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HISTORY PERIODICALS



SAN FRANCISCO HISTOHY CEMTEB



1X1



X



SAN FRANCISCO
PUBLIC LIBRARY

REFERENCE
BOOK



Not lo he liiki'ii from I lie Lihniry



.H/ffTORY P£R10OiCAL4r



CITY-COUNTY



Vol. 22 — Nos. 1 8C2
JAN. -FEB., 1955



SUBSCRIPTION
?5.00 Per Year



OUR TWENTY-THIRD YEAR OF CONTINUOUS SERVICE



THE MAGAZINE



GOOD GOVERNMENT





¥¥X



REED W. ROBINSON
President, Redivod Empire Association




(Set «ory on Page 6)



Page Two



CITY-COUNTY RECORD



January-February, 19"^



LETTERS TO THE
I EDITOR

EAST BAY MUNICIPAL
UTILITY DISTRICT
Editor:

In behall o/ the Board of Direc-
tors and personally I should like
to wish you and thf members of




LOUIS J. BREL'NER. President

Board of Directors
E. B. Municipal Utility District

your staff a Merry Christnias and
a prosperous Neic Year.

The George H. Allen Publica-
tions has been most helpful, dur-
ing the year, in keeping it's read-
ers informed on the operation of
this publicly owned water service
utility for which we are most
grateful.

Many thanks to you for the fine
cooperation which you have ex-
tended East Bay Municipal Utility
District in the year 195^.

Most sincerely,
LOUIS J. BREUNER
President Board of Directors

Editor:

I enjoy the City-County Record
very much indeed. I have copies of
the Record put out many years
ago. They too were excellent but
nothing like the present issues.

The Record is a beautiful job
and certainly full of essential in-
formation. It vi a great help to me
and I would not be wtthout it.

Every best wish for continued
success.

ELIZABETH CAS8IDY
A I tomey-at-Law.



PARK-PRESIDIO LADIES'
CLUB
Editor:

Just a few lin'M of sincere
thanks from the memliKrs of the
Park-Presidio Lridies" Club for
your generosit xhich enabled
three (S) of ou Serxnce men at
Letterman Genei"' H'^rnt'il i,,
place long distance
to their families <i
time.



757642




"This added-on room was hard
to heat ... 'til we got our electric heater!"

says Mrs. Robert Mize, 26 Park Avenue, Mill Valley, California
(shown here with four of her eight children, Steve, Mary Louise, Chuck and Leslie)



"When we added this com-
bination utility-play-guest
room to our house, it couldn't
be connected to the central
heating system. But a mod-
ern electric heater solved our
cold-room problem in a
hurry. We get instant heat —
exactly the degree we want
— automatically."
"We're so pleased, we're hav-
ing a complete electric heating
system installed throughout
our new vacation house."




Whether you need instant
heat for a hard-to-heat room
— or a completely new heat-
ing system throughout your
home— electric heating pro-
%ades the modern, completely
automatic way to get all the
warmth you want. Electric
heat is clean, draft-free, with
no heat wasted. For com-
plete details, see any quali-
fied, experienced, electrical
contractor or dealer, or your
local P. G. and E. office!



Peci/u Gtu andEUctrk Company



It was greatly appreciated by
the lucky ones and made our An-
nual Tree Trimming Party at the
Recreation Hall for our men still
confined at the hospital, a really
complete success.

Thanks again from all of us.
Sincerely,
"VA McCONNELL, Secy.
:•,, h-Presidio Ladies' Club



IRWIN MEMORIAL BLOOD
BANK

of the San Francisco Medical
Society
Editor:

We fiave just received the De-
cember issue of your magazine,
City-County Record, and we wish
to extend our sincere thanks to
those responsible for the blood ap-



peal which appears on the back
cover.

Your continued support of our
blood program is sincerely appreci-
ated.

MRS. CHARLES D. HEMPHILL
Manatiing Director
(Continued on Page 15)



January-February, 1955



CITY-COUNTY RECORD



Page Three



/IshkyMcMunm



funeral Directors

PAUl, E. McCONNELI,

Maoacr

4200 Geary Blvd. at 6th Avenue SKyline 1-8403



i



^el«KOHt ^i9ni4t



2360
FILLMORE ST. |t f: -^ j p^-?5
Comer Washington ^K p^^ V'X

Sin Francisco IS,
California




J FLOWERS of QUALITY SINCE 1905 %

1^ We Telegraph f\owen . . . Large Seieaion 0/ Co\or\u\ Candles (?



