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Oliver N Bacon.

A history of Natick, from its first settlement in 1651 to the present time; with notices of the first white families, and also an account of the centennial celebration, Oct. 16, 1851, Rev. Mr. Hunt's address at the consecration of Dell Park cemetery, &c. .. (Volume 2) online

. (page 1 of 22)
Online LibraryOliver N BaconA history of Natick, from its first settlement in 1651 to the present time; with notices of the first white families, and also an account of the centennial celebration, Oct. 16, 1851, Rev. Mr. Hunt's address at the consecration of Dell Park cemetery, &c. .. (Volume 2) → online text (page 1 of 22)
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FIRST COK®ATIOm MEETING-HOUSE JM'ICK.



HISTORY OF NATICK,



FIRST SETTLEMENT IN 1651



PRESENT TIME;



NOTICES OF THE FIRST WHITE FAMILIES,



AND ALSO AN ACCOUNT OF THE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, OCT. 16,

1851, REV. MR. HUNT'S ADDRESS AT THE CONSECRATION

OF DELL PARK CEMETERY, &c., &c., &c.



BY OLIVER N. BACON,

ATTORNB'Y AT LAW.



BOSTON.

DAMKELL & MOO HE, P111NTE118

16 Devonshire Street.

18 5 6.






Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1855,

By OLIVER N. BACON,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

^^ ^ I to



t ^ i c u t i a u



TO THE

YOUNG MEN OF NATICK,

WHO AVrSH TO HAVE A CORRECT KNOWLEDGE OF THE HISTOPa'

OF THE TOWN ; TO BECOME ACQUAINTED WITH,

AND CHERISH THE VIRTUES OF.

THE FATHERS OP THIS "PLACE OF HILLS,"

IS DEDICATED, WITH ARDENT WISHES FOR THEIR HAPPINESS
AND PROSPERITY,



BY



One OP THEIR NUMBER



PREFACE.



At the close of the labor of compiling this volume, and as it is submitted
to the perusal of its patrons, the author would beg their indulgence in a few
words by way of explanation of the inducements which led him to undertake
the work.

It was not from any confidence he had in his own ability over many of his
fellow-townsmen, but all who had given any attention at all to the sub-
ject, with the exception of one who was abroad, were earnest in persuad-
ing him to undertake what they had either relinquished or indefinitely
postponed.

He felt exceedingly desirous that a history of the last thirty years,
the most eventful of any similar period in the history of the town, should
be blended with that of events in her earlier years, published and un-
published, and all presented in a connected form to the public, that the
antiquarian and the annalist, and more particularly the people of the town,
might have an opportunity of reading it without the labor of searching
it out in its original resting-places.

He saw, or thought he saw, a probability that much valuable history
would be soon lost, unless it was arranged and published and in multi-
plied copies placed in more secure receptacles than the drawers or attics
of the actors in the events, or their descendants.

In short, it has been his desire to fui-nish each family with an accurate
account of every event of importance and interest which has taken place
in their own town since its settlement, and to place it beyond the reach
of such accidents as a short time since destroyed the records of a neigh-
boring town.

He has endeavored to state facts accurately, and on the very best au-
thority ; to give no statistics but such as were reliable, and to guard with
care against the introduction of errors into his work.

To all who have aided him in the work, to [the Secretary of the



4 PREFACE.

Commonwealth, the Librarian of the Massachusetts Historical Society, and
his friend Lyman Mason, Esq., of Boston, he would tender his grateful
acknowledgments. lie is under especial obligation to Prof. Calvin,
E. Stowe, of Andover Theological Seminary, and Rev. Samuel Hunt, of
Franklin, Mass., for the use of manuscripts, as well as other important
assistance.

If the volume shall answer the end for. which it was intended, if it
shall prove at once an accurate and impartial history of the town, the
highest hopes of the author will be realized.

O. N. B.



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

General Description. Name and Signification. Manner of obtaining Tosses-

Original Boundaries. Construction of the Pirst A lUagc.



sion.



CHAPTER II.
Sketch of the Life of Eliot. Birth. Coming to New England. Settled as Tead^er
' at Koxbury. Journey in search of a place to locate an Indian To- Eh^t

at Natick Care of the Indians. Petitions to General Court m their behali.
LeUer of the Indians to Eliot while in England. His Translation of theBjble
Purine of a copy by the Town. Bev. Mr. Hunt's Address. Incidents xn
the Life of Eliot. Anecdotes. Son settled at Newton.

CHAPTER III.

Monument, jaisiontdi ALt-m^. ^ -nr^i,-,,, Auppdntos

ical Notice of Dea. Ephraim, Sassamon, Takawampait, Waban. Anecdotes
of Indians. Bi-Centennial Celebration.

CHAPTER IV.

"he D cll^tlot Independence. Muster Boll or .l.e NaUe. Company
iBlkor Hill. Proprietors of Town in 1719, 1782 and m 1800.

CHAPTER V.
Beclciastieal llis.ry. Tlte "^'^^^;;:jX;^,,^^in::^-
tZl'^^rX^O^ 5:. plod. Eio/apLieal Notice
:f Rev. Stephen Badger. Fom.atio„ of hi. Cl,ureh. Its Bissolut.on. Pub-

lications of Mr. Badger.

CHAPTER VI.

Controversy as to the Location of a Meeting-House. First Meeting-House. His-
Controversy Settlement of Kev. Freeman Sears, ^isto s

2ils lL of persons who have held the office of Deacon. B.ogra u
cal Notice of Mr. Sears. Fourth of July Celebration in 1809. Mr. bear, s
Oration. Sickness and Death.

