Copyright
Oliver Optic.

Palace and cottage; or, Young America in France and Switzerland. A story of travel and adventure online

. (page 1 of 22)
Online LibraryOliver OpticPalace and cottage; or, Young America in France and Switzerland. A story of travel and adventure → online text (page 1 of 22)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES



3 3433 08252958 1











EJVEWTORF~I N












THE NEW YORK
PUBI <ARY





DATION8






PALACE AND COTTAGE ;






h






OR,



YOUNG AMERICA IN FRANCE AND

SWITZERLAND.



A STORY OF TRAVEL AND ADVENTURE.



BY



OLIVER OPTIC.



4,






i >



' i - i .



BOSTON:



LEE AND SHEPARD.

(.' j
(/



1869.



":' *

' *
*



THE NEW YORK

PUBLIC LIBRARY

9422504

ASTOR. LENOX AND

TiLDEN FOUNDATIONS

R 1936 L



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868, by

WILLIAM T. ADAMS,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.



-



ELECTROTYPED AT THE

Boston Stereotype Foundry,
No. 19 Spring Lane.









TO MY YOUNG FRIEND,

WALTER L. PALMER

THIS VOLUME
is

AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED.



/



YOUNG AMERICA ABROAD.

BY OLIVER OPTIC.

A Library of Travel and Adventure in Foreign Lands. First
and Second Series ; six volumes in each Series. i6mo.
Illustrated.

First Series.

I. OUTWARD BOUND; OR, YOUNG AMERICA AFLOAT.

II. SHAMROCK AND THISTLE; OR, YOUNG AMERICA

IN IRELAND AND SCOTLAND.

III. RED CROSS; OR, YOUNG AMERICA IN ENGLAND AND

WALES.

IV. DIKES AND DITCHES; OR, YOUNG AMERICA IN

HOLLAND AND BELGIUM.
V. PALACE AND COTTAGE; OR, YOUNG AMERICA

IN FRANCE AND SWITZERLAND.

VI. DOWN THE RHINE; OR, YOUNG AMERICA IN
GERMANY.

Second Series.

I. UP THE BAL TIC ; OR, YOUNG AMERICA IN DENMARK
AND SWEDEN.

II. NORTHERN LANDS; OR, YOUNG AMERICA IN

PRUSSIA AND RUSSIA.

III. VINE AND OLIVE; OR, YOUNG AMERICA IN SPAIN

AND PORTUGAL.

IV. SUN NT SHORES; OR, YOUNG AMERICA IN ITALY

AND AUSTRIA.
V. CROSS AND CRESCENT ; OR, YOUNG AMERICA

IN GREECE AND TURKEY.

VI. ISLES OF THE SEA ; OR, YOUNG AMERICA HOME-
WARD BOUND.



PREFACE



PALACE AND COTTAGE, the fifth of the " YOUNG AMERICA
ABROAD " series, is a further continuation of the history of
the Academy Squadron in the waters of France, with the
journey of the students to Paris, and through a portion of
Switzerland. Like the volumes of the series which have
preceded it, the book contains an outline-sketch of the his-
tory of each of the countries visited, a brief statement of its
principal geographical features, a description of its form of
government, and the note-worthy peculiarities of its manners
and customs. As " Paris is France," the greater portion of
the time of the young tourists was devoted to sight-seeing in
the gay capital, though Havre, Rouen, Dijon, Macon, Lyons,
Strasbourg, Chamouni, and Mont Blanc were visited. The
tour in Switzerland included several of the lakes Geneva,
Lausanne, Montreux, Martigny, Sion, the Simplon, Altorf,
Luzerne, Interlaken, Thun, Berne, and Basle. None of these
places are minutely described, only their peculiar features
being mentioned. So far as the work claims to be descriptive
and historical, the greatest care has been taken to secure
entire accuracy.

The story of the runaway cruise of the Josephine occu-
pies a considerable portion of the volume ; and if it incul-

(5)



6 PREFACE.

cates in another form the trite but never worn-out moral, that
" the way of the transgressor is hard," and the moral episode
that it is unsafe to " fight the devil with his own weapons,''
it will only accomplish what the writer intended.

