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Southern Branch
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University of California

Los Angeles

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This book is DUE on the last date stamped below



FEB 1 1 1924



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PEACE, POWER, AND PLENTY
BY ORISON SWETT MARDEN



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Innka bg (J^rtann ^m?tt Murhtn

HE CAN WHO THINKS HE CAN

i2mo, By mail ^i.io

EVERY MAN A KING; or, MIGHT
IN MIND MASTERY

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THE OPTIMISTIC LIFE

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SUCCESS UNDER DIFFICULTIES

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RISING IN THE WORLD; or,
ARCHITECTS OF FATE

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CHARACTER OPPORTUNITY

CHEERFULNESS IRON WILL

GOOD MANNERS ECONOMY

THE POWER OF PERSONALITY



SIAIENOUMM-SaOUL,
iios RHQSUBS, cam.





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Pl^tttg



BY



ORISON SWETT MARDEN

Author of

'Every Man a King," "Pushing to the Front," etc., and

Editor of "Success Magazine"



'* Your ideal is a prophecy of
what you shall at last unveil."



7^2,^-7



NEW YORK
THOMAS Y. CROWELL & CO.

PUBLISHERS



i J t t * 1 '



Copyright, 1909,
BY ORISON SWETT MARDEN



Published, January, 1909



Second Edition



c i t ' ' c ' ' < ' c ' ' '






TO

MY WIFE



/



PREFACE




EVER before in the history
of mankind has there been
such an awakening to the
great possibiHties of the
power of right thinking as
we are now witnessing in all
civilized countries.
Metaphysical schools are springing up under
different names in all parts of the enlightened
world. People are getting hold of little bits
of one great divine truth, a new gospel of
optimism and love, a philosophy of sweetness
and light, which seems destined to furnish
a universal principle upon which people of all
nations, of varying philosophies and creeds,
can unite for the betterment of the race.

The basic principle of this great metaphysi-
cal movement has opened up many possibilities
of mind building, character building, body
building, and success building which are des-
tined to bring untold blessings to the world.

We are all conscious that there is something
in us which is never sick, never sins, and never
dies, a power back of the flesh but not of it,
which connects us with Divinity, makes us one
with the Infinite Life.

vii



i«A






VIU



PREFACE



We are beginning to discover something of
the nature of this tremendous force back of
the flesh, this power which heals, regenerates,
rejuvenates, harmonizes, and upbuilds, and
which will ultimately bring us into that state
of blessedness which we instinctively feel is
the birthright of every human being.

To present in clear, simple language, shorn
of all technicalities, the principles of the new
philosophy which promises to lift life out of
commonness and discord and make it worth
while; to show how these principles may be
grasped and applied in a practical way in
every-day living to each person's own indi-
vidual case is the object of this volume.

There is a growing belief that " God never
made His work for man to mend," We are
just beginning to discover that the same Prin-
ciple which created us, repairs, restores, re-
news, heals us ; that the remedies for all our
ills are inside of us, in Divine Principle, which
is the truth of our being. We are learning that
there is an immortal principle of health in
every individual, which, if we could utilize,
would heal all our wounds and furnish a balm
for all the hurts of mankind.

The author attempts to show that the body
is but the mind externalized, the habitual men-



PREFACE



IX



tal state outpictured ; that the bodily condi-
tion follows the thought, and that we are
sick or well, happy or miserable, young or old,
lovable or unlovable, according to the degree
in which we control our mental processes.
He shows how man can renew his body by
renewing his thought, or change his body, his
character, by changing his thought.

The book teaches that man need not be the
victim of his environment, but can be the mas-
ter of it; that there is no fate outside of him
which determines his life, his aims; that each
person can shape his own environment, create
his own condition ; that the cure for poverty,
ill-health, and unhappiness lies in bringing
one's self through scientific thinking into con-
scious union with the great Source of Infinite
life, the Source of opulence, of health, and
harmony. This conscious union with the Cre-
ator, this getting in tune with the Infinite, is
the secret of all peace, power, and prosperity.

It emphasizes man's oneness with Infinite
Life, and the truth that when he comes into
the full realization of his inseparable con-
nection with the creative energy of the uni-
verse, he shall never know lack or want again.

