Philip Schaff.

The American church history series, consisting of a series of denominational histories published under the auspices of the American Society of Church History; (Volume 11) online

. (page 35 of 41)
Online LibraryPhilip SchaffThe American church history series, consisting of a series of denominational histories published under the auspices of the American Society of Church History; (Volume 11) → online text (page 35 of 41)
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rape and arson, and the tardy execution of such law as we
have, or their damnable evasions. Southern Presbyterians
recognize the great provocations ; nevertheless, they theo>
retically and in general practice deprecate at once the
provocatives and the outbursts of mob violence. They
preach and live commonly against it.

Brighter illustrations of Christian living than are found
in Southern Presbyterian homes exist nowhere.

1 " Minutes of 1892," p. 462.



CHAPTER V.

THE RELATION OF THE CHURCH TO OTHER BODIES.

" If any man say, I love God, and hateth his brother,
he is a Har: for he that loveth not his brother whom he
hath seen, how can he love God whom he hath not seen?"^
The Presbyterian family of churches has been wont to
recognize brethren in the numerous evangelical churches
throughout the world. These churches have been dis-
tinguished for a liberality of posture toward the other
branches of the Church of God in pleasing contrast to the
exclusive claims of the majorities in the Episcopal and
Baptist communions. And this posture toward the rest
of the Christian world is of such importance as affecting
the true unity of the Church of God in its opposition to
the world that it deserves particular and careful treatment
in the history of any church.

Having set forth, therefore, the origin and the historic
development of the Southern Church, external and in-
ternal — its growth in numbers and external means and
muniments, and its growth in doctrine, polity, and life —
it becomes our duty to show how the church has lived
with her neighbor churches.

But before doing this we propose to set forth the re-
lations which this church has maintained with the state.
These relations are not less important than the foregoing.
If a church be united with a civil government, one of two
things, as history establishes, invariably follows : the church
becomes supreme and uses the state as its servant, thus

1 I John iv. 20.

. 422



NOX-SECULAK CHARACTER OE I'lIE CI/CRCII. 423

employing means and methods which Ciod's Word forbids;
or the state becomes supreme and prostitutes the Church
of God to its own service.

Some ch-eamers to-day talk about christianizin



Online LibraryPhilip SchaffThe American church history series, consisting of a series of denominational histories published under the auspices of the American Society of Church History; (Volume 11) → online text (page 35 of 41)