The first series of YOUNG AMERICA ABROAD, of which the
present volume is the last but one, has been received with a
degree of favor so far beyond the author's expectations that
he is encouraged to persevere in his original purpose of
including all the countries of Europe in his plan; though
for the present it is more than ever incumbent upon him to
acknowledge his sense of grateful obligation for the kind-
ness of his young friends, as well as of their parents and
guardians, and the conductors of the press, for the generous
welcome and the unexpected favor accorded to these volumes.

HARRISON SQUARE, MASS.,
November 23, 1868.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER PAGE

I. WHISTLING FOR A BREEZE. . . . .11

II. THE BURNING STEAMER 27

III. THE RESCUED PASSENGERS. .... 43

IV. LANDING THE SURVIVORS 59

V. THE BAG OF GOLD 75

VI. THE LITTLE VILLAIN 92

VII. CABIN AND CROSSTREES 108

VIII. SOMETHING ABOUT THE GEOGRAPHY AND INSTI-
TUTIONS OF FRANCE. . . . . -125

IX. AN EPITOME OF THE HISTORY OF FRANCE. . 142
X. THE KNIGHTS or THE GOLDEN FLEECE AT

WORK. ........ 166

XL THE CAPTURE OF THE JOSEPHINE. . . . 183

XII. A FEW HOURS IN ROUEN 200

XIII. THE KNIGHTS AT SEA. 217

XIV. PALACES IN PARIS 235

(7)



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE

XV. RIDES AND WALKS ABOUT PARIS. . . . 252

XVI. THE EXCHEQUER OF THE RUNAWAYS. . . 270

XVII. THE PRESENTATION AT COURT. . . . 288

XVIII. THE WAY OF THE TRANSGRESSORS. . . 308

XIX. A VISIT TO CHAMOUNI AND MONT BLANC. . 319

XX. A RUN THROUGH SWITZERLAND. . . . 334



PALACE AND COTTAGE,

(9)



PALACE AND COTTAGE;

OR,

YOUNG AMERICA IN FRANCE AND
SWITZERLAND.




CHAPTER I.

WHISTLING FOR A BREEZE.

is lazy work," said Captain Paul Kendall,
of the Josephine, to the vice-principal, as he
paced the deck rather impatiently for a young man in
his dignified position.

" Yes ; but it will be lazier than this before it is any
livelier," replied Mr. Fluxion.

"I'm afraid we shall not see Havre to-morrow,"
added the young commander.

" Probably not ; for if I am not mistaken in the
indications, we shall have a head wind before night."

" Well, I would rather beat dead to windward all
night than roll about in one of these stupid calms,"
added the captain. " I hate calms."

" So does every genuine salt-water sailor ; but we
have no influence with the clerk of the weather, and
we must take things as they come calm as well as

storm."

(ID



12 PALACE AND COTTAGE, OR



..



I suppose we must," yawned Captain Kendall, as
the topsails began to shake for the want of a breeze
to fill them.

" By the way, captain, don't you think it's rather
undignified for a commander to complain or grumble
at the weather ? '

" I know it is ; but I never grumble at anything but
calms."

"Do you expect to grumble up a breeze, Paul?"

" Of course not. The rule is, to whistle for a
breeze."

" Then follow the rule."

" But I don't believe in it.

" Don't believe in whistling for a breeze ! ' ex-
claimed the vice-principal, laughing, and with appar-
ent astonishment.

" I certainly do not," replied Paul ; " though I
remember being out with an ancient skipper at
Brockway, who, when the wind died out, as we
were going through a narrow place against the tide,
began to whistle as though the safety of his venera-
ble craft depended upon the vigor of his piping."

"Didn't the wind come?' ; asked Mr. Fluxion.

" I believe it did, after we had drifted back half a
mile," laughed Paul.

" Exactly so. The breeze came ; that is all I want
to prove. If you only whistle long enough, 'tis sure
to bring the wind."

"But what has the whistling to do with it?" de-
manded Paul.