CHAPTER Vir.
Settlement of Bev. Martin Moore. Some account of his Ministry. Dismission
Subsequent Life. His Published Works.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER VIII.
Settlement of Rev. Erasmus D.Moore. Dismission. Notice of Rev Samuel
^n. "^^^^r-^'- — - Element ^^^^^

CHAPTER IX.
°'"S:-:, ^^'"■" ^■°°^-'-»' CKu.., „e..o... Ep.eo.

CHAPTER X.
Natuol Hist„,y. Cli^a.c. Geology. Botany. Po„d„ Rivers, Brooks, Fbh.

CHAPTER XI.

""trBS^ro^'w"-''"''*' »"■«»•*. I'ost Offices, Public Build-.
Rev M, Hum. ^™=="''«»'> of Dell Park Cemeter;.. Address of

CHAPTER XII.

'*"'»"::' n»%/';?''^"'* °''^''"'*- I""!"'!"- each decennial re-riod
Since 1/90. Population in 1763 in 177fi in i777 t i ^ r„

Education, California Emigration ' '^'' '"'"■^'^°°' ^''^"^^^°"'

CHAPTER XIII.
OiEcial History. To.vn Officers. List of Select Men. Town Clerks Rp.,.
sentatxves. Attozixeys at Law. Physicians. ^'P''-

CHAPTER XIV.
Bio,^pM^,N„U„e of College Graduates and other indrviduals belonging to

CHAPTER XV.
Employment of the People. Agriculture. Manufactvzre of Shoes.

CHAPTER XVI.
""tS^NatfcrrJTT'r"""- ^''^"'e Association. Lyceums. Li-

ri:^.r^n\fs::ie^nLer"'°"' "'""■• '""*"" ''"'°' '-*''■

APPENDIX.

Cherokee ip"ab« I.^ ^'l"",'"'' ^""'"'^ » Natick, Formation of
Suicides. MLder, ]Se p . , """ ^"'" I-"™»'- Accidents,
nesting WhSinS';;oin-f;TNa«ci':''™ "°""=- ^°'''°"'- '""



HISTORY OF NATICK.



CHAPTER I.

General Descriptiox. Name and Signification. First Settlement.
Manner of obtaining Possession. Original Boundaries. Construc-
tion OF THE First Village.

Natick is situated in the south part of Middlesex County, on the
line of the Boston and Worcester Railroad, sixteen miles from the
former and twentj-four from the latter city. Cambridge Court-
House is sixteen miles to the east, and Concord twelve to the north
of it. By a survey for a map of Massachusetts, under the superin-
tendence of Simeon Borden, Esq., the latitude of the spire of the
Orthodox meeting-house is ascertained to be 42° 17' 68" .17. Its
longitude, 70° 21' 09" .45.

Like most of the towns of Massachusetts, it is very irregular m its
boundaries. Its lines seem more ambitious of reaching the tops of the
neighboring hills and the depths of the valleys, than of surrounding a
symmetrical territory. It has a triangular shape, lying between the
towns of Framingham and Needham on the west and east, Sher-
born and Wayland on the south and north ; Dover touches it at
the south-east, and Weston at the north-east corners. It has more
diversity of scenery in hills, valleys and plains, than most of the
surrounding country, as is apparent not only by its appearance from
commanding elevations, but by the name apphed to it by the Indians,
" Natick, a Place of Hills." With unerring sagacity, the red man's
eye caught the distinguishing features of each place it rested on, of
each river by whose banks he roamed, and apphed to it for a name
that word of his own language most descriptive of its pecuharities.
" Massachusetts— the Blue Hills ; " " Nonantum— Rejoicing," a hill
in Newton ; " Musketaquid"— Indian name of Concord, signifying
Grassy Brook. When we see its slow serpentine river, lying in the
lap of banks of the deepest verdure, we see how full of meaning is the



Q

° HISTORY or NATICK.



Cr/ZoL" '° "' "^™''^^ inheritance
right hat he and all his iindred should solemnly give up their

inteies nght, and possession of the town of Natiek. They wore all
vei7.-ll."gsot„do, and therefere on a lecture-day, solemnly and
Sred ' (fn ' Y ""' "" *^ "^°P'^' J"''" Sp'een and all Wa
inttest' S\,'"' r'1'^ S"-» '^™?»" «r ■igl.t and
ml ek unt tt fr 7"''^ ''"* '" *^ '^■"' ™ "■>* about
< nrlv ' T 1- f " '"'"■''" "f ""^ *""» of Natiek, that so the
praying Ind.ans might make a town, and they receiv; nothin. „

Fon::r:i'r '"'^;T' T ""■'• ^^■^•^'■^* ^'™'' t^eyhadformeS;ut
^or lands, they would only take up lots, as others did, by the public

order a,id agreement of the town, and at the same time they re eiv d
a gratuity unto their good contentment " ^

. ^r" '1;° '^^'"S^""' »f Natiek to the praying Indians the bounda

in th tc ","';:?' "T "^S - Its original boundaries my be found

received of it o'tent ' A , t 1 T*'- " '"™^' "'^•■' "^'^ "^^
Sherborn moetint ouse a,fd Ccl f '"■"'"!^' ""'^ '^"S t^'-™
It extended sont'b T n , ^ '' '"'" '""'»''"


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

Online LibraryOliver N BaconA history of Natick, from its first settlement in 1651 to the present time; with notices of the first white families, and also an account of the centennial celebration, Oct. 16, 1851, Rev. Mr. Hunt's address at the consecration of Dell Park cemetery, &c. .. (Volume 2) → online text (page 1 of 22)