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Orville J. (Orville James) Victor.

Gettysburg College Catalog (Volume 1963/65-1969/71) online

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sidering a major in Art, Music, or Physical Education should make his in-
terest known when requesting an interview so that arrangements can be
made for an appointment with a member of the department concerned.
Seniors should plan their visits before February 1; juniors, after April 1.



Offers of Acceptance 63



OFFERS OF ACCEPTANCE



The Early Decision Plan



The student with an excellent record through the junior year of secondary
school, who has decided on Gettysburg College as the college of his first
choice, may submit an application for Early Decision acceptance. This
must be his only application and must be received by November 1 5 of the
senior year. Notification of the decision on admission will be made during
the first week in December. Payment of a nonrefundable advance fee of
$100 is required to validate this offer of acceptance.

The Early Decision applicant must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test and
three Achievement Tests no later than July following the junior year. Stu-
dents submitting applications for Early Decision who are not offered accept-
ance will be considered for admission under the Regular Decision Plan upon
receipt of grades and test scores from the senior year.




64 Admission with Advanced Credit and Placement




The Regular Decision Plan

To be assured of maximum consideration, students should present applica-
tions by February 15. Most offers of acceptance will be announced by
April 1 after the receipt of December or January Scholastic Aptitude Test
and Achievement Test results and senior first-semester grades. College
Entrance Examination Board Tests taken prior to the senior year may be
used to satisfy test requirements.

Payment of a nonrefundable advance fee of SI 00 is required to validate
this offer of acceptance. Since Gettysburg College subscribes to the principle
of the Candidate's Reply Date, the student has until May 1 to make his
decision and pay his advance fee.

A student offered acceptance under either plan is expected to continue
to do satisfactory work in all subjects and to earn his secondary school
diploma.



ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED CREDIT AND PLACEMENT

Students who have taken college level courses in secondary school and wish
to be considered for advanced credit or placement must take Advanced
Placement tests of the College Entrance Examination Board. The student
earning a score of 3 or higher on these tests may be given advanced credit
or placement on the recommendation of the chairman of the department
concerned after review of the test paper. Students who have completed ad-
vanced level or honors courses may be considered for advanced placement.



Admission as a Special Student 65

ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS

A transfer student may be admitted at the beginning of any term. He must
present a regular application, including secondary school records and College
Entrance Examination Board Test results, and an official transcript from all
colleges and universities attended. He must be entitled to an honorable dis-
missal without academic or social probation from the college from which he
transfers, and must be recommended for transfer by the Dean of the College
previously attended. A transfer candidate may be required to visit the
campus for an interview.

Gettysburg College requires approximately a B average in previous college
work for consideration for admission of transfer students. Credit is granted
for individual courses passed with a grade of C or better at approved in-
stitutions, provided that these courses fit reasonably well into the Gettysburg
curriculum. Academic credit for courses transferred is granted tentatively
until the student has satisfactorily completed one year of work at Gettysburg
College.

All transfer students must meet the requirements of all members of the
class into which they transfer. A student admitted as a sophomore must
complete at least six semesters as a full-time student. A student admitted
as a junior must complete at least four full semesters at Gettysburg College.
A transfer student must spend his senior year in residence completing at
least two full semesters in order to receive a degree from Gettysburg College.

ADMISSION TO THE SUMMER SESSION

Students who are candidates for degrees at Gettysburg College are eligible
to register for the Summer Session.

A student who is a candidate for a degree from another college may enter
the Summer Session upon certification by the Dean of that institution that
the applicant is a bona fide student and that the courses taken at Gettysburg
College will be accepted for credit if they are passed with certifying grades.

Others applying for admission to the Summer Session only may be ac-
cepted upon presentation of official evidence of preparation to meet the
regular admissions requirements.

The Summer Session Bulletin, listing course offerings, is available after
April 1 . This Bulletin and Summer Session application may be obtained
from the Admissions Office.

ADMISSION AS A SPECIAL STUDENT

A high school graduate, not a candidate for a degree, may apply for ad-
mission for one or more courses as a nonmatriculated student.



: - • V. - ' - •■-*''' "■' "'"'' "'"



College Expenses and
Financial Aid



COMPREHENSIVE FEE PLAN

Gettysburg College operates under the comprehensive fee plan for the
regular school year. The student pays a fee which covers all academic
expenses except books and private lessons in music.

