ Trepaiav
8ia\\aKTrjprav ol yeyovorwv, Kal erepw
err par ov rr]v 'Arrt/c^ eXu/tatVeTo /tal ra?



rrpocrr]Kovra)v. Xoyo? re r}i/ ort
'Azmo^o? 6 ^vpwv /3aai\eu<; vrcoa-^OLvro d\\ij-
Xoi?, 'A^rio^w yitet' o ^tX^TTTro? crva-rpareva-eiv erri
T Ai/yuTTToz' /cat eVt Kinrpov, wv rore rjpXGV ert
Trat? wi^ IlToXe/i,ato? o rerapro?, w (f)i\,OTrdrci)p



Kal ra? Ku/cXaSa? y/ycroi;? /cat \wviav.



MACEDONIAN AFFAIRS

frequent attempts upon Greece. When Sulpicius
rose to reply to them the crowd would not hear him,
but shouted that the ambassadors had spoken well.

2. Finally the Aetolians took the initiative and 205
made peace with Philip by themselves without the
Romans, and ambassadors were sent to Rome by
Philip himself and by the commander of the Roman
forces in order to come to an agreement. Peace was
made between them on the condition that neither
party should do any injury to the friends of the
other. This was the result of the first trial of
strength between them, and neither of them
believed that the treaty was a secure one, or based
on goodwill.

IV. FROM THE SAME

NOT long afterward Philip, having ordered a fleet 200
to be prepared by his maritime subjects, took Samos
and Chios and devastated a part of the territory of
King Attalus. He even assailed Pergamus itself,
not sparing temples or sepulchres. He also ravaged
the Mainland of the Rhodians, who had been
promoters of the treaty of peace. With another
part of his army he ravaged Attica and laid siege to
Athens, on the ground that none of these countries
concerned the Romans. It was reported also that a
league had been made between Philip and Antiochus,
king of Syria, to the effect that Philip should help
Antiochus to conquer Egypt and Cyprus, of which
Ptolemy IV., surnamed Philopator, 1 who was still a
boy, was the ruler ; and that Antiochus should help
Philip to gain Cyrene, the Cyclades islands, and Ionia.

1 This should be Ptolemy V., surnamed Epiphanes, the son
of Ptolemy Philopator. The latter died in B.C. 203.

15



APPIAN'S ROMAN HISTORY, BOOK IX

Kat rrfvBe rr/v B6j;av, eKrapdcra-ovcrav airav-
'PoBiOL IJLCV f Pa>/zauH9 e/i^i/fcra^, eVl Be rot?
PoBiwv 'Adrjvaicw TrpeafBeis TJTIMVTO < &i\i r jnrov
rfjs 7roXto/?/aa9. KCLL Atra>Xot fierayiyvcocrKovTes
Karrjyopovv &>? KOI Trepl cr<^a? airitrTOV 7670^0x09,
Y)%lovv re avOi<? e? TOL>? 'Pco/naiwv a~v/jL
eyypa(j)rivai. 'Pwfjialoi 8' AtrwXot? 6yae'/



9

rou9 /acrtea9 eTre/ATrov, o Trporjyopevov avrots
'PLVTIO^OV fjiev AlyvTTTW fjirj eTTi^eipelv, <&i\i7T7rov
Be /jL-rjSev e? 'PoStou9 77 *A.dr)vaLov<s TJ "ArraXoy
77 69 a\\ov nva 'PwjJLaiwv

TOVTOIS 6 c E > t/\t7T7r09 CL



at> efjLjjLevwcriV y avveOevro nrpos avrov
eiptfvr}. OVTCO p.ev ai yevo/JLevat, (nrovBal e\e-
\vvro, KOI crrparia 'P&fiaiwv 69 TTJV 'EXXaSa
rjTreiyero, <rTpaTrjyovvro$ UoTrXiov real vavap-

Aev/ciov. U. p. 358.



f Ort 6 OtXi7T7TO9 6 Ma/ceSoz/a)*' /3acrt\ev<f
*&\afjLi,viva> . . . crr^ret, crvvayovrwv auTOU9 'H-Tret-
pwrwv TrpecrjSeajv. 9 Se o ^Xa^Lvlvo^ <$>L\nnrov
eiceXevcrev eKa-rrjvaL TTJS t EXXaSo9 ov f Pa>/zatot9
aXXa. ra?9 TroXeo-iv avTal$, /cal r9 /3Xa/3a9 rat9
Trpoeiprj/jievais aTroBoOfjvai, o /j,ev QiXtTTTros ra
ev . . . Mai p. 368.

