Copyright
P. F. (Peter F.) Seligman.

Survey of oceanographic and meteorological parameters of importance to the site selection of an Ocean Food and Energy Farm (OFEF) in the eastern Pacific : final report, July 1975-September 1976 : prepared for U.S. Energy Research & Development Administration online

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Online LibraryP. F. (Peter F.) SeligmanSurvey of oceanographic and meteorological parameters of importance to the site selection of an Ocean Food and Energy Farm (OFEF) in the eastern Pacific : final report, July 1975-September 1976 : prepared for U.S. Energy Research & Development Administration → online text (page 6 of 10)
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cal cyclone region.

3. In this nearshore area, nutrients of adequate concentrations are relatively near the
surface (15-25 jug-at/hter NO3 at 100 meters).

4. Research and support facilities are available close to the proposed sites.

5. The region is within the natural habitat zone of Macrocystis pyrifera . Tempera-
ture and light regions are excellent for Macrocystis growth.

6. Current speeds are mostly within the ranges specified for optimal OFEF opera-
tions and kelp growth characteristics.

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA OFFSHORE CHARACTERISTICS

Figures 50 through 71 (from the Naval Weather Service, Ref. 45) give detailed ocean-
ographic and meteorologic data of the southern California offshore area. These data, along
with the criteria below, were used to select specific sites. Table 8 gives nutrient concentra-
tions for various depths off southern Cahfornia and northern Baja California.

Winter (February) and summer (August) wave heights > 2 and > 6 feet (> 0.6 and
1 .8 meters) are given in Figs. 50 and 5 1 , and > 9 and > 12 feet (> 2.7 and 3.7 meters) in
Figs. 52 and 53. Percent frequency of the wave heights given increase to the west showing a



minimal value of 20 percent for > 2-foot (0.6-meter) waves in August nearshore (Fig. 5 1) to
a maximum of 70 percent for> 2-foot (0.6-meter) waves in the northern Channel Islands
(34°N). High waves (> 3.7 meters) occur rarely in August (2.5 percent at about 1 2 1°W,
32°30'N) and are slightly more common in winter (Figs. 52 and 53).



Table 8. Nitrate concentration versus depth off southern California and northern

Baja California.













Ocean


Locations










Depth (m)


1


n


3


4


5


6


7


8


9


10


11










Nitrate concentration (/xg


-at NO3


-N/liter]











1


1


2


0.5


0.5


0.5





-


-


-


-


10


1


2


2


0.5


0.5


0.5





-


-


-


-


50


1


7


2


18.0


7.0


16.0


12


-


16


13


-


100


15


-


9


22.0


20.0


22.0


21


-


-


-


-


200


24


20


19


30.0


28.0


26.0


28


-


-


-


-


300


30


30


-


32.0


33.0


28.0


33


30


-


-


23-33




Ocean


Locat


ons








Data Sources







1 . San Diego Trough - September 72

2. Off Baja California - July 72

3. Off Baja California - August 72

4. San Diego Trough - April 7 1

5. San Diego Trough - October 70

6. San Diego Trough - April 70

7. Santa Catalina Basin - May 65

8. San Diego Trough - April 75

9. Catalina Island - September 75

10. Catalina Island - November 75

1 1 . Range of values from 300 meters -



unpublished data

unpublished 30°N, 120°W

unpublished 30°N, 120°W

unpublished 32° 30'N, 117° 30'W

unpublished 32° 30'N, 117° 30'W

unpublished 32° 30'N, 1 17° 30'W

33° 18.5'N, 118° 40'W (Ref. 46)

Supplied to W. North for upwelling experi-
ments.

