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Philip P. (Philip Pearsall) Carpenter.

The mollusks of western North America online

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Macron lividm. Point Loma, S. Pedro, common ; extends northwards to the
Farallones. [ = Planaxis niaritella, Newcomb, MB.; non auct.]

tl Olivella semistriata, Gray, fide Newc., is a species found N. of Monterey onlv."
[As Dr. Gray's species is from Panama, that of Newcomb is probably
O bcetica.']

"Nassa interstriata, Conr., foss. (?= N. paupera, Gld.) ; resembles N. fossata,
Gld. (=J3. ekgans, Rve.*), but distinct. Common south from Sta. Barbara."
[Probably N. perpinguis, Hds. N. paupera is quite distinct, = N. striata,
C. B. Ad., teste Cuming.]

t{ Fissurella wolacea I have seen from Catalina Is." [Esch.'s shell is generally
considered S. American. ? May Dr. Cooper's be a form of volcano. .]

Acmcea. With regard to limpets and other variable shells, Dr. C. writes :
a From my examination of large numbers of specimens, I am more and
more compelled to believe that hybrids are very frequent between allied

* 2iassa elegan* was first published, by J. Sowerby, in the Min. Conch. 1824.

100



ON MOLLUSCA OF THE WEST COAST OF NORTH AMERICA. 615

species, and that the comparatively few links that are met-with in large
series of two forms should not be allowed to unite them, hut be considered
as hybrids."

Lunatia Lewisii. Abundant on beach. [One sp. measures 5f in., and the
animal of a much smaller one (4 in.) is 11 inches long.]

Ostrea. " The same species throughout to S. Franc. : S. Diego," Cooper. [Be-
sides the typical northern shell, O. lurida, are well-marked Pvars. laticaudataj
rufoides, and expansa.~]

There are also several species which are quoted in Dr. Cooper's letters, or
appear from his sketches to be quite distinct, or at least new to the fauna :
but they have not yet been sent for identification. Among these the following
are the most important. The MS. numbers refer to the tracings which Dr.
Cooper kindly copied from his original drawings. Where a " " appears,
the information is derived from his letters only.

MS. No.
402. Allied to ?Thracia.

Cyathodonta, probably plicata, Desh. (Cape St. Lucas, Xantus).

6200. Figure accords exactly with Venus toreuma, Gld. Catalina Is., beach.
1058. Figure accords with Lioconcha hieroqtyphica. Catalina Is., 120 fin.
1060. Resembles Sunapta. Catalina Is., 40 fin.

676. Resembles Crassatella Pacifica.

874. Lucina.

983. Nucula, with concentric sculpture. Sta. Barbara, 15 fm.

Yoldia. One fresh valve of a large and remarkable species, 2-6 by 1-2 in,,

with fine concentric sculpture, very inequilateral. Sta. Cruz ; on beach.
751a. ?Ianthina.
1077, 1078. Chitonidee. Two highly sculptured species. Sta. Barbara, 12 fm.

?Gadinia. Cat. Is., Cooper; Farallone, Is., Rowdl. "The animal differs in

having pectinated flattened tentacles. It may be the type of a new o-enus

Rowellia."

466. Emarginula. [The first appearance of the genus on the W. American coast.]
4155. Glyphis.

354. Like Haplocochleas. Sta. Barbara, 15 fin.
564. Like Pyrgola. 40 fm.

Trivia sanguined. Dredged dead in Cat. Is.

Trivia. " Thinner and larger than sanguinea. Common in Lower Cal." [?=s

Pacifica.'}

" Terebra specillata" One sp. near S. Pedro.

Pleurotomidce. Several species are represented only by single specimens.

Among them are

588. Drillia.

1021. Drillia, 2 in. long, shaped like Mitra. One worn sp. Catalina Is.. 120 fin,
1020. Drillia, reversed. Catalina Is., 60 fm., living.

479rt. Clathuretta (large). Sta. Barb.. 20 fm.

663. Clathuretta, 15 fm., Sta. Barb.
1852. ?Clathurella, 40 fm.
1053. ?Daphnella,6()fm.

419, 426. Two species of shells resembling Daphnella.
1055. ?ela, 80 fm.

423a. Mangelia, 15 fm., Sta. Barb.

3976. Shape of Cithara, without ribs. Catalina Is., beach.

1028. "?Aclis," reversed. One sp., Cat. Is., 120 fm. [The figure more resembles
a young Vermetid. J

463. " Cancdlaria ? Tritonice, Sby. Agrees with Dr. Newcomb's specimen." g.
Diego, one dead on beach, 2 in. long.

