Pennsylvania. Dept. of Factory Inspection.

Annual report of the Factory Inspector of the Commonwealth of ..., Volume 8 online

. (page 91 of 93)
Online LibraryPennsylvania. Dept. of Factory InspectionAnnual report of the Factory Inspector of the Commonwealth of ..., Volume 8 → online text (page 91 of 93)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


1


Jan. 5, ...


....


I






1
8


2
12

20
80






Jan. 5, ...


L_.......


Aug. 1, ...




! '


Aug. 1. ...' ' i




t


Aug. 8, ...


- 1 ■ 1


1


.\.x.^^


Aug. 2, ...




r";


Aug. 8 '


^ ' 1 1


Aug 1, ...|


1 1


May 6 I '


2

....„
1


4 ....


^ 1

May 6


25
220




May 6


2K ....'... J '


May «


1
80 16 ....!


May 7 '


55 .... '


' • )

May 7


50 »>


....1


May 7


14
260
14
40

1
1
2
1
21




1 j


May 7


60




Aug. 1, ...' '


1 1


Aug. I, ...1


1

! '"


Aug. 2, ...'


Aug. 8,


1


Jan. n,




1


Jan. 21 ..








i"'"




Jan. 5. ...








«






Jan. 21, ..














Aug. 1, ...




1






40, 6

10 1 4






T'"


Feb. 5, ...




i




1


....




..,.!....



Note.— c means compliance.



Digitized by



Google



1134



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE Off. Doc.

REPORT OP WILLIAM A. CARNEY, PITTSBURG.



1

I*

s
z



Name of Factory or Workshop.


Location.


Goods Manufactured.


14


Pittsburg Brewing Co

Pittsburg Brewing Co.,

Pittsburg Brewing Co

Pittsburg Gas Co

PItUburg Meter Co.

Pittsburg Oil Refining Co

Rea & Co

Republic Iron Works,


21st and Josephine sta

26th & Sarah St.,

34th and Carson st

2d av


IJrewing beer, etc


22
35


Brewing beer, etc.,

Brewing beer, etc


70


Gas


64


East Pittsburg


Meters


8S


429 First av

2d av..

24th and Carson st

24th to 26th St

513 First av

1918 Carson st

29th and Carson st

434 Second av.,

1317 Carson st


Oil warehouse


80


Pork packing


19


Puddled Iron


20


Republic Iron Works,


Bar iron


93


Runker, Frank X.,

Sack, G.,


Ornamental iron,


3


Merchant tailor,


26


Sanz, M. & Son,


Bolts, nuts and spikes, ....
Elevators,


85


Seelar Elevator Works,

Shoenfeld & Co

Shuette, Wm., & Co

Snyder Bros

Stender, S E


6


Merchant tailor


12


21st and Mary st

2325 Carson st

437 First av

2l8t and Wharton st.,

2d av


Planing mill work,


21

90


House furnishings

Brass and steel pipe,

Glass


8


U. S. Glass Co.,


69


United Traction Co

Waite, Wm.,

Walker Brush Co


Generating electricity,


23


25th and Jane St.,

20th and Carey alley,

East Pittsburg,


Planing mill work


10


Brushes,


61


Westlnghouse Electric Co.,

Westlnghouse Machine Co

Wilson, Snyder & Co

Wolf, J. N., Soap Co.,


Electrical supplies, ,


62


East Pittsburg


Engines


82


2 to 18 Ross St.,

23d st


Machinery,


16


Soaps,







Places or establishments Inspected, 64. Number employed: Males, 19,070; females, 906; under



Digitized by



Google



No. 15. FACTORY INSPECTOR.

ALLEGHENY COUNTY, TWENTIETH DISTRICT—Contlnued.



1135



i




Orders Compiled.
















e










B


•0


o


i




1




i


1


o

1

1




1


3


S

£


Is

1^


1



Number Employed.



Number of
acoldenU.



Jan. 5, .
May 3. .
May 8. .
Aug. 1. .
June 27,
Au«r. 3. .
Auer. 3, .

