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DORIS.

Pray, Galatea, fay no more. I lately had a
fpecimen of your lover 's* mufick at your enter-
tainment,



DIALOGUES OF L U C I A N. 5j

tainment, you remember. Propitious Venus !
how much outdone by the braying of an afs !
and his lyre was like himfelf ! it was made of
the fcull of a deer, of which the horns ferved
for handles. The firings were all untuned.
PoflefTed of this inftrument, he played and fang
mofl furiouily ; while the finger and the player,
at variance with each other, equally outraged
all melody. When he recited his amorous
fonnet, to refrain from laughter " exceeded al.l
" power of face." So horrid was his noife,
that even Echo, goffip as fhe is, was mighty
lothe to make any reply to it. She really
feemed afhamed of repeating any thing fo rude
and uncouth. To mend the- matter, the 4ear
creature had got under his arm, for a play-
thing, the cub of a bear, almoil as rough as
himfelf. And who but mull envy Galatea ?

GALATEA.

Why do not you let us have a fight of your
admirer, Doris ? No doubt he is much hand-
fomer than Polyphemus, and plays and fings
better beyond all comparifon !

D 5 DORIS.



54 DIALOGUES OF LUCIA N,

DORIS.

If you come to that, I own I have no lover
at all, nor pretend to any. Much good may it
do you with yours, fay I. I hear he emits a
delicious odour, fcarcely inferior to that of a
goat ; and his victuals will require no drefling,
for he can make a very good meal on a trar
veller, I underftand. Take him, take your
Cyclops, apd make much of him.



A'LPHEUS and NEPTUNE.

NEPTUNE.

<

HOW happens it, Alpheus, that you alone,
of all the rivers that run into the fea, do
not mix with the fait water ? You never flop
to make the lead communication ; but, keeping
yourfelf to yourfelf, and your current as fweet
as ever, down you go like a gull or a heron^
popping up again by and by, juft as they do.

ALPHEUS,



DIALOGUES OF LVCIAN, 5$

A L P H E U S.

It is a love affair : fay nothing about it.
You have been often in love yourfelf, you
know.

NEPTUNE.

May I know the objedt of your love ? Is it
a woman, or a nymph ? Or perhaps you afpire
to a Nereid [7],

A L P H E U S.
No, no ; a fountain will do for me.

NEPTUNE.
A fountain ! and where does it flow ?

A L P H E U S.

My fountain is a fountain of Sicily, by name
Arethufa.

NEPTUNE.
I know the fountain you admire very well.

[/] A nymph compared to a Nereid is as a river to a
fea.

D 4 Arethufa



56 DIALOGUES OF LVCIAN,

Arethuia is very bright indeed, clear and tran&
parent, bubbling up from a fine bottom ; a
filver pool, in which not a pebble is unfeen.



A L P H E U S.

I perceive you are very well acquainted with
the fountain to which I am going.

NEPTUNE.

Yes ; but go, get you gone, and be happy in
your love. But I wonder where you could get
acquainted with Arethufa : you are an Arca-
dian; and Arethufa, a Sicilian 1

A L P H E U S.

Do not detain me with your wondering; I
cannot flay to anfwer impertinent queftions.

NEPTUNE.

I beg your pardon. Go along. Emerge
from the fea, and become one water with your
beloved fountain.



PAN OPE




DIALOGUES OF L U C I A N.



PANOPE and GALENE.

PANOPE.

^D you obferve, Galene, the behaviour of
the goddefs Difcord yefterday ? There

Tfas a fupper in ThefTaly, to which Ihe was not

invited.

GALE N E.

I know nothing of the matter ; for I was not
there any more than Ihe. Neptune had given
jne orders to flay at home and keep the lea
quiet. What did Ihe do ?

PANOPE.