This volume shows how man can stand por-
ter at the door of his mind, admitting only his



X PREFACE

friend thoughts, only those suggestions that
will produce joy, prosperity; and excluding
all his enemy thoughts which would bring dis-
cord, suffering, or failure.

It teaches that " your ideal is a prophecy of
what you shall at last unveil," that " thought
is another name for fate/' that we can think
ourselves out of discord into harmony, out of
disease into health, out of darkness into light,
out of hatred into love, out of poverty and
failure into prosperity and success.

Before a man can lift himself, he must lift
his thought. When we shall have learned to
master our thought habits, to keep our minds
open to the great divine inflow of life force,
we shall have learned the secret of human
blessedness. Then a new era will dawn for
the race.

O. S. M.

January, 1909.



PAGE



CONTENTS
CHAPTER I

THE POWER OF THE MIND TO COMPEL THE

BODY 3

CHAPTER n

POVERTY A MENTAL DISABILITY 1 7



CHAPTER HI

THE LAW OF OPULENCE



37



CHAPTER IV

CHARACTER-BUILDING AND HEALTH-BUILDING

DURING SLEEP 53

CHAPTER V

HEALTH THROUGH RIGHT THINKING 69

CHAPTER VI

MENTAL CHEMISTRY 87

CHAPTER VII

IMAGINATION AND HEALTH 105

CHAPTER VIII

HOW SUGGESTION INFLUENCES HEALTH II5

CHAPTER IX

WHY GROW OLD? I3I



xii CONTENTS

CHAPTER X I'AGE

y=THE MIRACLE OF SELF-CONFIDENCE 1 63

CHAPTER XI

AFFIRMATION AND AUDIBLE SUGGESTION 1 85 l**^

CHAPTER Xn

DESTRUCTIVE AND CONSTRUCTIVE SUGGESTION 207

CHAPTER Xni

WORRY THE DISEASE OF THE AGE 223

CHAPTER XIV

FEAR, THE CURSE OF THE RACE 239

CHAPTER XV

SELF-CONTROL VS. THE EXPLOSIVE PASSIONS 269

CHAPTER XVI

GOOD CHEER — GOD'S MEDICINE 287

CHAPTER XVII

THE SUN-DIAL'S MOTTO 303

CHAPTER XVIII

"as YE sow" 317



I. THE POWER OF THE MIND TO
COMPEL THE BODY



IsOS PiHC*2liBS, GFxlX.



I. THE POWER OF THE MIND TO
COMPEL THE BODY

Our destiny changes with our thought; we shall be-
come what we wish to become, do what we wish to
do, when our habitual thought corresponds with our
desire.

"The 'divinity that shapes our ends' is in ourselves;
it is our very self."

jONG before Henry Irving's
death, his physician cau-
tioned him against playing
his famous part in " The
Bells," on account of the
tremendous strain upon his
heart. Ellen Terry, his lead-
ing woman for many years, says in her
biography of him :

Every time he heard the sound of bells, the throbbing
of his heart must have nearly killed him. He used
always to turn quite white — there was no trick about it.
It was imagination acting physically on the body.

His death as Matthias — the death of a strong, robust
man — was different from all his other stage deaths.
He did really almost die — he hnagined death with such
horrible intensity. His eyes would disappear upward,
his face grow gray, his limbs cold.

No wonder, then, that the first time that the Wolver-
hampton doctor's warning was disregarded, and Henr>'




4 PEACE, POWER, AND PLENTY

played "The Bells" at Bradford, his heart could not
stand the strain. Within twenty-four hours of his last
death as "Matthias" he was dead.

As Becket on the following night — the
night of his death — his physicians said that
he was undoubtedly dying throughout the
entire performance. So buoyed up and stim-
ulated was he by his great zeal for his work
and the bracing influence of his audience that
he actually held death at bay.

It is a common experience for actors who
are ill to be cured for a time and to be entirely
forgetful of their aches and pains under the
stimulus of ambition and the brain-quicken-
ing influence of their audiences.

Edward H. Sothern says that he feels a
great increase of brain activity when he is on
the stage, and this is accompanied by a cor-
responding physical exhilaration. " The very
air I breathe," says Mr. Sothern, " seems more
stimulating. Fatigue leaves me at the stage
door; and I have often given performances
without any suffering when I should other-
wise have been under a doctor's care." Noted
orators, great preachers, and famous singers
have had similar experiences.

