Peter Samuel.

The Wesleyan-Methodist missions in Jamaica and Honduras delineated; containing a description of the principle stations, together with a consecutive account of the rise and progress of the work of God at each online

. (page 1 of 39)
Online LibraryPeter SamuelThe Wesleyan-Methodist missions in Jamaica and Honduras delineated; containing a description of the principle stations, together with a consecutive account of the rise and progress of the work of God at each → online text (page 1 of 39)
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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES








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THE

WES LEY AN -METHODIST
MISSIONS,

IN JAMAICA AND HONDURAS,

DELINEATED:



CONTAINING A DESCRIPTION OF THE
PRINCIPAL STATIONS.

TOGETHER WITH A CONSECUTIVE ACCOUNT OF THE EISE
AND PROGRESS OF THE WORK OF GOD AT EACH.

ILLUSTRATED BY A MAP AND THIRTY-THREE LITHOGRAPH VIEWS,

EXECUTED FROM DRAWINGS TAKEN ON THE SPOT.



BY THE REV. PETER SAMUEL,

TWELVE YEARS A MISSIONARY IN JAMAICA.



LONDON:
PARTRIDGE & OAKEY, 34, PATERNOSTER ROW;

SOLD BY J. MASON, 66, PATERNOSTEE ROW.
M D C C C L.



. BENNETT, PRINTER, ABERDEEN.



BV



TO

THE REVEREND ROBERT NEWTON, D.D.,

WHOSE UNWEARIED, ELOQUENT, AND

SUCCESSFUL ADVOCACY
OF THE EVANGELIZ A TI ON OF

A PERISHING WOULD,

HAS LARGELY CONTRIBUTED TO RENDEE
THE WE S LE YA N-ME TH ODIST MISSIONARY SOCIETY

ONE OF THE NOBLEST
CHRISTIAN INSTITUTIONS OF THE AGE,

ftije foltofotng Folumc

IS RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED

BV

THE AUTHOR.



662865



CONTENTS.



CHAP. PAflK.

I. ORIGIN OF THE WEST INDIA MISSION. Difficulty of establishing a
Mission Conversion and efforts of N. Gilbert, Esq. Baxter's arrival
and labours Dr. Coke driven to the West Indies Rapid extension
of the Mission, 9

II. PORT ROYAL. First impressions of the Island Scenery Account

of Port Royal Rise and Progress of the Mission 15

III. KINGSTON. Origin and aspect of the city Religious destitution

Dr. Coke begins the Mission Mr. Hammett Parade Chapel opened
Persecution Mr. Werrill dies Mr. Brazier leaves the Island
Success of Messrs. Fish and M'Vean Messrs. Alexander, Campbell,
and Fowler arrive Fresh Persecutions Mr. Campbell escapes to
England Mr. Fish returns home, 25

IV. KINGSTON (Continued) Messrs. Bradnack and Gilgrass arrive

Great prosperity Mr. Knowlan New persecuting Acts passed
Mr. Gilgrass imprisoned the Missionaries silenced Home Govern-
ment memorialized a new Act of persecution passed Mr. Wiggins
imprisoned the Mission prospers Parade Chapel re-opened Mr.
Shipman arrives Circuits formed First District Meeting held a
Second Chapel opened in Kingston Rapid Progress of the Mission, 38

V. KINGSTON (Continued) Messrs Duncan and Young arrive Wesley
Chapel erected Arrival of Messrs. Whitehouse, Jenkins, and Allen
Death of Mr. Allen Objectionable resolutions passed A Dis-
trict Auxiliary Missionary Society formed A new persecuting Act
passed by the Legislature Ebenezer Chapel built Death of Mis-
sionaries Another attempt at legislative persecution Mr. Barry
prosecuted for libel First watch-night service held Alarm of the
Colonists at the progress of Anti-Slavery principles The insurrec-
tion Colonial Union formed Report of the House of Assembly
denounced by the missionaries, 50

VI. KINGSTON (Continued) Earl of Mulgrave succeeds Lord Belmore
Collision between the Governor and Assembly Royal Proclama-
tion against Unions Fury of the Unionists Encouraging aspect of
the Mission Departure of the Earl of Mulgrave Addresses by the
Missionaries, 63