I will tell you. Thetis and Peleus were re-
tired to their chamber, being conducted to it
by Amphitrite and Neptune. In the mean
time, without any body's perceiving it (which
is not at all to be wondered at, confidering how
the whole company was engaged in drinking,
Dancing, playing, and fmging), Difcord took
the opportunity of tofling in amongft them a
molt beautiful apple, all over gold, with this

jnfcriptipn :



58 DIALOGUES OF LUCIA N.

infcription : FOR THE FAIR ONE. This apple
went rolling along till it came, as if by defign,
where Juno, and Venus, and Minerva, were fit-
ting. Mercury directly picked it up, and read
the infcription. In the prefence of the god-
defies, we Nereids, you know, could have no-
thing to fay on the occafion. But they did not
lofe a moment. Every one at once claimed the
apple as her own, and with fuch vehemence,
that, if Jupiter hstd not been there to part rhem,
they would certainly have gone to blows about
It. For my part, lays Jupiter, I fhall not take
upon me to determine this matter. (You mutt
know, they all begged and prayed that he
would.) I fhall fend you to Mount Ida to the
fon of Priam. Priam's fon is a young man of
tafte, and cannot fail to do you juftice.

G A L E N E.
And did they mind what he faid ?

P A N O P E.

This very Jay they arc gone, I believe ; and
t>f courfe we fhall foon hear who carries off the
prize.

G A L E N E.



DIALOGUES OF LUCIA N. 59

G A L E N E.

O, it mnft be Venus, I am fure, if the judge

has the perfect ufe of his eyes.

'



TRITON, AMYiMONE, and
NEPTUNE.

TRITON.'

.

THERE is a young woman, who comes
every day to Lerna, to fetch water, a very
pretty body ; I do not know that I have ever
ieen a finer girl in my life.

N E P T TF N E.

A gentlewoman ? or only a fervant fent t*
fetch water ?

TRITON.

No fervant, Neptune, believe me. She is
one of the fifty, daughters of Danaus ; her name
is, Amymone. I have enquired into the parti-
culars.



6p DIALOGUES OF LUCIA N.

culars. Danaus, I hear, is very flridt with his
daughters, and brings them all up to work.
He fends them to fetch water, and employs
them in any other bufinefs which he thinks will
make them notable.

NEPTUNE.

Does ihe come alone ? It is a long way from
Argi to Lerna.

TRITON.

All alone. The foil of the Argives, you
know, is very dry ; fo that they are continually
in want of water.

NEPTUNE.

You have put me all into a flutter by what
you have faid. Let us go to her.

TRITON.

With all my heart ; this is her time of com-
ing, and I fuppofe her to be now about half
way to Lerna.



NEPTUNE,





6i



NEPTUNE.



Make hade with the chariot. Stay ; it will-
be fome time before you can put-to the horfes,
and have the carriage in proper order. Rather
get me a dolphin, one of the fwifteft, that I
may go in a trice !

TRITON.

Here he is ; the very dolphin you wifh for !

NEPTUNE.

Very well ; then let us be gone. You can
fwim by my fide ; and, when we come to Lerna,
I fhall be upon the watch. Do you mind when
flie comes. x

TRITON.

Here fhe is !



NEPTUNE.

A very beautiful young woman, indeed ! She
muft not efcape.

AMYMONE,



62 DIALOGUES OF LUCIA N.

A M Y M O N E.

Do you mean to kidnap me, Sir? You are
an emiflary, 1 fuppofe, of my uncle uEgyptus.
But I will call my father.

TRITON.

Be eafy, Amymone, hold your tongue ; this
is Neptune.

AMYMONE.

And pray what is Neptune to me ? Hold
off your hands, Sir. Dear me, you will drag
me into the water ! I fhall be drowned in the
fea!

NEPTUNE.

Never fear ; you fhall not come to any harm.
I will flrike this rock with my trident juft by
where you fee the pool, and caufe a fountaia to
fpring up; which fountain fhall be called by
your name. You will be very happy ; and not
obliged, like the reft of your lifters, to carry
water after you are dead.

N O T U a



DIALOGUES OF LUCIAN. 63

NOTUS and ZEPHYRUS.

N O T U S.

O then, Zephyrus, that heifer, which Mer-
cury is conducting over the water into
t, is a favourite of Jupiter ?

ZEPHYRUS.

You conjecture very right. But the heifer
was no heifer when Jupiter was pleafcd with
her. She was then the daughter of the river
Inachus. It was Juno, who, feeing her hufband
.fo very fond of her, thought proper to give her
the fhape which (he now has.

NOTUS.
And does he Hill continue to love her ?

ZEPHYR U S.

Very much. He has charged us by no means
to difturb the tranquillity of the lea now that Ihe
is on her voyage to JSgypt. She goes to
uEgypt to lie-in ; after which, ffre and her off-
fpring are to be deified.

e NOT U S,



DIALOGUES OF LUCIAN*

N O T U S.