The comprehensive fee allows a freshman or sophomore to take from
12 to 16 credit hours each semester in addition to the basic course in health
and physical education. Any freshman or sophomore pursuing studies
which total more than 16 credit hours per semester must pay $47.00 for
each credit hour above the 16 hours permitted. The comprehensive fee
allows a junior or senior to take from 12 to 18 credit hours each semester.
Any junior or senior pursuing studies which total more than 18 credit
hours must pay $47.00 for each hour above the 18 hours permitted.

Comprehensive Fee 1 (1967-68) $1,700

Board

College Dining Hall $ 480

Room Rents

Women's Dormitories

Cottages, Stevens Hall, and Huber Hall $ 280

Hanson, Musselman, and North Halls 330

Men's Dormitories

Pennsylvania Hall (Old Dorm) $ 280

Stine, Paul, Rice, and D Halls 330



1 For 1968-69 the Comprehensive Fee will be $1,900.

67



Minimum


Liberal


$1,700


$1,700


480


480


280


330


125


150



68 Veterans Administration Benefits

Estimate of Total Expense for an Academic Year

Comprehensive Fee
Board

Dormitory Room
Books and Stationery

$2,585 $2,660

This tabulation does not include laundry and personal expenses such as
clothing, spending allowances, fraternity dues, and transportation.

PART-TIME STUDENTS

Any student who is not a candidate for a degree and who is taking a pro-
gram of less than 1 2 semester hours is considered a part-time student, and
will be charged at the rate of $70.50 per credit hour.

PAYMENT OF BILLS

All College bills are due and must be paid in full before registration each semester.
Each student will be billed for one-half of the yearly comprehensive fee,
room rent, and board charge before the beginning of each semester. Checks
should be made payable to Gettysburg College and sent to the Bursar,
Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, Pa. 17325.

Of the advance payment of $100 made under either the early or regular
acceptance plans, $75 is credited to the first semester bill and the remaining
$25 is credited to the reserve deposit. This deposit is used to pay for minor
charges such as laboratory breakage, infirmary meals, and room damage.

Every student in College is required to pay a fee of $50 at spring registra-
tion. This amount is deducted from the student's first semester College bill.
No refunds will be made after July 1 .

No student will be permitted to be graduated, or receive a transcript of
record or statement of honorable dismissal, until all financial obligations
to the College and community have been met.

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION BENEFITS

Gettysburg College has made arrangements with the Veterans Administra-
tion whereby children of veterans attending College under the provisions



The Tuition Plan, Inc. 69

of Public Law 634 are eligible to receive monthly payments from the Vet-
erans Administration in accordance with the scale established by the law.

INSURED TUITION PAYMENT PLAN

The Insured Tuition Payment Plan of Boston is a combination of a pre-
payment installment plan covering four years of College expenses, and an
insurance policy guaranteeing payment for completion of the four years
in the event of the death or total disability of the person financing the stu-
dent's education. It is available to all entering students through Mr. Richard
C. Knight, 6 St. James Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts. Parents may write
directly to Mr. Knight for information and contract. The Director of Ad-
missions will mail a brochure of information to all new students on or before
June 1 of each year.

THE TUITION PLAN, INC.

Gettysburg College makes available to parents who find it necessary or more
convenient to pay in monthly installments a source of credit, The Tuition
Plan, Inc., of New York. This plan is a lending agency and should not be
confused with the Insured Tuition Plan. Through the Tuition Plan, Inc.,
contracts may be negotiated covering one, two, three, or four years' College
expenses with payments spread over eight, twenty, thirty, or forty months
respectively, with the multiple-year plan including the benefits of Parents
Life Insurance. Information describing this plan will be mailed to all stu-
dents during the summer months.




70 Transcripts

BOARD AND HOUSING ACCOMMODATIONS

All women students, except those living at home, and all entering freshmen
take their meals in the College Dining Hall.

All women students, all freshman men, and, as long as there is space avail-
able, all sophomore men are expected to live in College residence halls, ex-
ceptions being made only for married students and those students living at
home. Sophomores and juniors permitted to live off campus are subject to
recall to a College dormitory at the end of any semester.

