Copyright
Old friend.

The child and the Bishop : together with certain memorabilia of the Rt. Rev. Phillips Brooks late bishop of the Diocese of Massachusetts online

. (page 1 of 3)
Online LibraryOld friendThe child and the Bishop : together with certain memorabilia of the Rt. Rev. Phillips Brooks late bishop of the Diocese of Massachusetts → online text (page 1 of 3)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


y ; THE CHILD

_ANDTHE




*



UCSB LIBRARY



TH6 CHILD AND TH6 BISHOP

TOC6TH6R WITH

t

CERTAIN AeAORABILIA

OF

TH eR T ReV PHILLIP5 BROOKSoo



TH6 CHILD ANDTH6 BISHOP

TOC6TH6R WITH

CERTAIN AenORABILIA

OF

THeR T RV PHILLIPS BROOKSoo

BISHOP OF TH6 DIOCese OF
AASSKCHUS6TTS

BY

HNOLDFRI6ND




BOSTON

JGCUPPLS^C

BOYLSTON AND CHURCH STS

1694



Copyright, 1893,
BY J. G. CUPPLES & COMPANY.



All rights reserved.




TO THE MEMORY OF

MARY ANN (PHILLIPS) BROOKS,

THE MOTHER OF A GREAT MAN.




CONTENTS.



PREFACE ix

EXTRACT FROM LETTER OF ...
BISHOP BROOKS xiii

THE CHILD AND THE BISHOP . . 19

MEMORABILIA

A CHAPTER FROM MEMORY .... 29

THE SERMON ON PRESIDENT LINCOLN 37

As RECTOR IN PHILADELPHIA ... 43

PHILADELPHIA DIVINITY SCHOOL . . 47

CLERICUS CLUB 53

As RECTOR IN BOSTON 59

AT HARVARD COLLEGE 63

TRAVELS 65

OUTSIDE LABORS 67

BOSTON REMINISCENCES 71

As BISHOP 83

ESTIMATE 89

HISTORICAL PARALLEL 97

L'ENVOI 103



PREFACE.



GREAT desire having been
expressed by many people to
possess the picture which
appears as a frontispiece to
this volume, it was thought
best to place it in this little book, the copy-
right proceeds from the sale of which are
devoted to the creation of




w



THE MARY CRESSON FUND

FOR

THE BOSTON HOME FOR
INCURABLES

this charity having especially interested
Bishop Brooks. The only public bequest
made by him in his will was for this institu-
tion.




" HEAR the words of the Gospel written
by St. Mark in the Tenth Chapter, at the
thirteenth verse :

" They brought young children to Christ
that He should touch them ; and his dis-
ciples rebuked those that brought them
but when Jesus saw it he was much dis-
pleased, and said unto them, Suffer the
little children to come unto me, and forbid
them not : for of such is the Kingdom of
God. Verily, I say unto you, whosoever
shall not receive the Kingdom of God as a
little child, he shall not enter therein. And
he took them up in His arms, put His hands
upon them, and blessed them."

SERVICE FOR THE BAPTISM OF INFANTS.






HUS saying he (Socrates)
got up and went into
another room, and Crito
followed him : but us he
requested to stay be-
hind. We remained,
therefore, talking over with one another and
inquiring into what had been said : ever and
again coming back to the misfortune that
had befallen us : for we looked upon our-
selves as doomed to go through the rest of
life like orphans bereft of a father."

PLATO'S PHAEDO, 116.





EXTRACT FROM A LETTER.

INDEED I had a delightful visit. I still
seem to hold 'Beautiful Blessing' in my
happy arms. ... I like to think of the
new church getting more and more familiar
every Sunday. It must never lose associa-
tion with ' B. B.' and me, who gave it its
first consecration. But how quickly it will
lose its newness and get filled with memo-
ries.

Ever affectionately yours,

P. B.
Boston, May 23, 1890.




The Child and the
Bishop.