Feb. 5, .
Feb. 5, .
Aur. 8, .
Jan. 21,
Mar. 6, .
Ausr. 3, .
Jan. 22,
Jan. 5, .
Mar. 5. .
Aug. 2, .
Jan. K, .
June 28.
Mar. B. .
Jan. K, .
June 24,
June 25.
Augr. 2. .
Feb. 5, .



J I.

I i



•i r



21, 2.264; males U-16, 2SS; females U-lf, S.
Note.— c means compliance.



Good
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.



47

16

46

103

90

6

86

350

600

5

6

87

18

6

50

8

5

215

16

15

28

5.290

1,650

* 125

48



30 , 15 '



% t ....I



I I



15 ' 68 80



.... 2

4 8

825 , 920

....' 85

.... 20

12 I 7



Digitized by



Google




(1136)



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



FACTORY INSPECTION DISTRICTS

Digitized by VjOOQIC



N ALLEGHENY COUNTY FOR 1902.



Digitized by



Google



\



Digitized by



Google



SOMMAiy OF ISSPECTIiS.



72—15—1901



Digitized by



Google



1138



ANNUAL RBPORT OF THE Off. Doc.

NUMBER OP ESTABLISHMENTS AND EMPLOYES





Population. 1901.








Factory.










i









































o








































A




















a
















1




«














Counties.




b


n


















2


s










<o




'


s


c


1

m




s


d




9

s




m


d


V


3







u


s


d




1 i


&


o


1


«
S


£


1


1





TotalB.



Adams

Allegheny. .
Armstrong.
Beaver. . . . ,
Bedford, . . .

Berks

Blair

Bradford,

Bucks

Butler

Cambria, . .
Cameron.
Carbon, ....
Centre



SM.8
26,9
28.1
19.1
80.2
42.^
29.1
S5,:
28.2
66,^
8.8
23.^
21.^



Clarion,

Clearfield,

Clinton,

Columbia,
Crawford,
Cumberland,
Dauphin, . . .
Delaware, . . .

Elk

Erie

Fayette, —

Forest

Franklin, ...

Fulton,

Qreene

Huntingdon,
Indiana, —
Jefterson, ...
Juniata, . . . .
Lackawanna,
Lancaster, . .
Lawrence, . .
Lebanon



1,487
L.782

Chester, 48,204

(.982
!,664
[.634
1.947
L.483
1,82&
'.971
r.S22
(.454



8S0


869,206


99,806


2.510


82,947


13,488


18,480


1,286


9U


26,840


4,786


60


4,886


884


687


88


981


27.461


8,499


116


7,345


1.148


2,157


483


982


19.586


1,406


72


1.853


60


167


23


280


79.S85


27.570


562


19,6S5


7,409


6.187


9,063


480


42,669


12.666


130


U.824


1.191


2.426


169


906


29,497


8.610


161


8.143


822


296


28


70«


86.484


6,477


108


8.854


2.462


1.661


225


299


28.668


1,871


78


1,2C6


161


239


47


760


48,077


11.800


118


11.408


369


1.918


m



3.212
21.073
21,162
47.491
17,351
38,060
14.568
19.949
82.210
26,019
56,472
47.440
14,449
48,786
49.564

6,004
27.994

4.897
14,069
17.047
21,369
27,986

8.154
94.173
81.279
27.168
27,118



670
8.753
1,394
8.688
888
8.380
2.691
3.648
8.796
8.376
18.673
13.061
2.749
9.712
4.031



2.274

28

249

994

1.219

2,168

187

18.671

18.045

7.939

7,748



29;

»|

66

75

24 I

97'

.5,

45

95|

81

264 '
101

96
151
100 I



637
8.073 '
1,1»8 I
7.886

259
3,207
2.162 '
8.050
2,227
1.949 I
14.748
9.700
2.227 :
8.564 I
8,712 ,



28

675

178

1,222

95

97

492

683

466

1.865

3.671

8.278

456

965

271



»


1.961


6


21


16


228


88


793


36


1.146


78


2.001


17


122


880


11,943


279


9.360


80


7.629


98


5.909



16

186

61

152

60

6.413

6.397

383

1.743



85
680
171 '

1.4C8
61
438
394
636
816
963

8.332

3,264
316

1.246
794



36
8

41

164

220

278

70

6.796

5.147

886

1.606



84

12 '
228

10 I

126 I

9 I

66



196 I
582 !

8
186 I
198



493
13

124



927
116

10

t27

41

1



140

14

IM

2

2



72
294

867



15

2



11


IS


6


2


13


8


29




88


46


6


6


4S8


1.170


740


168


88


4


149


212



Digitized by



Google



No. 15. FACTORY INSPECTOR.