VI J. KINGSTON (Continued) Preparations for Emancipation Gift books
of the Bible Society Celebration of Freedom Rev. Valentine
Ward and party arrive Mortality among the missionaries a Tem-
perance Society formed Prosperity Educational efforts Rev. T.
H. Bewley appointed General Superintendent of Schools Agitation
of the Societies Termination of the Apprenticeship system Jubilee
of the Mission Marriage Act New Coke Chapel opened Great
Fire Special Mission of Mr. Young Promising appearance of the
Mission, 74

VIII. MONTEGO BAY. Situation and appearance of the town Arrival of
Dr. Coke and Mr. Werrill Mr. Fish Conflagration Maroon War
Mr. Fish leaves Mr. Campbell driven away Messrs. Shipman,
Ratcliffe, Whitehouse, and Orton successively appointed A new
Chapel built by Mr. Duncan The Insurrection Mr. Murray prose-
cuted Conduct of Magistrates censured Mr. Murray imprisoned
Persecution put down Messrs. Wedlock and Corbett Emancipa-
tion Death of Rev. Valentine Ward Advancement of the Mission
under Messrs. Kerr, Edney, Mearns, and Fraser, . . . .91

IX, SPANISH TOWN. Description of Spanish Town The mission com-
menced by Dr. Coke Mr. White Mr. Ratcliffe Death of Mr.
Adams Mr. Binning a Society formed at Old Harbour Messrs.
Crofts, Young, and Barry a new Chapel erected in Spanish Town
Mr. Kerr a Chapel built at Old Harbour Persecution Prospe-
rity Messrs. Edmondson and Harding Mr. Chapman stationed in
St. Thomas-in-the-Vale a Chapel erected at Linstead Extent of
the Circuit, 113

X. MOEANT BAY. Situation and appearance of the town Commence-
ment of the Mission Messrs. Williams and Campbell persecuted
and imprisoned Mr. Bradnack placed in favourable circumstances,
labours successfully, builds a chapel Mr. Burgar prospers in his
efforts and dies Mr. Wiggins Messrs. Home and Underbill
Mr. Ratcliffe Mr. Hartley dies Death of Mrs. Ratcliffe and chil-
dren Messrs. Johnstone and Duncan Death of Messrs. Johnstone,
Underbill, Parkin, Penman, and Barr Messrs. Atkins and White-
head labour with great success Messrs. Rowden and Burrows
Account of Yallahs, 126

XI. GRATEFUL HILL. Scenery of St. Thomas-in-the-Vale Origin of the
mission Grateful Hill Chapel built First missionary meeting held
Prosperity of the mission Mr. Whitehouse A chapel erected at
Unity Abortive attempt to destroy Grateful Hill Chapel Mr
Wedlock Electric phenomena Heavy rains Emancipation of the
slaves Earthquakes A negro family Prosperity of the mission
Religious Tract Society's gifts Baptist friends A rude book-keeper
a temperance association formed Agitation, re-action, and im-
provement, 148



CONTENTS. Vll

XII. STONEY HILL. Situation of the station Commencement of the mis-
sion by Mr. Young, and rapid progress A chapel opened at Red-
hillsMr. Grimsdall Mr. W. Wood Mr. Bleby Effects of perse-
cution on the mission Mr. Edney's prosperity a new chapel built
at Redhills Death of Mr. Greenwood Mr. Sergeant, . . . 16*5

XIII. FALMOUTH. Situation and appearance of Falmouth Dr. Coke

preaches at Martha Brae Mr. Shipman begins the Mission Mr.
Binning Mr. Ratcliffe forms a Society Successful efforts of Mr.
Box The insurrection Mr. Box imprisoned Thepeople persecuted
Robert Lamont and John Baillie The Chapel destroyed by
" Colonial Unionists " Mr. Bleby assaulted Meeting of the " Co-
lonial Unionists " Success of Mr. Walters The Chapel re-erected
The mission advances Duncans A prosperous day-school A
Chapel erected Affecting dealh of a negro child, .... 170

XIV. ST. ANN'S BAY. Situation and appearance of the Parish of St. Ann

A mission begun at Bellemont Mr. Shipman invited by Mr. S.
D. Drew Mr. Ratcliflfe forms a Society at the Bay Outrage on Mr.
Ratcliffe and family Persecution arid death of Mr. Grimsdall
Messrs. Whitehouse, Orton and Watkis imprisoned Magistrates
dismissed Mr. Orton tried for perjury Death of Mr. Saxton Per-
secution Chapels destroyed Messrs. Wood and Greenwood driven
from St. Ann's Mr. Greenwood imprisoned, and again driven from
the parish Cheering Success of Messrs. Greenwood and Barr
Messrs. Whitehouse and Wood Death of the latter Death of Mr.
Walters Efforts to rebuild the chapels A chapel built at the Bay
Great success Noble liberality of the people The Circuit divided
Mr. Kerr Liberality and disinterestedness of the people, . . 192