A heifer made a goddefs !



Yes, Notus, as fure as you are there. More
than that, Mercury told me, that {he is to take
cognizance of all that fail on the fea, with fove-
reign authority over every wind ; fo that we
muft all of us hereafter blow, or not blow, juft
as fhe pleafes.

NOTUS.

If that is the cafe, we muft treat her with
proper refpec\ that fhe may be kind to us.

Z E P H Y R U S.

Mind her! fhe has already completed her
voyage ! She is fairly landed, and is no longer
upon four legs ! Mercury, it feems, has fet
her upright, and a very handfome woman ihe is!

NOTUS.

Aftonifhing ! What is become of the horns,
and tail, and cloven feet ? She is now a moft

lovely



GI/ES OF LliClAtf. 6j

lo'vely young woman. But what can this mean ?
Mercury at the fame time ha's metamorphofed
himfelf. He no loriger looks like a young man,
for he has got the face of a dog.

Z E P H Y K. U S.

You and I mufl not be too curious in our
enquiries : he has good reafons, no doubt, for
what he does.



IRIS and NEPTUNE,

IRIS.

THAT vagabond ifland, which was broken
off from Sicily, ftill continues floating
about covered with waves ; but it is Jupiter's
pleafure that it fliall not do fo any longer. He
fays, it muft now be fixed, and aflume a con-
fpicuous ftation in the ^Ega&an fea. For fa
need requires.

NEPTUNE.

It ihall be done dire&ly, Iris. But I wonder
VOL. III. E



66 DIALOGUES OF LUCIAN.

what advantage he can propofe to himfelf by it.
What difference can it make to Jupiter, whe-
ther it be ftationary above the water, or float
about below ?

IRIS.

I can tell you, Latona is in labour, and wants
to be brought-to-bed upon it.

NEPTUNE.

And pray, Iris, can neither Heaven nor Earth
find room for Latona, but fhe muft

IRIS.

No, no, I tell you, no. Juno took care to bind
the earth, by the moft folemn oath, not to enter-
tain her on the occafion. But this ifland, you
understand, this ifland, being under water at the
time, is not fuppofed to be included in the en-
gagement.

NEPTUNE.

O now I begin to underftand you. Stop,
ifland, come up again, and go down no more
from this moment. Stay here, and enjoy the
happinefs of taking under your protection a
couple of my nephews, Jupiter's own fons, as
5 fine



DIALOGUES OF LUCIAN, 67

fine gods as need to be. You Tritons are to
conduct Latona to the place prepared for her
delivery, and take care that there be a perfed:
calm. As foon as the infants fee the light,
they will attack the \_q~\ ferpent which fo much
annoys their mother, arid revenge her wrongs.
Do you make hafte back to Jupiter, and tell
him every thing is ready. Delos is now fta-
tionary ; and Latona may come, and lie-in upon
it, as foon as fhe pleafes.



w



DORIS and THETIS;

DORIS.
HAT makes you weep, Thetis ?



THETIS.

O Doris, I have feen a moft beautiful
young woman, together with her new-born
babe, (hut up in a cheft, which her father has
ordered the failors to take out a good way to fea,

[q] The Python flain by Apollo, in memory of which
the Pythian games were inftituted. Ovidii Metam.

E 2, and



and then fink it. So the poor mother and chilsl
muft perifh together !

DORIS.

Why fo, fitter ? Are you acquainted with the
c'ircumftances of the flory ?



Acrifius had a very handfome daughter, and,
having a mind that flie fhould continue a virgin,
he fhut her up in a brazen chamber. What fell
out after this, I cannot pretend to fay. But
the flory goes, that Jupiter, being transformed
into a fhower of gold, rained in upon her through
the roof of her apartment ; and that, in confe.
quence of this fhower, fhe found herfelf with
child. With which the fufpicious father was
no fooner made acquainted, than he flew into a
violent rage, thinking his child had been fe-
duced. In fhort, fhe was no fooner delivered,
than he ordered her and her child to be fhut up
together in a cheft.

DORIS.

And how did fhe behave herfelf on the occa-

fion?

THE-



DIALOGUES OF LUCIAN. 69

THETIS.