City Employees Enjoy Real Savings On FURNITURE
and APPLIANCES ^^

Free Parking al 55 Tenth Street ^~ /^ ^ __ C^

1370 MISSION STREET

HEmlock M667






CITY-COUNTY
RECORD

GEO. H. ALLEN FJitor and Piihli,h»T

RICHARD H. ALLEN :.:z:zz::z.:z:::::^:':^i:zJ^^^

DODDM. McRAE General Counsel

Contributmg Editors:

William Flynn— Record BioRraphies: Whit Henry— Around and About

Publication Office: 3384 - 16th Street, San Francisco 14

Telephone HEmlock 1-1212

"WE'LL CALL A SPADE, A SPADE"

Subscription $5.00 per year. Issued monthly.

VOL. 22 — Nos. 1 ac 2 January-February, 1955



Around and About



HOTEL GOVERNOR



TURK and JONES



SAN FRANOSCO



All Rooms Outside With Bath— Reasonable Tariff

Convenient to Civic Center — Shopping — Theaters — et

Handy Garages - Excellent Grill and Lounges



HOTEL ASTOR

Overlooking San Francisco's

Civic Center

270 McAllister St. San Francisco



Die & Tool Products Co.

Machine Mark, Metal Stamping
341 So. Van Ness San Fr;



ALIOTO'S
Body and Fender Works

1721 - 1 5th Street San Francisct



Daniel's Creamery

Gold Medal Ice Cream



16th a: Sanche



San Francisco



PEERLESS Radio & TV

3721 GE.-itRY BLVD.
San Francisco



WHITE HOUSE
FRENCH LAUNDRY

2549 Clay St. San Francisco 15



LE DU & AHONEY

Auto Reconstruction
131 So. Van Ness San Francisco



REGAL ROOFING CO.

930 INNES AVENUE



FEED BAG

3401 California Strc
San Francisco



DR. S. W. BURTON

1641 O'Farrcll Street
San Francisco



T & W Enameling Co.

1562 Bancroft Street
San Francisco



BAYVIEW
SERVICE STATION

5300 - 3rd Street San Francisc



BOMBO'S CLUB

6221 THIRD STREET
San Francisco



By WHIT HENRY
¥ OFTEN THINK of things gas- who

tronomic, and rightly so. You
would understand if you saw my
waistline, a result of my wife's su-
perb cooking. But sometimes
good plate of beans and a bottle of
ale or beer can make a repast fit
a king. Please notice that I
said a good plate of beans, not the
run of the mill kind. If this inter-
ests you then take yourself to the
Little Shamrock, a small tavern
that has been operated for many
years by Tony Herzo. It is on the
corner of Lincoln and Ninth Av-
enue, right near Big Rec in Gol-
den Gate Park. Tony is well known
to old San Franciscans and is an
active member of the Old Timers
Basebedl Association — and his
beans are famous among ball play-
ers from far and near. Tony has
pictures of early San Francisco
and old time athletes on the walls
and no visitor ever had a dull time
within his doors.



AN ALWAYS INTERESTING
"^SPOT to visit in Los Angeles
is the Farmers Market. With per-
mission I quote from a brochure
that was given me when I last
visited there.

"It all started back in 1933, the
year when the Depression was the
only thing really going good.

"Koger Dahlhjelm was working
for a \iidy who owned a bakery-
tearoom. He kept the books for
four dollars a week and all the
date-nut sandwiches he could eat.
Roger noticed that the farmers of
the Southern California country,
side were even worse off than he.
A lot of them were trying to keep
going by operating roadside stalls.
Business was bad.

"Roger began thinking about
this, and he concluded that if all
the roadside stands were placed
together in a location in town,
they would do better. He exphiined
the idea to Fred Beck, a friend



was an advertising fellow.
Fred thought it wa-s a good idea
too. So they started looking for a
big 6eld in town where the far-

( Continued on next page)



Hoiv well

do you know

San Francisco?