XV. BEECHAMVILLE, WATSONVILLE, AND GUY'S HILL. A Chapel erected
at Bellemont The first Missionary Meeting Death of Mr. Drew
Prosperity of the mission Bellemont vacated The Society removed
to Blackheath Two years' persecution Re-establishment and pros-
perity of the mission Blackheath vacated Beechamville and Wat-
sonville Stations formed Guy's Hill Commencement of the
mission George Stanbury A Society formed by Mr. Edney
united to Oracabessa circuit Mr. Ritchie a Chapel erected by Mr.
Hodgson Enlargement of the circuit, 217

XVI. OCHO-RIOS, BROWN'S TOWN, AND STEWART'S TOWN. Ocho-Rios
Mission begun Imprisonment of Mr. Grimsdall A Chapel opened
The Chapel burnt down by the Colonial Unionists The people
compelled to hold their meetings in the open air for six years Mr.
Whitehouse 's success Death of Miss Jarvis A new Chapel built
Prosperity of the station Want of sufficient Ministerial help
Brown's Town A circuit formed Mr. Randerson Mr. Seceombe
Mr. Foster Stewart's Town Mr. Box forms a Society Mr
Hornby Death of Mr. Bewley Prosperity of the station, . . 230



XVII BATH, ST. THOMAS-IN-THE-EAST. Situation and appearance of Bath
A mission proposed to Messrs. Underbill and Home Premises pur-
chased and a Society formed Successful labours of Messrs. John-
stone, Duncan, Tremayne, Whitehouse, Orton, and Crookes Mr.
Samuel appointed to the circuit Discipline a Negro Funeral
Moral evils of Slavery Death of a slave Messrs. Bleby and
Ritchie Prosperity of the Mission under Messrs. Simmons, Edney,
and Eowden a New Chapel erected Mr. Atkins, . . . 243

XVIII. MANCHIONEAL AND POET MOR ANT. Situation and appearance of
Manchioneal Mr. Bradnack begins a mission Messrs. Underbill
and Home Messrs. Johnstone and Duncan A Chapel built Pro-
gress Mr. Rowden imprisoned Persecution of Mr. Barr Ad-
vancement of the station under Messrs. Gregory, Rowden, Atkins,
and Williams Port Morant Origin of the Circuit A Society
formed at Rocky Point A Society formed at Port Morant by Mr.
Atkins A Chapel erected Rapid extension of the mission Port
Morant made the head of the Circuit Prosperity of the Societies, 257

XIX. PORT ANTONIO AND MOUNT FLETCHER. Description of Port An-
tonio Captain Reece and Mr. Thaxter Mr. Kerr forms a Society
Death of Mr. Ratcliffe Mr. Edney Death of Mr. Vowles Mr.
Greenwood erects a Chapel at Hope Bay Persecution Mr. Row-
den Mr. Crookes Mr. Samuel Success among soldiers Emi-
grants Happy Deaths Mr. Williams builds a chapel Death of
Mr. and Mrs. Davies Mount Fletcher Situation Mr. Harding
erects a Chapel Mr. Hornabrook, 271

XX. CLARENDON AND BLACK RIVER. Extent and aspect of Clarendon
Circuit Halse Hall visited by Mr. Crofts A Station begun at Lime
Savannah Persecution Success of Messrs. Corlett, Bird, Burrows,
and Wilcox A Society formed at Vere Death of Messrs. Wilcox
and Corbett Messrs. Rowden and Jackson Death of Mr. Jackson
A Chapel erected at Lime Savannah, and a Schoolhouse at Vere
Messrs Samuel and Davies Schools opened Success Liberality
of the people Messrs. Hodgson, Lewis, and Thompson Black
River A Mission begun by Mr. SimmonsMessrs. Curtis and
Burrows Death of Mr. Redfern, . . . . . .289