VI



rjv inrecr^ero crrparov ev^wvov a^eiv oSov
drpi/Br) Tpialv 7;yuey3ai9. Suid. v. ev

16



MACEDONIAN AFFAIRS

This rumour, which caused universal dismay, the -c.
Rhodians communicated to Rome. After the Rhodi-
ans, ambassadors of Athens came complaining of the
siege instituted by Philip. The Aetolians also had
repented of their treaty, and they complained of
Philip's bad faith toward them and asked to be
inscribed again as allies. The Romans reproached
the Aetolians for their recent defection, but they
sent ambassadors to the kings ordering Antiochus
not to invade Egypt, and Philip not to molest the
Rhodians, or the Athenians, or Attalus, or any other
ally of theirs. To them Philip made answer that it
would be well if the Romans would abide by the
treaty of peace they had entered into with him.
Thus was the treaty dissolved and a Roman army
hastened to Greece, Publius commanding the land
forces and Lucius the fleet.



V. FROM THE VATICAN MSS. OF CARDINAL MAI

PHILIP, king of Macedon, had a conference with 193
Flamininus, which had been brought about by the
ambassadors of the Epirots. When Flamininus or-
dered Philip to evacuate Greece, in favour, not of
the Romans, but of the Greek cities themselves, and
to make good the damage he had done to these
cities, Philip partly. . .

VI. FROM SUIDAS

A SHEPHERD promised to guide a lightly equipped
army by a little used path in three days.

17



APPIAN'S ROMAN HISTORY, BOOK IX

VII



"Qri AevKLOs KoiWto? e? TOV TWV ^
crv\\oyov d7re(TTt\e TT pea /3eis , OL fier

KCU 'PoBiWV eTTeidoV CLVTOV? fjLTa0e(T0ai, 7T/50?

<r</>a? ctTTo TOU ^tXtTTTTou, Si7rpeff/3evTO Be KOI
al-rwv ftotjOetav o>? cri/yLt/ia^of?. ol Be

ev oliceiw KCU, yeirovt
Na/3ico? roi) AaKeBaijj,ovi(i)v rvpdvvov,
Se raZ? <yvu>^iaL^ rjiropovv, Kal ol TrXetoz'e? ypovvro
ra QiXiTTTTOv Kal aTrecrrpe^ovro 'Pco/uat'ou? Bid
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U. p. 359.

VIII



"On <&\anivlvo<$ av^ <jvvrev e?
^iXtTrvrro Kara TOV M^X^ea KO^TTOV, evOa

<yOpOVVTtt>V TOV QlXlTTTTOV 'PoBidOV Kal AlTO)\WV

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*Pa)fj,?1v du(j)OTepov<; aTrocrretXaf. ^/evofjievwv Be
TOVTCDV, ol [JLv ''EXX^re? eV TT) /3ov\fj Trj 'Pco/jLauwv
r)%iovv TOV <&i\iTnrov egayayeiv eK r^? 'EXXaSo?
ra? rpet? (frpovpas a? at'To? Tre^a? e/caXei T/}?
'EXXaSo?, T^ /xei^ eV XaX/a& Botwrot? Aral
Eu/5oei)crt al Aoxpois eTriKei/jLeviiv, Trjv Be ev

18



MACEDONIAN AFFAIRS

VII. FROM "THE EMBASSIES"

Lucius Quintius [Flamininus] sent envoys to the -c.
Achaean League to persuade them, together with the
Athenians and Rhodians, to abandon Philip and join
the Romans. Philip also sent ambassadors, asking
assistance from them as allies. But they, being
troubled by a war on their own borders with Nabis,
the tyrant of Lacedaemon, were divided in mind and
hesitated. The greater part of them preferred the
alliance of Philip and sided against the Romans on
account of certain outrages against Greece com-
mitted by Sulpicius, the former commander. When
the Roman faction urged their views with vehemence,
most of their opponents left the assembly in disgust,
and the remainder, being forced to yield by the
smallness of their number, entered into an alliance
with Lucius and followed him at once to the siege of
Corinth, bringing engines of war with them.