W. North, Personal Comm.

W. North, Personal Comm.

ICC experiment, from W. North (Ref. 12)



Wind speeds are relatively low off southern California. Speeds of 6-1 1 m/sec during
the summer (Fig. 57) occur between 10 and 20 percent of the time in the nearshore area and
up to 40 percent of the time west of San Clemente Island. In winter, the frequencies of near-
shore winds of 6-10 m/sec increase to 20 percent while those of offshore winds remain near-
ly the same. Winds of > 18 m/sec are increasingly frequent in winter, occurring about 1 to
3 percent of the time off the Channel Islands and less than 0.5 percent in the nearshore areas
(Fig. 54). Winds of < 3 m/sec occur about 30 percent of the time in winter and summer in
the Channel Island areas and about 50 to 60 percent of the time in the nearshore environ-
ment (33°-34°N).

The mixed layer* depth, given in Figs. 58 and 59, are relatively shallow in the near-
shore areas and increase in a westerly direction. During summer the mixed depth is very
shallow (about 6 meters) in the inshore areas; in winter this depth increases to 18 meters in-
shore, to about 24 meters off San Clemente Island, and to about 60 meters to the southwest
(30°N,120°W).

Figures 60 through 7 1 give monthly prevailing current direction and mean current
speed. Currents south of 32° 30'N are generally south at 20 to 25 cm/sec. North of this,
the currents are more variable in speed and direction. The prevailing nearshore currents are
also 20 to 25 cm/sec. Currents in the Channel Island areas are more variable in direction in-
cluding some westerly and northerly currents varying between 20 and 36 cm/sec on average.
During fall and early winter the prevailing currents change to predominately a north to
northwest direction (Davidson Current) with speed averaging 20 to 25 cm/sec. A high north-
westerly current approximating 50 cm/sec off Santa Catalina is observed in December (Fig.
71). In January, near coastal currents are variable and in the spring the prevailing direction
is south to southeast with speeds averaging from 20 to 30 cm/sec. Other current studies of
the southern Cahfornia area include CALCOFI, Ref. 47; Scripps Institute of Oceanography,
Ref. 48; and the Oceanographic Survey of the Santa Barbara Channel Oil Spill, Ref. 49.

Specific Phase 1 site selections in the southern California area were made using the
following criteria.

1 . Locate within the 500-fathom (915-meter) contour to make mooring costs as
economical as possible and still test the deep water OFEF concept.

2. Remain outside shipping and submarine transit lanes and common pleasure-
boating areas.

3. Be within 32 kilometers (2-hour transit) of scientific and logistic support due to
the frequent observation and measurement requirements of the Phase 1 fanns.



*The layer in which wind-mixing occurs and Iwlow wliich the therniocline begins. The mixed layer is usually a! a very low
nutrient concentration due to phytoplanktonic utilization in this zone.



90



PRIORITIZED PHASE 1 OFEF SITE SELECTION

The selected sites as shown in Fig. 49 were prioritized as stated below.

1. Site 1 is located in the inshore area south of Corona del Mar (33° 30'N, 1 17°
55'W). It was chosen as the first priority site because it is within 8 to 1 6 kilometers of the
Cal Tech marine laboratory, thus allowing easy access to the early prototype experiments.
The depth range is approximately 100-200 fathoms (180-360 meters) and the site is between
the pleasure and commercial routes from Los Angeles to San Diego and points south. In
addition, the inshore area has somewhat milder conditions than the offshore sites. Wave
heights and wind velocities are reduced below those of the offshore islands (see Figs. 50-59).
Also, the thermocline (bottom of the mixed layer) is frequently shallower at site 1 than at 2
and 3, making higli-nutrient concentrations nearer to the surface (Fig. 54).

2. Site 2 is located 8 to 24 kilometers northwest of San Clemente Island (33° 05'N,

1 18° 45'W). This site was chosen because it is close to the Naval Undersea Center facility on
the northern portion of San Clemente Island. An airstrip and small boats are available for
farm support. This site would be an excellent location to test the deep water (away from
coastal influence) concept of OFEF. In addition, this site would probably be less molested
by private boats than the other two selections. A discussion of the near-surface nutrient
regime is found in Ref. 10.