XXI. SAVANNA-LA-MAR, LUCEA, AND MOUNT WARD. Description of
Savanna-la-Mar Mr. Box begins a mission Persecution Messrs.
Inglisand Bleby re-organize the mission Mr. Curtis Mr.Lofthouse
erects a Chapel Death of Mr. Lofthouse Messrs. Randerson and
Moss Lucea Situation of the Town A mission begun Messrs.
Bleby and Seccombe Mr. Chapman erects a Chapel and enlarges
the Circuit Mount Ward Situation Mr. Murray begins a mission
Two years' persecution Mr. Wedlock revives the Society Mr.
Ritchie appointed resident missionary Mr. Lofthonse commences a
Chapel Mr. Curtis Mr. Chapman dies, 301



CONTENTS. IX

XXII. HONDURAS Description of the settlement Belize Mr. Wilkinson
begins the mission Death of Mr. Wilkinson Death of Mr. John-
ston Mr. Wedlock erects a Chapel Mr. Pilley fails to establish a
mission among the Mosquito Indians Mr. Edney extends the mis-
sion The Charibs build a Chapel Messrs. Greenwood and Jefferies
State of the Mission under Messrs. Webster and Collier, . . 311



ORDER OF THE VIEWS.



FAOB.

1. The House in which the Mission was begun to face the

title page.

2. Map of the Stations to face ....... 9

3. Port Royal Chapel, 15

4. Parade Chapel 23

5. Wesley Chapel and School-house, ..... 50

6. Ebenezer Chapel, ........ 55

7. Coke Chapel and Schoolhouse, ...... 87

8. Montego Bay Chapel, 91

9. Beecham Chapel, Sandy Bay, Ill

10. Spanish Town Chapel, 113

11. Morant Bay Chapel, 126

12. Yallahs Chapel, . . .146

13. Grateful Hill Chapel and Premises, -148

14. Stoney Hill Chapel and House, 166

15. Falmouth Chapel, 176

16. Duncan's Chapel, 186

17. Mission House at St. Ann's Bay, 192

18. St. Ann's Bay Chapel, 212

19. Beechamville Chapel and House, 217

|J' } Watsonville and Guy's Hill Chapels, . . . .223

22. Ocho Rios Chapel 230

9Q \

g/ v Brown's Town and Stewart's Town Chapels, . . . 234

25. Bath Chapel and Premises, 243

26. Manchioneal Chapel, 257

27. Port Morant Chapel, 267

28. Port Antonia Chapel, 271

29. Mount Fletcher Chapel, 284

30. Lime Savannah Chapel, 289

31. Savanna-la-Mar Chapel, 301

32. Lucea Chapel, 304

33. Mount Ward Chapel, ....... 306

34. Belize Chapel, Honduras Bay, Oil




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CHAPTER I.



ORIGIN OP THE WEST INDIA MISSION.



Difficulty of establishing a Mission Conversion and efforts of N. Gilbert, Esq.
Baxter's arrival and labours Dr. Coke driven to the West Indies Rapid
extension of the Mission.



THE success which has crowned the efforts of Evangelical Churches
to diffuse the glorious Gospel, within the last half century, calls for
devout thanksgivings, more earnest prayer, and enlarged exertions
on the part of all who long to see the day when " the fulness of the
Gentiles shall be brought in, and all Israel saved." As various
circumstances have operated to acclerate or retard the progress of
the glad tidings of salvation among the heathen, the Mission field
presents a variety of features, more or leas interesting to the religi-
ous public. Each Mission has its extraordinary, as well as its
common-place aspect : its period when incidents, full of all that is
exciting in disclosures of the degraded condition of the human
family abound : when the Missionary has penetrated the dark
places of the earth, with the torch of Gospel truth, and witnessed
the ravages of sin among his fellow-creatures, his discoveries are
sought after with an eagerness proportionate to their novelty, which
gradually dies away, as the ameliorating influence of Christianity
assimilates the once degraded heathen to the ordinary condition of
the professing Christian world.

This fact has received a striking illustration in West Indian Mis-
sions. Who that remembers the thrilling tales generated by
slavery, and the struggle that terminated in its annihilation in the
British colonies, can forget the deep interest felt by every Christian
and philanthropist during these periods ?