" I don't know ; I can't explain the meteorological
process by which the wind is started ; I only know



u

tl



YOUNG AMERICA IN FRANCE AND SWITZERLAND. 13

that, if you keep whistling, a breeze is sure to come,
sooner or later. I never knew it to fail," added Mr.
Fluxion, seriously.

u Shall I set the watch on deck to whistling:, sir?'*

O '

asked Paul.

44 If you please. You command this vessel," an-
swered the vice-principal, gravely.

44 Do you really think, sir, that we can whistle up
a breeze?"

44 Do you really think you can grumble up a breeze?"
No, sir ; I do not pretend that I can."
I only mean to say that if you whistle long enough,
a breeze will come ; and it is a great deal better to
spend the time in whistling than in grumbling."

4i I think I will not grumble any more, sir," said
Paul, accepting the good-natured rebuke as kindly as
it was given.

44 Better whistle."

44 But sailors are proverbial grumblers, Mr. Fluxion."

44 Old sailors before the mast have a constitutional
right to grumble ; but it does not become an officer,"
replied the vice-principal, as he went back to the steer-
age to attend to his classes, which he had left for a
few moments at recess.

Paul Kendall was full of life and spirit. He was
impatient of delay, and had the American anxiety
ever to be going ahead, even when he was in no
hurry to reach his destination. The breeze certainly
did not come for his grumbling ; on the contrary, it
died out entirely, and the Josephine rose and fell idly
on the long swells, her sails flapping and beating as
if they too were growling at the inactivity to which
the vessel was doomed.



14 PALACE AND COTTAGE, OR

The Young America and her consort had sailed
from Rotterdam that morning, and the squadron was
bound to Havre, where the students were to be intro-
duced to French life and manners. As boys, they
were naturally impatient for something new. Paris,
" the city of luxury," had a thousand attractions to
them, and the libraries of the two vessels had been
thoroughly ransacked for information, and especially
for pictures, relating to France and its gay capital.
Mr. Lowington, the principal, had always kept the
students well supplied with newspapers, and especially
with the pictorials, the latter of which, instructing
through the e} T e,, he deemed exceedingly valuable as
educational agencies. In the bound volumes of the
magazines and weekly illustrated papers were pic-
tures of the streets, public buildings, parks, and peo-
ple of Paris and other cities of Europe. These vol-
umes had been in great demand since the ship sailed
from Brockway, and some of the students declared,
when they visited Paris, that its palaces and parks
seemed as familiar as though they had often seen
them before.

Paul was impatient, and though he was able to
refrain from manifesting his feeling, it was not so
easy to banish it from his mind. He walked the
deck uneasily ; but the vessel was making no prog-
ress, and it was impossible for him to be satisfied.
He went below, sat for a while in his state-room,
reading the letters he had last received. This occu-
pation consoled him for half an hour, especially as
he had a letter from Miss Grace Arbuckle, who was
still with her friends in the vicinity of London, but



YOUNG AMERICA IN FRANCE AND SWITZERLAND. 15

who wrote that the family would soon start for the
continent, and would be in Paris early in September.
The young commander read the letter several times,
but even its perusal did not seem wholly to satisfy him.
The Josephine lay idly upon the waters of the Ger-
man Ocean. Possibly he was afraid the delay would
prevent him from reaching Paris in time to see his
fair friend.

He went on deck. The Young America, as help-
less as her consort, lay rolling on the long billows,
less than half a mile distant. Paul voted that the
calm was intensely stupid ; and at last he found it so
difficult to restrain the expression of his impatience,
that he ordered the officer of the deck to call the watch,
and set them to whistling for a breeze. Of course it
was regarded as a merry joke on the part of the com-
mander, and all hands gathered in the waist to exe-
cute the order. There was a noted whistler among
the crew, who led them in Yankee Doodle.

" Do you expect to raise a breeze in this way, Cap-
tain Kendall?" asked Henry Martyn, the second lieu-
tenant, who was on duty.

" Mr. Fluxion says it is better to whistle than to
grumble," replied Paul ; " and I have adopted his
suggestion. He is sure that if we only whistle long
enough, the breeze will come."