3. Site 3 is 5 to 15 kilometers northwest of Santa Catalina Island (33° 35'N, 1 18°
35'W). It is within 8 to 19 kilometers of the University of Southern California marine labo-
ratory, shown in Fig. 49, which could function as a support facility for the farm project.
The currents in this region can be somewhat higher than in other parts of the southern
Cahfornia area in winter (Fig. 69). A few nutrient measurements are given in Table 8. Site
3 is located just south of the shipping lane from Los Angeles to Hawaii and west of the
major pleasure-boat traffic to Avalon Bay in the southern portion of Santa Catalina.



91




r^






c5


x>


■4


' '


H


O




3


3


•S


ii


"rt



B .2



T3 C
C ^
« o






O *L)



£ 3

> u_

■5b O



S I cu 2



-= -;; s <")



-a T3 —

S § s

o _ o



•v i^ u- ^



c b



o 2 ^ .S



J= ^



^ ori J^






92




Figure 50. Percent frequency of wave height greater than 2 and 6 feet for the southern California area for
February. (1 foot ^ 0.3 meter) (Reproduced from Naval Weather Service, Ref. 45)



93



122 121

35




Figure 51 . Percent frequency of wave height greater than 2 and 6 feet for the southern California area for
August. ( 1 foot «= 0.3 meter) (Reproduced from Naval Weather Sei-vicc, Ref. 45)



94




Figure 52. Percent frequency of wave height greater than 9 and 12 feet for the southern CaUfornia area for
February. (1 foot ~0.3 meter) (Reproduced from Naval Weather Service, Ref. 45)



95




Figure 53. Percent frequency of wave lieight greater than 9 and 12 feet for the southern California area for
August. (1 foot ^0.3 meter) (Reproduced from Naval Weather Service, Ref. 45)



96




Figure 54. Percent frequency of wind speed less than or equal to 6 and greater than or equal to 34
knots for the southern California area for February. (1 knot ^ 0.5 m/sec) (Reproduced from Naval
Weather Service, Ref. 45)



97




Figure 55. Percent frequency of wind speed less tlian or equal to 6 and greater than or equal to 34
knots for the southern California area for August. (1 knot = 0.5 m/sec) (Reproduced from Naval
Weather Servite, Ref. 45)



98




Figure 56. Percent frequency of wind speed 11-21 knots for the southern California area for February.
(1 knot*: 0.5 m/sec) (Reproduced from Naval Weather Service, Ref. 45)



99




Figure 57. Percent frequency of wind speed 11-21 knots for the southern California area for August.
(1 knot ^ 0.5 m/sec) (Reproduced from Naval Weather Service, Ref. 45)



100




28
1






22



121



120



119



118



117



116



Figure 58. Depth of mean mixed layer off southern CaUfornia for February.
(1 foot^O.3 meter) (Reproduced from Naval Weather Service, Ref. 45)



101




Figure 59. Depth of mean mixed layer off southern California for August. (1 foot «= 0.3 meter)
(Reproduced from Naval Weather Service, Ref. 45)



102



Figures 60-71. Prevailing current direction and mean current speed for the southern California area.
Secondary currents are indicated with dashed lines and variable currents with a V. Monthly data,
January through December are given. (1 knot ^ 0.5 m/sec) (Data reproduced from Naval Weather
Service, Ref. 45)



103




120 119



117 116



Figure 60. January



104




Figure 61 . February



105




Figure 62. March



106



PREVAIUNG CURRENT DIRECTION AND
MEAN CURRENT SPEED (KnoU>

: ^ Prevailing current directtoo

— — ■ ^ Secoodary current direction

^ ^- Currents of equal duration

V Variable c

Number by direction arrow =
Mean speed (knots)

Percentage of wave
observationa re-
porting swell.




