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Orville J. (Orville James) Victor.

Gettysburg College Catalog (Volume 1987/88-1991/92) online

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Gettysburg College students, is a valuable college
resource. The Center's staff assists students with their
writing in the following ways:

- Discusses an assignment in order to clarify it or
to plan a method of approach

- Helps in organizing a paper or other piece of
writing such as letters of application

- Suggests ways to make troublesome parts of a
paper more effective

- Shows ways to correct recurring .grammatical
errors

The Writing Center is open six day a week. There is
no charge for this service.

Requirements and Recommendations

The Major in Literature

The requirements for the major in literature are

twelve courses in English and American language



and literature in addition to the first semester of
Literary Foundations of Western Culture (IDS 103).
All majors in literature are required to take English
150, 151, 152, 153, 154 and IDS 103. In addition, to
obtain the desired distribution of courses, majors
must elect one course from each of the following
categories:

I. English Language and Literary Theory
(1 course): English 208, 209, 210.

II. Topics in English Literaiy History
(3courses; 1 from each group):

A. Mediaeval, Renaissance: English 310 to 319.

B. 17th and 18th Centuries: English 320 to 329.

C. 19th and 20th Centuries: English 330 to 339.

III. Topics in American Literaiy History
(lcourse): English 340 to 349.

IV. Major Authors (1 course): English 362, 365,
366 or any seminar devoted to a British or
American author deemed by the department
to be of major importance.

V. Seminar (1 course): English 401-404, 420.
English 420, the Honors Seminar, is reserved
for students admitted to the Departmental
Honors Program.

English 101, 110, 201, 203, 205, 206, 305 and courses
in speech may not be used to fulfill the Department's
major requirements. Courses in Theatre Arts count
only toward the Theatre Aits major.

The Minor in Literature

The requirements for the minor in literature are six
courses. All minors must take two courses of the
Survey of English Literature sequence (English 150-
152), and three advanced courses. Writing courses,
with the exception of English 101, may be used to
fulfill the Department's minor requirements. No
more than two courses may be at the 100-level.

The Major in Theatre Arts

Majors in Theatre Aits must take IDS 103 and
Theatre Arts 105, 203 and 204. They must also elect
the specified number of courses from each of the
following categories:
I. Theatre Aits (3 courses): 1 course from each of
the following groups:

A. (Acting and Dance) 120, 163, 220, 307, 320,
377.

B. (Design) 115, 155, 255, 311, 355, 381.

C. (Directing) 182, 282.

II. Drama ( 3 courses): English 328, 329, 365, 366

III. Electives (2 courses): Any of the theatre arts and
drama courses listed above and/or Theatre Arts
222, 252.



ENGLISH



The Minor in Theatre Arts

The requirements for the minor in theatre arts are
six courses: Theatre Arts 105, Theatre Arts 203 or
204; one course in Drama (English 328, 329, 365,
366); 2 studio courses (Theatre Arts 115, 120, 155,
163, 182, 220, 255, 282, 307, 311, 320, 355, 377, 381,
382); one course in theatre arts or (any of the above
listed theatre arts or drama courses plus Theatre Arts
252). No more than two courses may be at the 100-level.

Elementary and Secondary Education
The major for students enrolled in the elementary
education program consists of ten courses, in
addition to the first term of Literary Foundations of
Western Culture (IDS 103). Working with the
Chairperson of the English Department, each
elementary education student will design a major
program following as closely as possible the
Department's distribution requirement for the
major. Students planning to teach English in the
secondary schools are required to take English 209
and either 365 or 366. Speech 101, IDS 104, and
either Theatre Arts 328 or 329 are strongly recom-
mended. The Department cooperates in offering
Education 304, Techniques of Teaching and
Curriculum of Secondary English, and Education
411, Internship in Teaching Composition.
History 131, 132, 203, 204 and Philosophy 203, 204,
211, 220 are strongly recommended for majors.
Students planning to do graduate work in English
should develop proficiency in Latin, French, or German.

English majors may take internships in a variety of
fields, such as journalism, law, public relations,
publishing, radio and television. Theatre Arts majors
may take internships in theatre, radio, television,
public relations and arts administration. Students
who wish to apply for internships must secure from
their advisers a statement of the Department's policy
regarding application deadline, form of proposal,
requirements, and grading.