"ven most lifelong residents of
the Bay Area haven't visited ail
the famous landmarks that have
made San Francisco beloved the
world over. If you're a stranger, a
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're
a native, you'll still find a tour ex-
citing, informative, entertaining.
Be sure to tell visiting friends;
Take a Gray Line tour of San
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands
do — every year and say, "There's
nothing lik; it!"

Passengers ride in spedally built,
luxurious parlor cars: trained,
courteous driver-guid-:s tell you
the background story of the places
you visit: fares arc surprisingly
low.

U-Drives,

Limousines,

Charter Buses

available

Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET
•YUkon 6-4000



Page Four



CITY-COUNTY RECORD



January-February, 1955



N and W FINE FOODS. Inc.

In Major Citui All 0,,r ihc » orUl

155 Berry Street San Francisco 19, Calif.

Jim Leu

RICHFIELD SERVICE

398 So. Van Ness Avenue San Francisco



Hugh Williamson

FURNITURE
MANUFACTURER



iSt.



San Francisco



IMPERIAL MEATS

"Quality Meals

al All Times"

593 O'FARRELL STREET

San Francisco



Lloyd's Mobil Service
Station

lOlh & Harrison Street
San Francisco, Calif.



Duval's

STUDIO CLUB

- JOHN :-: PAUL —

309 CORTLAND AVENUE
Mission 7-9981



FIL-AMERICAN
SMOKE SHOP

GArfield 1-9818

854 Kearny Street



COHEN BROS.

Strictly Kosher Market
1143 McAllister St. WEst 1-1133



Associated Transcribing
Service

1623 Market St. San Francisco



WORLD THEATER
649 Broadway

Telephone YUkon 2-60H5
S.in Fr.incisco 11, California



VIFM-VIENI

OPERATIC

ENTERTAINMENT

1313 Stockton St. S.Tn Francisco



SEVEN SEA'S

n Sessions Every Morving
18 TURK STREET
San Francisco



U. S. LAUNDRY &
CLEANERS

240 - 12th Street San Francisco



Phune G.Arheld 1-i:



Passetti Trucking Co.

Dump Truck & General Hauling

Debris Boxes - Lumber Carrier
264 aementina St. San Francisco



HANSEN
HARDWARE CO.

230 - 9th Street

HEmlock 1-2491



\R\I AHHNEX



UNderhiU l.riSI



Le Du & Ahonen, Inc.

Auto Reconstruction
Bumper Fender and Body Service

Beat Wheel Aliening and
Frame Straightening Equipment

131 SOUTH VAN NESS San Francisco



ACADEMY

OF

ADVERTISING ART



47 Keamy Street Sa

Phone: GArfield 1-4500



SNYDERKNIT

Snyder Bros.
Knitting Mills

120 EIGHTH STREET

San Francisco 3. California



CUSTOM FURNITURE FINISHING

Cherry's

OF SAN FRANOSCO

PIANOS ■ PERIOD FURNITURE

ANTIQUES • OFFICE FURNITURE

FI.XTURES



A. M. C3NOR.\TO



RAHO HOUSEWARES



// you .
2132 Che;



i'( find it try Ratio's



MARVEL CLEANERS

1501 California Street
San Francisco



HOUGHTON RIFFLIN
CO.

500 Howard St. San Francisco



Maydwel & Hartzell, Inc.

1 58 - 11 th Street San Francisco



WHIT HENRY

iCimtiniled from Page 3l
nicr.s could hrint; their veffptables
. . . jind thf highest and best field
of all was the one at West Third
Street and Fairfax.

"The field belonged to Earl B.
Gilmore. California oilman, and
\va.s, in fact, a corner of the old
Gilmore Farm that Earl's father,
.\rthtir Fremont Gilmore, had pio-
neered. Earl thought Roger's idea
was prettj- sound, which it was.
Earl said sure, they could use his
laud, so next came the job of in-
teresting the farmers.

"This wasn't easy.

"But Roger liept at it, talking
to egg producers and fruit ranch-
ers and truck farmers and so on
. . . and at last on a sutmy July
day in 1934 the Farmers Market
opened.

