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160







BANCROFT LIBRARY



ut of a Silver flute*



Tt\e Flcur de Lb Poet^.



o



OVT OrA i - *
i SILVER FtVTE

PHILIP VERR1LL MIGHEL5-




NEW YORK. J. SELWIN TAIT
ANP 5 ON 5, NVMPDR 5IXTY-
PFVD FIFTH AVDNVD. i i



M31



COPYRIGHT, 1896

J. SELWIN TAIT & SONS

NEW YORK

All Rights Reserved



roft Library



Dedication.

re Ella.

My soul through births and deaths pro-
cessioned on
The progress way, ambition - spurred ;

but, oh,
It glides so swiftly since you brought the

dawn

And made white -lilted aspirations
grow !



Contents,



Quatrains. PAGE.

THE SUNSET, . . . . .8

IN CALIFOENIA, .... 8
GOD'S MAKING.

The Mountains, . . .9

The Prairie, ... 9

The Sea, . . . .10

The Sky, .... 10

THE INDIAN SUMMER, . . . .11

THE JELLY-FISH, . . . .11

LIFE'S ATTRIBUTES.

The Mind, . . . .12

The Heart, ... 12

The Soul, . . . .13
Love, . . . .13

THE FLOOD, . . . . .14

TO-DAY, 14

Two GODDESSES WE MAKE.

Satiety, . . . .15

Moderation, . . .15

EFFORT, . . . . .16

POETRY, .... 16



CONTENTS.

Sonnets* PAGE.

ETEENITT.

The Heart, . . . 18

The Mind, . . . .19

The Soul, . . . .20

A WOMAN, . . . .21

WHY? 22

*THE SPIRIT OF CHEISTMAS, . . .23

'TWAS KADIGA WAS GKEAT, . . .24

SYMPATHY, . . . . .25

THE OBELISK IN CENTRAL PARK, . . 26

STONE AND SOUL, . . . .27

THE SACRIFICE, . . . .28

LET THERE BE LIGHT, . . .29

THE SUN, 30

GOD'S VOICE, .... 81



A THOUSAND YEARS AGO, . . .83

I WOULD NOT HAVE THEE CHANGE, . 34

THE VELVET OF THY HANDS, . . 35

THE DAWN THAT'S IN THINE EYES, . 37

fTHY REGAL HEART, . . . .39

ft THERE'S No ESCAPE, . .40

*THE NIGHT WE TRADED RINGS, . . 41

SHE SINGS OF LOVE, . .43

READS His NOTE, . . .45

ANSWERED YES, . . .47



CONTENTS.

PAGE.

ttWHEN BABY SMILES, . . .49

WHEN BABY LEARNS TO Kiss, . . 61



/lMscellaneou0.

I DREAMED OF LOYE, . . .63

THE ORGAN'S LOVE, v . 67

THE NIGHT-SKATER, . . .60
GOD'S SUN, ..... 61

PRE-EMPTION, . . . . .62

ALL ABOUT IT, . . .63

THE WEDDING-RING, . . . .65

AN OLDEN MEMORY CAME, . . 67

+fTHE BACHELOR SONG, . . .70

ttTrm MEN WHO LIVE ALONE, . . 71

tfA BACHELOR TOAST, . 72

ft TEN FINGERS, . . . .74

THE GLOW IN THE GRATE, . . 75

IT SHALL NOT PASS, . . . .77
WHY SHOULD I LIVE? ... 78

*Au REVOIR, . . . . .80

"Published in Chips.
t Published in Judge.
tt Published in Vanity.



Quatrains,



Gbe Sunset,

Old Sol dipped low, and red through

clouds he burst,

And all adown a ripple path he trod
'Till lo ! 'gainst purple lights appeared

reversed
The golden exclamation point of God !



f n California*

Great lines of mountain peaks against

the sky

Like God's eternal, vast chirography
Appear ; but raised in huge solemnity

Great Shasta stands an awe-inspiring I.



THE MOUNTAINS.

The huge-wrought, sinew-guarded veins
And arteries that gird the world and

spread
The blood of melting snows and myriad

rains,

Peak-garnered from the cloudy foun-
tain head.



THE PRAIRIE.

An inland sea of acres broad, and where
The undulating grassy billows leap

Exultantly ; and far away, and fair,
A schooner braves the mystic, West-
ern deep.