817. Cancdlaria. Fragment of a second species equally large.
1038. Sigaretus. 40 fm., dead, Cat. Is.
1050. Lamellaria. 10 fm., Sta. Barbara.
(385a ; 464, 818.) Naticida. 3 sp.

101



616 REPORT 1863.

676. Possibly a scaly var. of Monoceros engonatum ; like the Purpura, var. inibri*

cata, of Europe, but of different colour and texture ; ^ spiratum, Blainv.
1001. Figure resembles Vexittafuscolincata, Pse. Sandwich Is.
Aassa, smooth, with thick lip." Cat. Is., 30 fin. [Comp. insculpta."]

? Macron Kellettn. Cat. Is., dead, in 60 fin.

Chrysodomus Habulatus. Cat. Is., 120 fin., young, dead.

Fusus, " like geniculus, Conr." Farallones Is.
411. Trophon, like multicostatus.

6156. Muricidea. Cat. Is., 40 fm. [The young shells called Trophon, TypJiis,
&c., by Dr. Cooper can scarcely be identified without a series, and from
tracings only.]

515rf. ?Typhis. Sta.lBarb., 15 fm.

520. Pteronotus centrifugus, jun. S. Pedro ; rare on beach.

3846. Muricidea, like alveata. Mont. S. Diego.

956. ?Siphonalia. Monterey, Sta. Barb., beach.

In Prof. Whitney's Preliminary Report on the Survey, Proc. Cal. Ac. p. 27,
3Iay 4th, 1863, he states approximately as the result of Dr. Cooper's mala-
cological labours, up to the close of 1862 :

No. of species in the collection 335

Of which are new to California, and believed to be undescribed 123

Other supposed Californian species not yet collected 65

In a Survey conducted with such care, even negative evidence is of some
importance, though not conclusive. Dr. Cooper has not been able to obtain
the following species :

Discina Evansii.

Strigilla carnaria. [Mr. Nuttall's specimens were probably Atlantic.]

Venus dispar.

Trapezium Califomicum. [ Duperryi, Gumiacum.~\

Lucina bella. [Perhaps pectinata, Cpr. ; but the type seems lost.]

Modiola miens. [Probably an error in the Cumingian label.]

Mytilus glomeratus, u = edtdis, var." [Perhaps an accidental var. from being

crowded on a floating stick.]

Earbatia pernoides. [Very probably an error in Dr. Gould's label.]
Area multicostata. " Must have been brought to S. Diego."
Pecten purpuratus. [Ascribed to the fauna from abundant valves marked

" Cal." in the U. S. E. E. collections, but certainly from S. America. Dr.

Cooper has unfortunately not been able to discover any of the species

described by Hds.]

Radius variabilis. " Doubtless exotic."
Polinices perspicua. " Probably Mexican."
Eanetta triquetra. " Probably Mexican." [Guaymas.]

105. Having now presented to the student an analysis of all that is yet
known of the results of public surveys, it remains that we tabulate what has
been accomplished by private enterprise. Mr. J. Xantus, a Hungarian gen-
tleman in the employ of the United States Coast Survey under the able
direction of Professor Bache, was stationed for eighteen months, ending July
1861, at Cape St. Lucas, the southern point of the peninsula of California.
It is a source of great benefit to natural science that the Secretary of the
Smithsonian Institution is also one of the acting members of the Coast Survey
Board ; and that a harmony of operations has always existed between the
directors of these two scientific agencies in Washington. The publications
of the Coast Survey have earned for themselves a reputation not surpassed by
those of the oldest and wealthiest maritime nations. For obtaining data on
geographical distribution, Cape St. Lucas was a peculiarly valuable station,
being situated near the supposed meeting-point of the two faunas (v. B.A.