THE CHILD AND THE BISHOP.



THE CHILD AND THE BISHOP.

GIRT with those fast folded arms,
Safe, yet with tenderness pressed,
Calm is the innocent child,
Peaceful the trusting soul,
Quiet the nesting face,
As strength and innocence meet,
Spanning the perfect arch,
Twixt Man in completest power
And Infancy's opening life !

Little one looking away,
Pulling the curtain aside,
Out of the windows of time,
Out from the Wakening Soul,
What is Thy vision of life ?
Image of houses and men,
Playthings of creaturely joy,



THE CHILD AND THE BISHOP.



Flowers, and blossoms, and birds,
Life in its manifold forms,
These are the objects thine eyes
View from the window's wide pane.

Tired Thou turnedst again,

To the arms which are holding Thee fast,

To the smile which enchains in its peace

The fluttering spirit within ;

Calm, Thou beholdest once more

The eyes of the prophet of God

Casting their light into Thine !

And what in the face of the child,
Preacher of faith, seest Thou ?
Helper and Bishop of souls,
Friend and Bringer of Hope,
Torch-bearer here in the dark
And cavernous chambers of doubt,
What dost Thou see in the soul,
What in the face of mankind,
Looking far out upon time,



THE CHILD AND THE BISHOP.



Up through the windows of life,
What dost Thou see in us all ?

We have grown weary, our walk
Trembling, and road-sore our feet ;
Nothing of life can we solve,
As Thou, our leader and friend,
Dost the divineness of God
See in the children of men.

This dost Thou teach us, we know
This much Thy soul has made clear :
That the life is the light of mankind
(As the angels in Heaven behold
The face of the Father in light).
Never to falter in faith,
Never to sink into self,
Never to barter the gold
Of the Spirit for passable coin,
Not to play false to the soul,
This is Thy word to the world,
This is Thy message to men !



THE CHILD AND THE BISHOP.



And in thine eyes have we seen
The glow of the vision divine ;
Under the smile of Thy soul,
Brother and Helper, have we
Caught from the light of Thy face
A life that the world cannot know ;
Manhood, and duty, and faith,
Mastery over the flesh,
Triumph through patience and truth,
Light from the spirit of God,
Strength from the cross of our Lord,
This have we gathered from Thee !

Yes ! from Thy grasp upon God,

The light of the mount on Thy face

Shining resplendent in life,

We, on the sands of the plain,

Glimpses of glory have seen ;

Something of light and of fire,

Something of faith and of calm

From Thy presence among us have snatch'd.

Something have saved from the halt



THE CHILD AND THE BISHOP.



In the Caravan's March o'er the plain,
Where like the prophet of Old
Waiting in silence, alone,
Thou on the crest of the mount
Broughtest God's message to men.

Out of the windows of life,
Out of the caverns of doubt,
Forth on the welcoming world,
Close to the life of mankind,
Thou, like a Master of Souls,
Shewest the way for our feet !

Yes ! and the Father's lost face,
Seen in the sons of mankind,
Ever Thy spirit hath shown !
Deep in the marshland of sin,
Faint in the darkness of night,
Straying like sheep that are lost,
Still in the heart of mankind,
The image of God in the soul,
'Twas thine to explore and reveal,
Brother and preacher, and friend.

23



THE CHILD AND THE BISHOP.



Thou for the sheep of Thy flock
Shepherd of Shepherds, and friend
Of those who in doubt and in fear
Their faith in the tempest have lost,
When darkness has swept o'er the soul
And the lights one by one have gone out,
The windows of Heaven have seen,
Hast pointed with finger of Hope
To the penciled light in the sky,
To the glow that cometh at eve,
The sureness and truth of God,
To those who will trust and obey !

The golden clouds of the west,

Seem not more truly the dust

Of the feet where our God is seen,

Than the Scaffolding Thou hast built,

Whereby in these toiling hours,

The soul can ascend to its God,

And finish the temple's wall,

That building not fashioned with hands,

The Spirit's Eternal abode !