" No doubt of it," laughed Henry. " But I suppose
the same result would follow if we grumbled long
enough, and would be just as effectual as the other in
stirring up the elements."

"Whether the whistling brings a breeze or not, it
has a tendency to keep us good-natured," added Paul,



l6 PALACE AND COTTAGE, OR

" That music is not so bad. I'm not sure that we
can't beat the Young America's band."

The effect was, as the captain declared, quite pleas-
ing. The boys whistled well, and there was no little
music in their piping. It certainly soothed the rest-
lessness of the impatient tars, and actually proved to
be a new sensation. It was voted that Ben Duncan,
who led the exercise, should be the " chief whistler "
of the ship's company. At eight bells in the after-
noon, the watch was changed ; but the whistling was
diligently kept up, though not with such a pleasing
effect, on account of the absence from the deck of the
" chief w T histler." Unfortunately the breeze was very
obstinate, and would not come even for all the in-
dustrious wooing which was bestowed upon it. The
starboard watch whistled, and the port watch whistled.
The sun went down ; the exercises of the school-room
were ended, and both watches whistled in concert,
till such a \vhistling was never heard before ; but the
wind heeded it not yet.

" Whistling seems to do no good," said Terrill, the
first lieutenant.

" We have not whistled long enough," replied
Captain Kendall, laughing.

" We have kept it up for about four hours, I be-
lieve," added the first lieutenant.

" We may have to keep it up four hours more ; but
Mr. Fluxion says the wind is sure to come, if we
whistle long enough."

Ben Duncan had changed the tune from " Yankee
Doodle" to "Hail, Columbia;' 3 which, however, did
not seem to produce any better effect upon Old Bo-



YOUNG AMERICA IN FRANCE AND SWITZERLAND, ij

reas, for he still held out against all these earnest
adjurations. But the boys enjoyed the exercise, and
Ben led his piping orchestra through several of the
popular airs of the day. Mr. Fluxion and^Mr. Stoute
listened to the concert with genuine pleasure.

" As playing cards may lead to gambling, I am
afraid this sport will lead to pernicious practices,"
said Professor Stoute. "When I hear a boy whistling
in the house, or in a public conveyance, I always con-
clude that his education has been neglected."

" I agree with you ; but as a boy is taught to take
off his hat when he enters a parlor, so should he be
required to leave his whistle out doors. We will have
no whistling in the cabin or steerage."

"It's coming!' 1 exclaimed Captain Kendall, who,
as a prudent seaman, cast frequent glances at the sea
and the sky. "There's a ripple at the southward."

" I knew it would come, if you only whistled long
enough," replied the vice-principal. " I never knew
it to fail."

"It's coming from the south-west dead ahead,"
added the captain. " Mr. Terrill, brace her sharp up,
with her starboard tacks aboard."

" Man the sheets and braces ! ' shouted the first
lieutenant.

" All ready, sir," called the officers of the watch
from their stations.

" Haul on the jib-sheet ! Haul on the main-sheet !
Port the helm, quartermaster ! >:

" Port, sir," replied the petty officer in charge of
the wheel.

" That will do. Belay, all ! " added Terrill, when

3



1 8 PALACE AND COTTAGE, OR

the jib and mainsail had been hauled as flat as the
course required?

These two sails caught the gentle breeze, and the
Josephine began to ripple slowly through the water.

" Slack the weather-braces, and haul on the lee-
braces ! " continued the executive officer. " Haul in
the fore-sheet ! A pull on the flying-jib-sheet ! '

The officers at their stations repeated the orders,
each to the hands in his charge, as it related to his
duty.

" Belay, all ! ' called Terrill, when the sails indi-
cated were flat enough to draw.

" So much for whistling," said Paul, gayly, for the
breeze seemed to bring a new vitality to his frame.

u I am glad you acknowledge the efficiency of the
means, Captain Kendall."

" I am willing to grant that it is better to whistle
than to grumble, especially when the fellows whistle
as well as ours do."

" But I am afraid you have overdone the matter,"
added the vice-principal, as a smart flaw suddenly
careened the vessel till the water bubbled up through
her scupper-holes.

