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Volume II



Published b))

The Junior Class of the
Philadelphia College of Osteopathy

PHILADELPHIA, PENNA.



J / y /'



FOREWOR'D



-^_JHE purpose of this book is twofold.

First, it is hoped, by virtue of the person'
alities portrayed and the activities recorded
herein, that fond memories, now fresh with-
in our minds but which as the years roll by
are destined to become dim though no less
dear, may ever be held before our mind's eye,
their existence thus being perpetuated and
their safety insured against the inroads of time.

Secondly, it is hoped, by virtue of this
Synapsis and succeeding and, we trust, better
issues, that a true Synapsis may eventually
be formed between our beloved Alma Mater
and the ever-increasing number of her sons
and daughters, whereby the love and spirit
of P. C. O. may ever be nourished within our
hearts and her future may ever be a part of
us. Thus would our College be assured of
our loyal support and posterity of a better
and more organized Institution and Profession.




©OARD OF Directors



ALFRED P. POST, President
ROBERT A. BAUR
E. O. HOLDEN
WILLIAM J. MARTIN
GUSTAV C. ABERLE
HENRY F. DARBY, Jr.
C. D. B. BALBIRNIE
FRANCIS J. SMITH



To

Our Friend, Instructor, and Former Dean

J^r. Cfjarles; % J^uttart



WHO FOR TWENTY-FOUR YEARS HAS, BY PRACTICE
AND PRECEPT, UNSELFISHLY LABORED TO INSTIL
INTO THE MINDS OF THE STUDENTS OF THIS INSTI'
TUTION A TRUE CONCEPT OF THE PRINCIPLES AND
PRACTICE OF OSTEOPATHY, DO WE, THE CLASS OF
NINETEEN TWENTY'SEVEN, AFFECTIONATELY
DEDICATE THIS BOOK





.OA^^V-




COLLEGE

FACULTY

CLASSES

HOSPITAL

ACTIVITIES

ALUMNI

ADVERTISEMENTS




Hail, Alma Mater, dear.
To thee our love declare;
To us he ever near
Through all the years.
Help us thy truth to see;
Teach us staunch sons to he.
Striving contiyiually,
P. C. O. for thee.

When we depart from thee.
Serving where need we see.
Strengthen our loyalty.
Our trust in thee.
Guide us in all aright;
Give us through ivisdom, sight;
Grant us to ever fight,
P. C. O. for thee.

And when our wor}{ complete.
Our course on earth is ceased.
Judge us thy sons and mete
Our tas}{ well done.
Increase from day to day.
Daughters and sons, we pray.
To serve and live for thee,
P. C. O. for thee.

Dr. W. M. Hamilton, '25.




[13 J




SENIOR HALL IN THE MAIN COLLEGE BUILDING




LABORATORY OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE




PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY IN THE COLLEGE ANNEX




DISSECTION ROOM



HISTORY OF THE PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE
OF OSTEOPATHY

By dr. JAMES McGUIGAN

ALL THINGS worth while have a history. From time immemorial, no
/■A great institution has been established, no movement of recognized
A V universal importance has been started and nursed from infancy to
mature strength without the names oi its founders and others who were
factors in its development being closely associated with it. To mention one
is to suggest the other. It is fully realized that the facts, as here set forth,
surrounding the establishment and early life of the Philadelphia College of
Osteopathy are largely chronology, and that newer and greater achievements
will surely be written — accomplishments of men who will have followed the
lead so ably taken by the pioneers of the profession.

Like many of the large and great institutions of today, the Philadelphia
College of Osteopathy came into being in a very humble way. The history ot
its conception dates back to early in the year 1898, when, upon a certain
memorable evening, two osteopathic physicians, namely. Dr. O. J. Snyder
and Dr. Mason W. Pressley, in conjunction with a Mr. Riley, assembled to
discuss the necessity and desirability of establishing an Osteopathic College
in the city of Philadelphia, and to lay down the plans tor its inception.
Many and difficult were the problems with which they were confronted,
but, their cause being worthy and just, they were inspired to formulate the
necessary plans of organization and personnel for the proposed college.
The work of preliminary organization entailed considerable time and labor,
which they gave graciously. They wisely decided to secure the services of
the best instructors procurable, and likewise, to establish the college at a
central location. In due course of time, the formulation of plans having been
completed, a stock company was organized and the necessary funds secured
to put the proposition under way. Subsequently, the new institution was
incorporated, under the laws of the state of New Jersey, as the Philadelphia
College and Infirmary of Osteopathy, and was formally opened on January 27,
1899. The infant college occupied two rooms in the Stephen Girard Building,
Twelth Street above Chestnut, of this city. There the first classes were held.
Out of that group of students comprising the first class, the Class of 1901,
have come many prominent osteopathic physicians of today. The names of
Lillian Bentley, W. B. Keen, Harry Leonard, Frank B. Kann, Mary Hetzell,
are but a few that come to mind.