THE CHILD AND THE BISHOP.



Dead Thou art not, O Man
Dead Thou canst never be !
Not 'mid the graves of earth
Thy living voice shall we seek,
Thy loving soul shall we find !
Thou art to us as a star
Fixed in the quiet sky,
Seen in the silent hours,
Giving a light for all time,
Ruling the blackness of night,
Shining forever the same !
There art Thou poised, and the days
That move with invincible force,
Rapid, resistless and sure,
Never can hide from our eyes
The light and the joy of Thy soul,
Helper and Leader of men,
Bringer of peace and of light,
Witness to God and mankind !





Memorabilia.




MEMORABILIA,



A CHAPTER FROM MEMORY.




OME time during the summer
of 1858, the Rev. Phillips
Brooks came to Philadelphia
to be the rector of the
Church of the Advent at
Fifth and Buttonwood Streets.

His friend and fellow seminarian, the Rev.
Henry A. Wise from Virginia, was then rec-
tor of the Church of the Saviour, West Phil-
adelphia, and was electrifying great congre-
gations who flocked to hear his swan-like
discourses as with hectic face and trembling
voice he went from church to church
preaching by invitation on successive after-
noons and evenings.

Phillips Brooks and Henry A. Wise came
to the same field from the Virginia Semi-
nary, though Wise was first on the ground
29



MEMORABILIA.



and had earned his following, when the
shadow of death was seen in his face and the
storm of the coming war of the rebellion
was beginning to break. And so the way
was left open for the young Bostonian who
was at the little Church of the Advent at
Fifth and Buttonwood Streets.

It was at first a question whether this so-
called transcendental mind, would fit the
average Philadelphian. But it is the sign
of genius to fit the situation whatever
that situation may be, and in three months'
time, this young man whom his evangelical
friends eyed askance and his High Church
friends could not begin to fathom, was
started at his bicycle gait, spinning his way
straight up the heights to Olympus, while all
the religious world wondered. This tall
young man came one Sunday afternoon to
preach for his friend, the rector of St. Paul's.
It was the rector's custom in those days to

3



MEMORABILIA.



invite the new clergymen who came to the
city into his pulpit, and to welcome them
with a few words of brotherly greeting.
Great was the surprise of this visitor to find
himself classed in a category which was
utterly unknown and unfamiliar to him ; a
surprise which was shared by the large au-
dience when the sermon was over, since they
failed to recognize the sign language and
test words of the evangelical vocabulary.
The sermon was from the words, " Master,
which is the great commandment of the
law ? " And when it was over something
strange had happened to the inmates of a
number of pews. A land which was dim and
far off came very near ; a shadowy glimpse
of a future age which had been born of
boyish dreams stood out as clear as a land-
scape, seen through a nicely adjusted field-
glass, and it seemed as if the day for which
31



MEMORABILIA.



the young mind of that period was waiting
had come.

After the service the young preacher
came home to the father's house to supper
and met the family.

But the preacher did not say very much
to the boys. Something seemed to be
the matter with his collar and the boys were
rather shy of this strange and mysterious
visitor, and so the morning and the evening
of this friendship were the first day, and the
party broke up after supper, when the host
returned the favor, and went with his guest
to preach at his little church on Fifth Street.
And thus this great ministry and this lasting
friendship began. After these days, when
the young preacher was a power, throned
like a king in the pulpit which had been
built for his old friend and pastor, Alexander
H. Vinton, and when the boys whose eyes,
like those of Balaam, were opened, were now



MEMORABILIA.



in college looking forward to their own com-
ing ministry, how many and how helpful
were the hours stolen from routine duties,
when, sitting by the door of the Church on
Rittenhouse Square, they listened to the
voice and drank in the full, deep inspiration
of that nobly anointed nature. Many a Sun-
day afternoon, when the wide doors of that
Church were thrown back, and the crowds
flocked out into the open air, it seemed to
those listeners coming out into the street
again, as if the very heavens were on fire,
not because the sun was setting across the
Schuylkill, but because the preacher had
projected a light into the open sky of the
heavens ; the light of the mystic, the light
of the prophet ; that light which never was
on sea or land. Wordsworth says in his
matchless Ode

" Shades of the prison-house begin to close

33



MEMORABILIA.