"There were just 18 stalls at the
beginning, but this idea worked
fine. Roger made sure that the
eggs were the freshest, and the
vegetables were still damp from
the morning soil. Pretty soon one
housewife told another and busi-
ness was good at the Farmers
Market.

"Today there are more than 150
stalls and shops, and the market
is growing all the time.

"In the food section there are a
big grocery store and a dairy bar,
coffee stands and six bakerj-
places, honey stalls and home-
made jams. There are specialty'
meat shops and a couple of flor-
ists, wonderful fruit and vegetable
stalls and just about everything
you could think of. There are little
kitchens and restaurants serving
special foods ranging from ham-
burgers to Shrimp Louie to en-
chiladas to almond duck.

"The Farmers Market has its
own post office, telegraph station,
and Railway Express Agency.
There is a new laundry and dry.
cleaning service, a shoe repair
shop and two Notaries Public on
the premises.

"In the Stores Section are gift
shops and dress shops, and shops
offering delightful things imported
from ail over the world.

"It is estimated that 40,000 peo-
ple visit the Farmers Market every
day during the year — not counting
Sundays. People from all over the
world know about the >Iarket and
almost any day there will be cars
in the parking lots from every one
of the 48 states.

"People use words like 'fabu-
lous,* 'amazing,' and 'quaint' when
they talk about the Farmers Jlar-
ket. They say it's like a Parisian
side walk oafe; an oriental bazaar;
a church social .... it all depends
upon where they are from and
what mood they're in. They all
agree, however it's the darndest
place they've ever seen. You really
have to see it to believe it."

/^LOSELY AKIN to the Farmers
^ Market Stoiy is the Gilmore



Story. The Farmers Market hunk-
ers on the southwest corner m
Gilmore Island"- so named h.
ause foi- many years this plot "
land owned by Earl Gilmore wh
an island of county land surround
:ompIetely by the city of Lo>
Angeles. The ston,' of "Gilmore !.«-
land" and the Gilmore family i.«
as fabulous as the story of the
Farmers Market,

Back in 1870. when Los Angeles J
was still huddled along the banks
of the Los Angeles River. Arthur
Fremont Gilmore owned a part,
nership in two ranches. One was
east of Los Angeles. The other
was part of the original Rancho
LaBrea to the west of the city.
When the partners dissolved their
agreement, they drew straws to
divide the property. A. F. Gilmore
drew the west ranch — then 256
acres of wild country between Los
Angeles and the ocean. For a time.
Gilmore operated his ranch as a
successful dairy farm. One day.
while drilling for water, he struck
oil and that was the beginning of
the Gilmore Oil Company.

It was also the end of the dairy
business.

A. F.'s son Earl, grew up in the
oil business and developed the Gil-
more Oil Company into the largest
independent oil business on the Pa-
cific Coast. On the northwest cor-
ner of the old farm he built Gil-
more Stadiiun where midget auto
racing originated. (The care used J
Gilmore gas and oil. I Later ap-
peared Gilmore Field, a baseball
park where the Hollywood Stars
make their headquarters. In 1934
the Farmers Market was added to
the activities on the "Island," and
since then a modem Drive-In The-
ater.

In 1950 Gilmore Stadium was
pulled down to make way for the
new CBS Television City. Smack
in the middle of the "Island" and
surrounded by all these flourishing
enterprises is the Gilmore home —
built around the original old
adobe. Earl is one of the few men
who can truthfully state that he
sleeps in the bed in which he was
born.

"Gilmore Island" is now within
the limits of the City of Los An-
geles, but still retains it's old nick-
name.



OCEAN VIEW
BAKERY

Whipped Cream Good
Our Specially
98 Broad Street Sa



Ideal Sewing Machine Co.