By the end of the first year it became evident that more commodious
quarters must be procured. Accordingly, the College was moved to the
Witherspoon Building, Juniper and Walnut Streets. Here chemical and his-
tological laboratories were installed and equipped to fill the needs of the
student body. In addition, more than three thousand dollars' worth of ana-
tomical equipment was purchased, in the form of manikins, charts, skeletons,
etc. By means of these, Dr. Snyder hoped to make the course as practicable



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as possible, supplementing didactic work and book knowledge with laboratory
experimentation and the study of anatomical specimens.

Desiring to further strengthen the rapidly growing project, Dr. Snyder
and Dr. Pressley determined to increase the then'existing faculty with addi'
tional instructors. Among those men early added to the teaching staff were
W. B. Keen, M.D., Charles B. McCurdy, D.O., H. B. Carter, M.D., W. M.
McCally, D.O. Under the careful tutelage of these able men, the early classes
received excellent training m the fundamentals of Anatomy, Physiology,
Chemistry, Histology, and the Principles of Osteopathy.

Expansion again becoming necessary, due to the increased size of the
student body, the College was again moved, this time into a large mansion
situated at the corner of Thirty-third and Arch Streets. It was likewise
necessary to enlarge upon the personnel of the faculty, and among the in-
structors added were Dr. Robert Dunnington and Dr. Charles J. Muttart,
the latter destined to become the third Dean of the College. Dr. Muttart
is still an active member of the staff of instructors and head of the Department
of Gastro-Enterology.

As previously stated, the College was originally founded by a stock
company, the funds and revenue of which were devoted to buying the
necessary equipment. The stockholders never received any dividends from
their investment; to the contrary, it frequently became necessary for Dr.
Snyder and Dr. Pressley to delve into their own pockets to meet the necessary
obligations. In 1907, these two pioneers sold the institution to the present
organization, and the good work has thus been carried on. Through the
efforts of such men as Dr. Muttart, Dr. Dufur, Dr. Pennock, and Dr. Flack,
the last being Dean from 191 1 to 1924, the ideals and traditions of the
founders have been perpetuated.

In 1907, the College was again moved, this time to 715 North Broad
Street, where it remained until 1911. From 1911 to 1917 it was located at
832 Pine Street.

In 1917, the Board of Directors purchased the home of former Mayor
Reyburn, a palatial residence situated on the southeast corner of Nineteenth
and Spring Garden Streets, and it was quickly converted into the present
college building. Large classrooms were provided on the first and second
floors, while the third floor and basement were used as laboratories and
dissection rooms. In 1918, the new corporate name of Philadelphia College
of Osteopathy was authorized. The student body rapidly increased m size
until, in 1922, it became necessary to purchase the two adjoining buildings,
situated at 1818 and 1820 Spring Garden Street. The last acquisition pro-
vided ample room for clinics and additional laboratories.

When the present College site was obtained, in 1917, a new and mod-
ernly-equipped Hospital was constructed in the rear of the College building.
This Hospital was the outgrowth of an Osteopathic Dispensary which had
early been established at 1617 Fairmount Avenue, and which had, on May 10,
191 1, been chartered under the laws of Pennsylvania as the Osteopathic
Hospital of Philadelphia. The stock of the College had previously come to
be owned by the corporation controlling the Hospital, thus eliminating
individual stock ownership and placing both the College and the Hospital



under the control of a common Board of Directors. This plan has insured
both the College and the Hospital the loyal support of the osteopathic
profession, as both institutions are conducted for the advancement of their
respective spheres of usefulness to students, to the osteopathic profession,
and to the public.

In the year 191 1, the Board of Directors saw fit to raise the educational
standards of the College by extending the course to one of four years of eight
months each. This put the College on the same scholastic plane as that of
the Class A medical colleges of this state. In 1922, the course was again
extended, this time to four years of nine months each. In 1925, the require-
ments were again raised, students desiring to practice in Pennsylvania being
required to have completed one year each of Chemistry, Biology, and Physics
of college grade.

In the early days of the College the problems confronting its officials were
indeed trying. Not only were the financial problems exasperating, but, also,
these men were constantly being threatened with arrest by the members of
the medical profession. In spite of all opposition, the new science continued
to grow and gain favor in the eyes of hosts of its beneficiaries. When the
time came to put the name of Osteopathy on the statute books, people came
forward in large numbers and fought for the good of the cause. In 191 1 and
in 1925, laws were passed in this state defining Osteopathy and the rights
and duties of the osteopathic physician.