That " imperious must " which compels the



POWER OF THE MIND 5

actor to do his level best, whether he feels
like it or not, is a force which no ordinary
pain or physical disability can silence or over-
come. Somehow, even when we feel that it
is impossible for us to make the necessary
effort, when the crisis comes, when the emer-
gency is upon us, when we feel the prodding
of this imperative, imperious necessity, there
is a latent power within us which comes to
our rescue, which answers the call, and we
do the impossible.

It is an unusual thing for singers or actors
and actresses to be obliged to give up their
parts even for a night, but when they are off
duty, or on their vacations, they are much
more likely to be ill or indisposed. There is
a common saying among actors and singers
that they cannot afford to be sick.

" We don't get sick," said an actor, " be-
cause we can't afford that luxury. It is a
case of ' must ' with us ; and although there
have been times when, had I been at home,
or a private man, I could have taken to my
bed with as good a right to be sick as any
one ever had, I have not done so, and have
worn off the attack through sheer necessity.
It is no fiction that will-power is the best of
tonics, and theatrical people understand that



6 PEACE, POWER, AND PLENTY

they must keep a good stock of it always on
hand."

I know of an actor who suffered such tor-
tures with inflammatory rheumatism that even
with the aid of a cane he could not walk
two blocks, from his hotel to the theatre ; yet
when his cue was called, he not only walked
upon the stage with the utmost ease and
grace, but was also entirely oblivious of the
pain which a few moments before had made
him wretched. A stronger motive drove out
the lesser, made him utterly unconscious of
his trouble, and the pain for the time was
gone. It was not merely covered up by some
other thought, passion, or emotion, but it was
temporarily annihilated ; and as soon as the
play was over, and his part finished, he was
crippled again.

General Grant was suffering greatly from
rheumatism at Appomattox, but when a flag
of truce informed him that Lee was ready to
surrender, his great joy not only made him
forget his rheumatism but also drove it com-
pletely away — at least for some time.

The shock occasioned by the great San
Francisco earthquake cured a paralytic who
had been crippled for fifteen years. There
were a great many other wonderful cures



POWER OF THE MIND 7

reported which were almost instantaneous.
Men and women who had been practically in-
valids for a long time, and who were scarcely
able to wait upon themselves, when the crisis
came and they were confronted by this ter-
rible situation, worked like Trojans, carrying
their children and household goods long dis-
tances to places of safety.

We do not know what we can bear until
we are put to the test. Many a delicate
mother, who thought that she could not sur-
vive the death of her children, has lived to
bury her husband and the last one of a large
family, and in addition to all this has seen
her home and last dollar swept away ; yet she
has had the courage to bear it all and to go
on as before. When the need comes, there
is a power deep within us that answers the
call.

Timid girls who have always shuddered at
the mere thought of death have in some fatal
accident entered into the shadow of the valley
without a tremor or murmur. We can face
any kind of inevitable danger with wonderful
fortitude. Frail, delicate women will go on
an operating-table with marvellous courage,
even when they know that the operation is
likely to be fatal. But the same women might



8 PEACE, POWER, AND PLENTY

go all to pieces over the terror of some im-
pending danger, because of the very uncer-
tainty of what might be in store for them.
Uncertainty gives fear a chance to get in its
deadly work on the imagination and make
cowards of us.

A person who shrinks from the prick of
a pin, and who, under ordinary circumstances,
can not endure without an anesthetic the ex-
traction of a tooth or the cutting of flesh,
even in a trivial operation, can, when mangled
in an accident, far from civilization, stand the
amputation of a limb without as much fear
and terror as he might suffer at home from
the lancing of a felon.

I have seen a dozen strong men go to their
deaths in a fire without showing the slightest
sign of fear. There is something within every
one of us that braces us up in a catastrophe
and makes us equal to any emergency. This
something is the God in us. These brave fire-
men did not shrink even when they saw every
means of escape cut off. The last rope
thrown to them had consumed away; the
last ladder had crumbled to ashes, and they
were still in a burning tower one hun-
dred feet above a blazing roof. Yet they
showed no sign of fear or cowardice when



POWER OF THE MIND 9

the tower sank into the seething caldron of
flame.