GoD's /baking,



THE SEA.

Thou art the vast and pulsing heart of

earth,

Twice daily swelled in adoration of
The sun and moon, and thy emotion's

birth

Betrays Earth's inmost calms and
storms of love.



THE SKY.

The forehead dome of Mother Nature

thou,
Whereon her smiles and cloud-black

frowns are wrought

Unceasingly ; and Night above thy brow
Strews diadems inspiring upward
thought.



10



Gbe tTndfan Summer.

God's jewel days! His flawless jewel

days

That flash in diamond and in ruby rays
And golden topaz tints, and each and all
Bright polished on the sharp frost-wheel

of Fall.



A dainty soft, impalpable caress,
Transparent, tinged with rain-bow

tints, and this

Tide-launched to nestle in a Sea-
Nymph's tress,

For lo ! 'tis love-sick Neptune's wave-
lorn kiss.



11



Xife'0 attributes.

THE MIND.

God-planted light whose rays, dispelling

Doubt,
Illume the paths and days of age and

youth.
But oh ! if e'er 'tis dimmed, or worse

put out,

What piteous wrecks drift far and far
from Truth.

THE HEART.

A garden spot where orchids, like to

Love,
By gaudy weeds are always choked for

room,
But Gard'ner Conscience, standing all

above,

Can always say which dies and which
shall bloom.

18



Xite's attributes.



THE SOUL.

A hopeful, clinging Plant that every day
Starts forth afresh, its roots in human

sod,
And ever nears its bloss'ming; 'tis a

stray

And wind-blown seed a very germ of
God.

LOVE.

Not anything of lust and greed and fire,
But balm of gentleness untold, and

whole

Unselfishness, aye, infinitely higher
The Pollen from the blossoms of the
Soul!



Cbe jflooD.

'Tis said that all was wrong ; mayhap

'twas fears
Of worse to come God had, who saw

the plights ;
And then He drowned the whole in

mighty tears

For lo ! He wept for forty days and
nights.



Return to earth, oh Jesus Christ! for

here

Is vastest need of miracle divine;
Speak Thou Thy word o'er reeking

floods of wine

And turn them back to water, pure and
clear !



14



Aafce*



SATIETY.



Faustina gorged, her lips and eyes in-
flamed,

Hands goblet after goblet, cloyed with

wine,
Until her glutted victim's sense is

maimed,
And manly hunger, sotted, falls supine.

MODERATION.

Octavia, earthly spark of Heavenly

fire,
Dispenses nectar drop by drop, and

they,
The thirsty souls that drink and know

Desire-

Climb ever Fountain ward the lofty
way.



is



Effort.

The Plain of Mediocrity is wide,
Its fruits grow cheap and green be-
neath the sun,

But oh ! bethink, before you there abide,
The best is always waiting to be won !



Like summer-seeking birds that cross

the skies
In mile-high flocks, ten thousand

poems wing

Athwart the vault of thought ; and up-
ward flies

My arrowed pen, and fells one tiny,
wounded, trembling thing.



Sonnete,



THE HEART.

Oh ! had I in my hands the power to

make
Or choose the great Beyond which

death will bring;

To fix the compensation for the sting
Of Life, what endless heaven would I

take ?

Why not a blossom be, and care forsake,
And love forever, like a perfume, fling
To saddened hearts ; to make the

children sing

And laugh ; and oh ! to see a joy awake
In sunken, weary eyes; to greet the

morn
With dewy smiles ; to glad some desert

spot
Where tired feet must tread; to

ever be

In matchless lovliness returned reborn;
To always live and love oh were

this not

A peaceful, sweet and bright
Eternity ?



13



THE MIND.

Alas, though sweet and much, this is

not all
That heavenly joy could be, could I

but choose;
For, drifted on the storm, the flowers

lose
Their path and may 'mid ugly briars

fall;
And, always on the ground, their joy

must pall.
No, let me as a bird with morning's

dews
Arise each lovely day, and let the

muse
Of rapturous song be in my heart to

call

Forth joy and life in every woeful breast ;
Give me the wings, volition's slaves,

to bear
Me ever where the summer's day

may be.
What though I've knowledge none,

'twill be a rest
To lay the burden down; in God's

sweet air
To live and sing for all Eternity.



19



Bternftg.



THE SOUL.