The growth of the College from its inception has been uniformly success-
ful. Much of this success has been made possible through public contri-
bution. In 1916, a public campaign for funds for both the College and the
Hospital resulted in securing $60,000. In 1919, another campaign raised
$102,000, while in 1923, $70,000 more was subscribed. From the two small
rooms in which the first classes were held, the institution has come to occupy
its present commodious quarters, while from a faculty of half a dozen members
there has come to be a present faculty of fifty-six active instructors. The
institution has always maintained a place in the front ranks of osteopathic
colleges and has fostered a high standard of education, both preliminary and
professional. The curriculum has been increased from time to time in keeping
with the advances in osteopathic and medical teaching and scientific equip-
ment. Thus may the history of our College be concluded. The story, we
know, is incomplete, much having been left unsaid, but may the spirit of the
founders of this College ever be a guiding star to those who follow.



r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 HI I H I m 1 1 n mi n 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 Ml I u 1 1 u



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^



DEAN EDGAR O. HOLDER, A.B., D.O.

Born in Philadelphia, Pa. Graduated from Central
High School; A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1916;
D.O., Philadelphia College of Osteopathy, 192a.

During the World War served i}4 years, A. E. F.,
Sergeant Major, 538th Engineers.

Came to the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy in
191 5 as Head of the Department of Natural Sciences.
Since then has served on the Faculty in additional
capacities. Became Dean in June, 1924. Later was
likewise made Secretary and Treasurer of the Board of
Directors of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy
and the Osteopathic Hospital of Philadelphia, also
Superintendent of the Hospital.



WE ACKNOWLEDGE and revere him
as a sympathetic leader with inspir-
ing visions; as one who tempers justice with
mercy in the administration of duty, yet un-
flinchingly upholds the standards he is en-
trusted to represent; an untiring worker with
ambitions not for himself but for the College
and Osteopathy.




121]




CHARLES J. MUTT ART, D.O.

Head of tke Department of Gastro-Enterology




D. S. B. PENNOCK, D.O., M.D.
Head of the Department of Surgery



IHt/^,




[23]




J. IVAN DUFUR, D.O.

Head of the Department of J^leurohgy and Psychiatry




[24]




I 25]




[26]



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^



'4



EDWARD G. DREW, D.O.
Head of the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology




127]




PETER H. BREARLEY, D.O.

Head of the Department of Physiok



A



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u




H. WILLARD STERRETT, D.O.
Head of the Departments of Dermatology and Genito-Urinary Diseases




[30]




H. WALTER EVANS, D.O.
Head of the Departments of Bacteriology and Hygiene





Professors



C. D. B. BALBIRNIE, Ph.G., D.O.

Professor of Clinical Osteopathy and Lecturer on
Comparative Therapeutics




WILLIAM S. NICHOLL, D.O.

Professor of Principles of Osteopathy



wu



CHARLES W. BARBER, D.O.

Professor of Clinical Osteopathy






MARY PATTON HITNER, D.O.
Professor of Acute Infectious Diseases



SARAH W. RUPP, D.O.
Professor of Anatomy of the Ner\-ous System





Professors



H. McD. G. BELLEW, D.O.

Professor of Psychology and Associate Professor

of Osteopathic Technique



RALPH L. FISCHER, D.O.

Professor of Physical Diagnosis, Cardio- Vascular
and Respiratory Diseases





Associate Professors



FRANCIS J. SMITH, D.O.

Associate Professor of Osteopathy, and Lecturer

on Anaesthesia




M. FRANCOIS D'ELISCU, B.Sc, D.P.E.

Associate Professor of Hygiene, and Instructor

in Physiotherapy




EDWARD A. GREEN, A.B., D.O.

Associate Professor of Anatomy and Physiology




135]




Associate Professors



EMANUEL JACOBSON, D.O.

Associate Professor of Histology and Pathology




ROBERT PEEL NOBLE, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.G.
Associate Professor of Chemistry




Assistant Professors



FOSTER C. TRUE, D.O.

Assistant Professor of Clinical Osteopathy

and Instructor in Surgery



JAMES McGUIGAN, D.O.

Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Instructor
m Dietetics




Associates



ELIZABETH R. TINLEY, D.O.
Associate in Pediatrics

ELISHA B. KIRK, B.S., D.O.
Associate in Anatomy



ERNEST LEUZINGER, D.O.