Distribution Requirements

All courses offered by the Department, except
English 101, 201, 203, 205, 206, 208, 209, 305 and
courses in Speech and Theatre Arts, may be used to
fulfill the College distribution requirement in
literature. All Theatre Arts courses and English 205,
206 may be used to fulfill the College distribution
requirement in arts.

Senior Honors Program

English majors who have shown special promise in
English will be invited to complete a thesis and



seminar sequence during their senior year. Students
taking the program will write a thesis during the fall
semester under the direction of a member of the
Department. During the spring semester they will
participate in an Honors Seminar under the
direction of the Program Director. Only students
selected for and successfully completing the program
will be eligible to receive Honors in English. For
details of the Program, consult the brochure
available in the English Department.

101 English Composition

Aims to develop the students ability to express
themselves in clear, accurate, and thoughtful English
prose. Not limited to first year students. Repeated
spring semester.

Staff

110 The Interpretation of Literature

An intensive study of the dominant literary types:
short story, novel, poem, and drama. The course
attempts to stimulate a valid appreciation and
judgment of literature through precise critical
analysis of selected works truly representative of
major literary forms. Fulfills distribution requirement
in literature. Open only to first year students and a
limited number of sophomores. Offered both
semesters.

Staff

150, 151, 152 Survey of English Literature

A historical survey of English literature from Beowulf
through the twentieth century, with some attention
to the social, political, and intellectual backgrounds
of the periods under investigation. Selected works
will be discussed in class to familiarize students with
various methods of literary analysis, and students will
write several short critical papers each semester.

Staff

153, 154 Survey of American Literature

A chronological study of American writing from
colonial days through the present, with some
attention to the social, political, and intellectual
backgrounds. Primary emphasis during the first half
of the sequence falls on the Puritans and American
Romantics; the second half surveys writers from the
Romantics forward, including such figures as
Chopin, James, Williams, Stevens, Faulkner, Hughes,
as well as selected contemporary writers. One section
of English 154 will be reserved for students not
majoring in English.

Staff



ENGLISH



89



201 Advanced Expository Writing

An intensive course in advanced rhetorical tech-
niques, with particular emphasis on analysis of
evidence, selection of appropriate style, and
importance of revision.

Ms. Stavropoulos and Mr. Garnett

203 Journalism

A general introduction to journalism. Students can
expect to spend their time practicing the techniques
of writing news copy, feature, sports, and editorial
articles; composing headlines; doing make-up; and
working at copy reading and rewrite.

Ms. Henry

205, 206 The Writing of Fiction, Poetry,
and Drama

A workshop in the writing of short stories, verse, and
plays, with an analysis of models. Either course may
be used to fulfill the distribution requirement in arts.

Ms. Larsen

209 History of the English Language

Provides a historical understanding of the vocabu-
lary, forms, and sounds of the language from the
Anglo-Saxon or Old English period to the twentieth
century.

Mr. Baskerville

210 Theories of Literature

Undertakes to examine and compare the various
ways in which literature has been regarded: its
sources, forms, and purposes. The history of critical
theory is surveyed, from Plato and Aristotle to the
present, with emphasis upon the modern period and
such movements as New Criticism, structuralism,
deconstruction, and feminist criticism. The goal of
the course is to make students aware of themselves as
readers.

Ms. Beig

226 Introduction to Shakespeare

A course that endeavors to communicate an
awareness of Shakespeare's evolution as a dramatist
and of his importance in the development of
Western literature and thought. Designed for
students not majoring in English.

Mr. Myers

231 to 260 Studies in Literature

An intensive study of a single writer, group, move-
ment, theme, or period. May be counted toward the
major. Fulfills distribution requirement in literature.
Open to first year students.

Staff



305 The Writing of Poetry and Short Fiction:
Advanced

A course open to students who have demonstrated
that their skills in the writing of poetry and fiction
might be further developed. The goal of each
student will be the composition of a group of poems
or short stories. Prerequisites: English 205, 206.

Ms. Larsen

310-319 Topics in Mediaeval and Renaissance
Literature

A variety of authors, themes, genres, and movements
will be studied, ranging from Anglo-Saxon poetry
and prose through Shakespeare's works. Several
sections, each dealing with a different subject, will be
offered each year.