Oh blissful, only Heaven! not birds nor

flowers
Art thou, nor selfish joy, nor harps,

nor gold.
Thou art of meekness and of love

untold

Unknown, unpracticed in this vale of
showers,

And far beyond these darkened lives of

ours.
Oh grant to me when death shall next

unfold
The binding husks, a heart no longer

cold,
And send me back, but not to Summer

bowers

Nor happiness, but let me come again
To earth with soul so great that
suffering

Is joy, and here, 'mid deepest misery
Of struggling little children, women,
men,

Let me relieve, partake of everything,
Until I shall deserve Eternity.



20



B "CUoman.

Maid she was not, as years decree, but,

deep
Within, her heart was maiden young,

for so
Hearts ever were and aie; nor did

she know
What pangs and loves a mother's soul

may keep.

No wife she was, nor sister, and her sleep
Ne'er brought a dream of times when,

long ago,
She held a daughter's place and

shared young woe
With one whose eyes could smile or

sweetly weep
In sympathy ; but God, in whispering

wind,
Had called her Daughter, and, with

soul abloom,
She made herself a Sister to the

tried
And spent ; nor ceased until for human

kind

She lived a Mother's life, and ban-
ished gloom,

And lo ! Joy made her Wife before
she died.

21



Why is it that the groansome loads of

Fate

Are thrust, not on the shoulders, broad
and strong,

Of beings swart and big, who daily
throng

The ways of Life, but on the Souls that

late
Have staggered, spent and tired, from

burdens great,
And now deserve the laurel which

their long
And patient suff' ring earned ? It

seems all wrong !
Why cannot Fate attack its size and

mate ?
Great God ! perhaps it does ; perhaps

the weak,

Refined and pure, are ablest, after all
To bear the thorns and briers that

abound
In heaven's path ; and when they

aching, meek
Complete the task some obstacle

must fall,

And Souls of Men advance another
round.



ttbe Spirit of Gbristmas,

Again the old, young day that gave to

earth

The Man embodying the Godliness
That's in us all ; again the day we

bless
For charities and gifts and hours of

mirth.
But oh, before the year that gave Him

birth,
The world that heeded sorrow, knew

distress

Possessed its heavenly gift, for noth-
ing less
It had in mothers, sisters, wives, whose

worth

Is scarce conceded. Yet they labor on,

Performing miracles whose daily pain

Puts death to shame. And when I see

them triced
On home-made crosses from the dawn

to dawn,
Enduring all, and less in sun than

rain,

I say, the world is full of Jesus
Christ!



Ifca&fga tunas Great.



Mohammed, with a mind God-budded,

wise

While yet but spring-time's leafy
hours he wore,

Wed Kadiga, his elder by a score
Of years, and she, whose clear pro-

phetic eyes
Saw deep, gave autumn fruits that he

might rise ;
And she alone a mother's anguish

bore,
Of all his wives. In later years, while

sore
With jealousy, Ayesha, false, with

sighs,
Said, "Kadiga was old, 'twas well she

died,"
But oh his tears rebuked the speech.

Said he,
" My only mate she was my dear-

est Fate
That gave me strength and soul, and at

my side
She lives ; in everything she guided

me

Oh Kadiga ! 'twas thou wert truly
great!"

24



Within a glen, a pine perhaps too

proud
Stood towering up, and lowly plants

that crept

Grew all aloof. One night the hill
was swept

By mighty breaths of Jove, and then
aloud

Broke forth his cannon-voice and from

a cloud

His bolt, air-rending, terrifying, leapt
To smite the tree, and when the

heavens wept

They laved a riven trunk which, shat-
tered, cowed,
Shook fearfully. Late came the morn,

but bright
It shone, all menace gone. And lo !

the vines,

The timid, loving vines, approach to
see

And climb and kiss the wounds and
hide from sight

The lightning-blasted torse, and each

entwines

And clings through storm and
shine in Sympathy.



Cbe Qbcliefc in Central patfe.