The College provides a single bed, a mattress, a dresser, a study desk, and
a chair for each student. Pillows, linens, blankets, study lamps, draperies,
and other accessories must be furnished by the student. A reputable laundry
provides linen rental and service.

REFUNDS

No refunds of the comprehensive fee will be made except where a student
has had to withdraw because of serious illness or call by Selective Service,
in which case the fee will be refunded on a proportionate basis.

No refund of the board fee may be made unless authorized by the Business
Manager.

Room charges are refundable only if a student leaves College because of
serious illness or call by Selective Service, or finds a replacement who is
willing to assume the remaining charge.

COLLEGE BOOKSTORE

The Bookstore in the Student Union Building is operated by the College
for the convenience of the students. Since it is operated on a cash basis,
all students should be provided with $60 to $75 in cash each semester to
purchase the necessary books and supplies.

TRANSCRIPTS

Each student is permitted one free transcript of his full record upon gradu-
ation or withdrawal from College. Anyone desiring more than one must
send his request to the Registrar and enclose payment of $1 for each addi-
tional transcript requested.



Student Financial Aid 71

Student Financial Aid

Although the charges made by colleges and universities have risen sharply
in recent years, the fact remains that in most institutions the moneys paid
by a student or his parents still cover only a portion of the total cost of a
student's education. As far as private institutions are concerned, the re-
maining part comes from endowment income and from annual gifts from
sources such as alumni, businesses, foundations, or churches. Thus it is
accurate to say that all students receive financial aid in some form or another.

Gettysburg College recognizes the primary responsibility of the student
and his parents to provide as much toward the total cost of the student's
college years as possible. Since an education is an investment which should
yield lifelong dividends, a student should be prepared to contribute to it
from his own earnings wherever possible, both before entering and while
in college.

Gettysburg College has a program of financial aid for worthy and promis-
ing students who are unable to finance their education from their own or
their family resources. Access to such aid is considered a privilege, not a
right. The qualifications for it are academic ability, academic achievement,
and promise of contribution as a student and citizen. The amount of aid
in any particular case is based upon the financial need of the student. The
College participates in the College Scholarship Service and requires all
applicants to file the Parents' Confidential Statement.

Financial aid is awarded by a faculty committee in the form of grants,
loans, or a combination of these. Loans are of two kinds, those provided
by the College and those available under the National Defense Student
Loan program. Free grants need not be repaid, but the College assumes
their recipients have incurred an obligation and that they will subsequently
contribute as they can to help insure that the benefits which they enjoyed
will be available to others. More than one fourth of the students receive
financial assistance in some form.

All financial aid awards are made for one year only. The Committee
will consider a request for renewal and will act on the basis of the applicant's
record as a student and campus citizen and his continuing financial need.

A new student seeking financial aid should present the Parents' Con-
fidential Statement as soon as possible after applying for admission, but not
later than February 15. A student already enrolled who has previously
had some form of aid should secure a renewal application from the Director
of Financial Aid and Placement and should request his parents to complete
this form. All Parents' Confidential Statements should be sent to the College
Scholarship Service, Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey.



72 Endowed Scholarships

There are work opportunities for a limited number of deserving students.
A student seeking such employment, whether an entering student or one
already enrolled, should apply to the Director of Financial Aid and Place-
ment. Also, each year some students take part-time work in the community.
The Director of Financial Aid and Placement assists some students in securing
such employment but takes no direct responsibility.

Rules governing all types of financial aid are stated in the Summary of
Regulations published by the Dean of Students.

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS

Richard A. Arms Scholarship The income from $8,750 contributed by the Class of
1924 in memory of the chairman of the Mathematics Department (1920-1963) is
awarded to a student on the basis of character, ability, and need.

Dr. Joseph B. Baker (7901) and Rena L. Baker Scholarship The income from $2,500
donated by the Woman's League of Gettysburg College is given to a needy and
deserving student pursuing work in the Music Department.

Dr. Ray Alfred Barnard (1915) Scholarship The income from $2,201 provided by
Dr. Barnard is given to a male student from the Central Pennsylvania Synod who is
preparing for the Lutheran ministry.

The Rev. Sydney E. Bateman (1887) Scholarship The income from $500 is awarded to
a needy ministerial student.