FOR YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1901.



1139



S

CD

S-



127

9
18

1

78
22

9
16

8
14

1
20

7
S9

6
12
13

7
16
SO
78
34

2
29
17



Bake Shops.



CO



20
1,312
16
34
2

402
49
85
56
13
88
4

54
14
74
C
26
27
12
26
CO

152
8S
2

59
42



a



1,428



1,637



840



1

18 I
4 I
6
3



"V^'ork Shops.



173 7,040 7,246



163



297



£



10,226



227



147



J '.



I . I



13
23 '



51

96 i



15

3 I



2
10



10
1
2
3
6
7
5

41
115

14

»



24

2

6

12

11

15

5

214

895

27

91





1 L ..._J ^^._ _._l _._.!.. _^_. ._._.___.._


; 1 i


1






4 «


1














1


3
4
























1































101


89
62
3
19


19

8


8
1














3






























2

















Digitized by



Google



1140



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE Off. Doc.

NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS AND EMPLOYES



Counties.



Population, 1901.



"3






Factory-



S
S






Lehigh,

Luzerne,

Lycoming

McKean

Mercer

Mifflin

Monroe,

Montgomery, ...

Montour,

Northampton, . .
Northumberland ,

Perry

Philadelphia, ...

Pike

Potter

Schuylkill

Snyder

Somerset

Sullivan,

Susquehanna, . .

Tioga,

Union,

Venango,

Warren

Washington, ....

Wayne,

Westmoreland, .

Wyoming,

York



46.06&
133.522
S7,224
27,056
29,214
11.603
10,700
68,681

7.768
51,286
46. 70S
13,168
634,485

4,451
16,913
90.302

8.597
26.166

6,41S
20,596
25.119

8.666
24.922
20.075
47,977
15,204
86,842

8,635
57,912



47.824
123.599
38.439
24.288
28,173
11.567
10,461
70.314

7.758
48,402
44,209
13,006
659.212

4.815
13,708
82.625

8,707
23.295

5,716
19,448
23,967

8.926
24,726
18.871
44,204
14,963
74.383

8.517
58,501



I 17,112

I 16.590

10.029

I 8.667

I 5,144

2,175

; 1.228

19,964

I 1.959

I 14,967

4,692

927

249,583

12

3. 740

7,120

233

1,309

8C8

1.560

1,741

400

2.674

2,603

7,173

2,013

14,389

13i

18,162



294
1,036

235

103
75
28
36

315
20

166
SO
21
4,701
2
96

232
16
73
36

128

116
22
62
74

101
50

189
9

891



12,079

9,966

7.231

3.170

5.010

1.900

924

16,258

1,600

12.078

3,234

769

168.016

9

3.550

4.299

115

1.108

764

1,448

1,642

396

2,521

2,884

6,810

1,390

13.513

98

12,479



4,935
6,227
2.684

399



4,556

340

2,771

1,375

164

74.467

1

167

2,565

108

89

39

76

69

86

85

44

309

611

928

29

6.659



4,097

6.638

1.814

445

678

250

848

8.597 I

435 ]

3.932 I

1,263

192 j
47,938



[email protected]

151
79
54
11
12

426
90

2(78

78

9

8.3(9



851

1.661

98

196

74

144

139

61

193

366

1.303

664

2.746

39

1,863



159

6
53

4

18 I
17



'2
14
309

129

476

3

293



742

1.003

251

24

5

U

41

354

97

221

117

15

7,350



15
167



34

TT

211

8

602



Digitized by



Google



No. 15. FACTORY INSPECTOR.

FOR YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31. 1901— Continued.