116



135



34



33



32



y R r\ "^ r FT IK

^-^ i I ^ /I -I ■5\i/

.1 -r >. i /, i„„ I ; \i./_




Figure 63. April



107




Figure 64. May



108



122

35r



121



120



119



118



117



116

n35



PREVAILING CURRENT DIRECTION AND
MEAN CURRENT SPEED (Knots)




Figure 65. June



109



122
35[—



121



120



119



118



117



116
n35



PREVAILING CURRENT DIRECTION AND
MEAN CURRENT SPEED (Knots)




Figure 66. July



110




120 119



Figure 67. August



111




Figure 68. September



112




122 121



120 119



Figure 69. October



13



NOVEMBER

PREVAILING CURRENT DIRECTION AND
MEAN CURRENT SPEED (KnoU)



135




122 121



120 119



117 116



Figure 70. November



114




122 121 120 119



117 116



Figure 71 . December



115



RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE OFEF SITING

It is recommended that one or more of the Phase 2 and Phase 3 farms be located
in the southern Cahfornia offshore region from 32° 30'N to 34°N and from 1 17° 30'W to
120°W. If dynamically-positioned farms have not been completely engineered by the time
large-scale OFEF's are ready to be tested, a number of possible locations exist in water shal-
low enough to allow for mooring. One possible offshore region is the zone from Cortes Bank
at 32° 30'N, 1 19°W northwest past San Nicolas Island to Santa Rosa Island at 34°N, 120°W
(Fig. 49). This region is called the Santa Rosa-Cortes Ridge and is a relatively shallow region,
100 to 500 fathoms (180 to 900 meters), 24 to 40 kilometers across and covering approxi-
mately 5000 square kilometers (1,280,000 acres). Other possible regions include the area
south of site 1 between commercial and pleasure traffic zones covering about 1300 square
kilometers of nearshore sites and the area northwest of San Clemente and Catalina Islands,
33° 15'N to 34°N and 118° 20'W to 1 19° 20'W, encompassing about 2600 square kilometers
(not including shipping lanes). These areas could conceivably support some 22 Phase-1 (405
square kilometer) farms, all within 120 kilometers of potential support and processing cen-
ters. As dynamically-positioned farms are engineered and built, and as international agree-
ments are made, the farms could spread further west and south, thus opening up millions
of square kilometers to potential OFEF farming.



116



SURVEY OF OCEANOGRAPHIC AND METEOROLOGICAL PARAMETERS

OF IMPORTANCE TO THE SITE SELECTION OF AN OCEAN FOOD

AND ENERGY FARM (OFEF) IN THE EASTERN PACIFIC.

APPENDICES A-E



117



APPENDIX A

SEASONAL NITRATE PROFILES FOR THE EASTERN PACIFIC

OCEAN AREAS AS DEFINED IN FIGURE 1

Data for nitrate profiles were obtained from the National Oceanographic Data Cen-
ter and summarized using the Naval Undersea Center UNIVAC 1110 computer and devel-
oped software.

Nitrate is given in micrograms-atoms/hter on a log scale and are shown to a maxi-
mum depth of 500 meters.



118



RREn TEN - SPRING



c +



0.01



0.1 1
' -■ ' I i I I i I I



IC




IDC



200 -




-IOC



-20C



-300



400 -



-400



500 ^ 1 1 r I I I M l , T I I I I I II 1 r—

0,01 0.1 1

NITRRTE [pg-a/L)



I 1 1 1 1 I I



10



-500



100



Figure A. 1 .



119



RRER ELEVEN - SPRING



100-



200




100



-200



300



-300



400'



■400



500 4-



0.01



I I I M I I I I I I I I I I



0.1 1

NITRRTE [pg-a/L;



10



I I I



4-500



100



Figure A.2.



120



nREfl TWELVE - NINTER



0.01 0.1
^1 1 1 — I



100 -



200



LiJ



330 -



400



500 \ 1 1 — I . I I M l



0.01




I 1 I

NITRRTE (pg-a/L)



J I I I I 1 -1-500



Figure A. 3.



121



RRER TWELVE - SPRING




-100



-200



-3O0



-400



NITRATE [pg-a/U



I I I if 500

100



Figure A.4.



122



RREfl TWELVE - SUMMER




400



1 — I 'I I I M I 500
100



NITRRTE (gg-a/U



Figure A. 5.