Belt Hess-Quay Scholarship The income from $9,250 provided by Effie E. Hess Belt
(1898) in commemoration of several relatives is awarded as follows: first preference
is given to a member of Grace Lutheran Church, Westminster, Maryland; second
preference to any other resident of Carroll County, Maryland, who is pursuing
theological studies at the College; and third preference is given to any deserving
student.

Jesse E. Benner (1907) and Minerva B. Benner Scholarship The income from a bequest
of $10,000 is used to aid worthy students in need, preferably ministerial students.

Burton F. Blough Scholarship The income from $5,000 contributed by a former trustee
is used to aid needy and deserving students.

Edward B. Buller Scholarship Fund The income from $5,000 contributed by the Luth-
eran Church of the Good Shepherd, Pearl River, New York in honor of the Rev.
Edward B. Buller (1923), is awarded on the basis of character, ability, and need,
preference being given to a student from Good Shepherd congregation or to another
deserving Lutheran student.

Class of 1913 Scholarship The income from $12,786 is awarded to a needy and de-
serving student.

Class of 7916 Scholarship The income from $11,397 is awarded to a needy and de-
serving sophomore.

Class of 1918 Scholarship The income from $20,542 is awarded to needy, deserving
students.



Endowed Scholarships 73

Class of 1921 Scholarship The income from $5,141 is awarded to a needy and de-
serving student.

Jacob C. Eisenhart and Rosa Bolt Eisenhart Scholarship The income from $6,500 estab-
lished by the J. C. Eisenhart Wall Paper Company is awarded to a deserving Lutheran
ministerial student or a student planning to become a Lutheran missionary.

Clarence A. Eyler (1880) and Myrtle B. Eyler Scholarship The income from a bequest
of $5,000 is awarded to a worthy Lutheran preministerial student.



Annie C. Felty Scholarship The income from
student.



is given to a needy and deserving



Dr. Daniel F. Garland (1888) Scholarship The income from $500 is awarded to a de-
serving ministerial student.

Richard W. Gaver (1966) Memorial Scholarship The sum of $1,000 contributed by
Mr. and Mrs. Leo J. Gaver in memory of their son is awarded to a student on the
basis of character, ability, and need, preference being given to a premedical student.

Dr. and Mrs. James E. Glenn Scholarship The income from $12,225 contributed by
J. Donald Glenn (1923) in memory of his parents is awarded to a worthy student
preparing for either the Christian ministry or the medical profession.

Gordon-Davis Linen Supply Company Scholarship The income from $10,200 contributed
by the company is awarded to a deserving student.




74 Endowed Scholarships

Grand Army of the Republic Living Memorial Scholarship The income from $2,500
donated by the Daughters of Union Veterans is awarded to a needy and deserving
student, preferably the descendant of a Union veteran.

Ida E. Grover Scholarship The income from a bequest of $8,630 is awarded to a needy
and deserving student.

John Alfred Hamme (1918) Scholarship The income from $1 5,281 given by Mr. Hamme
is awarded to a deserving student.

Dr. and Mrs. Leslie M. Kauffman Scholarship The income from $19,000 donated by
the Kauffmans is awarded to a deserving student, preference being given to students
of Franklin County, Pennsylvania, or to premedical or preministerial students.

Hon. Hiram H. Keller (1901) Scholarship The income from $15,000 bequeathed by
Mr. Keller, a former trustee, is granted on the basis of need and ability, preferably
to applicants from Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

The Rev. Frederick R. Knubel (1918) Memorial Scholarship The income from $2,965
given by John M. McCollough (1918) in memory of his classmate, is awarded to an
outstanding senior ministerial student who has financial need.

Clarence Gordon and Elfie Leatherman Scholarship The income from $4,216 given by
the Leathermans is awarded to a deserving preministerial student.

The Rev. H. J. H. Lemcke (1860) Memorial Scholarship The income from $14,494
given by Ruth Evangeline Lemcke in memory of her father is awarded to worthy
men students who are graduates of Pennsylvania secondary schools.

Frank M. Long (1936) Memorial Scholarship The income from $75,000 given in
memory of Frank M. Long is awarded to students on the basis of character, need,
and ability.

Charles B. McCollough, Jr. Memorial Scholarship Income amounting to about $3,350
per year from a fund provided by Charles B. McCollough (1916) and Florence
McCollough in memory of their son and by H. R. Earhart in memory of his grand-
nephew is awarded to one or more worthy men students.