102



ON MOLLUSCA OF THE WEST COAST OF NORTH AMERICA. 617

Rep. p. 350); and also, not being a place of trade, or even an inhabited district,
likely to be free from human importations, although we should be prepared
to find dead exotics thrown on its shores both by northern and by tropical
currents. In his solitary and what would otherwise have been monotonous
life,. Mr* Xantus found full employment in assiduously collecting specimens
in all available departments of natural history ; having received ample in-
structions, and the needful apparatus, from the Smithsonian Institution.
The bulk of the shells at first received from him were worn beach speci-
mens ; but afterwards several species were preserved, with the animals, in
alcohol. Mr. Xantus generously presented the^first series of the molluscs to the
Smithsonian Museum, reserving the second for his native land. The first
available duplicates of the shells not occurring in the Reigen collection will
be found in the British Museum or in the Cumingian cabinets*. Although the
whole series would have found little favour in the eyes of a London dealer or
a drawing-room collector, it proved a very interesting commentary on the
Reigen and Adams Catalogues : it added about sixty new forms to the accu-
rately located species of the marine fauna, besides confirming many others,
which rested previously on doubtful evidence ; and disproved the intermixture
of northern species, which, from the map alone, had before been considered
probable.

The collection is not only essentially tropical, but contains a larger propor-
tion of Central American and Panama species than are found in the Reigea
Catalogue. This may partly be due to the accidents of station, and partly to
this projecting southern peninsula striking the equatorial currents. It must
also be remembered that the Reigen Catalogue embraces only the Liverpool
division of his collection ; and that many more species may have existed in.
that portion of the Havre series which did not find its way to the London
markets. Mr. Xantus also obtained individuals of identical species from
Margarita Island, and a series containing living specimens of Purpura piano-
spira (only thrown up dead on the promontory), from Socorro Island, one of
the Revilla-gigedo group. A very few specimens of Haliotis and of Pacific
shells may have been given to him by sailors or residents : they were not
distinguished from his own series in opening the packages. The collection is
not yet complete. In consequence of the French occupation of Mexico, it
was with difficulty that Mr. Xantus himself " ran the blockade" at Manza-
nello ; and he was compelled to leave there thirty-one boxes of shells, alco-
holics, &c., subject to the risks of war.

The Polyzoa were placed in the hands of Mr. G. Busk for examination,
and the alcoholics were intrusted to Dr. Alcock, the Curator of the Manches-
ter Natural History Society. Neither of these gentlemen have as yet been

* During the period that Mr. Xantus was out of employment, owing to the derange-
ments of the war, a portion of the duplicates were offered for sale, and will be found in
some of the principal collections.

103



S18 REPORT 1863.

able to report concerning them. The first notice of the shells appeals in the
Proc. Ac. Nat. Sc. Philadelphia, Dec. 1859, pp. 331, 332. The new species
are described in the * Annals and Magazine of Nat. Hist./ 1864, vois. xiii. and
xiv., as follows :

A.N.H. Vol. XIII.
Sp. Page.

1. 311. Asthenotharus villosior, n.g. 1 living sp. and fragm.

2. Sokmya valwdus. 1 living sp.

3. Tellina (Peron&oderma) ochracea. 1 sp.

4. 312. Psammobia (? Amphichcena) regularis. Valves.

5. Callista poUicaris. 1 sp., living (= C. prora, var., teste Eve., C. I. f. 45).

6. Callista (?pannosa, var.) pitella. Extremely abundant, living. Also

Acapulco, Jeicett. (Very variable, yet always differing from the
typical South American shells.)

7. 313. Liocardium apicinum. Extremely abundant, living. Also La Paz j Aca-

pulco, Jeivett.

8. Lucina lingualis. Extremely abundant, valves.

9. ? Crenella inflata. Valves ; very rare. (An aberrant form.) Also Panama,

as. Ad.

10. 314. Bryophila setosa, n.g. Abundant ; living among sea- weed, on Purpura

planospira. Also California, Cooper.

11. ?Atys casta. Rare : allied to Cylichna.

12. Ischnochiton parallelus. Rare ; living.

13. Ischnochiton (?var.) prasinatus. 1 living sp. Possibly a form of paral-

lel.

14. 315. Ischnochiton serratus. 1 living sp., like Eknensis.

15. 474. Nacetta peltoides, = Nacella, sp. ind., Maz. Cat., no. 262.

16. AcmcBa (?var.) atrata. Intermediate between P. discors, Phil., and P,

floccata, Rve. Also La Paz, Margarita Bay.

17. Acm&a strigillata. Intermediate in characters and station between

A, patina and A. mesokuca. Also Margarita Bay.

18. 475. Glyphis saturnalis. Not uncommon ; living.

19. Eitcosmia variegata. (Probably a subgenus of Fhasiauella.) Rare, dead.

20. Eucosmia (?variegata, var.) substriata. Very rare.

21. ,, Eucosmia punctata. 1 sp.

22. 476. Eucosmia cyclostoma. 1 sp.