We Sell and Repair All Kinds

of Sening Machines

3006 MISSION STREET



Ace Venetian Blind

Laundry

Traverse Rods - Cornice Boxes

- Roller Shades -

473 Bryant St. San Francisco



January-February, 1955



CITY-COUNTY RECORD



Page Five




PACIFIC GREYHOUND'S MERRY MILES

A Young Woman of Charm and Personality

(By KECOKD ST.\FF WKITEK)

Editor's Note — A few weeks ago, the membership of the Park-
Presidio Ciinc Club had the privilege of meeting and listening to the
young woman whom we are featuring as our "Woman of Distinction"
for this issue. The Editor of the Record was present and was so im-
pressed by the charm, ability and personality of this young executive,
that we secured the background material for this article. If/e feel cer-
tain that our readers ivojild want to know more about "Merry Miles"
who has taken the travelling public by storm in the past few monthn.
and who through the generous advertising of the Pacific Greyhound
Lines, has become a person of great interest throughout the seven
Western States. Truly a "Woman of Dlitinction!"

Ql K VOTE FOR WOMAX-OF-THE-MONTH is the new travel per-
^-' sonality. Merry Miles, who was introduced by Pacilie Greyhound
Lines last Fall and has been featured ever since in advertising
throughout the seven western states served by the Western division
of Geryhound. The name has also been adopted by Overland Greyhound
Lines, with headquarters in Om-,^.



aha. and Southwestern Greyhound
Lines, whose main office is in
Foit Worth. Tex. These compan-
ies have appointed feminine
"stars" of their own to use the
Merry Miles name.

Meny Miles is more than a
trade chai'acter: she is a I'eal life
person, a petite, slender brunette
with an infectious smile, who acts
as a travel advisor and goodwill
ambassador foi- Pacific Greyhound
in many of its contacts with the
public. In addition to promoting
the various services of the com-
pany in local and regional adver-
tising, and writing a newspaper
column titled "Travel Smiles, by
Merry Miles." she makes personal
appearances before clubs, schools,
church gi'oups and other organ-
izations at state fail's, opening
ceremonies of new depots, intro-
ductions of new equipment, inaug-
uration of routes, and many other
functions.

The name Merry Miles was, of
coiuse, coined, and while it is a
quite believable name, the words,
also connote "happy travel." and.
because of her connection with
Greyhound, it especially means
happy travel by Greyhound bus.
The Greyhound people offer the
public "meri'y miles" to alt Amer-
ica, according to their advertising.
and are featuring this theme ag-
gressively with theii' new trade
personality.

Some of the outstanding Grey-
hound services that are being pro-
moted under the Merry Miles name
ai'e pre-planned vacations, Slum-
ber-Stop Service, and thru-express
schedules. The bus company is also
using Merr>' Miles extensively in
the public showings of the Grey-
hound Scenicruiser. amazing new
double-deck bus, which is now in
servile between San Francisco and
Chicago.



Merry Miles is believed to be the
first trade character of her type
used by a transportation com-
pany; that is, a travel personality
used not merely as a symbol in an
advertisement, but also as a good-
will ambassador to carry the com-
pany's messages of new and im-
proved services to the public b>-
means of personal appearances
and speaking engagements. The
use of Merry Miles in this way is
proving very valuable to Grey,
hound in changing the public con-
ception of Greyhound as simply
"the cheapest way to travel" to a
realization that Greyhound now
offers exclusive travel advantages
due to the gi'eat advancements
that have been made in providing



San Francisco's

fine store for men.

featuring

Oxxford clothes,

Walter-Morton clothes,

Cavanagh Hats,

Alan McAfee shoes.

340 Post Street, San Francisco




A WOMAN OF DISTINCTION



more luxurious equipment, greater
convenience and dependability, and
other features that appeal to trav-
elers of all types.

Advertising featuring M e r r y
Miles is being run in all types of
advertising media, including news-
papers, magazines, radio, televis-
ion and outdoor posters. No doubt
all readers of the City - County
Record have seen, heard or read
the Merry Miles messages in one
or more of these advertising
media. Her voice is heard on radio
progiams and spots, she is being
seen on live television broadcasts,
and advertisements cai-rying her
picture have been printed by the



millions.

Merry Miles is a San Francisco
girl, and her headquarters are in
San Francisco. So, as our Woman-
ofthc-Month. the City - County
Record gives you that preposses-
sing young woman who. through
the magic of advertising and by
virtue of her own natural charm,
has become in just a tew months
one of the outstanding travel per-
sonalities of the West — Merry
Miles of Greyhound!

San Francisco's wannest days
are only about 11.5 degrees higher
in temperature than the coolest
days.