Associate in Clinical Osteopathy and
Instructor in Gastro-Enterology

MILDRED FOX, D.O.

Associate in Pediatrics



Lecturers



ROY K. ELDRIDGE, Ph.G., D.O.

Lecturer on Comparative Therapeutics



G. H. NEWMAN
Lecturer on Roentgenology



J. WALTER JONES, D.O.
Lecturer on Clinical Osteopathy



Demonstrators



A. D. CAMPBELL, D.O.

Demonstrator of Osteopathic Technique



EARL B. FRENCH, D.O.

Demonstrator of Osteopathic Technique



FREDERICK A. LONG, D.O.

Demonstrator of Clinical Osteopathy



Instructors



GEORGE H. TINGES, D.O.

Instructor in Diseases of the Ear, Nose

and Throat

GEORGE L. LEWIS, D.O.
Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases

RUSSEL ERB, B.S.
Instructor in Chemistry and Bacteriology



JOHN M. LE CATO, A.B., A.M.

Instructor in Physiology

H. OLIVER BOSTON, D.V.S.

Instructor in Pathology

PAUL T. LLOYD, D.O.

Instructor in Obstetrics



ENRIQUE VERGARA, A.B., D.O.
Instructor in Pathology and Bacteriology



Assistants



CARL FISCHER, D.O.

Assistant in Clinical Osteopathy

VALERIA HADRO, D.O.

Assistant in Laryngology and Rhinology



ERNEST A. JOHNSON, D.O.
Assistant in Physics and Physiology

WILBUR P. LUTZ, D.O.
Assistant in Physical Diagnosis



WILLIAM SPAETH, D.O.
Assistant in Bacteriology and Pediatrics




QLAs ses

\M Urn lit r r[i~-



CjREEriXGS ro THE CLASS OF 1 92 6

For the man who is true to the present, is true to his best:
and the soul that wins the ground immediately before it,
ma}{es life a triumph. — Ozora Stearns Davis.

I AM conscious of a sense of contentment in felicitating
you as you depart from College to enter upon the practice
of Osteopathy. This is, in great measure, inspired by the
realisation that you are well qualified — indeed tortified —
by virtue of a philosophy and principles that are inviolable.
With the lapse of a half century since their inception,
the teachings of Andrew Taylor Still are no longer viewed
as revolutionary by the world. They have been borne '
out m fact, m accordance with the almost prophetic
vision of the founder. His disciples have prepared the
way for you. Today the world is receptive to you.



It is easy m the ivorld to live after the world's opinion.

— Emerson.

T3EJOICE in the knowledge that you are well versed in
J-V the anatomy and physiology of the body. Your recog'
nition of the abnormal, with this training as a foundation,
is the central principle of osteopathic practice. The
presence and the potency of the osteopathic lesion as a
cause of disease marks the essential departure from the
school of medicine. The world looks to you tor encourage'
ment and conviction upon this platform. Be joyful in
your presentment of this truth to mankind; take your
place of respect in any community; glory in the fineness
of your power to divine and remedy.

Give to the world the best that you have, and the
best will come back to you. It is not the spurt at the start
but the continued, unresting, unhastening advance that
wins the day. Edgar O. Holden.




'^^^mi



141]



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS




Joseph F. Py, Presidfnt




Paul G. B. Norris, Historian



Donald Watt, Prophet



SENIOR CLASS HISTORY



m



A COLLEGIATE career, entered upon, it seems, in a not-remote
yesteryear, is now drawing to a close. As the Sealing Day approaches
— the Day when the Grand Ole Class shall be dispersed as a unit
and Its comprising confreres shall be scattered to distant fields, we relax in
post-bellum tranquility and record — the scholastic anamnesis of the Class
of 1926.

From the day of its inception, the class established itself upon a basis,
stolid and unequivocal. Open warfare was pledged on intra-class hostilities
and their disruptive denouements; an excoriating contemptuosity tor trimmed
opinion developed; gibraltaric standards of intrinsic benevolence were
adopted; salutary regard for the institution was insisted upon; and a con-
fidence in the administration ot the Class was pledged.

Events, representative of rigorous tests, have challenged the temper of the
Class platform and the enthusiasm with which it was administered, but it is
sate to state that there has been no sHght ingress upon the integrity ot the
standards, nor has the spirit of their execution suffered abatement.