Transplanted thing of days and peoples

dead

And gone, how full of mystic dignity
Thou art ; how hard and long and

stubbornly
Thy granite holds thy signs, which not

the tread
Of mighty Time stamps out ; and yet,

the thread
Of occult writings once engraved on

thee
Is broke, for on that side which knew

no lee
From constant biting winds, a single

shred
Of deep-cut things remains. Perhaps

that side
Was wrought with idols vain, a crude

array
That mocked at heav'n and all the

truths that be;
And then the sands of Him swirled

fierce to chide,
And plane the carvings off as if

He'd say,

" Thou shalt not have another God
than Me! "



Stone anfc Soul,

(On seeing the picture : "Napoleon before the Sphinx.")

Behold great Bonaparte as there he

stands

And gazes on the Sphinx, whose soli-
tude
No vaster than his own can be ; whose

rude
Kough-sculptured mystery, half hid in

sands,

Lone rival is to his; whose face commands
A fellowship with all this awesome

mood
By ages gone bequeathed ; and there

its nude
Hewn paws extend in welcome to his

hands.

Oh wondrous pile and mighty, that defies
The sand-toothed blast, and Time's

austere attack!
Thou shalt dissolve and crumble

down to dust,
Ere age shall touch that Soul that

through the skies
Of great eternity goes gladly back,
Refined and chaste, to God and
Love and Trust.



Sacrificed.



Incessant Sea, I hear you pound and

pound
Upon your shores of sharp, unyielding

stones,
And hear your mighty roar, your

sobbing moans,
As wave on wave 'gainst jagged cliff is

ground
And churned to foam. Yea, too, I hear

the sound
Of anguish-smitten men whose million

bones
Are smashed and wrecked on Doubt;

and naught atones

For Individual woes yet all are bound
To break, as waves, and do their meager

mite
For one grand common good. And

look ! behold !
The granite's edge is rounded by the

tooth

Of unrelenting seas that day and night
Grind on ; and Doubt, the grim, the

dark, the cold,

By Thought is worn and under-
neath is Truth.



Bet Cbete J3e



Long distant times apart there came to

Earth
A Buddha and a Christ, and these, to

save
The peoples groping there, their wis-

dom gave
And lives. And now again a mighty

dearth
Of goodness reigns, and greed and lust

have birth
Of Ignorance than which no greater

knave
E'er stalked abroad or held as help-

less slave
The Soul of Man. Oh God! what is

the worth
Of all the creeds which ever fail to

reach
The multitudes in darkness? Make

the blaze

Of education scatter wide the night,
That we may not to senseless sinners

preacn !
O Thou, the Great, Almighty One,

upraise

Thy voice again and cry, "Let
There be Light!"



29



Gbe Sun.

"The Sun has set," we sigh, "and

oh ! 'tis drear
And chill, and night comes down,"

or else we say
"Behold it rise in purple mists, and

day
Spread far and soft and bright ! " Suns

do appear
To rise and set, but oh ! they're shining

clear
And always bright 'tis Earth that

turns away
And makes its bleak and then, anon,

its gay
Warm hours and days. Thus too,

though joy be near
And steadfast in its gleams, we turn

and turn
And get its beams where shadows

gloomed before;
But all the while, behind, a darkness

lies
To blend its edge with light's, and

though we yearn
To have on every side our sunshine

pour,

It must be best as 'tis, for God is
wise.



God's Voice*

Vast space unsearched, forbidding, full

of dread

And mystery affrighted very light ;
And cavern glooms were fountain

heads of night
And awesomeness ; and e'en the pulsing

tread
Of Time came not a region for the

dead
Of universes 'twas, whose dreary

plight

Originated misery and blight
Of hopes, and doubt, but when all

hope was fled
Behold ! a sound vibrating through the

air,
Exploring inmost cells which naught

before
Had reached shook atoms down

with deafening jars,
And piled them hugely, mass on mass,

and there,
When Sound had finished, chaos was

no more,

For lo ! God's voice it was, creating
stars !

31



IRon&eauy.



B 3bou0anD ^ears Bgo.

RONDEAU.

A thousand years ago and thou and I,
Who loved each other then and knew

not why,
Were thrust apart, and in my place

stood he,

Who, blind to all of Fate's affinity,
Possessed thee, caged a bird denied
the sky.

I saw the eons pass, the centuries die,
And waited ; well I knew the mystic tie
Of Love would last that bound both
you and me

A thousand years ago.

And now our Union-Time the gods

supply ;
Twas worth the patience, worth the

while to vie
With Time, but wer't not yet for

years to be,
So much I love that I would wait for

thee

As once before I did with just a sigh
A thousand years ago.