Messrs. Baskerville and Myers and Ms. Stavropoulos

320 - 329 Topics in Seventeenth and Eighteenth
Century Literature

A variety of authors, themes, genres, and movements
will be studied, ranging from Donne and Herbert
through Johnson and Boswell. Several sections, each
dealing with a different subject, will be offered each
year.

Ms. Lambert, Mr. Myers, Ms. Stavropoulos
and Ms. Stewart

330 - 339 Topics in Nineteenth and Twentieth
Century Literature

A variety of authors, themes, genres, and movements
will be studied, ranging from Blake, Wordsworth, and
Coleridge through Yeats, Eliot, Woolf, and selected
contemporary writers. Several sections, each dealing
with a different subject, will be offered each year.

Ms. Berg, Messrs. Garnett and Goldberg,
and Ms. Johnson

340 - 349 Topics in American Literature

A variety of authors, themes, genres, and movements
will be studied, ranging from colonial writers
through selected contemporary authors. Several
sections, each dealing with a different subject, will be
offered each year.

Messrs. Fredrickson, Stitt, and Winans

362 Chaucer

Examination of selection of Chaucer's minor poems
and of five of his major poems (including "Troilus
and Criseyde" and "Canterbury Tales") as the means
of assessing the poet's response to literary influences
and of tracing the development of his original
genius.

Mr. Baskerville



90



ENGLISH/THEATRE ARTS



365, 366 Shakespeare

A course that seeks, to communicate an understand-
ing both of Shakespeare's relation to the received
traditions of his time and of his achievement as one
of the most important figures in Western literature.
Language, characterization, and structure in each of
the numerous plays will be carefully analyzed.
English 365 will focus on the early plays through
Hamlet and Troilus and Cressida, English 366 on the
later plays.

Mr. Myers

401, 402, 403, 404 Seminar

Intensive studies of announced topics in Mediaeval
and Renaissance literature, in Seventeenth and
Eighteenth century literature, in Nineteenth and
Twentieth century literature, and in American
literature. Prerequisite: Senior standing in the major or
departmental permission.

420 Honors Seminar

An intensive study of an announced topic under the
guidance of the Director of the Senior English
Honors Program. Prerequisite: Successful completion
of an Honors Thesis. Offered in the spring semester.

Staff

464 Honors Thesis

An individualized study project involving the
research of a topic and the preparation of a major
paper tinder the direction of a member of the
Department. This research and writing will be done
during the fall semester of the senior year. Prerequi-
site: By invitation of the Department only.

Staff

Individualized Study

An individual tutorial, research project, or internship
under the supervision of a member of the staff. A
student must submit a written proposal to the
Department well in advance of registration. Prerequi-
sites: Approval of the Department and of the
directing faculty member. Offered each semester.

Staff

Theatre Arts

The major in Theatre Arts is described, page 87.

Any Theatre Arts course may be used to fulfill the
distribution requirement in arts.

105 Introduction to Theatre Arts

An overview of theatre, including its historical



background, its literary works, its technical aspects,
and its performance techniques. Students will study
the theatre of today in relation to its predecessors
and in terms of its modern forms in cinema and
television. Students will read texts and analyze
methods used in bringing those works into produc-
tion. Field trips will offer opportunities to critique
performances.

Mr. Hanson and Ms. Howe

115 Theatre Production

A course designed to provide an extensive investiga-
tion of the historical and contemporary trends and
practices essential for theatre production. The
student gains an understanding of theatre proce-
dures and acquires a grasp of the equipment
necessary for the execution of scenery, properties,
sound and stage lighting. This course is a combina-
tion of lecture and laboratory- work and requires
backstage participation in college productions.

Mr. Hanson

120 Fundamentals of Acting

The Study of the theory and technique of the art of
acting; voice technique for the stage; the use of
pantomime, including the study of gesture and
movement. Emphasis will be placed on the discipline
and control of the body and the voice to best serve
the actor. Improvisation will be employed. In
addition, students will be expected to perform in
scenes for class analysis. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.