1141



56
35
20
14

S
3
29

4

29

85
4
338
1
9

54
4
6
2
7

12
5
8
5

26
4

39
2

30



Bake Shops.



29
301
65
2S
30
10
14
1^4
13
111
76

4
1,200

2
19
194
10
12

4

l'^
22

8
17
12
52

8
96



107
49
19
10



20

4 '
7 I



10
62



1

10
11



7

3
2
4
2
2
23





Work Shops.




S


s
i


2








^


?3


ii


s


2


1




d

41


a


:^


n


a


1




Xi


OB

"3


1


1


1





5
122
23



3

2
2

19
2
9

21
2

ZS



4

21
3



6.472



9,419 2,110 , 222 ,



Digitized by



Google



(1142)



Digitized by



Google



APPENDIX.



(1148)

Digitized by VjOOQIC



(1144)



Digitized by



Google



OrnoiAL Document, No. 15.



SYNOPSIS OF INSPECTION LAWS.



(Publislied here for ready reference.)



' CONNECTICUT.

No person under the age of 16 years can have the chiw labor,
care, custody, operation, or management of any
elevator.

Factory buildings must be kept clean and suflBcient- sanitary inspec-
ly ventilated. The inspector may order mechanical ap-
pliances to carry dust generated by machinery out of
workrooms. Suitable water closets must be provided
in shops and factories employing five or more persons,
and seats in all establishments for female employes.

Belting, shafting, gearing, drums, and other ma- safeguarda.
chinery must be guarded when deemed necessary by
the inspector. Machinery, excepting steam engines,
must not be cleaned while in motion. Elevator and
floor openings, generally, must be guarded with safety
gates, hatch cavers, and other devices, as the inspec-
tor shall direct, and elevator cars must be furnished
with proi>er safety attachments.

Every story above the first of every schoolhouse, protection from
orphan asylum, insane asylum, reformatory, opera ^^'
house, hall, boarding house with twelve inmates, and
tenement house with five families, must be provided
with more than one way of egress, inside or outside,
and every such building, and in addition thereto, every
factory and workshop employing twenty or more per-
sons above first floor, more than two stories in height,
shall be provided with one or more fire-escapes.

ILLINOIS.

Children under fourteen years of age can not be em- Limitation of
ployed in any factory or workshop, and minors must

(1145)

73



Digitized by



Google



1146



ANNUAL. REPORT OP THE



Off. EKkj.



Santiary inspec-
tion.



produce sworn statements as to age. Office register of
minors must be kept by employers, and a record of
names and ages of minors posted in rooms where they
are employed. Physician's certificate as to the physi-
cal ability of any minor to perform certain labor may
be demanded by inspectors.

Inspectors have access to every place where articles
of clothing are manufactured for sale; with power to
condemn end order destroyed garments found infec-
tious or infested with vermin, and to prohibit the em-
ployment in any dwelling rooms of any person not
a member of the family living therein.



Limitation of
child labor.



Hours of labor.



Safeguards.



Sanitary inspec-
tion.



Payment of
wages.



MAINE.

No child under 12 years of age shall be employed in
any manufacturing or mechanical establishment, nor
any child under 15 years of age except during vacation
of the public schools, unless such child has attended
school sixteen weeks of each year preceding its 16th
year. To secure employment every child must procure
a certificate from the school authorities to the effect
that the school laws are complied with, and it shall
contain the age and birthplace of such child, and be
kept on file for reference by the employer.

No female under 18 years of age and no male under
16 years of age shall work more than ten hours per
day or sixty hours per week. Male minors over 16
years of age, with consent of parents, may contract to
work longer hours, otherwise ten hours is a legal day's
work for such minors. The same rule applies to
women over 18 years of age, with provision that the
limit of over-time for women shall not exceed six hours
in any one week or sixty hours in one year. Employ-
ers must post in every room where minors and women
are employed, a notice in large tyi)e regulating the
hours of labor for such persons.

The inspector must enforce a law requiring the pee-
per swinging of doors in factories and workshops.

Whatever is discovered by the inspector which en-
dangers the life or health of the employes in factory,
workshop, mine, or quarry must be reported to the
local board of health, who must investigate.