23. Hapkcochliascyclophoreus,ii.g. (PRelated to Ethalia. ) Very rare, dead.

24. Narica aperta. 1 sp.

25. ,, Fossarus parcipictus. 3 sp.
2^>. 477. Fossarm purus. 1 sp.

27. Litorina puUata,= Litorina, sp. ind., Maz. Cat., no. 399. Abundant.

28. Litorina (Philippii, var.) penicittata. Like the W. Indian L. (ziczac, var.)

lineata. Abundant.

29. Rissoa albolirata. 1 sp.

30. Fenella crystattina. 1 sp.

31. 478. ?Hydrobia compacta. May be a JBarleeia. 1 sp.

32. Hyala rotundata. 1 sp.

33. ?I)iala ekctrina. 1 sp.

34. Acirsa [teste A. Ad.] menesthoides. 1 sp.

35. Cythna asteriaphila. Imbedded in a star-fish, like Stylina. 1 living sp.

36. Bittium nitens. 1 sp.
Vol. XIV.

37. 45 Mangelia mbdiaphana. 1 sp.
od. 46 Drillia appressa. 1 sp.

SO. Cithara fusconotata. very rare.

40. Obeliscus variegatus. 2 worn sp. Described from a fresh Guaymas

shell, Mus. Cal. Ac.

41. (Odostomid) Evalea aquisculpta. 1 sp.

42. 47. (Odostomia) Evaka delicatnla. lap.

43. ,, Chrysallida angusta. 1 sp.

104



ON MOLLUSCA OF THE WEST COAST (>V NORTH AMERICA.



610



A. K H. Vol. XIV.
Sp. Page.

44. 47. Eulima fuscostrigata. 1 sp.

45. Opalia crenatoides. 1 perfect and a few rubbed specimens. This, and

the Santa Barbara fossil, O. ?var. iwctdpta, are so close to the Por-
tuguese O. crenata, that additional specimens may connect them.

46. Truncaria eurytoides. Common; rubbed. Also Guacomayo, in the

Smithsonian Museum.

47. 48. Sistrum (?ochrostoma, var.) rufonotatum \ connected with type by a few

intermediate specimens. Rare ; dead.

48. ?Nitidella milkpunctata. Also Guacomayo, Mus. Smiths. Very rare, dead.

49. Nitidella densilineata. Very rare ; dead.

50. ?Anachis tincta. 1 sp.

51. 49. Anachts fuscostrigata, 1 sp.

52. Pisania elata. A few worn specimens ; like Peristernia, without plait.

The following table contains the species previously described, with the ad-
dition of the other localities in which they are known to occur. The numbers
in the first column are those in Prof. C. B. Adams's Panama Catalogue : a
P in the same column signifies that the species has been found at Panama
by other collectors. The second column contains the shells of La Paz, col-
lected by Major Eich and others, and are marked by an italic P. In the
third column, A shows that the shell has been found at Acapulco, on good
authority ; and C, that it is known at other stations on the Central American
coast. The fourth column exhibits the corresponding numbers of the species
in the B. M. Reigen Catalogue; and G shows that the shell has been found
in the Gulf district by other collectors. In the fifth column, Cal. stands
for Upper, and L for Lower California ; Marg. for Margarita Bay, Gal. for
the Galapagos, E for Ecuador and the tropical shores of S. America, and WI
for the West Indies. The sixth column continues the numbering of the
species from the list in the ' Annals.'



Pan.

Cat.


La
Paz.


Aca-
pul.


Maz.
Cat


Other
habitats.


No.


List of Cape St. Lucas Shells.


517




A


14


E


53


Discina Cumingii. On Margaritiphora.


P






22


E


54


Gastrochcena ovata. In Spondylus.






A


23


Marg.


55


Saxicava pholadis. In Spondylus.












56


JEucharis, sp. ind. 1 dead valve, resembling W.














Indian species.


P






35




57


Sphcenia fragilis. In Spondylus,








G




58


Tkracia squamosa. 1 broken pair.




P






L


59


Thracia (Cyatliodonta) phcata ("PsstfrwwcaMt,














Migh."). 1 sp., jun.


P






G




60


Lyomia inftata. 1 sp.








36


E


61


Lyonsia picta. 1 valve.


463


P


C


55




62


Tellina Cumingii. 1 pair.


469




A




E


63


Tettina rubescens [ = Hanleyi]. Smashed valre.


472










64


Strigilla smcera. 1 valve.






A


67




65


Strigilla lenticula. Valves.