On her own account flie did not fo much as
litter a word, but bore her fufferings with the
greateft patience. Her babe was her only con-
cern. His death fhe deprecated of his grand-
father with many tears, fhewing him what a
fine child he was. While the infant, ignorant
of his fate, fmiled at the waves, and diverted
himfelf with feeing his danger. I weep to think

Of it*

D Q fc | >

And you make me weep. Were they both
.drowned ?

THETIS.

Neither of them. The cheft is ftill floating
about Seriphus, and they are in it both alive.

DORIS.

Why cannot we interfere ? The eheft may fall
into the nets of the Seriphian fiftiermen, and
come fafe to land.

E 3 THE-



70 DIALOGUES OF LUCIAN.

THETIS.

Very well ; let us order it fo. He is a fine
child ; and it were a pity, that either lue or his
mother fliould periih in the fea.



TRITON.

THAT fea-monfter, which you Nereids fen?
to deftroy Andromeda, the daughter of
Cepheus, did her no manner of harm, whatever
you may fuppofe ; on the contrary he, not fhe,

is dead.

, /

NEREID S.

Dead i who killed him ? Did Cepheus lie in
wait, with a fufficient force to furprife and flay
him ? The young woman, I fuppofe, was made
ufe of as a bait, to draw him into the fnare.

TRITON.

No fuch thing. You know Perfeus, the fon

of Danae; you cannot but know him, Iphia-

> . ........ . . - ...

nalia.



DIALOGUES OF LUCIA N. 7 1

naffa. When his grand-father had put him
and his mother into a cheft, which he ordered
to be thrown into the fea, your compaffion
faved their lives.

IPHIANASSA.

I remember it. By this time, I dare fay, the
boy muft he grown up to a fine flout young
man.




IPHIANASSA.

From what motive ? He was under no obli-
gation to me, that could induce him to do it.

TRITON.

I will tell you the whole flory. At the re-
queft of the king, he fet out on an expedition
againfl the Gorgons, and being come into Libya,
the country where they were

IPHIANASSA.

Pray let me ak you, had he no companions
in his expedition ? Or did he undertake to go
alone ? The road to Libya is none of the beft.
E 4 TRI-



*]2 DIALOGUES OF LUCIA N.

TRITON.

Oh ! as to that, he travelled through the air,
Minerva having previoufly furnilhed him witK
a pair of wings ; and, when he arrived in the
country where they lived, I fancy they muft
have been afleep ; for he cut off the head of
Medufa, and immediately flew away with it.

I P H I A N A S S A.

I wonder how he managed to get a fight of
her ; for they are not to be looked at. At
lead, whoever looks at them once, is doomed to
look no more.

TRITON.

Minerva holding out her Ihield I tell it to
you juft as I heard him tell it himfelf, firft to
Andromache, and afterwards to Cepheus Mi-
nerva gave him an opportunity of feeing the
image of Medufa reflected in her fhield, which
anfwered the purpofe of a mirrour. When lavr
ing hold of a lock of hair with his left hand,
and looking at the fame time at her Hkenefs,
with the falchion, which he held in his right
hand, he cut off her head j and, before her

fitters



DIALOGUES OF LUCIA N. 73

Afters could be waked, away he flew with it.
Being come to this part of ./Ethiopia, which
lies near the coafl, and flying very low, he
chanced to efpy An4romeda fattened to a rock
which projected into the fea. Ye Gods ! how
beautiful flie appeared to him, with hair diftie-
velled, and hardly half-dreffed ! He could not
do lefs than pity her, which naturally induced
him to afk why Ihe was thus expofed. And in
a very little while (it was to be fo) falling in
love with her, he determined to fet her free.
Accordingly when the horrible monfler came
ruihing on, as if to fwallow up his prey in a mo-
ment, Pcrfeus being above him, ready prepared
with his falchion, ftruck him a blow with it,
and at the fame inftant turned towards him the
head of Medufa in his other hand. Thus he was
at pnce killed and petrified. Andromeda being
freed from her chains, Perfeus led her on tiptoe
down the flippery rock, and is now celebrating
his nuptials in the houfe of Cepheus. After
which, he means to take her with him to Argi.
So that inftead of a cruel death, you find, An-
dromeda has got a good hufband.