VIII. FROM THE SAME

FLAMININUS came into conference with Philip a 197
second time at the Malian gulf. When the Rhodians,
the Aetolians, and Amynander the Athamanian
made their complaints against Philip, Flami-
ninus ordered him to remove his garrisons from
Phocis, and required both parties to send ambassadors
to Rome. When this was done the Greeks asked
the Roman Senate to require Philip to remove from
their country the three garrisons which he called "the
fetters of Greece " ; the one at Chalcis, which threat-
ened the Boeotians, the Euboeans, and the Locrians ;

19



APPIAN'S ROMAN HISTORY, BOOK IX



fo KaOdirep 7rv\ai<$ rrjv He\07r6vvrjcrov drco-
K\elova'av, KOI TpiTrjv ev A^yU^rpmS^ rrjv
Kal Mdyvrjcriv e^eBpevovaav 1} Be /3ov\r)
<&i\i7r7rov Trpecrfteis ijpero TI (frpovoir) irepl
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eTravYjecrav, > a^ivi>o < ^ e Ka

6? ovBev (Tv^aivovT^ aXX^Xot? aWi<$ e? 7ro\e/jLov
Kadiaravro. U. p. 360.



IX

1. "On r)TT7]Oel^ 7rd\iv o <I>tXt7r7ro? irepl <TVJJ,-
dcrewv eTre/crjpvKevero TT/OO? <&\a/AiVLVOV, 6 5'
avru) (jvi'e\6el,v e? Xoyou? cruve%a)pi, TroXXa
WV AtVtoXwz' Bva"%epaiv6vTG)V, Kal 8ta/3aXXo^-
avrbv e? BwpoBo/CLav, Kal Kara'jL'yvwGKovTWV
}5 65 aTravra ev^epov^ /jLeTa/3o\fjs, rjyov/jievos B*



ovre



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ftiav. Ta^a 8' avrov Kal TO irapd^o^ov r?}5 VLK^
dyaTrdv eiroiei. avvdefjievos Be %wpi,ov ol TOV
<$>i\L7T7rov eTre\@elv eBei rov^ cruya/za^oL'? eK&Xevcre
yvcofiriv 7rpoa7ro<pijvaa'@ai, Kara TroXet?. ra /iei/
S^ Trapd TWV a\\wv (fciXavdpcoTra ?]v, TO re
ru^5 aBrj\ov % MV eiraOev o ( J ) tXt7T7ro5
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dXXa 7T\eov K (rvvrvyias avrov TraOelv T



o



dyvoetv ecfrrj TOV ^^a/jnvlvov on /j,r)Bev aXXo
20



MACEDONIAN AFFAIRS
the one at Corinth, which closed the door of the B - tv

197

Peloponnesus ; and the third at Demetrias, which, as
it were, kept guard over the Aetolians and the
Magnesians. The Senate asked Philip's ambassadors
what the king's views were respecting these garrisons.
When they answered they did not know, the Senate
said that Flamininus should decide the question and
do what he considered just. So the ambassadors
took their departure from Rome, but Flamininus and
Philip, being unable to come to any agreement,
resumed hostilities.



IX. FROM THE SAME

1. PHILIP, after being defeated again, senta herald
to Flamininus to sue for peace, and again Flamininus
granted him a conference, whereat the Aetolians
were greatly displeased and accused him of being
bribed by the king, and complained of his facile
change of mind as to all these matters. But he
thought that it would not be to the advantage of the
Romans, or of the Greeks, that Philip should be de-
posed and the Aetolian power made supreme. Per-
haps, also, the unexpected victory made him satisfied.
Having agreed upon a place where Philip should
come, he directed the allies to deliver their opinions
first city by city. The others were disposed to be
moderate, viewing suspiciously the uncertainties ot
fortune as evinced in the calamities of Philip, and
considering this disaster that had befallen him due



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