Upon the growing boy ;

But he beholds the light, and whence it flows,

He sees it in his joy.

At length the man perceives it die away,
And fade into the light of common day.

In those war days in Philadelphia great
Union meetings were held in different
churches and men forgot their religious
differences in the fact that they were loyal
to the government, or were the much hated
"copperheads", a term of reproach taken
from the reptile world, from the insidious
habit of this serpent which lay low and
bit the heel of those who passed by, a
trait as old in history as the questionable
blessing of the dying patriarch upon the
tribe of Dan, when he said :

" Dan shall be a serpent by the way : an
adder in the path, that biteth the horse-



34



MEMORABILIA.



heels so that his rider shall fall backward."
(Gen. xlvii, 17.)

At many of those famous war meetings
the young Bostonian was a most welcome
speaker, and whether he offered prayer
or spoke a word of cheer and counsel, his
tall lithe form was ever a benediction.




35



MEMORABILIA.



THE SERMON ON PRESIDENT
LINCOLN.

How wonderfully prophetic are the fol-
lowing passages taken from his funeral
eulogy on Abraham Lincoln as the dead
body of the martyred President lay in Inde-
pendence Hall.

It was a marvellous address for one so
young to make as far back as 1865. When
one reads it now nearly thirty years later, and
sees this outline eulogy realized and filled
to the letter in the after career of Phillips
Brooks, the words of the noble of Ethiopia
come into the mind as after reading Isaiah's
glowing page he said to Philip the Deacon
by his side, " of whom speaketh the prophet
thus, of himself or of some other man?"
(Acts viii, 34.)

"The more we see of events the less we
come to believe in any fate or destiny ex-



MEMORABILIA.



cept the destiny of character. It will be our
duty then to see what there was in the char-
acter of our great President that created the
history of his life, and at last produced the
catastrophe of his cruel death.

" From his boyhood up he lived in direct
and vigorous contact with men and things,
and both his moral convictions and his in-
tellectual opinions gathered from that con-
tact a supreme degree of that character
by which men knew him, that character
which is the most distinctive possession of
the best American nature, that almost in-
describable quality which we call in general
clearness or truth, and which appears in the
physical structure as health, in the moral
constitution as honesty, in the mental struct-
ure as sagacity, and in the region of active
life as practicalness.

"A great many people have discussed
very crudely whether Abraham Lincoln was
38



MEMORABILIA.



an intellectual man or not : as if intellect
were a thing always of the same sort, which
you could precipitate from the other con-
stituents of a man's nature and weigh by
itself, and compare by pounds and ounces
in this man with another. The fact is that
in all the simplest characters the line be-
tween the mental and moral' natures is
always vague and indistinct.

" They run together and in their best com-
binations you are unable to discriminate, in
the wisdom which is their result, how much
is moral and how much is intellectual. You
are unable to tell whether in the wise acts
and words which issue from such a life there
is more of the righteousness which comes of
a clear conscience or of the sagacity which
comes of a clear brain.

" It is the great boon of such characters
as Mr. Lincoln's that they reunite what God
has joined together and man has put

..... '. 39



MEMORABILIA.



asunder. In him was vindicated the great-
ness of real goodness and the goodness of
real greatness. The twain were one flesh.