As a field for Missionary enterprise the British West Indies were
far from encouraging, from the sacrifice of health and life required
by a climate inimical to European constitutions ; the resistance inhe-
rent in slavery to the spirit and claims of Christianity ; the heteroge-
neous character of the population, from physical as well as social
and political causes ; the mental degradation and absence of educa-
tion ; the pernicious influence of Obeahism and African superstition ;
the stringent discipline necessary to extort labour from the unwilling
captive ; the suspicious light in which every religious teacher was

"C A



10 ORIGIN OF THE MISSION.

viewed by those whose intelligence made them aware of the fact,
that their power must he proportioned to the blindness of their vic-
tims. The immense influence possessed and exercised by West
Indian proprietors in the Parliament of the mother country, as well
as in the Colonial Houses of Assembly, gave a respectability, a con-
sistency, an air of justice, and a degree of power sufficiently formi-
dable to the apparently weak efforts of a few humble missionaries,
whose whole strength lay in the blessing of Him who is pleased by
the most insignificant means to bring about the grandest results of
his moral government.

It is a remarkable as well as pleasing fact, that the Methodist
Mission in the West Indies was originated by a slaveholder, who
was also Speaker of the Honourable House of Assembly in the
Island of Antigua. This gentleman, whose name was Nathaniel
Gilbert, being on a visit to England, was brought to God by the
ministry of Mr. Wesley, who notices him in his Journal of Feb.
17th, 1758 : " I preached at Wandsworth. A gentleman come
from America has again opened a door in this desolate place. In
the morning I preached in Mr. Gilbert's house. Two negro servants
of his, and a mulatto, appear to be much awakened." Again, in
December, he observes : " I rode to Wandsworth and baptized two
negroes belonging to Mr. Gilbert, a gentleman lately come from
Antigua ; one of these is deeply convinced of sin ; the other
rejoices in God her Saviour, and is the FIRST African Christian I
have known. But shall not our Lord in due time have these
heathens also ' for his inheritance ? ' ' Here we have the first-
fruits of the West India Mission : the master and his slave, a
happy pledge of future success.

Mr. Gilbert began to call sinners to repentance ere he left Eng-
land. In 1760, Wesley, on arriving at Bristol, remarks : " I per-
ceived by the liveliness of the people that Mr. Gilbert's labours
had not been in vain." The anxiety he felt for the happiness of
his fellow-men was now particularly diverted towards those in dark-
ness around his West Indian home. He tried to prevail on the
illustrious John Fletcher to accompany him as the first missionary
to his benighted people, as appears from the following extract of a
letter written by that good man, to the Rev. C. Wesley, dated
March 22, 1759 : " A proposal has lately been made to me to
accompany Mr. Nathaniel Gilbert to the West Indies. I have
weighed the matter ; but, on the one hand, I feel that I have neither
sufficient zeal, nor grace, nor talents, to expose myself to the temp-
tations and labours of a mission in the West Indies ; and, on the
other, I believe, that, if God call me thither, the time is not yet
come. I wish to be certain that I am converted myself, before I
leave my converted brethren to convert heathens. Pray, let me
know what you think of this business : if you condemn me to put
the sea between us, the command would be a hard one ; but I might,



ORIGIN OP THE MISSION. 11

possibly, prevail on myself to give you that proof of the deference
I pay to your judicious advice."

Returning to Antigua, Mr. Gilbert invited one or two to join him
in his family worship. " On the afternoon of the first Sunday six
besides his own family attended ; on the second, nine ; and on the
third, about eighteen." It was immediately reported throughout
the island that he had turned preacher ; from this time he lost all
relish for the practice of the law, and felt an exclusive desire to pro-
claim the glorious Gospel ; a natural shame and fear of man to which
he had been subject, entirely left him as soon as he began publicly
to proclaim the word of God. His brother, Francis Gilbert, supported
him ; general attention was excited ; his house, though capable of
accommodating about two hundred, soon became too small for the
growing congregations. Unmoved by the ridicule with which he
was assailed, he continued his efforts as long as he lived ; and
when called to rest from his labours, two hundred negroes, convinced
of sin or converted to God by his ministry, wept over his grave.
Left as sheep without a shepherd, a few were picked up by some
Moravian Missionaries, who arrived about this time in the island,
and the remainder were found by Mr. John Baxter, who, against
the earnest remonstrances of his friends, proceeded to Antigua in
1780 to pursue his business of shipwright in his Majesty's dockyard
in English Harbour. This excellent man, who had been a local
preacher at Chatham, in England, full of zeal to do good, returned
from the exhausting toils of the day only to spend the evening in
instructing the slaves on the plantations ; while all his Sabbath
hours were sacredly devoted to religious labours. Not " counting
his life dear unto himself," he continued steadfast in his career of
usefulness, though assailed by much opposition and persecution.
At length he gave up his situation of storekeeper, with a Govern-
ment salary of 400 currency per annum, trusting his Heavenly
Father for bread, in order that he might be at full liberty to
pursue his apostolic toils among a willing people, who hungered and
thirsted for the bread and water of life. His end was in harmony
with his character ; he was ardently loved by the negroes, for whose
eternal happiness he sacrificed all he possessed, and toiled inces-
santly, till, in 1805, he went to glory from among them in the full
triumph of faith.