When in Deadwood, in the Black Hills of
South Dakota, I was told that in the early-
days there, before telephone, railroad, or tele-
graph communication had been established,
the people were obliged to send a hundred
miles for a physician. For this reason the
services of a doctor were beyond the reach
of persons of moderate means. The result
was that people learned to depend upon them-
selves to such an extent that it was only on
extremely rare occasions, usually in a case of
severe accident or some great emergency, that
a physician was sent for. Some of the largest
families of children in the place had been
reared without a physician ever coming into
the house. When I asked some of these
people if they were ever sick they replied,
" No, we are never sick, simply because we are
obliged to keep well. We cannot afford to have
a physician, and even if we could it would
take so long to get him here that the sick one
might be dead before he arrived."

One of the most unfortunate things that
has come to us through what we call " higher
civilization " is the killing of faith in our
power of disease resistance. In our large



10 PEACE, POWER, AND PLENTY

cities people make great preparations for sick-
ness. They expect it, anticipate it, and con-
sequently have it. It is only a block or two
to a physician ; a drug-store is on every other
corner, and the temptation to send for the
physician or to get drugs at the slightest
symptom of illness tends to make them more
and more dependent on outside helps and less
able to control their physical discords.

During the frontier days there were little
villages and hamlets which physicians rarely
entered, and here the people were strong
and healthy and independent. They developed
great powers of disease resistance.

There is no doubt that the doctor habit in
many families has a great deal to do with the
developing of unfortunate physical conditions
in the child. Many mothers are always call-
ing the doctor whenever there is the least sign
of disturbance in the children. The result is
that the child grows up with this disease pic-
ture, doctor picture, medicine picture, in its
mind, and it influences its whole life.

The time will come when a child and any
kind of medicine will be considered a very
incongruous combination. Were children prop-
erly reared in the love thought, in the truth
thought, in the harmony thought, were they



POWER OF THE MIND ii

trained to right thinking, a doctor or medicine
would be rarely needed.

Within the last ten years tens of thousands
of families have never tasted medicine or re-
quired the services of a physician. It is be-
coming more and more certain that the time
will come when the belief in the necessity of
employing some one to patch us up, to mend
the Almighty's work, will be a thing of the
past. The Creator never put man's health, hap-
piness, and welfare at the mercy of the mere
accident of happening to live near physicians.

He never left the grandest of His creations
to the mercy of any chance, cruel fate, or
destiny ; never intended that the life, health,
and well-being of one of His children should
hang upon the contingency of being near a
remedy for his ills; never placed him where
his own life, health, and happiness would
depend upon the chance of happening to be
where a certain plant might grow, or a certain
mineral exist which could cure him.

Is it not more rational to believe that He
would put the remedies for man's ills within
himself — in his own mind, where they are al-
ways available — than that He would store
them in herbs and minerals in remote parts
of the earth where practically but a small por-



12 PEACE, POWER, AND PLENTY

tion of the human race would ever discover
them, countless millions dying in total igno-
rance of their existence?

There is a latent power, a force of in-
destructible life, an immortal principle of
health, in every individual, which if developed
would heal all our wounds and furnish a balm
for the hurts of the world.

How rare a thing it is for people to be ill
upon any great occasion in which they are
to be active participants ! How unusual for a
woman, even though in very delicate health,
to be sick upon a particular day on which she
has been invited to a royal reception or to
visit the White House at Washington !

Chronic invalids have been practically
cured by having great responsibilities thrust
upon them. By the death of some relative
or the loss of property, or through some emer-
gency, they have been forced out of their
seclusion into the public gaze ; forced away
from the very opportunity of thinking of
themselves, dwelling upon their troubles, their
symptoms, and lo! the symptoms have dis-
appeared.

Thousands of women are living to-day in
comparative health who would have been
dead years ago had they not been forced by



POWER OF THE MIND 13

necessity out of their diseased thoughts and
compelled to think of others, to work for
them, to provide and plan for those depen-
dent upon them.

Alultitudes of men and women would be
sick in bed if they could afford it ; but the
hungry mouths to feed, the children to clothe,
these and all the other obligations of life so
press upon them that they cannot stop work-
ing; they must keep going whether they feel
like it or not.