Every firm and corporation, including municipal cor-
porations and excluding railroad corporations, employ-



Digitized by



Google



No. 15. FACTORY INSPECTOR. U47

ing more than ten persons, must pay fortnightly all
wages earned by employes.

MASSACHUSETTS.

Children under 13 years of age can not be employed Limitation of

•^ ° 1.1. -T X ^^^^^ labor.

in any factory, workshop, or mercantile establishment.
A sworn statement of the age of all minors under 16
years of age must be obtained and kept by employers.
Children under 14 years of age applying for employ-
ment, must produce a certificate of school attendance
of thirty weeks during the year preceding employ-
ment. In cities where manual training is conducted,
school attendance is required to the age of 15 years.
No child under 14 years of age shall clean nmchinery
operated by mechanical power, and the chief of the
department of inspection, with the approval of the
Governor, may designate what employments are in-
jurious to the health of children under 14 years of age
and prevent their employment thereat. No child
under 15 years of age shall operate or have charge
over any elevator, or any minor under 18 years of
age shall operate or have charge over any elevator
running over 200 feet per minute. Children under 15
years are prohibited from appearing in any circus or
theatrical exhibition.

Minors under 18 years of age, and all women em- Hours of labor
ployed in manufacturing establishments, are prohi- chiwre"®" *"
bited from working more than fifty-eight hours in one
week, and more than ten hours in one day. No minor
under 18 years of age can be employed more than sixty
hours in one week. Legal day's work for both sexes
employed by the State is nine hours, whether employ-
ed by the State directly or by contract for the State.
No child under 14 years of age can be employed in any
establishment before 6 A. M., or later than 7 P. M.,
nor any minor or woman in any manufacturing estab-
lishment between the hours of 10 P. M. and 6 A. M.

All factories must be kept clean and well ventilated; sanitary inspec-
and in factories employing five or more persons, and in
workshops employing five or more children, young per-
sons, or women, inspectors may make such changes,
and compel the application and use of any mechanical
means, without incurring unreasonable cost, which in
their judgment is necessary to secure proper ventila-



Digitized by



Google



1148



ANNUAL. REPORT OF THE



Off. Doc.



Safeguards.



Protection from
fire and other dis-
aster.



Inspection of
steam boilers.



Accidents.



Weekly pay law.



tion. Public buildings and school rooms come under
the factory laws providing for sanitation and ventila-
tion. Sweat shops are regulated by license laws re-
quiring cleanliness in and about the tenement house so
used, and a tag upon all clothing. made under the sys-
tem, guaranteeing that it is free from vermin and all
infectious or contagious matter.

Belting, shafting, gearing and drums in factories
must be securely guarded. Wherever manufacturing
machinery is propelled by steam, suitable communica-
tion must be provided between each room where such
machinery is placed in the engine room, in order to con-
trol the motive power in case of accident. Machinery
other than steam engines must not be cleaned while
running if objected to by an inspector. The openings
for hoistways, hatchways, well holes, and elevators in
all buildings must be protected in such a manner as
inspectors may direct and any elevator deemed dan-
gerous or unsafe by an inspector shall be placarded
as such, and its use prohibited until made safe.

Inspectors may order fire escapes, safe stairways in-
side or outside of buildings, and the altering of doors
and windows suitable for speedy egress in all public
buildings, and all factories, workshops, mercantile es-
tablishments, hotels, tenements, etc., having at any
time more than ten persons, or any floor above the
second, and all such floors shall require suitable means
for extinguishing fire.

Six special inspectors are api>ointed to inspect all
uninsured steam boilers of a certain capacity and used
in connection with stationery engines, or for heating
public buildings, and to examine engineers and fire-
men as to their competency to have charge over such
steam plants.

Engineer or firemen operating boiler must have li-
cense; license must- be renewed at the end of three
years. License fee, f 1.

Manufacturers and mercantile establishments must
re|)ort "forthwith" all accidents resulting in the death
of an employe, or which prevents his return to work
within four days after the occurrence.

The chief inspector can compel all persons and cor-
porations employing twenty-five or more persons to
pay employes their wages weekly, excepting when the
railroad commissioners shall exempt any railroad cor-



Digitized by



Google



No. 15. FACTORY INSPECTOR. 1149

poration from the provisions of this act, if, in their
opinion, any of the employes of said corporation wish
less frequent payment.