" I hope not," replied Paul. " The night is clear."

" These south-west winds are very unsteady ; and
you may have whistled up more wind than we
want."

"We can take care of it, if we have," laughed
Paul. " The Josephine is good against almost any
south-west flaw, after she gets her bearings. I don't
see any signs of bad weather, sir," added Paul, more
anxiously.



YOUNG AMERICA IN FRANCE AND SWITZERLAND. 19

" No ; I don't think we shall see any very heavy
weather to-night ; but it may blow pretty hard before
morning," replied Mr. Fluxion.

The wind freshened very rapidly, and the whistling
appeared to have done its perfect work. As the vice-
principal suggested, the wooing of the breeze appeared
to have been overdone, for it was soon necessary to
take in the foretop gallant-sail, and a little later the
main-gaff-topsail, for the Josephine almost buried her-
self in the billows. Thus relieved, she sped through
the water at the rate of ten knots an hour. Then to
avoid running away from the Young America, whose
best point in sailing was not upon the wind, it became
necessary to lower the foresail, and take in the flying-
jib. Under this easy sail she went along very comfort-
ably. At ten o'clock, Paul went below, and turned
in. Having a good conscience, and no immediate
hope of seeing Miss Grace Arbuckle, he dropped
asleep without any needless delay.

At eight bells, or midnight, the starboard watch was

O ^

relieved, and the first lieutenant reported to the cap-
tain that the Young America was three miles ahead.

" Direct Mr. Humphreys to set the foresail," said
he, turning over, and going to sleep again ; for these
interruptions were so frequent that they hardly dis-
turbed him.

The wind was still fresh and flawy, and under the
additional sail, the Josephine often reeled over until one
unaccustomed to such accommodations might have
found a good excuse for rolling out of the berth on

o j

the floor. Of course Captain Paul Kendall was too
dignified to do such an absurd thing ; and the uneasy



2C PALACE AND COTTAGE, OR

motion of the schooner, as she rolled and pitched,
head to the sea, did not even awake him from his
peaceful slumbers.

At six bells in the morning there was a lively ex-
citement among the quarter watch in charge of the
vessel. Martyn, the second lieutenant, and Pelham,
the second master, who had the deck, held a consulta-
tion together, while the hands on duty climbed upon
the bulwarks, and gazed eagerly at the object which
had attracted their attention. It was a bright light to
the north-west of the vessel, which had just flamed
up with startling brilliancy.

"What is it?' asked Pelham, anxiously.

" I don't know. \Yould you report it to the cap-
tain?'' replied Martyn.

" I should do so, if I were in your place. I think
it must be a vessel on fire. I can't think of anything
else which would make such a lisrht."

^j

" You may inform the captain, if you please," add-
ed .Martyn, as he raised his spy-glass to examine
more carefully the bright light.

Pelham went down into the cabin, and knocked at
the door of the captain's state-room.

" Come in ! ' replied Paul ; and Pelham entered.

" We have just discovered a bright light bearing
north-west ; and Mr. Martyn directed me to report to
you, sir," said Pelham. .

"What is it?"

" I don't know, sir ; but I think it is a vessel on
fire."

Paul jumped out of his berth.

"Where is the ship?' he asked.



YOUNG AMERICA IN FRANCE AND SWITZERLAND. 21

" She is about two miles to the ieeward of us. We
have been beating her- two to one for the last three
hours."

" I will be on deck in a moment," replied Paul, as
he began very hastily to dress himself.

"Shall we change her course?' 1

" No ; but call the first part of the port watch."

Pelham went on deck, where Paul soon appeared.

" How long since you discovered the light, Mr.
Martyn?' ; he asked of the officer of the deck.

u Only a minute or two before I reported to you."

" Put her head for the light."

" Stand by sheets and braces ! ' called the second
lieutenant.

"'All ready, sir."

" Ease off the fore and main-sheets ! Let out the
jib-sheet ! ' continued the officer of the deck.

" Set the foretop-sail ! " added the captain, after he
had examined the light, which was at least ten miles
distant.