NE-



74 DIALOGUES OF LUCIA N.

NEREID.

Upon my word, I am not forry for it.
What harm had the poor girl done to us ? If
the mother gave herfelf airs, and pretended to
be fo very handforne, was the daughter to blame
fgrit?

D O R I Si

Only think how the mother muft have la-
minted the lofs of her daughter !

NEREID.

Well, well; we will think no more of it.
To be fure the [r] barbarian was infufferably
faucy, but fhe has had punilhment quite enough
in her fears for her daughter. May it be a
a PP v marriage !

[r] Cafliope, the mother of Andromeda, had boafted
of being more beautiful than the Nereids ; in revenge
for .which, they bound her daughter Andromeda to a
rock, to be devoured by a monfter.



ZEPHYRUS



PJALOGUES OF LUCIAN.



ZEPHYRUS and NOTUS.

"'-

ZEPHYRUS.

ON the fea, from which I rife, and from,
which I blow, was ever any thing fo mag-
nificent ? You did not fee it, Notus.

NOTUS.

I do not know what you mean. What was

it ? Who were the parties concerned in it ?
i

ZEPHYRUS.

You have had a lofs indeed ! fuch a light will
never be feen again.

NOTUS.

I was out of the way, being employed near
the Red Sea blowing over the Indian coaft.

ZEPHYRUS.'
You have feen Agenor, the Sidonian ?

NOTUS.

The father of Europa ? I have. What then ?

ZE-



DIALOGUES OF LUCIA H,

Z E P H Y R U S.
I am juft going to tell you what then.

N O T U S.

Meaning no doubt, that Jupiter has been a
great while in love with the young woman. I
knew that before, without your telling me.

Z E P H Y R IT S.

You might know, I dare fay, of his being in
love'; but the fequel of the ftory you are now
to learn from me. Europa had gone down to
the fea-ihore, accompanied by fome play-fellows
of her own age ; when Jupiter, having affumed
the form of a moft beautiful Bull, made his ap-
pearance amongft therrij as fond of play as any
one of them : he was all over milk-white, his
horns were elegantly turned, and his looks were
gentle. He fo wantoned on the beach, and
bellowed fo charmingly, that Europa was in-
duced to venture herfelf upon his back. Which
fhe had no fooner done, than away he ran with
her, as faft as his heels could carry him, to the
fea, into which he immediately jumped, and be-
took



DIALOGUES OF LUCIA N. 77

took himfelf to fwimming. The young woman,
moft terribly frightened, laid hold of one of
his horns with her left hand, to fave herfelf
from falling; while, with the other, Ihe had
enough to do to keep her cloaths from being
difcompofed by the wind.

N T U S.

On my word, you have been moft notably en-
tertained. Jupiter in the fea, with his fair one
on his back ! a gallant fpedtacle !

ZEPHYRUS,

The befl part of it is to come* The fea,
Notus, was no longer ruffled with waves, but
perfectly calm, fmooth, and ferene. We winds
had nothing in the world to do, nothing more
than to attend, and obferve what was going for-
ward. Little Cupids fluttering on the furfacc
of the water, in which now and then they wetted
their toes, carried lighted torches, and joined
in the bridal fong. Nereids, half naked, were
to be feen riding on Dolphins, all clapping their
hands. The family of Tritons, and every inha-
bitant of the waves, that was not an abfolutc

fright,



7 8 DIALOGUES OP LUCIA IT.

fright, came dancing about the maid. Neptune
afcended his chariot, and, with Amphitrite by
his fide, merrily went before, clearing the way,
as he faw his brother out of his element. Laft
of all came Venus, borne aloft on a ihell by a
couple of Tritons, and fcattering flowers ori
Europa. Thus it was all the way from Phoe-
nicia to Crete. Where, when once he had fet
foot on the ifland, our bull was a bull no longer.
Jupiter was himfelf again, and led by the hand
to the Diclsean grove the blufhing maid, whofe
down-caft eyes and blufhing cheeks fufficiently
declared her apprehenfions. Our bufinefs was td
tumble about the waves, and ruffle the fea.

N O T U S.

You have been very fortunate indeed ! while
I had nothing better to look at than griffins^
elephants, and negroes;



MENIPPUS and MERCURY:

M E N I P P U S.
S I am a ftranger, Mercury, you will in-



A



troduce me to all the fine gentlemen a'nd
ladies of the place;



MER-



, DIALOGUES OF LUCIA IT. 79

MERCURY.