P










66


Lutricola viridotincta. 2 valves.


485






41




67


Semele bicolor. Valves.








G


Marg.


68


Semele Californica, var. Valves.








40


L


69


Semele flavescens. Rare.


480
473


P


A
A


43


E
WI


70
71


Cumingia trigonularis, jun. In Spondylus.
Heterodonax bimaculatus. Abundant ; normal, and














numerous vars.



105



620



BEPORT 1863.



Pan.

Cat.


La |Aca-
Paz.j pul.


Maz.
Cat


Other
habitats.


No.


List of Cape St. Luca Shell?.






A


756


(Mar.)


72


Donax, var. ceelatus. Valves.








76




73


Donax ?Cotiradi, jun.


456




C


77


L


74


Donax ?navicula, jun.


493


P


C


80




75


Mulinia angidata. Valves.




P




79


WI


76


Standella fragilis. 1 sp. living, and numerous














adult valves.


446


P


C


83


E


77


Trigona radiata, jun.












78


Trigona nitidula, Sby. Several living; sp. agree














exactly with Sby.'s figure. [Perhaps Lam.'s














Mediterranean shell is different.]


448




C


90


E


79


Dosinia Durikeri. Rare.




P




88


KMar.


80


Dosinia ponder osa. Several pairs [jun. = distorts].


444




A


92




81


CaUista aurantia.


447


P


A


93


E.Mar.


82


Callista chioncea.






C


96


Marg.


83


CaUista vidnerata. Living, and dead valves.








98


E


84


Callista (?var.) alternate. 1 living.










L


85


Amiatitis callosa. Rare, living [= C. wo6i7*s,Rve.].




P




G


L.Mar.


86


Chione mccincte. Very rare.




P


C




E


87


Chione pulicaria, var. Ulacina. Valves, abundant.




P


A




E


88


Chione neglecta. Living and valves.








106




886


Chione undatcUa -\-\QI. bilineata, Rve. (pars). Very














rare. [Probablv = ncalecta, var.]


435


P


C


113


E


89


A-iomalocardia subimbriccta. Valves.








111




90


Tapes squamosa. 1 sp.


P




A


24


E


91


Petricola robusta. In Spondylus.








27




92


Rupellaria linguafelis.








117


E


93


Crassatella varians. Living. Large and abundant.


492




C




E


94


CrassateUa oibbosa. Valves.




P




118




95


Lazaria Californica. Very rare.






C






96


Venencardia crassa. 1 valve.


405




C


1216




97


Chama Buddiana, jun. On syenitic rock.


407




A


121


E


98


Chama echinata, Brod. Living, from Socorro Is.


P




C


121


Marg.


986


Chama frotidosa, var.








123


L


99


Chama ?exof/yra. Worn valves.




P


A


122


Gal.


100


Chama spinosa. 1 sp.


433


P


A
C


125


E
E.Mar.


101
102


Cardium consors. Valves. (Very fine at Acapulco.)
Cardium procerum. Valves.


4:34






126


E


103


Cardium senticosum. Valves.


P


P


A




L


104


Hemicardium biangulatum. Valves.




P


C


136


WI


105


Codakia tigerrina. Living, very large, and young














valves. ' [Of the Pacific Is. type.]


P
P


P


A


137
147


Pac.Is.
E


106
107


Codakia ?punctata, jun.
Lucina eburnea. Living, rare.


P




A


140




108


lAicina excavata, 1 valve.








145




109


Lucina prolongata. Valves.








143




110


Lncina cancellaris. Valve.






C


G




111
112
113


Diplodonta subquadrata. 1 sp.
])iplodonta calculus. Several living sp.
Miltha Childreni. [A few fresh specimens correct














the habitat " Brazil," previously assigned to this
extremely rare and remarkable shell, which ap-














pears to be a gigantic Felania.~\


P




A


153




114


Kellia suborbicularis. In Spondylus,






A


154




115


Lasea nibra. 6 sp. living.


?




C


167




116


Mytilns palliopunctatw. Fragment.


P


P


A


168




117


Mytilus multiformis. Abundant.


P






169




118


Septifer Cumingianus. Common.



106



ON MOLLUSCA OF THE WEST COAST OF NORTH AMERICA.



621



Pan. La
Cat. jPa*.


Aca-
pul.


Mass.
Cat.


Other
habitats.


No. List of Cape St. Lucas Shells.




P


A


170


L.Mar.