Situations have been encountered in the full force of their projection —
situations which would have strained the ardor and unity of any class. At
such times, stormy sessions were occasioned behind the seclusion of closed
doors, and how well we can recall the bitterness, heat of rhetoric, and some-
times pathos of those conclaves. How indeUble the impress ot their sincerity,
constructiveness, and prevalence of opinions! And can we, or is it to be
desired that we ever shall forget the complete confidence with which the
ultimate decisions were accepted by the minority, satisfied in their conviction
that the better had been selected? Ah no ! Those are days on which we will
long muse; which will long evoke narration, and which will eternally bind us
to the memories of our years at College.

The glamor and excitement ot our Freshman days, in which it was "Hey
Frosh" this and "Hey Frosh"' that, are memorable. The Class was properly
and strenuously received; holy regulations were levied and enforcement there-
of attempted with no regard for customs of good society, anatoniical in-
tegrity, or tonsorial pulchritude. Reactions followed which were instructive
to the commendable Class of "25 — so much so that on the night prior to the
scheduled Class Rush, officers of our Class were inveigled into abduction,
and other essential members were rendered helpless with shackles and hand-
cuffs and properly concealed. The chaos of Dante's Inferno found rivalry on
the following day. Skirmish after skirmish but sharpened the combative
acumen of the gladiators until it culminated m an onslaught on the Gibraltar



'^l



M



m



[43]



of our adversaries. But the smirk of Fate was eminent, and the broad-toed,
brass-buttoned gendarmes assumed control of affairs, thereby saving the
Sophs an ignominious fate and reestablishing us to the roll of "Voters in
Good Standing." Rage, however, was imminent from suppression and
demanded an outlet, but that is another story and would be out of place here.

The Sophomore Year was one of moment. Under restrictions, we ac-
corded the Class of '27 a most instructive reception. Caps and bands were
instituted, in addition to the altered regulations, which properly conferred
the inferiority complex, so essential to the salubrity of the Frosh. A fine
Class they have been and a credit to their collegiate parents. During the
latter part of this year, a petition was also presented to the Faculty requesting
enlargement of the classrooms. The response became manifest as a complete
renovation of the College Annex.

The Junior Year was stellar. In it the Junior Prom, so admirably instituted
by '25, was projected to heights quite unanticipated. The Synapsis, the
College Year Book, was herein introduced and the first edition published
under unusually adverse circumstances.

The Sheepskin Year has necessarily been one of scholastic concentration,
though by no means prominent for any absence of school spirit. As a con-
structive answer to an urgent request on the part of the Class, fourteen new
treating-rooms were added to the Out-Patient Clinic. The Senior Day,
another worthy innovation of '25, was also furthered.

And here we conclude this resume of essential events in the History of
the Class of 1926, realizing that its memory will, as has that of those who have
gone this way before, soon be shelved amongst those of our worthy predeces-
sors, and the dust of Time will essay to assimilate its distinct singularity.
And, grant we must, with all-too-human umbrage, the success of this not
irregular obfuscation; but we can never agree that what has been accom-
plished by the Class of "26 can ever suffer any single degree of obscurity
which the chronological remoteness of the pioneer might suggest. With
this unequivocal assurance, we enjoy that modicum of felicity which makes
us content ; and so, we proceed to the remaining duties of life in unparalleled
happiness. Paul G. B. Norris, Class Historian



DONALD K. ACTON "Don"

Elkins Park, Pa.

Iota Tau Sigma.

Cheltenhatn High School; Elkins Park Preparatory School.
Tennis Team II, III, IV.





CARSON L. ADAMS "Ted'
Philadelphi.a, Pa.

Iota Tau Sigma.

Hammonton (N. J.) High School.



C. DONALD AMIDON "Aim"
Rome, N. Y.

Phi Sigma Gamma.

St. Aloysius Academy. New York Junior Osteopathic Society;
Neo Senior Society; Baseball Team I, II, III, IV; Basketball Team
I. II, III, IV; Class Baseball Team I, II, III, IV; Class Basketball
I, II.





[46]



MARY GOODFELLOW BISHER "Mother"

Philadelphia, Pa.

Kappa Psi Delta.

Philadelphia High School; Pennsylvania Museum and School
of Industrial Art. Pennsylvania Junior Osteopathic Society.




f^




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4^



CHARLES A. BLADES

Avon-by-the-Sea, N. J.

Theta Psi.

Asbury Park High School; White Plains High School; Western
Maryland College; U. S. Navy 1917-19.



ALEXANDER BOTHWELL

Bristol, Conn.
Bristol Public High School; Hardwick (Vt.) Academy.





WESLEY BLESSING BRADLEY ''Brad''

Albany, N. Y.

Albany High School; First Institute of Podiatry.
Staff I, IV; New York Junior Osteopathic Society.



WILLIAM BANNING BUXTON "Buc}('

Utica, N. Y.


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