I have not time, Menippus. And, betides,
you have nothing to do but to look about you.
On your right hand you fee Hyacinthus, and
Narciflus, and Nireus, and Achilles, and Tyro,
and Helen, and Leda ; in ihort, all the beauties
of antiquity.

MENIPPUS.

Beauties ! I can fee nothing more than fculls
and bare bones.

MERCURY.

Sculls and bare bones do you call them ? Do
you pretend to defpife what all the poets are

unanimous in admiring ?

\

MENIPPUS.

Pray, which is Helen ? How am I to diftin-
guifti her from the reft ?

MERCURY.
That is Helen.

ME*



So DIALOGUES OF LUCIAN."

MENIPPUS.

And that bare fcalp engaged the attention of
all Greece ! for that a thoufand fliips were fitted
out ! for that fo many Grecians and Barbarians
fell in battle ! for that fcull fo many cities were
levelled with the ground !

MERCURY.

You never faw the woman, Menippus, when
fhe was alive, or you would not run on at this
fate. If you had feen her then, you would have
thought fo much time and trouble well beftow-
ed. You Ihould not condemn a flower, when
it is faded ; becaufe flowers in full bloom, you
fcriow, are very fine things.

MENIPPUS.

True : but I wonder, Mercury, how the
Greeks could be fo very thoughtlefs, as not to
confider, that they were making all that ado
about a flower, which would foon be no flower
t all !

MERCURY.

You are a philofopher, Menippus ; arid I have

no'



DIALOGUES OF LUCIAN. 8l

no leifure for philofophy. My buiinefs is to
look out for more dead. In the mean time, I
advife you to look out for fome convenient fpot,
where you may lie down, and compofe your-
felf.



PROTESILAUS, MENE-
LAUS, and PARIS.



JS. A C U S.

WHAT makes you ufe Helen fo ill, Pro-
teiilaus ? You are abfolutely throttling
her.

PROTESILAUS,

If I do, it is not more than Ihe deferves. Was
it not owing to her, ^Eacus, that I loft my life
before I had finifhed my houfe, and that I left
my new married wife a widow ?

& A C U S.

I rather think Menelaus was the perfon in
F fault,



82 DIALOGUES OF L U C I A N.

fault, who could take you away with him to
Troy on fo miferable an errand.



PROTES IL.AU S.

Very true ; I beg pardon. Menelaus is the
perfon I am to blame.

MENELAUS.

No fuch thing, my good fir. Pray what do
you think of Paris ? Did not Paris in diredt de-
fiance of all law and juftice carry off my wife ?
the wife of his friend ? I had entertained him in
my houfe. And does he not deferve to have
his neck pinched not only by you, but by every
body elfe ? Greeks and Barbarians ? What num-
bers of people has he been the death of!

PROTESILAUS.

I was wrong, Menelaus. Yes, you inaufpi-
cious Paris, you are the man ; and you mall not
find it an eafy matter to efcape my vengeance.

PARIS.

Surely, Protefilaus, you would not be fo un-
reafonable ! Would you puniih me for being in

the



DIALOGUES OF LUC I AN. 83

the fame predicament with yourfelf ? Why, fir,
I was in love, it is true ; but what then ? So
was Menelaus. And you know very well, that
love is not a matter of choice. We were both
of us under the influence of an irrefiftible God,
who drives us about juft as he will, and whofe
mandates we are bound to obey.

PROTESILAUS.

What you fay has reafon in it. I wilh I could
lay hold of that God, that Cupid.

JE. A C U S.

Let me put in a word for him. Cupid, I
believe, would hardly deny his having infpired
the paffion of Paris ; but the death of Protefi-
laus he would moft certainly attribute to Pio-
tefilaus himfelf, and no other. What occafion
had you to run away in fuch a hurry from your
new-married wife ? Her you utterly forgot, and
became fo enamoured of glory, that, on your
arrival before Troy, nothing lefs would ferve
your turn, than madly leaping out of the ihip
before every body elfe, that you might be flam
the very firft man.

F * . PRO-



84 DIALOGU E 8 OF LUCIAN.

PROTESILAUS.

I can make a better apology for my conduct.


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