Having the wind free now, the Josephine began to
tear through the water at a rate highly creditable to
her reputation as a fast sailer. The fore-topsail was
shaken out, sheeted home, and hoisted up. But even
then, Paul was not satisfied, and ordered the fore-top-
gallant-sail and main-gaff-topsail to be set. He felt
that he w r as justified in crowding on all her spars
would bear, and even in risking the lighter ones, for
a fire at sea is one of the most terrible of calamities.
At that moment, scores of men, women, and children
might be struggling for life with the rude waves, and
the existence of a score who could endure for another



22 PALACE AND COTTAGE, OR

hour might depend upon the brief moments he should
gain by pressing the vessel.

For half an hour the Josephine sped furiously on
her errand of mercy. The Young America had also
crowded on all sail, and was bearing down upon the
burning vessel. The consort outstripped her in speed
under her heavy press of canvas. Hardly ten minutes
had elapsed since the light was discovered, and from
a little flame, " no bigger than a man's hand," it had
now become a broad sheet of glaring fire. The
waters were illuminated for miles around, and the
scene, terrible as it was, had an element of sublimity
which filled the ship's company with awe. In half
an hour, the Josephine had approached near enough
to enable the young commander to make out the burn-
ing vessel. She was a large steamer. Her smoke-
stack was still standing, and from it poured forth a
dense volume of smoke and flame. A closer scrutiny
assured him that her wheels were still working. The
fire had apparently broken out near the stern, and her
head had been turned up to the wind, so the flames
could be confined to that part of the vessel. It was.
evident that she was in the hands of a brave and skil-
ful man, who was doing all that human arm could for
the preservation of her passengers.

" There will be a terrible loss of life, I fear," said
Paul, with a shudder, to the first lieutenant.

u I saw a small vessel near her just now," replied
Ten-ill.

" So did I ; but she cannot do much. She is only
a fishing-boat. Where is Mr. Fluxion ? " asked Paul,
who had been so' little accustomed to rely upo-n others,



YOUNG AMERICA IN FRANCE AND SWITZERLAND. 23

that it had not yet occurred to him he had a superior
on board.

" He has not been on deck," replied Terrill. " I
suppose he does not know anything about it."

" Keep her steady as she is," added Paul, as he has-
tened below to the apartment of the professors, where
he knocked at the door.

" Who's there?" called Mr. Fluxion.

" Captain Kendall, sir," replied Paul. " I wish to
see you, sir."

u I will be out in a moment."

The captain sat down in the cabin to await the ap-
pearance of the vice-principal, who soon opened the
door of his room.

" What's the matter, Paul?" demanded Mr. Fuxion,
assured, by this unseasonable summons, that some un-
usual event had occurred.

" There's a steamer on fire within three miles of
us," replied Paul.

" On fire ! ' exclaimed Mr. Fuxion, startled by the
intelligence, for his long experience at sea enabled
him fully to appreciate the nature of the calamity.

u Yes, sir ; I was called more than half an hour



ago."



u
u



Why didn't you call me?'

I was so busy, sir, that I did not think of you," re-
plied Paul, honestly ; " but I have done everything I
could, and I hope I have done it right."

" No doubt you have. Do you make out the steam-
er?'' inquired the vice-principal, as he hurried on the
rest of his clothing.

t; She is a large steamer, and seems to be very well



24 PALACE AND COTTAGE, OR

handled. The fire is aft, and they keep her head up
to the wind."

" Is there any other vessel at hand?'

u The Young America is a couple of miles astern
of us, and I made out a small fishing-boat near the
burning vessel."

4U What's the matter?" demanded Professor Stoute.

" A steamer afire," replied Mr. Fluxion, as he has-
tened to the deck with Paul.

u I have crowded on all sail, and we were making
twelve knots just now, sir," said the captain. " Can I
do anvthing more?' 5

** o

" Nothing more can be done till we come up with
the burning vessel," replied the vice-principal, as he
anxiously surveyed the exciting scene.

A booming gun now broke upon the ears of the ap-


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

Online LibraryOliver OpticPalace and cottage; or, Young America in France and Switzerland. A story of travel and adventure → online text (page 1 of 22)