33



Bot f)a\?e Gbee



RONDEAU.

I would not have thee change a single

way

Of thine, howbeit, if or sad or gay
Or set to mystic strains that bind me

o'er
And o'er again nay, though thy

power is more
And subtler far than that of elfin fay.

And when thine eyes express the gen-

tlest nay
To hasteful love, and bid it trembling

stay
And quietly approach the sacred

door
I would not have thee change.

For oh ! dear heart ! it seems as if a ray
Of brightness rare thou art, and this,

the day
You let me come within thy heart to

pour

My love, I'm lifted up to almost soar
With thee and from my inmost soul I

say,
I would not have thee change.

34



Gbe tflelvet of ab Dante,



RONDEAU.

The velvet of thy hands, as chaste as

snow,
But warm and soft and all with health

aglow,
Enchants me quite ; small wonder

that in bliss
I hold them both, nor deem it comes

amiss
To touch, caress them, tenderly and

slow.

No fabrics done in silks, no downs that

blow
From wings of bees, as zephyr tossed

they go

The orchard blossoms through, com-
pares with this

The velvet of thy hands.

35



Cbc Delvet of abg f>an&0.



And on the night when first I found
them so,

Ethralled I stood and bended down,
and oh !

They throbbed so gently 'neath the

lingering kiss ;
And now 'twould plunge me deep in

woe's abyss

If thou shouldst say I must not touch
nor know

The velvet of thy hands.



2>awn Cbat'0 1Fn Gbine



RONDEAU.

The dawn that's in thine eyes, ah gently

bright,
Breaks forth and floods thy cheeks with

rosy light
And tints of pink, and leaves the

softest gray

In dimple nooks and 'neath thy chin

to play

In winsomeness that charms my linger-
ing sight.

Then Love, like birds that sweetest songs

indite
To morning's birth, sings forth with all

its might

To plead and plead thou wilt not turn
away

The dawn that's in thine eyes.

37



Dawn Cbat's fn Gbtne



For now my soul's awake and wings its

flight
To compass what thy sunshine smiles

invite ;
And when it seems as if Life's golden

day
Had lost, in clouds, its hope-inspiring

ray,

I look and see outsmiling gloom or
night

The dawn that's in thine eyes.



TRegal Ibeart.

RONDEAU.

Thy regal heart, which I have dared to
woo,

Sways such a gentle power and subtly
new,

That I, republican, am wrought to fall

On bended knee, and there to offer all

My liberties to monarchy in you.

Strange scepter is it that can thus undo

My precepts hard and furnish me, in lieu,

A plot to build a throne and there
install

Thy regal heart.

But, dear, I love the change. I love the
view

Thy ways have opened, and I'll gladly
strew

The way with blooms that leads within

thy halt-
But I'll conspire that you one day

shall call

A consort to the throne that's built unto
Thy regal heart.



Gbere'0 flo Bscape,

RONDEAU.

There's no escape for me, for thine
Are charms that all my love entwine,
And bid it linger close to thee,
As zephyrs do to meadow lee
As sighs do to the swaying pine.

'Tis Heaven rules ; should you consign
My love to torture, keen and fine,
'Twould linger, wounded, constantly
There's no escape.

But, dear, thy wooing heart benign,
Love-haloed, is a mercy shrine
At which I kneel on willing knee,
And naught can part the chain on me ;
Not even death can break the line.
There's no escape.



Gbe night *aie traded 1Rfn00.

RONDEAU.

The night we traded rings, the chandelier
Poured witching light within thine eyes,

and clear
And dear they beamed; we both

averred
'Twas just for fun, and yet my heart

was stirred

Until I thought its tale of throbs you'd
hear.

We laughing stood, and thou, oh thou

wert near !

And then I placed my ring, a souvenir
Of all, upon thy hand ; strange things

occurred
The night we traded rings.

41



Hiabt We (Traded



For since that time thy voice is in mine

ear,
And something passed that lingers

sweetly here
Within my soul for oh ! the things

it heard !
And, though we dared not breathe the

tingling word,
'Twas hearts we gave, thine own con-

fessed it, dear,
The night we traded rings.



42



Sbc Sings of Xove.

RONDEAU.

She sings of love, ah yes, and deems it

fair

To choose a wooing, sentimental air
When Harry comes to call ; but oh !

to hear
The sad, sad things alas, that bring

no tear

She sings for those for whom she does
not care.