Ms. Howe

155 Fundamentals of Stage Design

Basic theories and technique of design for the stage.
The theory behind the design, and the interrelation-
ship of scene design, lighting, costumes, and
properties. How stage design interprets the themes
and moods of a play as well as identifying period and
place will be studied. This course will follow a lecture-
discussion format and involve extensive studio work.
Students will analyze, create, and execute basic
designs for the Laboratory Theatre Series in
association with students in Theatre Arts 182.
Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 115 and/or permission of
the instructor.

Mr. Hanson

163 Introduction to Dance

An overview of the history and development of
modern dance with emphasis on the early pioneers
(Duncan, Denis-Shawn, Humphrey, Weidman,
Hawkins, Cunningham), intended to develop an



THEATRE ARTS



91



appreciation of dance as an art form. The study of
form and technique and the physical application
thereof. Emphasis will be placed on the discipline
and control of the body to best serve the dancer.

Ms. Vilardo

182 Fundamentals of Directing

The study of the theory and technique of the art of
the director: how a play is selected; play analysis;
tryouts and casting, the purpose and technique of
blocking, movement, and stage business. Students
are required to direct scenes in class and a short play
as part of the Laboratory Theatre Series. Prerequisite:
Theatre Arts 155 and/or permission of the instruc-
tor.

Mr. Schmidt

203, 204 History of the Theatre

A survey of the theatre from the primitive to the
present. Emphasis is placed on the relevance of
theatre design, production techniques, and acting
styles to the plays of their periods, and the relation-
ship between society and the theatre it nurtured. The
first semester covers Greek, Roman, Medieval,
Elizabethan, and Oriental; the second semester is
devoted to the Italian Renaissance, French, Neoclassi-
cal, the Restoration, and the Eighteenth, Nineteenth,
and Twentieth centuries.

Mr. Schmidt

220 Advanced Acting

Further study in the theory and technique of the art
of the actor: the analysis and interpretation of a role
and the building of a characterization. Roles, both
comic and tragic, from Contemporary, Restoration,
Elizabethan, Commedia dell'Arte, and Greek theatre
will be analyzed and performed. Prerequisite: Theatre
Arts 120 and/or permission of the instructor.

Mr. Schmidt

222 Oral Interpretation of Literature

An analytical and structural study of recognized
prose, poetry and dramatic selections which will
facilitate individual rehearsal and performance of the
literature. These readings will incorporate the
Readers Theatre format and emphasis will be placed
on developing an appreciation for the literary work
as a complete aesthetic unit. Students will be
challenged to recognize their potential for speaking
and reading before an audience. The class will
employ an ensemble approach and present several
public performances during the semester.

Mr. Hanson



252 Studies in Film Aesthetics

A study of historically significant films, film theory
and criticism, intended to develop an appreciation
for film as an art form. Students will keep a journal of
critical responses to films, write short critical papers,
and will become familiar with writing that has been
done about films.

Mr. Fredrickson

255 Advanced Stage Design

Examination of historical and contemporary theories
of scene, lighting, and costume design. Students will
consider design as the visual manifestation of the
playwright's concepts. Besides designing the same
play for proscenium, arena, thrust, and profile stages
and a period play for a period other than its own.
students will complete advanced designs in scene,
lighting, and costumes and create designs for the
Laboratory Theatre Series in association with
students in Theatre Arts 282. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts
155.

Mr. Hanson

282 Advanced Directing

Further studies in the theory and technique in the
art of the director. Students will engage in direc-
tional analyses of plays representing different
periods. Particular attention will be given to contem-
porary methods of presentation with special
emphasis on arena and thrust staging. In addition to
directing scenes in class, students will direct two
scenes and a one-act play for public presentation, the
latter as part of the Laboratory Theatre Series.
Prerequisites: Theatre Arts 155 and 182 and/or
permission of the instructor.

Mr. Schmidt

307 Theatre Arts Practicum - Acting

A practical learning experience in acting. During a
seven-week period, students will perform in three
children's theatre productions and will also partici-
pate in three mainstage productions as part of
Gettysburg Theatre Festival's summer program.
Students are afforded the opportunity of working
alongside professional actors and under professional
direction before discriminating audiences.
Commedia dell'Arte improvisational techniques are
employed in the creation and rehearsals of the
children's theatre offerings. A study of the works of
the authors represented on the mainstage, analyses
of the literary and theatrical aspects of the works to
be produced as well as discussions sessions and



92



THEATRE ARTS/SPEECH



workshops with the professional actors and directors
are included in class work.