W^hat does the world not owe to that im-
perious " must " — that strenuous effort which
we make when driven to desperation, when all
outside help has been cut off and we are
forced to call upon all that is within us to
extricate ourselves from an unfortunate situ-
ation ?

Many of the greatest things in the world
have been accomplished under the stress of
this impelling " must " — merciless in its lash-
ings and proddings to accomplishment.

Necessity has been a priceless spur which
has helped men to perform miracles against
incredible odds. Every person who amounts
to anything feels within himself a power
which is ever pushing him on and urging him
to perpetual improvement. Whether he feels



14 PEACE, POWER, AND PLENTY

like it or not, this inward monitor holds him
to his task.

It is this little insistent " must " that dogs
our steps ; that drives and bestirs us ; that
makes us willing to suffer privations and en-
dure hardships, inconveniences, and discom-
forts ; to work slavishly, in fact, when inclina-
tion tempts us to take life easy.



II. POVERTY A MENTAL
DISABILITY



II. POVERTY A MENTAL
DISABILITY

The worst thing about poverty is the poverty thought.
It is the conviction that we are poor and must remain so
that is fatal to the gaining of a competence.

Holding the poverty thought keeps us in poverty-
stricken and poverty-producing conditions.

OVERTY is an abnormal
condition. It does not fit
any human being's constitu-
tion. It contradicts the
promise and the prophecy
of the divine in man. The
Creator never intended that
man should be a pauper, a drudge, or a slave.
There is not a single indication in man's
wonderful mechanism that he was created for
a life of poverty. There is something larger
and grander for him in the divine plan than
perpetual slavery to the bread-winning prob-
lem.

No man can do his best work — bring out
the best thing in him — while he feels want
tugging at his heels; while he is hampered,
restricted, forever at the mercy of pinching
circumstances.

The very poor, those struggling to keep




i8 PEACE, POWER, AND PLENTY

the wolf at bay, cannot be independent. They
cannot order their Hves. Often they cannot
afford to express their opinions, or to have
individual views. They cannot always afford
to live in decent locations or in healthful
houses.

Praise it who will, poverty in its extreme
form is narrowing, belittling, contracting,
ambition-killing — an unmitigated curse. There
is little hope in it, little prospect in it, little
joy in it. It often develops the worst in man
and kills love between those who would other-
wise live happily together.

It is difficult for the average human being
to be a real man or real woman in extreme
poverty. When worried, embarrassed, en-
tangled with debts, forced to make a dime
perform the proper work of a dollar, it is
almost impossible to preserve that dignity and
self-respect which enable a man to hold up
his head and look the world squarely in the
face. Some rare and beautiful souls have
done this, and in dire poverty have given us
examples of noble living that the world will
never forget; but on the other hand, how
many has its lash driven to the lowest depths !

Everywhere we see the marks of pinch-
ing, grinding, blighting poverty. The hideous



POVERTY 19

evidences of want stare us in the face every
day. We see it in prematurely old, depressed
faces, and in children who have had no child-
hood and who have borne the mark of the
poverty curse ever since their birth. We see
it shadowing bright young faces, and often
blighting the highest ambition, and dwarfing
the most brilliant ability.

Poverty is more often a curse than a bless-
ing, and those who praise its virtues would
be the last to accept its hard conditions.

I wish I could fill every youth with an utter
dread and horror of it; make him feel its
shame, when preventable, its constraint, its
bitterness, its strangling effect.

There is no disgrace in unpreventable pov-
erty. We respect and honor people who are
poor because of ill-health or misfortune which
they cannot prevent. The disgrace is in not
doing our level best to better our condition.

What we denounce is preventable poverty,
that which is due to vicious living, to sloven-
ly, slipshod, systemless work, to idling and
dawdling, or to laziness; that poverty which
is due to the lack of effort, to wrong thinking,
or to any preventable cause.

Every man should be ashamed of poverty
which he can prevent, not only because it is



20 PEACE, POWER, AND PLENTY

a reflection upon his ability, and will make
others think less of him, but also because it
will make him think less of himself.

The trouble with many of poverty's victims
to-day is that they have no confidence that
they can get away from poverty. They hear
so much about the poor man's lack of op-
portunities ; that the great money combina-
tions will compel nearly everybody in the


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