119 Modiola capax. A few living sp. " Gal." [?].






A


172


Gal.


120 Crenella coarctata. In Spondylus.


P




A


176




121 Lithophagus aristatus. In Spondylus.


P




A


175




122 Lithophagus plumula. In Spondylus.




P


C


181




123 Area midticostata. Adult valves, and jun. living.


P




C


189


E


124 Byssoarca Pacifica. Hare.


418




A


WO


E


125 Byssoarca mutabilis. Valve.


420


P






E


126 Barbatia Reeviana. Valves.








192




127 Barbatia vespertilio. Valves.


424




C


193




128 JBarbatia illota. Valve.


423


P




195


E


129 Barbatia solida. Eare.


416




A


194


E.Mar.


130 Barbatia gradata. Valve.




P




G




131 Axincea gigantea. Large valves, and jun. living.








696




132 Axincea, sp. ind.








201


E


133 Pinna lanceolata. Fragment.


395






200




134 Pinna maura. 1 sp., jun.


P


P


A


202




135 Pinna rugosa. 1 sp., Jun.


391


P


C


204




136 Margaritiphorajimbriata. Living.










E


137 Avicida Peruviana. Valves.


393


P


A


205




138 Isognomon Chemnitzianus. Common, living.








206




139 Isognomon Janus. 4 sp. living. [One has closej












ligament-pits, passing into costellatus, just as no.












138, var. passes into incisus.~\




P


A


G


E


140 Pecten subnodosus. Several valves, and 1 living.












[P. intermedia is only a var. of this species.]


387


P


A


207


E.Mar.


141 Pecten ventricosus. Valves. [The young is P.












circularis^ Sby., pars.]




P




G




142 Janira dentata. ~\ ery plentiful.




P








143 Lima tetrica. 1 living, and valves [=Z. squamosa,












teste Cuming. W. I., Mediter., Pac. Is.].


390








Gal.


144 Lima arcuata. 1 fresh pair. [Can hardly be separa-












ted from L.fragilis, Gal., Pac. Is., in Mus. Cum.]


385






208




145 Spondylus calcifer. Valves. Bed var., and speci-


386
381




C
A


210
211




men changing into purple.
146 Plicatula penicillata. 1 sp. on Fasciolaria.
147 Ostrea iridescens. A few living.


383


P




212


Marg.


148 Ostrea ? Virginica, jun.








213


E


149 Ostrea Columbiensis. Valves.


384


P




215


Marg.


150 Ostrea amara. On Pomaulax.










Oal.


] 51 Cavolina Helemus. Fragment. (Pelagic.)












1 ^>^ \

156 ( [Nudibranchs and Aplysia. Not yet determined.


321


P


A


224


E


157 Bulla Adamsi, and var. Common.








225


L


158 Bulla nebulosa. Rare.






A


226


L.Gal.


159 Bulla Quoyi. Very rare.










L


160 Haminea vesicula. Plentiful, living.








229


?L


161 Haminea cymbiformis. 1 sp. [Closely related to












H. virescens.~]


i




240


Marg.


162 Siphonaria <equilirata. Dead. [ful.


P




A


239




163 Siphonaria lecanium, with var. palmata } &c. Plenti-












104 Onchidium Carpenteri. Very rare.








235


L.Cal.


165 Melampus olivaceus. Rare.












166- 1 [The rest of the Pulmonates will be tabulated












172 f afterwards, vide p. 630.]








243




173 lanthina decollata. Very rare.










L


174 Ischnochiton Mar/dalensis. Large and highly sculp-












tured. Very rare.



107



62?



REPORT 1863.



Pan.
Cat.


La
Paz.


Aca
puL


Ma/.

Cat.


Other
habitats


No.


List of Cape St. Lucas Shells.






c


252


E


175


Ischnochiton limaciformis. 2 specimens.








256




176


Ischnochiton Beanii. 1 sp.








258




177


Acanthochites arragonites. A few living sp.






c


261




178


Patella discors. Dead.






A


260




179


Patella pediculus. Dead.








264


Marg.


180


Acmcea fascicidaris. Abundant, living.








268




181


Acmcea mitella, jun.




P


A


273


Gal.


182


Fissurellaruyosa,]\m. [A var. is first black, with














two white rays ; afterwards changes to whitish.]


357




C






183


Fissurella microtrcma. Common. [Passes into








Online LibraryPhilip P. (Philip Pearsall) CarpenterThe mollusks of western North America → online text (page 16 of 45)