123



RRER TNELVE - FALL

0.1 1 10




I I I r

NITRATE (pg-a/L:



-100



-200



-300



-400



500



Figure A.6.



124



nRER THIRTEEN - NINTER



0.01



0.1



200-



Q_
U2
Q



400 -



10

I M I



100

W-0




-100



-200



-300



400



500 I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I < I I 1 1 1 1 — I I 1 I I I ! 500

0.01 0.1 1 10 100

NITRATE (pg-a/L)



Figure A. 7.



125



flRER THIRTEEN - SPRING



100 -



200



300-



400 -



500



0.01




I I I I I I I I I



0.1 1

NITRRTE (Mg-o/L)



10



100
' ' "'1



100



200



300



400



-I — I I f I I i | -500
100



Figure A.8.



126



RRER THIRTEEN - SUMMER



0.01



100 -



0.]



I I I I 1 1 1



200 -




100
^-4-0



■100



-200



300



-300



400 -



-400



500 ?

0.01



I I I I I I



NITRATE (pg-a/L:



10



-1 r 1 . I I 1^ 500



100



Figure A. 9.



127



RREfl rOURTEEN - WINTER



0.01 0.1

Q i I



200-



X

U2
Q



300-



400-



1 10 100

' ' ' I ... I ■ I . . ..... I I Q



500 \ I' I I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I I 1 1 1 1

0.01 0.1 1 10



NITRRTE (pg-a/U



100



-200



•300



400



-I — I I I M M 500
100



Figure A. 10.



128



RREfl FOURTEEN - SPRING



O.OI



0.1





100 -



200



300-



400




500 h



I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I M I



0.01



NITRRTE (pg-a/U



100



-100



200



-300



400



1 1 I 1 M ! 500
100



Figure A. 11 .



129



RREfl FOURTEEN - SUMMER



0.01 0.1 1 10 100



100-



200-



300-



400-



500 t I I I I I 1 I 1 1 I I 1 I I I 1 1 1 I



0.01



n 1 1 — ! 500



NITRflTE (Mg-a/U



10



100



-200



-300



-400



100



Figure A. 12.



130



RREfl SEVENTEEN - WINTER



0.01



IOC



200 -



300 -



400-



500




0.1 1 10

NITRATE (^Jg-a/U



Figure A. 13.



131



RREfl EIGHTEEN - SPRING

O.OI 0.1



400-



1 U

' ' ■ ' . I . ■ I I I




100
"4-0



-100



-200



-300



400



500 I I I I I I I I 1 1 I 1 I 1 I I I 1 1 I I I I I I 1 1 1 I I I I I I I M 500

0.01 0.1 1 10 100

NITRRTE (pg-a/L)



Figure A.M.



132



RREfl EIGHTEEN - FRLl



0.01 O.I

Q 1 ■ ....... 1



100



200 -



300 -



400 -



500 -f



0.01



1 10 100

' ' ' ' ' ' ....... I Q



I I I I I I I I



NITRRTE (pg-a/U



I I I 1 1 1 1 I

10



-100



200



-300



400



I I I I T 500
100



Figure A. 15.



133



flRER NINETEEN - NINTER



400 -



500 -



0.01



I I I I I I I
0.1




I I I I I f I I I I I I I 1 I M

NITRATE (pg-o/U



I I I I I 1 1 500
100



Figure A. 16.



134



RREfl NINETEEN - SPRING



0.01



100



200 -



300-



400-




500 -^ , r

0.01



I I I I I I



0,1 1

NITRRTE (Mg-a/Ll



100



200



-300



400



I I I I I I f 500
100



Figure A. 17.



135



RRER NINETEEN - SUMMER



100



200-






400




300-



500 f II I I 1 I I 1 1



NITRRTE (Mg-a/L)



100

^-4-0



-100



-200



-300



■400



I I I I 1 1 500



100



Figure A. 18.