Yea, too, and songs of war, until the

hair

Is like to stand, and suitors harldy dare
To breathe; and then, oh strange!
when Harry's near
She sings of love.

Perhaps 'tis chance some songs should
bring despair,

43



Sbe Sings ot Xox>e.



While cooing things reach forth and

hearts ensnare,
Who knows ? Mayhap 'tis subtle art,

and dear.
But, after all, there's only this that's

clear,

Though war she sings at some, when
Harry's there
She sings of love.



Sbe "Rea&a f>is TAote.

RONDEAU.

She reads his note and smiles, and in

her eye
Is twinkling light, while tints all pink

and shy
Arise to warm her cheeks ; you'd

think that he
Had penned exceeding well if you

could see
Her tuck the note away and turn to fly

Adown the curving orchard path, where

lie
Sweet petals dipped in pink, the maiden

shy

Slips quite alone, and then, all blush-
ingly,

She reads his note.

The butterflies and bees and birds
know why

45



Sbe TCea&a 1bf smote.



Her slender hands keep wandering up

to pry
The portals o'er her heart. Is love

the key
That solves the maiden's wondrous

mystery ?

Who knows? The fiftieth time, with
heartsome sigh,
She reads his note.



Sbc BnswereD i?e0.

RONDEAU.

She answered yes, although no word

she said
Nor whispered shyly, but her nodded

head
And gleaming eyes were eloquent of

thought
And sweet consent, while on her lips

was nought
But smiling yes, that came and coyly

fled,

The while her hands, in his, dear an-
swer sped
Straight to his heart ; and then, with

sighs instead

Of words, to own herself as caught,
She answered yes.



He wins, yet now he stands with half-
real dread



Sbe Bnswerefc



To beg a kiss, to which all-trembling led
His faltering words, and then, by

Cupid taught,
Love's gentlest plea has coaxed the

boon he sought,

For well dear maid, with lips all
blushing red,
She. answered yes.



TO)en JBabs Smiles.

RONDEAU.

When baby smiles 'tis dainty, faint a

stray,
Soft dawn of mirth to come but elders

say
Tis not a smile at all, and laugh to

see
The mother try to coax and woo the

wee,
Dim sign that may not come again all

day.

But then her eyes, that watch the hours

away,
More keenly see; and, oh, the lovesome

play

That 'twixt the two goes blithsomely
When baby smiles.

And when at last 'tis sure the elfin fay
Has really learned, why, then it is that
they

49



TKHben ffiabE Smiles.



Who doubted most are generously

free
With tribute kisses, and on tireless

knee

The household bends, and all are
sweetly gay,
When baby smiles.



50



TOen $abB Xearns to IRtes.

RONDEAU.

When baby learns to kiss and puts her

sweet
Dear puckered little mouth right up to

meet
An older one, 'tis like a bud might

rise

To woo the honey-seeking butterflies,
And with the older velvet blooms com
pete;

'Tis like the winsome tread of fairy's

neat
And dainty-touching, blush-compelling

feet

Upon a sunny beam athwart the skies,
When baby learns to kiss.

And like it is to dewy touch, so fleet,
Of dawn that flushes in her East retreat;
For lo, 'tis softly shy and fairy size,
And wet as lips of nectar-strewing

skies ;

And mamma's joy is boundless and
complete

When baby learns to kiss.

51



Miscellaneous,



1f Dreameo ot Xove.

I dreamed that on a hill serenest Night
Descended, and she gently bore away
Her dearest sister, Twilight, in her

arms,

And over all the place she calmly took
The sleeper's post to watch for coming

dawn.
Her million hosts of fairies lightly

tripped
From out the scented bushes and the

trees ;
Or stepped with dainty tread from many

flowers

Till all were come together in the grass.
The tiny Queen, whose harshest sum-
mons scarce
Seemed half as loud as sleeping linnet's

sweet
And fluttering note within her happy

heart,
Was gaily answered by a thousand

slaves

53



1T 2>rcamefc of Xov>e.



Whose only bonds were friendship's
silken cords ;

And these illumed their lamps and,
skimming o'er

The reaching, longing petals and the


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Online LibraryPhilip Verrill MighelsOut of a silver flute → online text (page 1 of 2)