"This union of the mental and moral into
a life of admirable simplicity is what we most
admire in children ; but in them it is unset-
tled and unpractical. But when it is pre-
served into manhood, deepened into reli-
ability and maturity, it is that glorified child-
likeness, that high and reverend simplicity,
which shames and baffles the most accom-
plished astuteness and is chosen by God to
fill his purposes when he needs a ruler for
his people, of faithful and true heart. Such
as he had who was our President.

" Here then we have some conception of
the man. Out of this character came the
life which we admire and the death which
we lament to-day. He was called in that
character to that life and death. It was



MEMORABILIA.



just the nature . . which a new nation
such as ours ought to produce."

These extracts taken from the discourse
preached at the Church of the Holy Trinity
while the body of the President was lying in
the city, show us the unconscious prophecy
and confession of Phillips Brooks' own rich
and harmonious well-poised character, as after
the nearly thirty years which have passed
since this funeral oration was delivered,
that character has produced an impression
upon the Christian world unparalleled by any
living man of this century.




MEMORABILIA.



AS RECTOR IN PHILADELPHIA.

He preached the Baccalaureate Sermon for
the graduating class of 1865 at the University
Chapel on Ninth Street, Philadelpia, the
first time that this chapel was used for
such a purpose. Those who remembered
the famous " exhibitions " of the University
of Pennsylvania with the jargon of comic
programmes and rival and opposing claqueurs
will not forget this occasion when, the Glee
Club acting as choir, the young preacher,
then in the rising glory of his greatness as
the rector of Holy Trinity church, preached
a sermon from the words, " The light of the
body is the eye : if therefore thine eye be
single thy whole body shall be full of
light, but if thine eye be evil thy whole
body shall be full of darkness. If therefore
the light that is in thee be darkness, how



43



MEMORABILIA.



great is that darkness ! " (Matthew vi, 22,

23.)

The young minister lived in those days at
Locust and Sixteenth Streets ; and at Spruce
Street, No. 1339; and at 1,115 Walnut
Street. His rooms were always most at-
tractive : there was never the smell of the
shop about them, but on the contrary al-
ways the delicious repose of the idler, the
latest reviews and magazines, the newest
books, the most fascinating pictures and bits
of art, while the fragrance of tobacco lin-
gered over the curtains, manuscript and bric-
a-brac, and one never was in a hurry to leave.

The same delightful friendship which he
formed for a few college men, and most
carefully and persistently nurtured and
cherished, continued when these collegians
became seminarians at the Philadelphia Di-
vinity School at Thirty-ninth and Walnut
Streets, West Philadelphia.



MEMORABILIA.



His brother Frederick Brooks was at the
Divinity School in those days, a thoughtful
earnest quiet man, and three or four little
groups or knots of men rallied around the
\ personality of the younger Brooks, and that
of a very remarkable young man of Scotch
birth and ancestry who was easily the leader
of all who came into touch with him, John
Irving Forbes.

One of these seminarians on a certain oc-
casion read an essay at the Divinity School
which attracted the favoring judgment of
this Agamemnon among the students, and
into his room one night at 11.30 o'clock
walked the Rev. Phillips Brooks, demanding
without further parley or comment, but in
an imperious and commanding way which
was always his own distinctly effective way,
that the essay in question should be forth-
with immediately read.

The student in question, after vainly de-

______ 45



MEMORABILIA.



murring and apologizing and explaining the
matter, saw his big visitor settle himself
down with a pipe to listen, his big eyes
ogling the shy student out of a week's re-
pose of mind, as he remarked : " Come,
come now, it's late, go on, let me hear it, and
remember I want to hear it not because
Forbes believes in you fellows, but because
you fellows believe so tremendously in
Forbes. I always like men who believe ter-
ribly in other men."




MEMORABILIA.



PHILADELPHIA DIVINITY SCHOOL.