136



AREA NINETEEN - EflLL



200 -



Q_

D



300 -



400 -



500 -?-



0.01




t I I I I 1 1
0.1



I I I I I I I I I I I —

10



NITRRTE (Mg-a/U



100

- 4-0



-100



-200



-300



I 500



400



100



Figure A. 19.



137



RREfl TNENTY - NINTER



100-



200



300-



400-



500 -^ 1 1 — I I I I I II



0.1 1

NITRATE (pg-a/U



100




Figure A. 20.



138



0.01



AREA TWENTY - SPRING

10



100



200






300-



400 -




100



-100



-200



-300



-400



500 f



I III



O.OI



0.1



NITRRTE (ijg-a/U



I I I I I I I I f 500



10



100



Figure A.21.



139



AREA TWENTY - SUMMER



100-



200



300-



400-




100



200



300



400



500



- I I I 1 I I 1 1 1 I I I I I I 11 I I I I I I I I 1 1

0.01 0.1 I 11

NITRATE (Mg^o/L)



-I 1 — I I I M I ! 500



100



Figure A.22.



140



RRER TNENTY - PflLL



O.Dl



100



200 -



300-



400




500 \ I I I I I I I 1 1 I I I I I I 1 1 1



0.01



0,1 1 10

NITRRTE (pg-o/L)



100
"4-0



100



■200



-300



■400



I I I I I 1 1 I I I



! 500



100



Figure A.23.



141



APPENDIX B

Seasonal temperature profiles for survey areas shown in Figure 1 . Temperature data
is from the National Oceanographic Data Center and represents all hydrocasts of record for
the season and area depicted.

Temperature envelopes give an approximation of minimum and maximum tempera-
tures at various depths and the range of depths at which the thermocline is located.

Figure B.l shows the geographic location of survey areas 1-9.



142




Figure B. 1. Geographic location of survey areas 1-9, southern California area.



143



flREfi one: - N INTER



O




TEMPERRTURE [C'l



Figure B.2.



144



RREfi ONE - SPRING




10 15 20

TEMPERRTURE (C)



2'3



Figure B.3.



145



RRER ONE - SUMMER



100-



20C



300-



400



500




10 15 20

TEMPERRTURE (Ci



30



Figure B.4.



146



nREfl ONE - FALL



lOC-



Q



30C -



40C -



50C




10 15 2C

TEMPERRTURE (C^



25



_ 2Q(j



-300



-400



50G



30



Figure B.5.



147



RRER TWO - WINTER



Q




500 T—-




10 15 20

temperature: (o



-100



200



300



400



-500



Figure B.6.



148



200-



X
£-1

a.

Q



300



400-



500



nREfl TNO - SPRING



c

-


} 5

I— 1 — 1 — i—i — 1 1 1


10
1


15


20


25










0^ ■




100 -




w













Ml









20



TEMPERATURE (C)



Figure B.7.



30



-100



-200



-300



■400



149



nREn TWO - SUMMER



100-



200



300



400-



500 -




T

15 20

temperature: (cj



-100



200




-300



25



30



Figure B.8.



150



RRER TWO - FALL




IC 15 20

TEMPERATURE iCl



Figure B.9.



151



RRER THREE - NINTER



Q_
Q




-30G



-400



SCO



TEMPERRTURE (C



Figure B.IO.



152



AREA THREE - SPRING



ICC



2C-: -



Q



300 -



500




temperature: (o



Figure B.ll.



153



nRER THREE - SUMMER



LJ
C




TEMPERRTURE (CI



Figure B.12.



154



RRFfl ThREE - TALL



a




15 2C

TEMPERflTu'RE (C1



Figure B.13.



155



RRER FOUR - NINTER



5 10 15

.1 L




10 15 20

TEMPERRTURE tCl



25



30



Figure B.14.



156



nRER FOUR - SPRING




T

10 15 2C

temperrture: (o



30



Figure B.15.



157



RRER FOUR - SUMMER







10 15 20

TEMPERATURE (C)



3C



Figure B.16.



158



RRER FOUR - FRLl



G_
O




TEMPERRTURE (C1



Figure B.17.