Mr. Schmidt

311 Theatre Arts Practicum - Technical

A practical learning experience in technical theatre.
During a seven-week period students will participate
in the varied technical aspects of mounting three
mainstage productions as well as three productions
offered by the Theatre for Children as part of the
Gettysburg Theatre Festival's summer program.
Hands-on experience will be gained from the
construction, painting and placement of sets,
hanging and running stage lights and the construc-
tion and gathering of properties and costumes. A
study of the theatrical aspects of the works to be
produced and analyses of the concepts and tech-
niques employed in this production and others of a
similar nature (both contemporary and historical)
are integral aspects of the course.

Mr. Hanson

320 Problems in Acting

A course designed for students who have demon-
strated the skill and talent to undertake further
studies in acting which will culminate in an indepen-
dent study project. Prerequisites: Theatre Arts 120 and
220 and/or permission of the instructor.

Mr. Schmidt

328, 329 Twentieth Century Drama
A study of major dramatists from Ibsen to the present
and of dramatic movements such as realism,
naturalism, expressionism, as well as Theatre of the
Absurd. The first semester includes Ibsen,
Strindberg, Chekhov, Shaw, Pirandello, Odets,
O'Neill, and others; the second semester begins after
World War II and includes Williams, Miller, Osborne,
Pinter, Beckett, Ionesco, Genet, and others.

Mr. Schmidt

355 Problems in Stage Design

A course designed for students who have demon-
strated the skill and talent to undertake further
studies in design which will culminate in an indepen-
dent study project. Prerequisites: Theatre Arts 155 and
255.

Mr. Hanson

377 Theatre Arts Practicum - Acting (Advanced)

An advanced practical learning experience in acting
for students who have demonstrated that their skills
in performing before the public (both young and
old) might be further developed. Students will



continue work begun in Theatre Arts 307: they, will
be expected to produce mature and advanced work
and undertake a broader range of roles and more
complex ones. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 307.

Mr. Schmidt

381 Theatre Arts Practicum-Technical (Advanced)

An advanced practical learning experience in
technical theatre for students who have demon-
strated that their skills in the technical aspects of
theatre might be further developed. Students will
continue work begun in Theatre Arts 311 and they
will be expected to undertake more advanced
assignments in set construction, stage lighting,
costumes and properties. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts
311.

Mr. Hanson

382 Problems in Directing

A course designed for students who have demon-
strated the skill and talent to undertake further
studies in directing which will culminate in an
independent study project. Prerequisites: Theatre Arts
182 and 282.

Mr. Schmidt

Individualized Study

A production of a major work, a tutorial, or an
internship under the supervision of a member of the
staff. A student must submit a written proposal to the
Department well in advance of registration. Prerequi-
sites: Approval of the Department and of the
directing faculty member.

Staff

Speech

101 Public Address

A study of the basic principles of public address.
Emphasis is placed on developing both a theoretical
and practical understanding of oral communication,
through lecture and reading assignments, as well as
through practice in preparing, organizing, deliver-
ing, and criticizing speeches in class.

Mr. Hanson

201 Advanced Public Address

An analysis of public address as an art form and as an
important civilizing force in Western society.
Students will have the opportunity to apply concepts
and strategies they have learned in Speech 101.
Prerequisite: Speech 101.

Mr. Hanson



FRENCH



93



French



Associate Professors Gregorio, Michelman,
A. Tannenbanm, Pvichardson Viti and Viti
( Chairperson)

Assistant Professor Arey

Adjunct Assistant Professor Exton

Adjunct Instructors Faucon and Petto

Overview

Foreign language study not only teaches students
much about their native tongue but also introduces
them to another people's language, literature, and
customs. This awareness of cultural and linguistic
relativity is one of the hallmarks of a liberal educa-
tion.

Introductory French courses develop students skill in
spoken and written French and acquaint them with
the literature and culture of the French-speaking
world. Language laboratory work is mandatory for all
beginning students. With emphasis on oral/aural



Online LibraryOrville J. (Orville James) VictorGettysburg College Catalog (Volume 1987/88-1991/92) → online text (page 115 of 133)