From his success his toils became so severe, that, unless relieved
by some assistance, he must soon fall a sacrifice. Mr Wesley was
repeatedly and earnestly written to, but no help arrived, till, by a
singular Providence, Dr. Coke was brought to witness with his own
eyes the necessity of the case. This distinguished missionary hav-
ing, in 1785, left England for Nova Scotia, accompanied by Messrs.
Hammet, Warrener, and Clarke, was unexpectedly carried to the
Island of Antigua, the scene of Baxter's labours. The voyage
proved one of the most perilous ever witnessed by those on board



2 OKIU1N OF THK MISSION.

the ship : one tempest followed another in rapid succession ; the
vessel sprung a leak ; the stores were nearly exhausted, and all
hope of reaching America given up, when the captain resolved to
run for the most convenient port that might present itself in the
West Indies. During this season of trial the missionaries con-
tinued in earnest prayer to " Him who holdeth the winds in his fist
and the waters in the hollow of his hand ;" while the captain raved
like a maniac, crying out, " There's a Jonah on board ! there is a
Jonah on board." In a fit of superstitious frenzy he rushed on Dr.
Coke, seized his books and papers, cast them into the raging sea,
and vehemently declared that, should he again dare to pray while
he remained on board his ship, he would throw him overboard !

As they approached the West Indies, the weather gradually
became mild, and with it the temper and conduct of the captain.
The first port they reached was St. John's in the Island of Antigua,
at which they arrived on Christmas-day. No sooner were they
put ashore than the Doctor and his companions met Baxter, who
was on his way to preach to a large congregation of black and
coloured people.

The mystery of their disastrous voyage was now solved : the set
time to favour the West India islands was come ; a great and effec-
tual door was opened for missionary efforts ; the fields were " white
unto the harvest ;" " Ethiopia was stretching out her hands unto
God." The joy of the devoted Baxter and his people was fully
shared by their unexpected visitors. The pious heart of Coke was
stirred in him at the sight of a thousand Africans listening with
intense interest to the glad tidings of salvation from his lips, and
receiving at his hands the memorials of the Redeemer's dying love.
His reception by all classes was cheering. A salary of 500 per
annum was offered if he would settle in the island, and he was in-
vited, as a mark of respect, to a public dinner, at which the Duke
of Clarence, aftewards William the Fourth, was one of the guests.

If the soul of Columbus was thrown into ecstasy at the sight of
these enchanting islands, where nature has poured out in rich pro-
fusion her choicest beauties, the sight of the moral condition of their
inhabitants engaged the deepest sympathies of the devout missionary,
who was so providentially cast upon their shores. Fired with the
thought of diffusing scriptural Christianity throughout the islands
of the Caribbean Sea, he left Mr. Warrener to assist Baxter, and
proceeded to some of the neighbouring islands, in order to extend
the mission. St. Vincent's presented an open field ; a society was
formed which soon numbered 500 members. St. Christopher's gave
similar encouragement. The success which crowned their labours
at St. Eustatius kindled the rage of the enemies of the Gospel.
u Certain lewd fellows of the baser sort " set on, and encouraged
hy the magistrates, succeeded in driving the missionaries from the
island. The flock being thus deprived of their shepherds continued



ORIGIN OF THE MISSION. 13

to assemble, and eucouraged each other to hold fast, and hope for
better days.

In 1788 the missionaries visited Tortola and Nevis, where they
met with a cordial welcome from many who received their message
with joy. At the latter island a society was formed, which gave
great encouragement ; whilst at Tortola their success was still



Online LibraryPeter SamuelThe Wesleyan-Methodist missions in Jamaica and Honduras delineated; containing a description of the principle stations, together with a consecutive account of the rise and progress of the work of God at each → online text (page 1 of 39)