The origin of the Philadelphia Divinity
School is like the sources of the Nile, and
the beginning of all history, shrouded in
myth and fable. There were men who grad-
uated from this school before it was a school,
and before the classes came into regular and
apostolical succession, but they were like the
men who lived before the flood or like the
kings who reigned before the Pharaohs, or
like the dragons of the period who lived be-
fore the gate was hung on its hinges in
Eden. Their record on the page of history
is precarious and uncertain. These aborigi-
nal gentlemen of the early miocene period
of the Divinity School used to meet in the
basement of St. Luke's Church, where they
were instructed by the early Professors of
that rising institution. Dr. Howe, then



MEMORABILIA.



rector of the Church ; Dr. May, who was
imported from Virginia to be the main
spring of this new enterprise ; Dr. Stone,
who was translated from Massachusetts to be
the lecturer on evangelical theology; Dr.
Vaughn, who was the George Herbert type
of character, himself the lecturer and
the model of what was termed "pastoral
care," and Dr. Van Pelt whose title was the
familiar one which in Hebrew means
"teacher," together with Dr. Hare whose
work at the Episcopal Academy was then
over, were the early instructors of this
dawning school of the prophets. The hands
of that great organizer, Bishop Alonzo Pot-
ter, were seen under this institution, but it
had to begin somewhere without money and
without price, without the interest of the
rich or the favor of those high in church
affairs. So it began in the basement of St.
Luke's Church, in Philadelphia, and the path
48



MEMORABILIA.



which led to it was like the path the poet
Watt describes in his psalms in metre :

" But wisdom shows a narrow path,
With here and there a traveller."

But there came a day when to airy noth-
ingness there was given a local habitation
and a name, and in the early years of the
sixties, or just when the civil war was dawn-
ing, the Alibone mansion at Thirty-ninth and
Walnut Streets, in West Philadelphia, with
its large house and stable, received this
migratory school of the prophets journeying
westward according to Bishop Berkeley's
prophetic advice, and there the school be-
came a great power, and rested for a score
of years until the present edifice with its
spacious halls and chapel was erected.

John Irving Forbes was the great charac-
ter of those days to all who knew him, and
in many ways the most original and striking

49



MEMORABILIA.



personality that the Philadelphia Divinity
School ever produced. He died in 1871,
three years after his graduation.

Forbes fairly made the men who clustered
round him over again. He turned them in-
side out as the skilled farmer turns over to
the sunlight, the damp wet hay. He dragged
men out of their inner selves : taught them
to think, and thrilled them with his own
masterful leadership, and was a perfect Soc-
rates to an admiring group who lived upon
his bold and fearless ventures into the abyss
of the unknown. Himself a mystic, an old
Catholic, and a thorough-going Mauricean,
the men who were about him were as clay in
the hands of the potter. In those days he
was in constant communication with Mau-
rice, and used to read from time to
time the wonderful letters sent to him by
the great preacher and philosopher of Lin-
coln Inn's Fields. He was always in debate

5



MEMORABILIA.



with the professors, always respectful and
reverential in manner, and always conserva-
tive in expression and profoundly radical in
thought.

It was his interesting leadership at the
Philadelphia Divinity School which so at-
tracted the mind of the young preacher of
Philadelphia to this group of willing eager
disciples.

At the time of the ordination of these
men, together with a venerable pastor of one
of the city churches, the graduating class
from the Philadelphia Divinity School (which
was ordained in the year 1 868) found them-
selves invited to a breakfast the day before
their ordination at the celebrated Augustin's
Restaurant in Philadelphia, where these
embryo young clergymen were made the
guests of their friend, the Rector of the
Church of the Holy Trinity.

During these days, and for the few years



MEMORABILIA.



following, one by one this group melted
away into the natural condition of married
life. As one of these young men ap-
peared for the sixth time at the chancel rail
of the Church of the Holy Trinity in the
capacity of groomsman, to meet the brides-


1 3

Online LibraryOld friendThe child and the Bishop : together with certain memorabilia of the Rt. Rev. Phillips Brooks late bishop of the Diocese of Massachusetts → online text (page 1 of 3)