Page Six



CITY-COUNTY RECORD



January-February, 1955



REED W.



President

Redwood Empire Association



(By RECORD STAFF WRITER)



THE RECENT ELECTION OF REED W, ROBINSON of San
Francisco as president of Redwood Empire Association continues
the long chain of competent and highly respected men who have
stood at the association's helm since it's inception more than a quar-
ter century ago.

The association's new head is a successful businessman — a general
partner in Golden Nugget Sweets, Ltd., manufacturers of candy bars.
Headquarters of the 30-year-old concern are at 1975 Market Street,
across from the U. S. Mint.

In addition to his business, Robinson is actively interested in
public affairs and the activities of
innumerable civic organizations.

APPOINTED BY MAYOR

Appointed to the San Francisco
Board of Permit Appeals by May-
or Elmer E. Robinson at the start
of his first term in January, 1948,
Robinsin served with distinction
until he resigned upon his recent
election as president of the Red-
wood Empire Association in order
to devote full time to the new job.
While a member of the Permit Ap-
peals Board he ably served as
president during 1953.

He has been active also in the
Civic League of Improvement
Club holding various important as-
signments and at present is a
member of the board of governors
of the organization.

He is a former director of the
Veterans Home at Yoimtville; past
president of St. Francis Home As-
sociation; a former commander of
the 363rd Infantry Post, American
Legion; and former pi'esident of
the 91st Division Association.

WORLD WAR I

During World War I, Robinson
served as First Sergeant in "A
Company" in the 91st Division
with Chief Justice Earl Warren,
who at the time was First Ser-
geant of "I Company." Robinson
later served in the 3rd Division
with the occupation troops in Ger-
many.

He is (.'urrentlN' a member of
San Francisco Press and Union
League Club, serving on it's im-
portant Admissions Committee;
Elks' Club. American Legion and
Veterans of Foreign Wars. South
of Market Boys Clubs. Saint.s and
Sinners, and Oregon Cavemen.

Although boi-n in a log cabin on
his father's tobacco farm near




REED W. ROBINSON
Presided, Redwood Empire Assn.

Croley, Kentucky, Robinson has
spent most of his life in the San
Francisco area. He saw San Fian-
cisco burn in the earthquake of
1906. his family having moved to
Oakland in March of that year,
and was on hand for the great re-
building.

Because Robinson's widowed
mother had four children to sup-
port, his business life began at the
age of 10. Salary for his first job
was $1.50 a week. His mother, a
former teacher, educated him dur-
ing his free hours.

Through his initiative, Robinson
became associated with the sta-
tionery specialty business, later
entering the candy business.

Today, Robinson has several in-
ventions to his credit, among them
Quick Fudge which is marketed
by a large national organization,
and Drivert, a special sugar used
by bakers and confectioners.

He is presently a director of the
National Confectioners A s s o c i-



ation and is serving as chairman
of the employer-employee rela-
tions committee of that organiza-
tion.

Robinson regards in strictly a
business light the work of Red-
wood Empire Association in stimu-
lating tourist-vacational interest
in Redwood Empire, and obtaining
large sums of State and Federal
funds for the improvements of
highways in San Francisco, Gol-
den Gate Bridge and Highway Dis-
trict, and Northbay counties.

LONG ASSOCIATION

Dining his five-.vear association
with REA he has become intimate-
ly acquainted with its organiza-
tion through his former capacities
as chairman of the budget com-
mittee and senior vice-president.

He regards the association as
one of San Francisco's intangible
assets whose actual worth is best
measured by its accomplishments
over a long period of years.

"Outside of several other smal-
ler areas in California, we have the
only redwood trees in the woiid
and those giant redwoods — some
of them older than Christendom —
are of universal interest," he com-
mented.

Large numbers of visitors are
attracted to the Empire vacation-
spots by the association's public-
ity. These attractions, in addition
to the redwoods, include San Fran
Cisco's Chinatown and mile-long
Golden Gate Bridge, Marin Coun
ty's Muir Woods, Napa County's



Online LibraryPacific Publication CompanyCity-county record (Volume v.22 (1955) - v.24 (Nov. 1957)) → online text (page 1 of 134)