159



RRER FIVE - WINTER




TEMPERRTURE (C1



Figure B. 18.



160



nREfl FIVE - SPRING




50G



;C ;5 20

TEMPERRTiJRr (Ci



Figure B. 19.



161



nRER FIVE - SUMMER




10 15 20

TEMPERflTURE (CI



Figure B.20.



162



AREA FIVE - FALL




500



10 15 20

TEMPERATURE (C)



30



Figure B.21.



163



AREA SIX - WINTER



ICC-



2dL) ~



3CC-



4CC-



5CC




T
IC 15

TEMPERRTURE fC]



Figure B.22.



164



RREfl SIX - SPRING




10 15 2G

TEMPERATURE (CI



25 30



Figure B.23.



165



RREfl SIX - SUMMER




TEMPERRTURE (C)



Figure B.24.



166



flRER SIX - PRLL




-300



4GC



10 15 20

TEMPERRTURE (Ci



Figure B.25.



167



nREfl SCVEN - WINTER




10 ;5

TEMPERfiT^RE tC'



Figure B.26.



168



fiREfl SEVEN - SPRING







5DC



ID 15 20

TEMPERRTURE fC)



25



Figure B.27.



169



RREfl SEVEN - SUMMER



E—
Cl.
M
Q




IC 15 20

TEMPERflTURE (C^



25



30



Figure B.28.



170



flREfl SEVEN - FALL



Ui

a




TEMPCRRTiJRE fC)



Figure B.29.



171



AREA EIGHT - NINTER




[0 15 20

TEMPERRTURE (C1



Figure B.30.



172



RRFR EIGHT - SPRING




-I — < — . — , — > — p



Figure B.31.



173



RRER EIGHT - SUMMER



L.]




IC 15 2C

TEMPERATURE [Ci



25



3C



Figure B.32.



174



AREA EIGHT - TALL




5CC



-400



10 15 20

temperrture: fci



25



30



Figure B.33.



175



flRER NINE - NINTER



100-



200



a



300-



400 -



500




20

— L-



25



10 15 20

TEMPCRRTURE (C)



— T"
25



30
-i-0



-100



-200



-300



-400



-500



30



Figure B.34.



176



RREfl NINE - SPRING



Q_
Q



-100



-200




TEMPCRflTURE (C



Figure B.35.



177



AREA NINE - SUMMER



100-



200-



Q_
Q



300



400



500




1— ' — >— ' — < — r
15 20

TEMPFRflTURE (C)



25



100



200



-300



400



500



30



Figure B.36.



178



RREfl NINE - PflLL



100 -



LJ
Q




10 15 20

TEMPRRflTURE (C)



25



Figure B.37.



179



:oc -



C3



IOC -



[:;nr



RRER TEN

10



NINTER




tem^er'tilire: (c



Figure B.38.



180



nRER TEN - SPRING



4c:



sec




10 i:. 2c

rEMPERRTURE fd



Figure B.39.



181



RRER TEN - SUMMER







10 15 2G

TEMPERRTlJRE (C)



Figure B.40.



182



RRER TEN - FALL



LJ
C




FE'l^ERRTURE rC^



Figure B.41.



183



flRER ELEVEN - NINTER




10 15 20 25 30
I



10 15 20

TEMPERRTURE (C)



25



-100



-200



300



-400



500



30



Figure B.42.



184



RRER ELEVEN - SPRING



100 -



200



LJ
Q



300



400 -



500




10 15 20

TEMPERATURE (C)



-100



-200



300



-400



500



Figure B.43.



185



100



200-






300-



400-



500



nREfl ELEVEN - SUMMER


1 2 3 4 6 8 9 10

Online LibraryP. F. (Peter F.) SeligmanSurvey of oceanographic and meteorological parameters of importance to the site selection of an Ocean Food and Energy Farm (OFEF) in the eastern Pacific : final report, July 1975-September 1976 : prepared for U.S. Energy Research & Development Administration → online text (page 6 of 10)