Charles H. May (1904) Scholarship The income from $5,000 bequeathed by Mr. May
is awarded to deserving male students from York County, Pennsylvania.

Dr. John E. Meisenhelder (1897) Scholarship The income from $7,785 bequeathed by
Dr. Meisenhelder is awarded to a deserving student.

J. Elsie Miller Scholarship The income from $5,000 bequeathed by Mr. Miller is
awarded to a ministerial student.

Miller-Dewey Scholarship The income from $10,000 bequeathed by the Rev. Adam
B. Miller (1873) is awarded to a deserving student.

Nellie Oiler and Bernard Oiler Memorial Scholarship The income from $5,000 bequeathed
by Ida R. Gray in memory of her daughter and son-in-law is awarded to a deserving
student, preference being given to a Lutheran applicant from Waynesboro, Penn-
sylvania.



76 Endowed Scholarships

Lovina Openlander Scholarship The income from S3, 000 is awarded to needy and
deserving students.

Willard S. Paul Scholarship The income from $43,871 contributed in his honor by
friends of the College on the occasion of President Paul's retirement and thereafter
is awarded to a deserving student.

Earl G. Ports (1923) Scholarship The income from $7,200 provided by Horace G.
Ports (1925) in memory of his brother is awarded on the basis of character, need, and
ability, preferably to a student in the Department of Physics.

Philip P. Rudhart Scholarship The income from $26,812 bequeathed by Emma R.
Binnix in memory of her brother is awarded to deserving male students.

Gregory Seckler (1965) Memorial Scholarship The income from $2,500, given by Mr.
and Mrs. J. M. Arnold, Sr., in memory of Gregory Seckler, is awarded to a deserving
student, preference being given to an English major.

Edgar Fahs Smith (1874) Memorial Scholarship The income from a bequest of Margie
A. Smith in memory of her father will be awarded when the principal reaches a
stated sum.

Edward J. Stackpole Scholarship The income from $4,500 contributed by the friends
of General Stackpole is awarded to a deserving student, preference being given to
a student in American History interested in the Civil War.

The Rev. Milton H. Stine (1877) and Mary J. Stine Memorial Scholarship The income
from $5,000 provided by Dr. Charles M. A. Stine (1901) in memory of his parents
is awarded to a ministerial student.

Dr. J. H. W. Stuckenberg Scholarship The income from $15,000 bequeathed by Dr.
Stuckenberg is awarded to a qualified student.

Warren L. Swope Scholarship Fund The income from $5,000 contributed by Warren
L. Swope (1943), a career diplomat, is awarded on the basis of character, ability,
and need, preference being shown to students of American parentage who have spent
a significant portion of their pre-college years abroad.

Parker B. Wagnild Music Scholarship The income from $3,725 contributed by alumni
and friends of the Gettysburg College Choir, is given to a needy and deserving student
in the Music Department.

Dr. Rufus B. Weaver (1862) Scholarship The income from $19,991 bequeathed by
Dr. Weaver is awarded to deserving students.

Senator George L. Wellington Scholarship The income from $5,000 bequeathed by
Mr. Wellington is awarded to a deserving Lutheran ministerial student.

Jeremiah A. Winter and Annie C. Winter Memorial Scholarship The income from $14,250
contributed by Amelia C. Winter in memory of her parents is granted to a needy
and deserving student.

Norman S. Wolf Scholarship The income from $5,083 contributed by Dr. Spurgeon
M. Keeny in honor of the Rev. Norman S. Wolf (1904) is awarded on the basis of
scholarship, character, and need, preference being given to a student who is fatherless.






Other Aid for Students 11



OTHER AID FOR STUDENTS



Aero Oil Company Scholarship The sum of $600 provided by the Aero Oil Company
is available to a needy and deserving student from the area in which it operates.

Loans are available to members of the senior class from the Alumni Loan Fund, estab-
lished by the Alumni Association and augmented by individual and class contribu-
tions. Applicants need at least one approved endorser of their note. The loan is
interest free until one year after the borrower's class has been graduated, after which
it bears interest at the rate of 6 per cent per year.

Frank D. Baker Scholarship The sum of $300 is awarded to students in immediate



Online LibraryOrville J. (Orville James) VictorGettysburg College Catalog (Volume 1963/65-1969/71) → online text (page 33 of 59)