The system of grading work now or at any time here- Fines.
after used by the manufacturers shall in no way effect
the wages of a weaver except for imperfections in his
own work, and in on case shall the wages of those en-
gaged in weaving be affected by fines or otherwise, un-
less the imperfections complained of are first exhibited
and pointed out by the pei'son or persons whose wages
are to be effected, and no fine shall be imposed upon
any person for imperfect weaving, unless the provi-
sions of this act are first complied with, and the
amount of the fines agreed upon by both parties.

MICniGAN.

Children under 14 years of age can not be employed ^',^'^^^{3°^ °'
in any factory or workshop. Sworn statement as to
the age of minors under 16 years must be furnished to
employers, who must keep oflSce register of such and
post a record thereof on the walls of workrooms.
Female minors under 21 and male minors under 18
years of age must not be allowed to clean machinery
while in motion.

Males under 18 years and female under 21 years of ^°"" °' ^***°''-
age, can not work more than ten hours in one day, un-
less to make a shorter workday on Saturday, and not
more than sixty hours in one week.

Means must be provided to carry dust from all dust- samtary inspec-
creating machint^ry; separate closets must be provided
for each sex, and wash and dress rooms for all females,
and such closets and dress rooms must be kept in clean
condition.

Elevators, hoisting shafts, or well holes, must be safeguards.
securtul and equipped with trap or automatic doors,
and all gearing, shafting, and other apparatus kept in
safe condition. Hand-rails must be provided on stair-
ways, and stairs screened, and when necessary, stair
steps must be provided with rubber covers.

Factory buildings of three or more stories must be protection from
provided with fire escajK^s, easy of access and free ^^'
from draft of hoist way or stairway. Doors must be
properly hung and op(»n outwardly, and not fastened
during working hours.



Digitized by



Google



1150



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE



Off. Doc,



Limitation of
child labor.



Houn of labor.



Sanitary Inspeo-



Safeguards.



Protection against
Are.



MINNESOTA.

The law forbids any parent or guardian to let or hire
any minor under 21 years of age, nor must any person
wilfully permit any child under 14 years to work at
any employment injurious to health, dangerous to life
and limb, or likely to deprave its morals.

Children under 16 years of age must not be per-
mitted, nor must any woman be compelled, to work
more than ten hours in one day, or to work earlier than
7 A. M. nor later than 6 P. M. of any one day.

All work rooms must be well lighted, heated and
ventilated and kept in clean condition. Exhaust fans
must be adjusted for carrying dust from emery wheels
and grindstones. Separate closets for the sexes must
be provided, and wash and dress rooms where females
are employed, and seats for their use in mercantile
establishments. Bakeries, including hotel and restau-
rant kitchens, must have no connection, within or
without the room, with any water closet, earth closet,
ash pit or other nuisance, and employe or others are
not to be permitted to live or sleep in bakeries.

The law is specific in authority and includes almost
the whole range of machinery employed in industrial
operations. It provides that saws, planers, wood-
shapers, jointers, sand-papering machines, ironing
mangles, set screws, drums, belts, shafting, cables, fly
wheels, dynamos, and other electrical apparatus and
appliance, vats, pans and such other structures, and all
dangerous places in and about factories and other
works must be guarded. Loose pulleys must be ad-
justed where practicable, and shift-belts provided with
shifters. All elevators and other floor openings must
be fenced or otherwise protected, and all elevators sup-
plied with safety devices.

In all factories and other buildings in which people
are employed more than one means of egress must be
provided. Doors leading therefrom must open out-
ward, and be kept unfastened and unobstructed during
working hours. Hand rails on stairways must be pro-
vided, and stairs properly screened when used by fe-
males. One or more fire escapes shall be placed upon
all factory and other such buildings if three or more
stories in height. Plan of escape is defined by enact-



Online LibraryPennsylvania. Dept. of Factory InspectionAnnual report of the Factory Inspector of the Commonwealth of ..., Volume 8 → online text (page 91 of 93)